The next D&D movie...


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Scarab Sages

thejeff wrote:
Skivven Steelwhiskers wrote:
Why on Earth would Neil Gaiman write about a world someone else invented? this makes zero sense.
That's as crazy as him doing something like writing superhero comics.

Or Doctor Who.


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Or teaming up with Terry Pratchett, writing a single novel and now it's going to be a TV series that had both Bilbo Baggins and the 10th Doctor in it...

Sovereign Court

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Aberzombie wrote:
thejeff wrote:
Skivven Steelwhiskers wrote:
Why on Earth would Neil Gaiman write about a world someone else invented? this makes zero sense.
That's as crazy as him doing something like writing superhero comics.
Or Doctor Who.

Or Norse mythology


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Success in the movie business requires a 6th sense.

Look at Tom Cruise. His personal life is quite the wreck at any given time, yet he keeps making excellent movies.

The next D&D movie will prevail (or not) based on the merits of the character-driven plot, the actors they select to carry that story together, and the direction they get from the director.

An enormous FX budget, homage to "classic" novels or modules, BIG names involved, marketing hype, etc. None of that will matter.


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Bingo. Quark Blast wins this thread x10^100 !!!!


Hama wrote:
Aberzombie wrote:
thejeff wrote:
Skivven Steelwhiskers wrote:
Why on Earth would Neil Gaiman write about a world someone else invented? this makes zero sense.
That's as crazy as him doing something like writing superhero comics.
Or Doctor Who.
Or Norse mythology

Or any mythology really.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Quark Blast wrote:

Success in the movie business requires a 6th sense.

Look at Tom Cruise. His personal life is quite the wreck at any given time, yet he keeps making excellent movies.

The next D&D movie will prevail (or not) based on the merits of the character-driven plot, the actors they select to carry that story together, and the direction they get from the director.

An enormous FX budget, homage to "classic" novels or modules, BIG names involved, marketing hype, etc. None of that will matter.

I guess you didn't see the mummy remake... (I keed I Keed!)


Quark Blast wrote:

Success in the movie business requires a 6th sense.

Look at Tom Cruise. His personal life is quite the wreck at any given time, yet he keeps making excellent movies.

The next D&D movie will prevail (or not) based on the merits of the character-driven plot, the actors they select to carry that story together, and the direction they get from the director.

An enormous FX budget, homage to "classic" novels or modules, BIG names involved, marketing hype, etc. None of that will matter.

And yet, if they try to do much fantasy with on a low budget it's going to look cheezy and that will hurt. Marketing, big names and hot properties do put butts in seats - at least until the bad word of mouth starts to spread.

Less the "homage to classic novels or modules" part, since only a tiny fraction of the audience would be aware of those in this case, especially the modules. That's more for getting a direction and basic plot than anything.

None of those things will save a truly lousy movie, but without some of them it's hard to get traction - especially for a big budget action flick, which a D&D movie will have to be.


All I know is Tom Cruise isn't the reason I go to see movies. That died when they did the War of the Worlds remake...


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That said I still enjoyed Edge of Tomorrow and watching Cruise die like a dozen times, often from his own stupidity (like the rolling under the truck scene)


They have changed direction on this. The original plan was to set the story in and under Waterdeep, using the Yawning Portal Inn and presumably Undermountain. Now they have a new team on board so that might change (which might be a good thing: still not sure if a dungeon crawl is the right way to go for a movie or the majority of a movie). I suspect Forgotten Realms will stay the setting because it's the best-known D&D world and it's the default D&D setting, so the appeal to keep it the same and use locations from both the novels and the 5E books (the word "synergy" may have been uttered somewhere) will be strong.

I think their game plan will be to do an original stand-alone movie first and if that does okay, look at expanding that out to do other D&D worlds and maybe adapt books that will take a longer series of movies to tell (Dragonlance being an obvious choice there), or even a TV series. Hasbro are looking at a D&D Cinematic Universe to rival Marvel or DC. To be fair, D&D is actually tailor-made for this kind of approach, unlike say their bizarre ideas for a Transformers/MASK/Micronauts shared universe.

