Rasputin Must Die! [Spoilers]


Reign of Winter

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Shadow Lodge

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Sorry you feel that way. Not sorry enough to stop liking it though =D

Contributor

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Copernicus Mandrake I wrote:
I was interested in this AP... until I found out about this steamy load.

"Steamy load?"

Stay classy. Maybe you've got the wrong messageboards. Here we've got a "don't be a jerk" rule, and calling a product a piece of crap sight-unseen definitely falls within the bounds of jerkish behavior.


Meh. I'm sure he's talking about the concept, not the execution. I might consider dialing back the sensitivity a bit.

I bet it's very well-written. The concept, though, is not free from criticism. To a number of people, it could very much be called "bad" (using varying adjectives - though, admittedly, "steamy load" is definitely not a classy one...).

Contributor

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Oh, I'm totally open to criticism and all manner of negative reaction to an adventure that pushes the boundaries like this one does. That I can handle.

But "steamy load" transcends "this really isn't my thing" or "I'm really disappointed to hear this and won't be buying it" and enters a whole other arena of unnecessarily negative name-calling that's incredibly disrespectful.


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I'm with Brandon on this one. This has nothing to do with sensitivity. "Steamy load" is just asking for it. If you're going to be so dismissive of a product (before its release) at least say why it's a steamy load. He's not even saying he thinks it's a steamy load. He phrased it as an objective statement, but then didn't qualify it with anything.

I mean, c'mon. You mean to tell me he can gather up the energy, effort, and time to write a brief messageboard post but can't be arsed to add even one more sentence? I'm sure Brandon would appreciate it more if the guy told him why he doesn't like it.


*shrug* Maybe.

But in a messageboard loaded with:
- "dickish DMs"
- "rotflstomp" APs
(among 2 that I found in seconds)
"Steamy load" is hardly a head-turner.

Is there a consistency issue here?

Paizo Employee Creative Director

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The "consistency" is folks being jerks when they post, unfortunately.

Don't be a jerk.

If something isn't something you're interested in, by all means let us know, but don't be a jerk and get insulting.

And believe it or not, those of us who write and develop these books DO have feelings. We're human too, after all.

"Steamy load" might not be a head-turner to someone outside that system looking in and seeing a lot of negativity, but to someone who is writing or developing that particular book in question... those types of comments are ABSOLUTELY head-turners.

And furthermore, for me? When I see an insulting post like that, I tend to get angry and treat that person's feedback with less importance or interest. If you want to tell us something AND you want your feedback to be regarded well, do not be insulting. That's the #1 best way for your posts to end up being things we generally ignore here at Paizo, because we prefer to spend our time on constructive criticism and feedback.

And even FURTHERMORE, remember that even if you post 1 out of 100 posts as an insulting post, we are far more likely to remember that 1 insulting post. It doesn't take much for us to associate a person's name and avatar picture with the "Ignore that poster because they're just jerks" reaction.

So... don't be a jerk.

Dark Archive

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I admit I am rather skeptical of this part of the Ap for various reasons already mentioned in this thread and elsewhere however after reading the Excellent Dead heart of Xin I can safely say that whatever else happens the adventure itself will be very well written and if anyone can sell this adventure part to me it will be Brandon


My Pipe dream for this would be a post apocalyptic diesel punk setting for Pathfinder Modern set at the end of World War I and based around an invasion of demons and Fae.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps Subscriber

Don't be a jerk or as the excellent Wil Wheaton says, Don't be a dick.

This AP reminds me of my crazy days as newbie DM, looking to toss in all the amazing things I loved as a teen but only executed in a cool manner! I am so looking forward to chasing after Baba Yaga and seeing all of the sights on the way!

Now to find someone to run it on Roll20...:)


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I just got the PDF for the first module of Reign of Winter, where I learnt that the players are supposed to go to earth...

Well, add me to the list of the people who are extremely disapointed about this, it is hard to explain but for me this is the ultimate taboo in fantasy RPG.

