100 Books Found in the Strange Library


Homebrew and House Rules

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157. The Book of Death, March Unknown Author- this black leather tome has a scythe in a circle embossed on the cover underneath which is gold lettering indicating it belongs to March. Examining the inside reveals that it is a filled by an elegant hand written four column ledger. The first column contains names, the second is a series of numbers which upon a successful DC 14 perception check are discovered to be times down to 1/10,000ths of a second, the third column contains seemingly random words although a DC 19 Knowledge check (nature/dungeoneering/history) allows the reader to realize that they refer to causes of death, while the 4th column is mostly blank with occasional notes.

The first player to read the book understanding what all the columns mean will find their own name listed on the March 7th page, at 10:24:24.8774 dying of poison with the note "volume discount on res?"


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158. The Fruits of Wisdom.

This oversized book has a cover made from bark and its pages have the texture of dry leaves, though they don't crumble any more readily that conventional paper. It's a guide to living in harmony with nature and your fellow man, subsistence farming, growing your own mind-altering mushrooms and performing some simple rituals dedicated to the spirits of nature.
It counts as a masterwork tool to assist the reader with profession (farmer) and knowledge (nature).

If the book is left on bare earth with sunlight and water, it puts down roots and sprouts. The dry pages turn green and come to life and over the course of a year it grows into a fruit tree. The pages can still be turned, but the book cannot be moved without killing the tree. In the spring, it grows new copies of the book, suitable for planting or drying and storing.
Fresh green copies are nutritious, delicious and faintly intoxicating.

A character who follows all the book's advice for a year and a day, (which include pacifism, wearing no metal, eating a strict vegan diet, maintaining a neutral good alignment and regularly performing the rituals) will meet the author in a vision. He appears in the form of an ancient, moss-bearded face on a giant tree and teaches the reader to be a druid, giving them everything they need to gain their first class level over the course of a moon.


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159. The Hidden Malediction

This modest handbook is bound in supple red leather and the pages are crisp, watermarked velum edged in alchemical silver. It was apparently authored by Malphidius Von Yolsc; Knowledge: Nobility (DC 15) reveals he was a merchant noble, part of a class of "New Money" that came to power, flourished, then were struck down by a terrible plague roughly 60 years ago in a prominent campaign city.

The first chapter, labeled simple "A Foreward", recounts an event from history: The Kryptovaran Ball wherein the nobles assembled were afflicted by the disease that came to be known as "The Velvet Scars". It graphically describes the horror of a small group of nobles, trapped in one of the Kryptovaran vaults (this particular house enjoyed having their parties in the grand burial vaults beneath their manor) by a terrorist who unleashed the Velvet Scars into the air from a sealed vial and remained to watch them all suffer and die.

The fact of history though is that some of these folk survived long enough to be rescued by a group of mercenary adventurers. These survivors banded together after their ordeal and made a club of sorts where they could meet and conduct business. The disease had horribly disfigured them and in time their wealth failed them.

The remaining chapters lay out The Hidden Malediction; a cult-like assemblage which meets in secret and then conceals their hideousness through mundane and sometimes supernatural means. Each of the chapters lays out a different aspect of the group: leadership, rites of belonging, etiquette and such.

Anyone reading this book from cover to cover may make a Knowledge: Religion (DC 25) to realize that the Hidden Malediction and their sadistic rites are in fact a cult of the goddess Lamashtu. They must also roll a Fort Save (DC 15) or suffer the Velvet Scars.

The Velvet Scars

Type disease, ingested; Save Fortitude DC 15
Onset 1 day; Frequency 1/day
Effect 1d4 Con Damage and 1D4 Cha Drain; Cure 2 saves

The Velvet Scars is a terrifying and deadly disease. It attacks the organs as well as the dermis, making it unbearable to be in one's own skin. It is named for the thick, ropy scars seemingly burned into the flesh of the victim.


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160. I Will Shut Your Smug Face In A Gods-Damned Waffle Iron And Kick You In The Ass Again And Again And Again

This small but beautiful book has gold foil edges to every page, rich purple ink and a remarkably intricate design on both covers. All the text is the very finest calligraphy. Even the ribbon bookmark is a little work of art.
The whole thing is completely filled with a ferocious rant, apparently directed at the reader, threatening, insulting and generally expressing the writer's utter loathing. The author claims to be "Your sickening whore mother".
Anybody who reads all the way through one of the thirteen chapters must make a dc 28 will save or be shaken for an hour.
It's not clear what practical purpose this volume could possibly serve, but it's a potentially valuable work of art. The materials alone are worth hundreds of gold and the workmanship is nothing short of astonishing.


Mark Hoover wrote:
159. The Hidden Malediction

I just stole this.