Liberty's Edge

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Werthead wrote:

They have changed direction on this. The original plan was to set the story in and under Waterdeep, using the Yawning Portal Inn and presumably Undermountain. Now they have a new team on board so that might change (which might be a good thing: still not sure if a dungeon crawl is the right way to go for a movie or the majority of a movie). I suspect Forgotten Realms will stay the setting because it's the best-known D&D world and it's the default D&D setting, so the appeal to keep it the same and use locations from both the novels and the 5E books (the word "synergy" may have been uttered somewhere) will be strong.

I think their game plan will be to do an original stand-alone movie first and if that does okay, look at expanding that out to do other D&D worlds and maybe adapt books that will take a longer series of movies to tell (Dragonlance being an obvious choice there), or even a TV series. Hasbro are looking at a D&D Cinematic Universe to rival Marvel or DC. To be fair, D&D is actually tailor-made for this kind of approach, unlike say their bizarre ideas for a Transformers/MASK/Micronauts shared universe.

If Hasbro is considering a high budget TV series (ala Game of Thrones) Dragonlance would indeed be perfect!!!


I'm kind of over having a TV series that is based on existing Dungeons and Dragons settings and/or novels...


”Bean Slaad” wrote:
Bingo. Quark Blast wins this thread x10^100 !!!!

Hey I wasn’t trying to say anything profound, just a baseline hope for this movie being good. Maybe even really good.

”thejeff” wrote:
And yet, if they try to do much fantasy with on a low budget it's going to look cheezy and that will hurt.

I second that. I saw the “extras” for the Syfy Dune series last summer or the summer before and they were touting the FX and it made me feel sad to watch them brag in detail about what they accomplished. L4D2 looks better than what they did.

”Thomas Seitz” wrote:
All I know is Tom Cruise isn't the reason I go to see movies. That died when they did the War of the Worlds remake...

I blame Spielberg for that one.

The Mummy? Hey even Tom can’t win every time. Even the GOAT has only won half his Super Bowls. Cruise is doing better than that.


Quark Blast wrote:
”Thomas Seitz” wrote:
All I know is Tom Cruise isn't the reason I go to see movies. That died when they did the War of the Worlds remake...

I blame Spielberg for that one.

The Mummy? Hey even Tom can’t win every time. Even the GOAT has only won half his Super Bowls. Cruise is doing better than that.

I don't see the relevance. But okay...I still don't believe that will affect the D&D movie IF they still get a decent brand name, like say Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele doing some good humor along side some thought provoking writing.


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I do think they need to start now, because with the end of GoT I am afraid the attention to Fantasy will fade.
We are in a rarely before known high of attention to D&D, what with CelebriD&D, Critical Role and several calls to attention from popular Shows like Community and BBT.
But that window will be closing fast. Depending on the quality of the several upcoming Fantasy Projects, Things may go downhill quickly.


So I'm struck down with an early Winter Cold, bored and looking for something to watch on Netflix and Amazon Prime

and I come across something called Mythica.

It's like someone did a movie about their D&D game and put Kevin Sorbo in a bit part just for fun.

Classic Party of 4 (Fighter, Mage, Thief and Cleric (but one of the robe and spell type clerics, not the Mace to the face type))

Not what I would call a great film but they were fun.
Binged through the 3 that were available and I gather there are 2 more out there.

If the D&D movie can't be at least as good as these, I will give up hope on ever having a good D&D film.

also: Wizards actually using material components, who would have thought.


I've seen some (all?) of the Mythica movies. They're like made for TV so they rank somewhere below B-movie status in terms of production value.

The next D&D movie had better be better than these. Way better.

The one thing I found interesting about Mythica was the wizards were at least half-alchemists.


I forgot to post this:

Mythica Website

You could build a campaign around this easily enough as there are lots of little fiddly details in the movies and on the official website.


This is our next chance for a good D&D Animation

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/criticalrole/critical-role-the-legend- of-vox-machina-animated-s?ref=project_link

Critical Role has a fanbase, the right mindset and the right ideas. Titmouse is a respectable Animation Studio. This could be a very real Chance to catch the attention of a big Studio or Streaming Service.

MST3K has demonstrated that a succesful Kickstarter can be the foot in the door to get picked up by e.g. Netflix. So let us all cross our fingers and spread the message!


This link is a bit stale given the pace of the internet these days but given the pace of development for the next D&D movie it hardly matters.