It completely annihilate any kind of immersion I could have had, suddenly it just feels like a teenager trip, like when you find those "San Goku fight Darth Vader" crossover.

I honestly don't care that there were supposedely influence from earth before (I didn't know it to and was happy like that)

It is just bad to me, real bad, I have a complete aversion to the "Let's go to earth to kill Rasputin with Machinegun" thing...

Isn't there enough place to go on Golarion, that of all possible places you have to go to earth?

It feels like when a video games, movies or books break the fourth wall, it can be "fun", but is also has the secondary effect to kill any immersion you had.

I was planning to have my players play Reign of Winter, but I won't now, I don't want to inflict that upon them, I just can't see myself telling them: "Alright guy, welcome to Earth!", without them laughing immediatly and saying "Hehe nice joke...It is a joke right?"

Ah well, I just have to forget I even read that completely and focus on the other 100% Golarion campaigns which by the way are almost all very awesome, but the whole earth thing, sorry, it is too much for me.

Dark Archive

Lauraliane wrote:

I just got the PDF for the first module of Reign of Winter, where I learnt that the players are supposed to go to earth...

Well, add me to the list of the people who are extremely disapointed about this, it is hard to explain but for me this is the ultimate taboo in fantasy RPG.

It completely annihilate any kind of immersion I could have had, suddenly it just feels like a teenager trip, like when you find those "San Goku fight Darth Vader" crossover.

I honestly don't care that there were supposedely influence from earth before (I didn't know it to and was happy like that)

It is just bad to me, real bad, I have a complete aversion to the "Let's go to earth to kill Rasputin with Machinegun" thing...

Isn't there enough place to go on Golarion, that of all possible places you have to go to earth?

It feels like when a video games, movies or books break the fourth wall, it can be "fun", but is also has the secondary effect to kill any immersion you had.

I was planning to have my players play Reign of Winter, but I won't now, I don't want to inflict that upon them, I just can't see myself telling them: "Alright guy, welcome to Earth!", without them laughing immediatly and saying "Hehe nice joke...It is a joke right?"

Ah well, I just have to forget I even read that completely and focus on the other 100% Golarion campaigns which by the way are almost all very awesome, but the whole earth thing, sorry, it is too much for me.

If you don't mind the suggestion, stay tuned. Get the remaining 4 adventures you were sure to run anyway, and judge #5 when it comes. I mean, you are a subscriber, depending upon how long you have been I'm sure you've had more than a few adventures you won't get around to running for some reason or another. You can probably modify #5 easily enough to take place in a different word or setting (I vote Iron Kingdoms' Khador, myself) and even if you can't, you can pull something out of it for sure, even if it's just a handful of folklore themed monsters.

I get where you are coming from, for instance, I'm completely opposed to playing a character who is at all like me, let alone a 'you go into the game and become the hero' type of module that companies put out from time to time. But if Paizo did that I'd reserve judgement until I saw it in print, for sure.


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Ninten wrote:


If you don't mind the suggestion, stay tuned. Get the remaining 4 adventures you were sure to run anyway, and judge #5 when it comes. I mean, you are a subscriber, depending upon how long you have been I'm sure you've had more than a few adventures you won't get around to running for some reason or another. You can probably modify #5 easily enough to take place in a different word or setting (I vote Iron Kingdoms' Khador, myself) and even if you can't, you can pull something out of it for sure, even if it's just a handful of folklore...

I don't mind the suggestion and I will definitely stay tuned, I am indeed a subscriber and I don't plan to cancel my subscription over this, that would be childish.

I really enjoy Paizo products and what they did with Pathfinder, and I look forward to seeing more for Pathfinder.

But the whole "Earth thing", that's pretty bad (for me at least)

An example of a setting that never broke this taboo could be Star Wars for example. How easy could it have been to say "Hey, Let's go light-speed to Earth, yeah", but they didn't, never, not even once did they hint about it.