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160. I'm a Book

"I'm a book. There's nothing especially notable about my appearance or contents; I am little more than a short children's tale. However, I possess the uncanny property of compelling anyone who speaks about me to refer to me in the first person."


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161. (Insert your name)'s Vindication
A thin volume bound in reddish leather, with the title inscribed in gold. It contains a passionate rogatory in defense of the reader, justifying every action of his/her life before an unspecified court. Reading the whole book grants a +1 bonus on Diplomacy checks regarding judges, lawmen and outsiders. A character dead while having the book in his/her possess is automatically resurrected three days later, but the book then disappears forever and all its benefits are lost.


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DungeonmasterCal wrote:
Mark Hoover wrote:
159. The Hidden Malediction
I just stole this.

That's what I live for DMC!


Dot for love of books! <3

Sovereign Court

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162. Humans & Households Core Rulebook
A rousing roleplaying game set in a mundane world of traffic lights, errant puppies, indoor plumbing, and other diabolical evils. Play as such character classes as Nerd, Athlete, Nurse, and Activist.

Apparently written by someone named ZOE.


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163. Zarphando Moderfelon's Handbook for the Adventurous Lover

This little purple volume is a guide to sex and romance for "unusually matched" lovers, primarily those of different size categories or types. It includes peculiar but fairly tame advice on "pleasing the dwarf in your life" as well as tips about the attitudes of exotic races and sapient monsters, half of which are about convincing them not to kill you.
The book frequently goes off on tangents, many of which recount the bizarre conquests of the author, an accomplished transmuter writing under a pseudonym.
Spending an hour studying the book grants a +2 insight bonus to attempts made to seduce one kind of creature of either a different size or type to you for the rest of the day. Each time the book is used in this way, there is a 50% chance that creatures of another random kind get the same bonus against you for a year.
Anybody who does some investigating could potentially ruin or blackmail Zarphando, who is widely known and respected under his real name.

Sovereign Court

164. Messa di Requiem per Audio Fantasma, a musical score meant to be performed by well-timed castings of Ghost Sound. Interestingly enough, the score is also an elaborate description of the Shout spell and can be used by a wizard to learn and prepare that spell.

Sovereign Court

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165. In Service to Vengeance: The Fall & Rise of a Fury.
This book gives an account of the life of an angel that fell from grace after being imprisoned by an evil wizard and made an infernal bargain with an imp for her freedom. She was transformed into an erinyes which meant the wizards carefully prepared anti-angel wards no longer affected her, allowing her to enact swift and bloody vengeance.
Surprisingly, the erinyes then goes on to enter the service of Calistria, chaotic goddess of vengeance, as one of her furies. The book alludes to a bargain made between Asmodeus and the Savored Sting for the furies service but no details are given nor is there any mention of what Asmodeus gained from the bargain.


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166. Passionate Nature.
This folio contains beautiful ink pictures of a young adult green dragon and a unicorn mare making out in natural settings. Pc's get a will save 20 to resist. Non adventurers get no save. An affected person will murder any enemy of nature they know of when they get a chance. They need a cure insanity to stop.
Unicorns are warriors in service to nature.


167. Seasons. This is a small volume, and would barely extend a half-inch or so beyond a normal person’s hand in both length and width, but it binds hundreds of very fine vellum pages together tightly. These are surprisingly resilient, much like the book as a whole; though its brown leather binding is cracked and curling, none of the polished bits ever seem to flake off, just as what must be claw and fang marks never get any worse.

The pages are covered in Elven script from edge to edge, leaving no room for marginalia except where the author has conspicuously made room for an afterthought or flash of inspiration. It seems to be a volume of a diary, and not the first, by a wizard with an affinity for nature, as her record of her life incorporates many whimsical meditations on a variety of wild places, sometimes reaching a mystical pitch.

Unnervingly, in at least two places the hand changes drastically, from minute delicacy to a scrawl that appears scarcely literate, or as if it was not a hand that grasped the pen. Nonetheless, though those sections dwell obsessively on change – in one case, referring guardedly to a miracle – the whole book is clearly by one author. In another instance, one of the passages of scrawl reaches a climax of prayer before ending abruptly, I am ready. O gods, it’s happening…

The next entry is dated months later, but makes no reference to that preceding.

Additionally, reading the volume through allows the reader to piece together enough from various meditations to treat the book as containing a copy of commune with nature as it would appear in a wizard’s spellbook. This is only of obvious use for classes which can prepare divine magic from spellbooks.

The Exchange

168. References

This lightly used plain and untitled book is rather crudely bound with twin woven through punched holes in the cover. The pages are folded vellum with the same twine and same holes. Easily untied and easily added to. The pages vary in quality and age, the inks are just as inconsistent but the handwriting is the same.