Dungeons & Dragons Movie Reportedly Gets A New Script As Early Casting Begins

Screen Rant wrote:
That Hashtag Show reports that Michael Gillio, who was brought in to rewrite Johnson's script, has turned in a new draft that has studio executives "absolutely buzzing." According to That Hashtag Show, McKay is no longer in line to direct and the film is currently without a director. While Paramount looks for a new director, the search has also begun for the movie's male lead. The studio is reportedly looking at a list that includes Will Smith, Josh Brolin, Chris Pratt, Vin Diesel, Matthew McConaughey, Jamie Foxx, Joel Edgerton, Dave Bautista, Jeremy Renner, and Johnny Depp.

That's quite a spread in acting quality for male leads.

Whatever happened to Ansel?


Quark Blast wrote:

This link is a bit stale given the pace of the internet these days but given the pace of development for the next D&D movie it hardly matters.

Screen Rant wrote:
That Hashtag Show reports that Michael Gillio, who was brought in to rewrite Johnson's script, has turned in a new draft that has studio executives "absolutely buzzing." According to That Hashtag Show, McKay is no longer in line to direct and the film is currently without a director. While Paramount looks for a new director, the search has also begun for the movie's male lead. The studio is reportedly looking at a list that includes Will Smith, Josh Brolin, Chris Pratt, Vin Diesel, Matthew McConaughey, Jamie Foxx, Joel Edgerton, Dave Bautista, Jeremy Renner, and Johnny Depp.

That's quite a spread in acting quality for male leads.

Whatever happened to Ansel?

If you mean 'Ansel Elgort', then he wouldn't fit on the list of actors that are all in an older age-bracket...

Maybe that's why?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook Subscriber

Although it's worrying that they are starting casting before they have a director. Ideally, you want a director to have a say in that...


MMCJawa wrote:
Although it's worrying that they are starting casting before they have a director. Ideally, you want a director to have a say in that...

Indeed, especially because the actor's first question will be, "Who's the director?"

Liberty's Edge

Some director news.

I hope it will be good.


Yikes, all comedies except spidey...


eh. Not like it's a requirement in my book to do stuff that is serious all the time. I mean look how that turned out for Snyder.


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Doing a D&D movie all dead serious would not be really close to either the source material OR the reality of 90% of the gaming community. Look at the most succesful current D&D Entertainment, Critical Role. They hardly ever have a session without SOME humour and some of their greatest hits are their silliest episodes (flying cow herd, anyone?)

I would like my D&D movie to be in a vein of the MCU, Indy or Mummy movies. Because D&D is about fantasy superheroes, and that works for me best with a light touch.


ugh, I need to puke...

Liberty's Edge

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Heck, there was even humor in the Lord of the Rings movies!


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Humor yes.
Comedy not so much. I don't think the fear is that it won't be dead serious, that they might use a light touch in places, but that it'll be played as just a comedy.


Marc Radle wrote:
Heck, there was even humor in the Lord of the Rings movies!

####ing Dwarves and Hobbits, always goofing off when there's a MacGuffin to destroy!

Liberty's Edge

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Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Making a D&D movie is haaaarrd


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Worth noting that the only things on the resume of the writer of CHERNOBYL were instalments of the HANGOVER and SCARY MOVIE franchises, and the director had pretty much only done music videos.

So you can have a poor track record and then do brilliantly when the right project comes along.

I'm more constantly befuddled why they're not adapting one of the multi-million selling novels in the universe, which would bring in a much bigger fanbase and get people more excited, rather than constantly risking things on the random writer's idea of what D&D should be. That hasn't worked out well so far.


Werthead wrote:

Worth noting that the only things on the resume of the writer of CHERNOBYL were instalments of the HANGOVER and SCARY MOVIE franchises, and the director had pretty much only done music videos.

So you can have a poor track record and then do brilliantly when the right project comes along.

I'm more constantly befuddled why they're not adapting one of the multi-million selling novels in the universe, which would bring in a much bigger fanbase and get people more excited, rather than constantly risking things on the random writer's idea of what D&D should be. That hasn't worked out well so far.

Truth!

Preach it brother!


D&D should be a type of movie, not a movie itself, just like D&D is more a type of game, rather than the game itself (which is what the DM/GM crafts: setting, table rules, campaign, etc.)