Even more than that, and with all the flaws George Lucas can have, right from the start he decided to start all his movies with this:

"A Long time ago, in a galaxy far far away"

That sentence is not just here because it sounds cool, it sets something very important for the audience: "You are nowhere near earth or even our galaxy, both in time and space, forget about it, and enjoy that fantasy universe to its fullest"

This might seem paradoxical, but I honestly think that it is easier to get immersed in a fantasy universe when it has clear boundaries, clear rules and logic that it follows even (or especially) if they are different than the ones we know.

That's what makes it so enjoyable to me, it is fantasy but there are still limit, rules coherence, logic, so it "could" be real.

Now what happens when our own world with all the rules and limits that we know, collide with all the rules and limits of that fantasy world, the immersion breaks, the feeling of "I am playing an imaginary character in a far far away imaginary universe" disappear, and it is sad.

I had the same exact breakdown feeling btw when I learnt that it was cannon that Ed Greenwood actually wrote the Elminster books because he met him during one of his trip on Earth, so what, did they had a beer in a pub or something? Terrible...

Sovereign Court

Obviously it seems the Earth aspect is a bit divisive.

In my mind it fills me with both excitement and apprehension. I am excited by the prospect of the visit to a world without magic (or at least very hidden magic) and how Paizo handles this. However I could easily see it being mishandled by a DM, rushed writing or by players to cause a very awkward book.

I expect a quality product from Paizo and hope that the result meets the expectations of the people here who are excited by the prospect.


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I am very sorry but Star Wars has been on Earth - Raiders of the lost Ark has hieroglyphs of R2 and C3PO, the ET species is in Phantom menace, and lets not mention the implications of the Star Wars Christmas special or the terrible EU stories especially the one where Chewie ends up being Bigfoot.


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Lauraliane wrote:
But the whole "Earth thing", that's pretty bad (for me at least)

I'm guessing this doesn't bother me nearly so bad because one of the best campaigns I've ever run was an old 2E Ravenloft: 1890s setting. That campaign ran for over eight years, almost exclusively based upon stories created by myself, but very fantastical in nature. Players loved it too!

I don't really see this as being any different, except I'm using a different rules system, and the adventure takes place in Siberia, which means it's way out of the way, so anything that happens probably wouldn't be heard about in the rest of the world anyhow.

I do have friends, however, that wouldn't buy into this jump. I do think I could convince them though . . . We've played a lot of different stuff over the years, and they've pretty much come to the understanding that I wouldn't lead them astray.

Yeah, I could have a lot of fun with this sort of thing! =)


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On the Earth thing:

This is all about Baba Yaga's hut. A Legendary Artifact in this gaming genre akin to a well of infinite worlds but cooler.

1) the PC's travel to a time on earth that has already passed
2) what a great way to explain the myth of rasputin, THAT's how he did it! oooooh.
3) an opportunity to go outside Golarion where they actually HAVE revolvers!
4) to the characters it's just another strange place that aren't staying in
5) to the players this era of earth is like nothing they know
6) what a great opportunity to role play.

It's not like they are going to down town manhattan in modern day.


I ran a year or so campaign of Anima, and it includes implications in the back story about the setting being settled by people from our future. They actually have a Catholic church, which was created to be a sort of opiate of the masses by the super high tech puppet masters. Otherwise, on the surface, it seems like a normal fantasy setting with anime influences. One of my most rewarding experiences running a game was the session where they found some strange magic items, and partway through the description they realized I was describing a circuit board. Until that point it had been standard fantasy, and my group was blown away.

If the trip to Earth is done right, then it could be a fantastic moment at the table. If you do end up running it and you walk into expecting it to be terrible, your players will probably notice and respond in kind. If you show up and try to 'convince them' to follow you even though its a bad idea, then it probably won't work out. If you jump into it with a gusto, possibly only dropping a few hints, and describe the first tank they see as fantasy characters would see it, well... it could be fantastic.