The inside cover simply written in ordinary script, Contacts, References and Can I do better?

There are three sections to this book:
Section 1. Contacts and suppliers for common, unique or hard to get items, those that don't ask questions, trusted craftsmen in other professions. Along with prices (previous prices simply lined out).

Section 2. References. All those customers he has done work for in the past. Some have addresses, some have notations of preferences/peccadilloes/quirks. It reads like a local whose who as well as some with just titles with an alias and "cash upfront" note.

Section 3. Description of jobs/product provided. I envisioned this as an expert engineer or a crafting wizard. Each page is a quick blueprint, diagram and description of item with cause and effect, occasional command words/secret passages alluded to. Usually lessons learned and critique of the job with reasons why, ie money time quality mistakes not to repeat, weaknesses, shortcuts.

Benefit: +2 craft/knowledge/profession related to the book. (reads as Masterwork Handbook)

Plothook: I am sure there are plenty if this gets into the right/wrong hands.


169. Baleful Signs This "book" is a stack of thin beechwood boards held together by rough twine tied in an intricate knot. The twine has been enchanted such that any knot in it creates a Phantom Trap.

Any non-rogue who reads this entire book in one sitting without resting, setting off or disarming all the traps and then reading the praise on the last board aloud gains the ability normally reserved only for rogues of detecting all magic traps with a perception roll but not the ability to disarm them. Any rogue who manages to do so gains a +10 bonus on perception rolls to detect magic traps and +5 bonus on disarm device rolls to disarm magic traps.


170. Understanding Life after Death: This simple leatherbound tome has no author attributed to it. Within its pages are varied stories of the misadventures of an adventuring company. The author can be deduced to be a mage of some sort based on the commentary. Throughout the book, said mage dies repeatedly from a variety of causes, some tragic, some hilarious. Each time he is revived and makes notes as to his faint memories of his time dead. A Knowledge (religion) check (DC 20) permits the reader to comprehend that most of his experiences involve standing in line in the Boneyard. The last pages finish with the words "...I'm not looking forward to that line again."

A dedicated reader who finishes this time gains a +2 bonus to Knowledge (religion) checks regarding the fates of souls and to Knowledge (planes) checks regarding Pharasma's realm.


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171. Elf Scout Manual, Volume Three: The cover of this small book (only 6" tall, 1/2" thick, 4" across) is made of bark from a rare tree. The pages, however, are of fine quality. This small handbook discusses survival techniques in general with a special emphasis on uses of rope and its care. There are many diagrams demonstrating the applications of the various knots described therein. Anyone spending 8 hours to read this book gains a +2 bonus on Survival checks. If the book is studied for an additional 8 hours, the reader also gains a +4 bonus to their CMB, but only for the purposes of binding others, and a +2 bonus to Escape Artist checks for the purposes of escaping bindings.


All the Secrets of (Stage) Magic Revealed!:

A notorious tome that has earned the derision of wizards everywhere, the focus of this hefty book is on stage magic. Readers will be presented with detailed instructions for the performance of any number of magic tricks ranging from simple sleight of hand to escapes from intricate deathtraps, complete with diagrams. Anyone spending one week reading through the book gains the Skill Focus (Sleight of Hand) feat as a bonus feat, as well as a +4 bonus on Perception rolls, but only when opposing a Sleight of Hand skill check. A rogue or bard who spends one week reading the book gains one additional benefit. These characters also gain a +4 bonus on Perform checks, but only those related to stage magic (GM's discretion).


cnetarian wrote:
169. Baleful Signs This "book" is a stack of thin beechwood boards held together by rough twine tied in an intricate knot. The twine has been enchanted such that any knot in it creates a Phantom Trap.
  • The first board contains a long list of acknowledgements to humorously false names (I.C. Weiner and such), and hidden in the list is a Sepia Snake Symbol.
  • The second board contains Explosive Runes.
  • The third board contains a Fire Trap.
  • The 4th board is inscribed with a Glyph of Warding with a blast glyph which will active the first time the surface of the board is touched by a living creature.
  • The 5th board contains a Symbol of Healing set to go off when someone 'reads the symbol(as all symbols in this book are) and was cast by a 20th level caster (as all symbols in this book are).
  • The 6th board contains a Symbol of Slowing.
  • The 7th board contains a Symbol of Pain.
  • The 8th board contains a Symbol of Sleep.
  • The 9th board is inscribed with a Greater Glyph of Warding set to a blast effect and activated by a living being touching the surface of the board.
...

Anyone can detect magical traps. Rogues only get the ability to disarm magicl traps.