The first movie also needs to stand on its own as a movie (see: the first Iron Man). If it spends too much trying to establish a franchise, it will fail (see: every attempt to replicate the MCU). Now, there are MCU movies that do that (Iron Man 2), but that was after the other movies built up good will and a connection to the characters.


Werthead wrote:

Worth noting that the only things on the resume of the writer of CHERNOBYL were instalments of the HANGOVER and SCARY MOVIE franchises, and the director had pretty much only done music videos.

So you can have a poor track record and then do brilliantly when the right project comes along.

I'm more constantly befuddled why they're not adapting one of the multi-million selling novels in the universe, which would bring in a much bigger fanbase and get people more excited, rather than constantly risking things on the random writer's idea of what D&D should be. That hasn't worked out well so far.

Sure, maybe jumping the gun on the writer's direction, but you do have to look at their body of work and wonder if it has bearing on the intended theme of the film (comedy, not humor).

I think the big part of the draw problem with D&D is that, despite folks thinking the novels are wildly popular, they are not popular enough to be a significant draw. Look at Rice's Mars series, which sold millions, bombing at the box office.


KahnyaGnorc wrote:

D&D should be a type of movie, not a movie itself, just like D&D is more a type of game, rather than the game itself (which is what the DM/GM crafts: setting, table rules, campaign, etc.)

The first movie also needs to stand on its own as a movie (see: the first Iron Man). If it spends too much trying to establish a franchise, it will fail (see: every attempt to replicate the MCU). Now, there are MCU movies that do that (Iron Man 2), but that was after the other movies built up good will and a connection to the characters.

Though even Iron Man started to set up the franchise, admittedly in the post credits scene.

Still, the hard question here is "what is the franchise?" What does it mean to be a D&D movie? So far it's been cheesy generic fantasy and hasn't really worked well.

Personally, I've suggested before that it might work best as a TV series, assuming the budget could be made to work. Maybe with spin-off movies. Make use of the huge power growth curve as a defining feature, starting off weak and ramping up to cosmic levels. Make that the defining feature, since it's pretty unique - at least among big media properties.


Planpanther wrote:
Werthead wrote:

Worth noting that the only things on the resume of the writer of CHERNOBYL were instalments of the HANGOVER and SCARY MOVIE franchises, and the director had pretty much only done music videos.

So you can have a poor track record and then do brilliantly when the right project comes along.

I'm more constantly befuddled why they're not adapting one of the multi-million selling novels in the universe, which would bring in a much bigger fanbase and get people more excited, rather than constantly risking things on the random writer's idea of what D&D should be. That hasn't worked out well so far.

Sure, maybe jumping the gun on the writer's direction, but you do have to look at their body of work and wonder if it has bearing on the intended theme of the film (comedy, not humor).

I think the big part of the draw problem with D&D is that, despite folks thinking the novels are wildly popular, they are not popular enough to be a significant draw. Look at Rice's Mars series, which sold millions, bombing at the box office.

John Carter?

Sure it sold millions, but over nearly a century and mostly long ago. Not sure what kind of fanbase it really had when the movie came out.

You've also got to make a good movie, of course.


thejeff wrote:
Planpanther wrote:
Werthead wrote:

Worth noting that the only things on the resume of the writer of CHERNOBYL were instalments of the HANGOVER and SCARY MOVIE franchises, and the director had pretty much only done music videos.

So you can have a poor track record and then do brilliantly when the right project comes along.

I'm more constantly befuddled why they're not adapting one of the multi-million selling novels in the universe, which would bring in a much bigger fanbase and get people more excited, rather than constantly risking things on the random writer's idea of what D&D should be. That hasn't worked out well so far.

Sure, maybe jumping the gun on the writer's direction, but you do have to look at their body of work and wonder if it has bearing on the intended theme of the film (comedy, not humor).

I think the big part of the draw problem with D&D is that, despite folks thinking the novels are wildly popular, they are not popular enough to be a significant draw. Look at Rice's Mars series, which sold millions, bombing at the box office.

John Carter?

Sure it sold millions, but over nearly a century and mostly long ago. Not sure what kind of fanbase it really had when the movie came out.

You've also got to make a good movie, of course.

