Rule of Cool Legend


Other RPGs


Not the Mongoose Legend discovered it while I was looking for Mongooses Legend reviews.
Anyone tried it?


Yeah, played a couple games. It's balanced, but varied. I built a manifestation of a particular sun goddess at level 20 (max in the system) and she wasn't unbeatable, but she wasn't weak by any means. My biggest complaint is that it doesn't achieve the clarity it strives for in its current state, with stuff about racial tracks.


Metool wrote:
Yeah, played a couple games. It's balanced, but varied. I built a manifestation of a particular sun goddess at level 20 (max in the system) and she wasn't unbeatable, but she wasn't weak by any means. My biggest complaint is that it doesn't achieve the clarity it strives for in its current state, with stuff about racial tracks.

How does it fare compared to Fantasycraft, Pathfinder and any other d20 competitors?


Well, there's no piling on so many levels in five different classes. You build a class, and barring a feat, you stick with that class to 20. The good news is, you can multiclass, by trading out one set of class features for another. Say you want to be a paladin, but with sneak attack. That's entirely doable. And if you take a special race, you can trade out these ability tracks for racial tracks, like Dragon, which grants natural armor and HP bonuses, among other things.
There are Key Offensive and Defensive Modifiers, which you add to attack/damage and AC/HP. Paladins, for example, use Strength as their bonus to hit and damage, and Charisma as their ability to ignore/soak damage, whereas a Monk uses Wisdom to hit things, and Constitution to defend.
Saves have been bumped up on both advancement rate and DCs (no more 'spell level', half character level instead).
All additional attack from Base Attack Bonus are made at just a flat -5, and full-round actions are not a thing, so a level 20 character with good BAB can, as a standard action, make four attacks, at +20/15/15/15 (plus KOM, item bonus and other modifiers (no flanking or other situational modifiers)).
Base Attack Bonus is added to AC, too.
The armor types are heavy armor (+2 AC, -1 Reflex) and light armor (+1 AC). Magic armor has a value of 2-6, although you only ever have one magic item slot that can handle a bonus of 5 or 6 from armor.
Magic item slots! You can have as many or as few magic items as you want, but you can only equip so many. You can trade the vast majority of your item slots (including the highest-level slot) for another set of class features.
There are, generally speaking, no class features that don't affect creatures in some way. So, no trapfinding, but there is, say, move-action or always-on invisibility (both Extraordinary, by the way).
Oh, and non-casters can finally have nice things and go beyond human limits. Magic doesn't rule all. Ninjas get infallible invisibility (Ex) as a capstone, for example.

This is just what comes to mind, of course. There's more, for sure.


I see.And the Magic system?


Spontaneous casting, and you learn 3 spells for every 'circle' you have in a spellcasting track. There are 7 levels (circles) of spells.
(There is a two-feat chain that lets you convert spell slots into spell points (2 per circle of the spell) that you can use to cast spells you could have cast 5 levels ago, at a rate of 1 spell point per circle of the spell.)
The game as a whole operates off of circles, a term used to refer to the 'weight class' of a given ability. Rage grants you +1 to attack and damage per circle in the Path of Rage track, for example, and Assassin grants you Sneak Attack equal to +1d6 per circle in the track. They also grant you more benefits, but I can't remember them off the top of my head.

Spells are refreshed after every Scene, which is essentially how long you can go without a break.
There are two spell lists, tactician and shaman. Shaman is more about healing, damage, positive/negative energy and buffs, while Tactician is about battlefield control and buffs.
Some tracks give spell-like abilities, like Elementalist (pick a type of energy, and be able to blast with it from the get-go. Energy balls, cones of energy, you'll get these), Necromancer (vampiric touch, speak with dead, chill touch, all that badness), and Arcane Secrets (at-will tricks that are hard to place).
There is a track that lets you channels SLAs you have (spell-like abilities, you'll be seeing a lot of this in the system) through a magical melee weapon.


Currently GMing a game in a homebrew 1930s dieselpunk fantasy world. I like that it's easy to play unusual races (we have a Ghoul Ranger) from 1st level, have the unusual race clearly affect the abilities of the character, but without being unbalanced compared to an elf or human of the same class. You can play something very straightforward - we have a Human Rogue whose main stats are Dex and Cha and uses sneak attack - or something very unusual, like a dragon-descended inventor who wades into melee with draconic claws and small automoton machines that provide a defensive field. Those two characters would be equally easy to make and roughly mechanically balanced with each other in Legend, which is not something many systems can claim.