Sczarni

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173. Larenzetti Investment Company Ledger: This large, cheap paper ledger contains nothing but columns of numbers in red and black ink, apparently indicating the deposits and withdrawals from a bank account. However, it radiates feint conjuration magic.

If any number is written in the book in common black ink, an equal amount of GP will disappear from the pockets or bags of the person who writes it. This gold becomes stored in the book. If the writer does not have sufficient gold on their person, the ink immediately fades away from the page. Similarly, if any number is written in the book in common red ink, that amount of GP will appear in the writer's pocket, so long as there is sufficient gold stored in the book. Otherwise, the ink fades away.

A DC 10 Intelligence check can establish that there is currently 641 GP stored within the book.


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174. The secrets of Norgorber: This book is nondescript, almost eye catchingly so, with simple gray covers and a simple glued on flap of paper holding the title but no author name. It describes in about a hundred pages the infiltration attempt against a cult of Norgorber in Absalom, in detail, ending with the impassioned plea that "if you are reading this, I am certainly dead, but this book escaped their notice. Make sure it is spread well, to let the world know what is written herein." However, a perceptive enough reader will notice some disparities. For example, the author doesn't say why he or she chose to take such a risk. In truth, far more than half the book is eminently false, the rest describing historical or ineffective methods, often of cults that were eradicated. The true author is, of course, a cultist of Norgorber.

The Exchange

175. Study of Gnomes
This is a former spellbook of Hio. An young magician striking out on her own who focused on Charms and Mind Enchantments. She rather enjoyed being the center of attention and being fawned over. She was given a taste of her medicine when she failed multiple saving throws. She was tried in a very public court and her sentence was a geas to obsess about several lawn ornaments that had a tendency to move about.

The spellbook used to contain several spells which have been overwritten by mad meandering scribbles and doodles of cartoonish garden statuettes. 0300 Red-capped gnome in Vici's garden, staring at me from underneath the rose bush. 0545 Kissin gnomes have left Ms Loni's sunflower bed, jumped the fence to now lie atop the oak stump next store. 1032 Smokin'gnome on toadstool sitting at farmermarket entrance, now facing inward. 1120 The red-capped gnome is gone! Where? Heading to Kiki's place, it has the biggest yard.

There may be several volumes scattered throughout the town as she fills them up. If asked, DC5, all the locals know of Hio. She serves as an example of what not to do, abusing power. Gnome PCs who dress outlandishly may find themselves under stealthy scrutiny until dismissed as "Not a lawn ornament."


176. Reflections on the Foundations of Faith
This hefty tome is 600 pages long and bound in worn brown leather. The cover depicts a plain drawing of an angel and devil sitting side by side at a table facing the viewer. Each is drawn with a blank facial expression and passive body language. The cover is torn over the area between them and, therefore, the contents of the table cannot be seen.

The author of the book, a cleric of Aroden named Palistic, wrote it after the death of his deity. It is a series of essays on the nature of faith and various philosophical questions that it engenders. His central point is that belief in deities must be all-consuming even absent the divine power manifested in their names. Otherwise, he argues, the mortal world is a vacuous experience of material forces acting upon each other with sentience only as an insignificant aside.

Palistic wrote the book over a period of 17 years and agonized over his commitment to Aroden. He was a tedious writer who belabored points and often fell to lengthy digressions. It takes 10 continuous hours of complete solitude to finish his work. A character that makes it all the way through the book must make a DC 19 Will save. If he fails then the next time he attempts to use a class ability or a spell that depends on alignment (such as smite good/evil, Dictum, detect alignment etc.) it will fail.

If the character succeeds on the Will save he will gain 1 rank in Knowledge (Religion).


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177. The Fluidity of Time

This beautiful set of seven scrolls are a collection of illuminated poetry by the monk Fugitarian. Each of them is painted in beautiful bold colors and inks on cloth of gold. When studied the reader feels the sense of cool mist all around them and hears the distant roll of the ocean.

Each poem depicts some aspect of water and time, as if they were one energy. In point of fact Fugitarian belonged to an order whose sole goal was to harmonize the power of these forces in their own bodies. When studied and meditated on for 3 rounds the scrolls grant a +1 Competence bonus to initiative.

Each time they are used however the reader wets their pants.


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178. Game of Thrones: a saucy fictional tale of rich influential nobles who spend a significantly larger portion of their time naked and getting randy than anything else, really.


VM mercenario wrote:
Anyone can detect magical traps. Rogues only get the ability to disarm magicl traps.

from the description of symbol of death (applies to all symbols)Note: Magic traps such as symbol of death are hard to detect and disable. A rogue (only) can use the Perception skill to find a symbol of death and Disable Device to thwart it. The DC in each case is 25 + spell level, or 33 for symbol of death.