Exactly, its a double threat. Do folks really think dragonlance or forgettable realms will make a difference? Good movie? You mean like the Hasbro offerings G.I. Joe and Battleship?


Orville Redenbacher wrote:
thejeff wrote:
Planpanther wrote:
Werthead wrote:

Worth noting that the only things on the resume of the writer of CHERNOBYL were instalments of the HANGOVER and SCARY MOVIE franchises, and the director had pretty much only done music videos.

So you can have a poor track record and then do brilliantly when the right project comes along.

I'm more constantly befuddled why they're not adapting one of the multi-million selling novels in the universe, which would bring in a much bigger fanbase and get people more excited, rather than constantly risking things on the random writer's idea of what D&D should be. That hasn't worked out well so far.

Sure, maybe jumping the gun on the writer's direction, but you do have to look at their body of work and wonder if it has bearing on the intended theme of the film (comedy, not humor).

I think the big part of the draw problem with D&D is that, despite folks thinking the novels are wildly popular, they are not popular enough to be a significant draw. Look at Rice's Mars series, which sold millions, bombing at the box office.

John Carter?

Sure it sold millions, but over nearly a century and mostly long ago. Not sure what kind of fanbase it really had when the movie came out.

You've also got to make a good movie, of course.

Exactly, its a double threat. Do folks really think dragonlance or forgettable realms will make a difference? Good movie? You mean like the Hasbro offerings G.I. Joe and Battleship?

Good in this case doesn't necessarily mean critical artistic merit. :)

I honestly don't know. I'm not sure what kind of popularity any of the D&D novel franchises have at the moment. At least doing one of those might give some structure to the project, rather than completely generic fantasy.


Look all I we need is for Lord Soth, Rastilin Majere, Cyric and St. Kazgoth to run around the multiverse because they want shiny magic stones...


thejeff wrote:
KahnyaGnorc wrote:

D&D should be a type of movie, not a movie itself, just like D&D is more a type of game, rather than the game itself (which is what the DM/GM crafts: setting, table rules, campaign, etc.)

The first movie also needs to stand on its own as a movie (see: the first Iron Man). If it spends too much trying to establish a franchise, it will fail (see: every attempt to replicate the MCU). Now, there are MCU movies that do that (Iron Man 2), but that was after the other movies built up good will and a connection to the characters.

Though even Iron Man started to set up the franchise, admittedly in the post credits scene.

Still, the hard question here is "what is the franchise?" What does it mean to be a D&D movie? So far it's been cheesy generic fantasy and hasn't really worked well.

Personally, I've suggested before that it might work best as a TV series, assuming the budget could be made to work. Maybe with spin-off movies. Make use of the huge power growth curve as a defining feature, starting off weak and ramping up to cosmic levels. Make that the defining feature, since it's pretty unique - at least among big media properties.

I'm not sure about it being a single franchise, as its stories can have very little to do with each other. The Legend of Drizzt and The Finder's Stone are set in the same world, but have almost nothing else in common. Same franchise? What about the Dragonlance Chronicles or the Prism Pentad, which are on completely different worlds. Same franchise?

Making a good stand-on-its-own movie, but with potential sequel material (or "wider world" hints in a post-credits scene), should be the first priority. Making a larger shared world/multiverse should be much lower (and potentially shifted to future movies, except for hints and Easter Eggs for the devoted fans), as that one thing that has tripped up would-be shared worlds in the not-so-distant past.


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Whatever the setting, and they should pick a setting:
Then introduce a core adventuring group and a number of peripheral characters. The core group then go on to level up over the course of several movies. The peripherals can be brought in as things develop over the many adventures. And at lest one of the main cast characters should die and not be resurrected.

Liberty's Edge

I would just about kill for a great DragonLance trilogy!


So no one likes my suggestion huh?


I dont envy them this endeavor. Half the people want the cartoon or crit role, the other half want obscure novel trilogies (Thomas wants marvel D&D). Most folks dont know anything about those things, so introducing folks to the D&D verse will be difficult, let alone capturing a fractured fan base of wants...

Dark Archive

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I just want an actual *party,* not a single hero and his tagalong sidekicks. Preferably with folk to cover the four classic roles of magic-user, fighting-man, cleric and thief. Everything else can wait for sequels, including the fancy later additions like warlocks and dragonborn.