No alignment system, and a condensed skill system, although with some very nicely streamlined uses for skills in combat. Gear is, as Metool alluded to, much condensed as well. Items are a smaller percentage of your abilities, your character itself gets more. There's no disadvantage to using Trip or Disarm until you have 2 attacks, so combat maneuvers are a much bigger part of the game at lower levels (and for Monks, at all levels). Also, as Metool said, even "mundane" types really aren't. It's worth noting that the martial classes are the Barbarian, Paladin, Ranger, and (some) Rogues - there's no "Fighter" in this system (at least not in Core). Several abilities that are rare or tricky to get in 3.5/PF are easily accessible or even expected in Legend - the book explicitly states that just about everyone will have access to flight, whether through a class feature or an item, by around 10th level. Tremorsense is not hard to get your hands on. Where PF has a feat for +5 to your land speed, Legend has a feat for +15 to all of your speeds, with no prerequisite.

The system is very larger than life, I guess is what I'm saying. I'd be happy to address any other questions as well.


Tim4488 wrote:
There's no disadvantage to using Trip or Disarm until you have 2 attacks, so combat maneuvers are a much bigger part of the game at lower levels (and for Monks, at all levels).

Monks, because they eventually get the ability to replace attacks they make with combat maneuvers (which they get more of as they level). 's fun stuff.


Thank you all.

@Tim4488:

How would you compare it to Fantasycraft and Mongoose Legend?
(if you have knowledge of those systems)


I've never played either of them, sorry.


Coming from 3.5, it feels a little odd, not being able to have a character that's first level of 20 different classes, or heavy optimization theorycraft discussion.
You can optimize fine, but you don't need to have taken statistic 101 for it, basic algebra's fine.
I am very very looking forward to future development, to see if it can keep up the amazing balance that has been shown up till this point.
Monsters are really easy to make too, but they have the same abilities players do, which is another odd paradigm shift.
It's not bad, just interesting


That is a downside I suppose I should have mentioned - sometimes I find it difficult to make decent monsters given what we have so far. The mechanics provided don't always quite give me the feel or set of abilities that I would like. That said, a monster guide is on the way and should include a LOT more to work with.


I've been putting together monster ideas myself, and since creating a fail combination is actually not easy, I ended up just doing it thematically.
SO far it's been working well.
I love that I can create a one sentence/description of each track, and mix and match it for any idea I can come up with and it's almost guaranteed to work, for a unique playstyle.
Ok, love's maybe not the word, it seems to be only way I can figure how to do it without overstressing.


I just got turned onto this from another poster and it seems like a really good game to me. Not really comparable to 3.5/pathfider/fantasycraft at the moment but that may change as I dig into it more. However, I do have a question for those with a better grasp of the system:

How does multiclassing tracks work exactly? Especially, since it says that certain tracks can't be take by other classes, but only mentions 2 specifically (Paladin Judgements and Esoterica). Are their any other tracks that can't be taken or are those the only 2 so far?


Those are the only two tracks you can't sacrifice another track to gain at the moment, and you can't trade them away, either. In other instances, you trade your Slow track away, say, and gain circles in the new track as if it was your Slow track.


As Metool said, those are the only two. It's worth noting, however, that some tracks consist of 2 or more options with entirely separate abilities, and you can't take those separate options as multi-class options. For example, a Rogue's Offensive Track can be either Assassin, Demo Man, or Swashbuckler, but they all count as the "Rogue Offensive Track" Track. You can't make someone with two of those options. The same applies to the Rogue's Defensive Track (3 options), the Ranger's Daggers and Bolts (2 options), Sage's Wrath (2 options), and, in a lesser way, the Undead Track (5 options, although not every circle is different for those 5).


Oh. In addition, you can't multiclass into or out of Shaman's Path, but that'd be silly, since it's a free multiclass anyway.

Community / Forums / Gamer Life / Gaming / Other RPGs / Rule of Cool Legend All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.
Recent threads in Other RPGs