Bill Lumberg wrote:

176. Reflections on the Foundations of Faith

This hefty tome is 600 pages long and bound in worn brown leather. The cover depicts a plain drawing of an angel and devil sitting side by side at a table facing the viewer. Each is drawn with a blank facial expression and passive body language. The cover is torn over the area between them and, therefore, the contents of the table cannot be seen.

The author of the book, a cleric of Aroden named Palistic, wrote it after the death of his deity. It is a series of essays on the nature of faith and various philosophical questions that it engenders. His central point is that belief in deities must be all-consuming even absent the divine power manifested in their names. Otherwise, he argues, the mortal world is a vacuous experience of material forces acting upon each other with sentience only as an insignificant aside.

Palistic wrote the book over a period of 17 years and agonized over his commitment to Aroden. He was a tedious writer who belabored points and often fell to lengthy digressions. It takes 10 continuous hours of complete solitude to finish his work. A character that makes it all the way through the book must make a DC 19 Will save. If he fails then the next time he attempts to use a class ability or a spell that depends on alignment (such as smite good/evil, Dictum, detect alignment etc.) it will fail.

If the character succeeds on the Will save he will gain 1 rank in Knowledge (Religion).

This book would be crucial in a special ritual to re-integrate Aroden from soul shreds across the multiverse.


Goth Guru wrote:
Bill Lumberg wrote:

176. Reflections on the Foundations of Faith

This hefty tome is 600 pages long and bound in worn brown leather. The cover depicts a plain drawing of an angel and devil sitting side by side at a table facing the viewer. Each is drawn with a blank facial expression and passive body language. The cover is torn over the area between them and, therefore, the contents of the table cannot be seen.

The author of the book, a cleric of Aroden named Palistic, wrote it after the death of his deity. It is a series of essays on the nature of faith and various philosophical questions that it engenders. His central point is that belief in deities must be all-consuming even absent the divine power manifested in their names. Otherwise, he argues, the mortal world is a vacuous experience of material forces acting upon each other with sentience only as an insignificant aside.

Palistic wrote the book over a period of 17 years and agonized over his commitment to Aroden. He was a tedious writer who belabored points and often fell to lengthy digressions. It takes 10 continuous hours of complete solitude to finish his work. A character that makes it all the way through the book must make a DC 19 Will save. If he fails then the next time he attempts to use a class ability or a spell that depends on alignment (such as smite good/evil, Dictum, detect alignment etc.) it will fail.

If the character succeeds on the Will save he will gain 1 rank in Knowledge (Religion).

This book would be crucial in a special ritual to re-integrate Aroden from soul shreds across the multiverse.

Oh you flatterer! *Blushes*

In all seriousness, I am glad you liked it.


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177. A Game of Chairs. This short book has detailed instructions on how to set up, organize, and play Musical Chairs.

178. Dusk. This book tells the tail of a love triangle between a human man, a vampiress and a werewolfess. The possessor of this book is hunted down by both Vampires and Werewolves, that is really the only thing they agree upon


Vod Canockers wrote:


178. Dusk. This book tells the tail of a love triangle between a human man, a vampiress and a werewolfess. The possessor of this book is hunted down by both Vampires and Werewolves, that is really the only thing they agree upon

Is that because the book contains secrets they do not want revealed or do they just have the same opinions on its literary merits?


3 people marked this as a favorite.

179. The Master of the Circlets. A collection of halfling adventure stories, some imaginary, some actually based on the deeds of the greatest halfling heroes of all time (and their human, elven, dwarvish and aasimar "henchmen"). Whoever possesses this book has better initial attitude from halflings (+1 degree), but can't help to be drawn in endless chattings about the greatness of said heroes.


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Bill Lumberg wrote:
Vod Canockers wrote:


178. Dusk. This book tells the tail of a love triangle between a human man, a vampiress and a werewolfess. The possessor of this book is hunted down by both Vampires and Werewolves, that is really the only thing they agree upon
Is that because the book contains secrets they do not want revealed or do they just have the same opinions on its literary merits?

They all hate the main character.


Bill Lumberg wrote:
Vod Canockers wrote:


178. Dusk. This book tells the tail of a love triangle between a human man, a vampiress and a werewolfess. The possessor of this book is hunted down by both Vampires and Werewolves, that is really the only thing they agree upon
Is that because the book contains secrets they do not want revealed or do they just have the same opinions on its literary merits?

Sparkles and literary merits.


Bill Lumberg wrote:
Vod Canockers wrote:


178. Dusk. This book tells the tail of a love triangle between a human man, a vampiress and a werewolfess. The possessor of this book is hunted down by both Vampires and Werewolves, that is really the only thing they agree upon
Is that because the book contains secrets they do not want revealed or do they just have the same opinions on its literary merits?