Generally, previous fantasy movies have reserved magic for someone who might as well be Gandalf, and omitted clerics (and 'fantasy religion') entirely. I'd like to see both represented more like the game. Less random deus ex machina magic and more 'common' stuff like magic missile or fireball. More of everyone acting, at once, as a party (similar to some of the group action shots on the old X-Men cartoon, or some of the fight scenes in Age of Ultron, where the focus isn't on one single character, but on tracking across a group of people, each doing something), and doing something, less of 'fighter fights, then everyone stops and the wizard blows everything up.'

Hiring a bunch of relative nobodies could help lend itself to this sort of team dynamic, by not having a single famous 'name' actor surrounded by a bunch of unknowns, and causing the focus to be on BigNameStarHere, and not their amazing band of sidekicks. (And save some money that could have gone to BigName's salary for special effects...)


Planpanther wrote:
I think the big part of the draw problem with D&D is that, despite folks thinking the novels are wildly popular, they are not popular enough to be a significant draw. Look at Rice's Mars series, which sold millions, bombing at the box office.

The Mars/Barsoom books have sold millions, sure, but decades and decades ago. They were not a still-bestselling series with millions of fans, like the first two Dragonlance trilogies or Drizzt (which have sold about 30 million copies). That's a massive amount, for context about three times (each) more than ASoIaF had sold before HBO adapted it as GAME OF THRONES. Or, more to the point, more than all the copies of all the D&D rulebooks ever sold (possibly even combined with PATHFINDER).

D&D is really two things. The first is a mechanism to tell stories which it's hard to make a movie about, unless you do a Gamers/HarmonQuest/Critical Role/Stranger Things thing and have people both playing the game in the film and then we see the events in the fantasy world. That would be fun for a one-off movie, but you couldn't sustain that across a franchise (and yes, Hasbro are completely going after a franchise here).

The second is a multiverse, a place where different worlds and characters exist side by side. That, I think, is what Hasbro wants, the ability to make say a Forgotten Realms movie or a Dragonlance or Eberron movie or maybe even a Dark Sun movie and have it do well by itself, but also feed into some kind of shared world setting. And also sell tons of spin-off merchandise and more copies of D&D itself, of course.

What everyone is hoping is that Hasbro have also cottoned on that this worked for Marvel not because they made a bunch of movies in a connected multiverse, but they made a bunch of (mostly) good movies in a connected multiverse. If they can nail that, the rest can follow.

Liberty's Edge RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32, 2011 Top 16

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Werthead wrote:
Planpanther wrote:
I think the big part of the draw problem with D&D is that, despite folks thinking the novels are wildly popular, they are not popular enough to be a significant draw. Look at Rice's Mars series, which sold millions, bombing at the box office.

The Mars/Barsoom books have sold millions, sure, but decades and decades ago. They were not a still-bestselling series with millions of fans, like the first two Dragonlance trilogies or Drizzt (which have sold about 30 million copies). That's a massive amount, for context about three times (each) more than ASoIaF had sold before HBO adapted it as GAME OF THRONES. Or, more to the point, more than all the copies of all the D&D rulebooks ever sold (possibly even combined with PATHFINDER).

D&D is really two things. The first is a mechanism to tell stories which it's hard to make a movie about, unless you do a Gamers/HarmonQuest/Critical Role/Stranger Things thing and have people both playing the game in the film and then we see the events in the fantasy world. That would be fun for a one-off movie, but you couldn't sustain that across a franchise (and yes, Hasbro are completely going after a franchise here).

The second is a multiverse, a place where different worlds and characters exist side by side. That, I think, is what Hasbro wants, the ability to make say a Forgotten Realms movie or a Dragonlance or Eberron movie or maybe even a Dark Sun movie and have it do well by itself, but also feed into some kind of shared world setting. And also sell tons of spin-off merchandise and more copies of D&D itself, of course.

What everyone is hoping is that Hasbro have also cottoned on that this worked for Marvel not because they made a bunch of movies in a connected multiverse, but they made a bunch of (mostly) good movies in a connected multiverse. If they can nail that, the rest can follow.

I hope they realize that you need to start planning that from the first movie though and not just throw a bunch of stuff at the wall, see what sticks, and jam things together later on.

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