Literary Merits? A parody of a romance novel based on a dream has no merits!


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180. The 30 Year Old Virgin: A tale of an awkward adventurer and his inability to consummate so much as a momentary tryst. Originally the book was thought to be widely panned due to the unbelievability that an adventurer could manage to get by without bedding at least someone or something (or being bedded by something, even if against his will), it was recently discovered that it was actually widely panned for the unbelievability that an adventurer ever survives to the age of 30 in the first place.

Dark Archive

181. The Misadventures of the Hidden Glaive. This 150 page book is a compilation of the many often-humorous, and usually bawdy events occurring in a temple to Shelyn over the course of a long summer. Suggestive illustrations accompany the ornate calligraphy of the script, and while the book is well worn, it remains readable, and quite amusing. The true value of the book lies in its pebbly cover, which has a series of raised dots and sunken divots almost too small to see, giving it a strange texture when held. Viewing the unmarked cover through eyes of minute seeing, or via a more mundane form of magnification reveals a strange series of coordinates, which, when matched with information about the temple garnered from the story, reveal the location of a secret treasury within the temple, said to contain a 'treasure beyond price.'

Extensive research will lead to the location of this temple, in Taldor, only to reveal that it was renovated and relocated after an earthquake sixty years ago. Whatever 'priceless treasure' it once secured is long gone...

182. A Widow's Revenge. This slim battered tome is a sheaf of papers, bound by cord, and has no covers. It tells the tale of a poor widow who turned to the dark arts to curse the bastard child of another woman who ousted her from her dead husbands home and cast her into the streets, and details the terrible vengeance she wrought upon him by calling forth a fiend from the depths of Hell itself. Oddly, the book detects to magical inspection as having a mild aura of magic (conjuration), evil and good. Of special note is that the name of the fiend is concealed within the first character of every chapter, drawn larger than the other letters and in a dark reddish-brown ink (which may be identified as human blood). The conjuring of the fiend is detailed so thoroughly as to allow any reader to attempt to replicate the conjuring, and if they perform the feat precisely, a fiendish figure will indeed appear.

However, one of two 'twists' will occur. The 'true name' is incorrect, by a single letter. If the would-be-summoner manages to detect and correct this deficiency, they do indeed conjure up a fiend, only to discover that the *other* directions in the text are also incorrect, and the fiend is in no way bound to serve, and the conjurer in no way protected from it's attacks. If the hapless summoner does not recognize the mispelled name (perhaps having no knowledge of arcana or the planes, and not being familiar with the infernal tongue), a very different outsider appears, one who cloaks its appearance as that of a fiend, but is instead a celestial, who uses it's summoning to guide the wrong-headed summoner to a more ethical or moral course of action.

It is something of an irony that the less knowledgeable the would-be summoner, the more likely they are to survive dabbling with this book...


181. The room is there, it contains the glaive, but the coordinates are now useless.


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183 The Book of Kellids

This short book recounts an unnamed traveler's journeys through the lands inhabited by the various Kellid people. It contains numerous observations about Kellid practices and customs and makes comments about them. The author is obviously talented and his rich depictions of these harsh people make the book an engrossing read. His notes and suggestions on ways to make a favorable impression on Kellid hosts are fascinating and memorable.

Unfortunately they are also wrong. In fact, the writer penned this book without ever leaving his study in Magnimar. The entire contents of the book were cobbled together from questionable sources, at best. And where the author had no material to work from, he simply invented fanciful tales for his own amusement.

A reader who succeeds on a DC 17 Knowledge (Geography or Local) will recognize this book as a fake. If someone actually uses the suggestions found in this book to make a good first impression on a Kellid then his Diplomacy check will be at a -5 penalty.


184 They Walk Among Us

Few books can compete with They Walk Among Us for conjuring a mood of obsessive paranoia. The author of the book is given as “Maximus Isarn”, an obvious pseudonym. Most readers would agree that there was more than one author based on the pronounced changes in style. In a few chapters the writing suggests that the author’s native language was not Taldane. Despite the changes in style the book is uniform in that it is poorly written; in some instances it resembles nothing more than a stream of disorganized thoughts put to page.

The book was started in the early years of the Galtan revolution and the author gleefully recounts his exploits capturing Chelexian sympathizers and others who were declared enemies of the Revolution. By the third chapter, the author writes that he has assumed police powers under the direction of the Revolutionary Council. He then set about hunting down counter-revolutionary traitors and fugitive nobles who attempted to flee from the new Galtan revolutionary justice. Maximus Isarn goes to great lengths to describe the exact techniques he and his men used to discover and unmask subversive elements before sending them to the Final Blades.

In later chapters Maximus Isarn grows convinced that shapechangers are ubiquitous among the foes of the new Galt and that they are planning to overthrow the Revolution and enslave the people of Galt. These later chapters are notable for frequent use of foreign expressions and illustrations of common disguises. The final three chapters are little more than drawings of monstrous figures shown in the steps of transforming into humanoid shapes. Extensive notes on the tell-tale signs of shapechangers accompany the drawings.

Anyone who reads the book will gain a +2 bonus on Perception checks to recognize creatures using the Disguise skill. They will also gain a +1 bonus to Perception checks to spot magically disguised creatures.

Sovereign Court

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185. Bury Them Deep a thick and heavy tome, stained with dirt and more questionable substances. It documents in great detail the burial customs of dozens of cultures, and analyses the undead spawning from (im)proper execution of these funerary rites. Of special interest is the appendix, which provides pointers on recognizing graves containing undead, and a passionate plea by the author to "rob graves responsibly", rather than releasing monsters willy-nilly.


cnetarian wrote:
VM mercenario wrote:
Anyone can detect magical traps. Rogues only get the ability to disarm magicl traps.
from the description of symbol of death (applies to all symbols)Note: Magic traps such as symbol of death are hard to detect and disable. A rogue (only) can use the Perception skill to find a symbol of death and Disable Device to thwart it. The DC in each case is 25 + spell level, or 33 for symbol of death.
Trapfinding wrote:
A rogue adds 1/2 her level to Perception skill checks made to locate traps and to Disable Device skill checks (minimum +1). A rogue can use Disable Device to disarm magic traps.

The rogue does not gain the ability to notice magical traps, either anyone can or noone, aparently.

Also:
Traps wrote:

Magic: Many spells can be used to create dangerous traps. Unless the spell or item description states otherwise, assume the following to be true.

A successful Perception check (DC 25 + spell level) detects a magic trap before it goes off.
Magic traps permit a saving throw in order to avoid the effect (DC 10 + spell level × 1.5).
Magic traps may be disarmed by a character with the trapfinding class feature with a successful Disable Device skill check (DC 25 + spell level). Other characters have no chance to disarm a magic trap with a Disable Device check.

You need trapfinding to disable but anyone can use perception to detect it.

I can only find that wording in the symbol spells, Explosive Runes for instance only mentions Disable Device. Either those spells are special and the rogue is the only one that can use perception on them or they have the wording wrong and nobody catched it before so it could be errataed. Might merit it's own thread for FAQ.


VM mercenario wrote:


You need trapfinding to disable but anyone can use perception to detect it.
I can only find that wording in the symbol spells, Explosive Runes for instance only mentions Disable Device. Either those spells are special and the rogue is the only one that can use perception on them or they have the wording wrong and nobody catched it before so it could be errataed. Might merit it's own thread for FAQ.

I agree the symbol spells need to be errated (errataed?), 'rogue' should be changed to 'trapfinding' and perhaps the limit should be dropped. Having over the weekend tracked a wizard(?) to his/her/its (haven't gotten to s/he/it) protected-by-symbols lair without a rogue (he died and was replaced which I believe the GM wasn't expecting to have happen), I am perhaps too sensitive to the 'rogue' only limit: but undetectable-except-by-rogues symbols does create a strong incentive to have a rogue in the party. Change the bonuses to read as something appropriate to dealing with magical traps according to the rules used by the GM for magic traps, bearing in mind that it is not an easy feat to handle all those traps in one session without rest, so it should have significant bonuses.

Dark Archive

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186. Along Came a Spider This 40 page book has wooden covers with twigs along the outer edges shaped like spider's legs, clutching the book shut. The pages have a smooth cloth-like texture and are made of spider silk, while the glittering colorful ink is made of powdered beetle-shells and spider's venom (long past its time of efficacy, although eating the entire book would make one nauseous...). The story, accompanied by several stylized full page illustrations, and a spider on every page of text, in different places, is a macabre tale, written as if for children, about a spider living in a manor house, who is bedeviled by a house servant who keeps brushing away her webs and attempting to kill her. By the end of the story, she has bitten the offending servant, who dies of her venom. The letters of the text, written in the common tongue, are in a strange style, with long strokes, so that the letters themselves look like twitching spider's legs, and the book has a faint glimmer of conjuration magic. If held in hand and used as a focus component during the casting of summon swarm, summon monster or summon nature's ally, and the spell is used to summon a spider swarm or giant spider, the spell lasts for an additional round, and, in the case of a summoned swarm, the swarm does not attack the caster, so long as he retains hold of the tome, allowing him to pass freely through the area of the swarm. The tome provides no such protection against spider swarms conjured by others or encountered normally...

This book is one in a series of grim children's stories set from the perspective of the same spider, who goes on to kill a pesky child in the house, a visiting mother-in-law, and, finally, the owners of the manor. The writer is either an aranea or an unusually intelligent (and quirky) phase spider, who enjoys writing horrifying children's stories.

187. Windows of the Soul Written in Azlanti, this book collects three scholarly dissertations by the same Thassilonian researcher, each on the nature of the eye. The first monograph, The Eyes Have It, is filled with diagrams and discussions regarding the human and animal eye, with a thorough and somewhat dry discussion of the various parts and functions of the organ. The second and shortest thesis, The Eye in the Storm, regards the specifics of various animal eyes, as well as elven eyes, and how they process light differently, and which structures account for this 'low-light vision,' as well as breaking into a short discussion about animals associated with exceptional night vision, such as bats and owls, and how such animals are indeed not preternaturally sighted at all, but instead have adapted to function through a superior sense of hearing. The third of these scholarly papers, Eye See You, focuses on the eyes of certain magical beasts, as well as dwarves and stone giants, and the property known as 'darkvision.' Again, many diagrams show the various inner parts of the eyes being discussed, and theoretical discussion as the otherwise invisible radiations that are perceived through this 'darkvision' enter a more speculative area than is normal for this otherwise no-nonsense author, who otherwise dismisses speculation in favor of dry facts. What is remarkable about this tome is that the illustrations all bear faint traces of illusion and enchantment magic, and if the text below them is read aloud in Azlanti, a one foot cubic silent image appears above the painted image, showing a three dimensional representation of the eye structure or similar diagram shown, while a ghost sound repeats the caption below the image in the authors voice. The image remains visible only so long as the voice is speaking, and then fades away. Readers have noted that the voice of the speaker is strangely alluring, and many come away from a perusal of this long-dead authors treatise with an interest in meeting the author, and not merely for his scholarship. In life, the author, a Thassilonian Sin-Mage of the School of Lust, who was indeed renowned for an attractive speaking voice, magically enchanted these copies of his dissertation to hand to students he found attractive, finding that the subtle magics led a number of them to return for 'private instruction,' which, apart from the study of the structure of the eye, was his favorite pastime. Centuries after his death, his books are handed around scholarly quarters, and, by quirk of their lingering magics, his theories regarding the function of the eye remain well-regarded, while more scholarly works from his time are long forgotten, as the author himself retains a certain nostalgic celebrity that has less to do with the quality of his research than with the sensual daydreams his spellwork inspires in repeat readers.


Set wrote:
Readers have noted that the voice of the speaker is strangely alluring, and many come away from a perusal of this long-dead authors treatise with an interest in meeting the author, and not merely for his scholarship. In life, the author, a Thassilonian Sin-Mage of the School of Lust, who was indeed renowned for an attractive speaking voice, magically enchanted these copies of his dissertation to hand to students he found attractive, finding that the subtle magics led a number of them to return for 'private instruction,' which, apart from the study of the structure of the eye, was his favorite pastime. Centuries after his death, his books are handed around scholarly quarters, and, by quirk of their lingering magics, his theories regarding the function of the eye remain well-regarded, while more scholarly works from his time are long forgotten, as the author himself retains a certain nostalgic celebrity that has less to do with the quality of his research than with the sensual daydreams his spellwork inspires in repeat readers.

So...Vincent Price or Barry White?


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188- the complete, unabridged works of Michael Moore with running commentary by Glen Beck...


Byrdology wrote:
188- the complete, unabridged works of Michael Moore with running commentary by Glen Beck...

I think we were looking for things that would be found in a library in Golarion during the epoch the APs are set in or in a world with a similar level of technology and magic, not something you'd find in a library in PF:modern.

Most, if not all, of Michael Moore's works cannot be viewed without a DVD player or VCR and television set and those are awfully thin on the ground in Golarion and similar fantasy universes even if such a work might fall through a dimensional rift.


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It would be a strange find in even a strange library... Just saying...


Atarlost wrote:
Byrdology wrote:
188- the complete, unabridged works of Michael Moore with running commentary by Glen Beck...

I think we were looking for things that would be found in a library in Golarion during the epoch the APs are set in or in a world with a similar level of technology and magic, not something you'd find in a library in PF:modern.

Most, if not all, of Michael Moore's works cannot be viewed without a DVD player or VCR and television set and those are awfully thin on the ground in Golarion and similar fantasy universes even if such a work might fall through a dimensional rift.

Plus I'm pretty sure Glen Beck can't read.

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