I remember buying dragon #100 as a kid and seeing the adventure was going to London to recover the Mace of st.cuthbert. I did have an odd feeling when reading it, but I have to admit the fish out of water part appealed to me..especially trying to find a coin shop that would buy the pc's strange gold coins and convert that to pounds.


Deathmaster was the best Part of that Issue.... Now I can finally make Mum-RA!


Lauraliane wrote:
and I don't plan to cancel my subscription over this, that would be childish.

???? Only if you're an abnormal consumer.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Arnwyn wrote:
Lauraliane wrote:
and I don't plan to cancel my subscription over this, that would be childish.
???? Only if you're an abnormal consumer.

Touchy touchy ;)


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Gorbacz wrote:
Arnwyn wrote:
Lauraliane wrote:
and I don't plan to cancel my subscription over this, that would be childish.
???? Only if you're an abnormal consumer.
Touchy touchy ;)

No! Just speaking about consumer behavior (one of my favorite university courses, BTW). Not buying something you're not interested in is normal consumer behavior. Believing it to be "childish" to not buy something you're not interested in is abnormal consumer behavior.

(I've taken a few consumer psychology courses in the past, so it's fascinating to see the things people put out there on the internet. The Paizo boards, especially, would probably make a good case study, come to think of it...)

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Arnwyn wrote:
Gorbacz wrote:
Arnwyn wrote:
Lauraliane wrote:
and I don't plan to cancel my subscription over this, that would be childish.
???? Only if you're an abnormal consumer.
Touchy touchy ;)

No! Just speaking about consumer behavior (one of my favorite university courses, BTW). Not buying something you're not interested in is normal consumer behavior. Believing it to be "childish" to not buy something you're not interested in is abnormal consumer behavior.

(I've taken a few consumer psychology courses in the past, so it's fascinating to see the things people put out there on the internet. The Paizo boards, especially, would probably make a good case study, come to think of it...)

Well, you might want to ask for money from those courses back, because they taught you nothing :)

First of all, many people tweak the APs and use them partially or heavily alter them. Also, I'm never going to run all this stuff on my shelf, but I keep subscribing because of support material.

In short, yes, cancelling an AP because one issue has an adventure that's not up my alley is well, maybe childish is a strong word, but certainly unwise. I can still get my kick out of statblocks, NPCs, ideas and support material.

Maybe, if there was an entire AP that would be totally not up my alley, I'd consider a sub suspension. But even they I'd miss all the stuff that comes beside the adventure.


Gorbacz wrote:
Well, you might want to ask for money from those courses back, because they taught you nothing :)

Now, now. It's a good idea to avoid saying such stupid things. :)

Quote:
maybe childish is a strong word,

Yeah, that's what I thought.

Quote:
but certainly unwise. I can still get my kick out of statblocks, NPCs, ideas and support material.

Oh, so you admit such a person is interested in the material! Excellent. (But then, that has nothing to do with what I said. I commented on the information given - if the person wishes to expand their comments, they are free to do so.) Of course, I'm also sure you're aware that a person can cancel a sub to avoid one issue they don't like, then re-up when they get to issues they like. My statement: "Not buying something you're not interested in is normal consumer behavior. Believing it to be "childish" to not buy something you're not interested in is abnormal consumer behavior" is correct.

Anyways, as much as I love talking about consumer behavior, I'd rather hear any tidbits that fall from Paizo/Brandon about how they handled this adventure, especially the mechanics. My post wasn't really anything to quibble about.


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All I care about is getting ahold of a BFG and shooting something in the face with it. >:)

Well that and not freezing to death first.


The 8th Dwarf wrote:
I am very sorry but Star Wars has been on Earth - Raiders of the lost Ark has hieroglyphs of R2 and C3PO, the ET species is in Phantom menace, and lets not mention the implications of the Star Wars Christmas special or the terrible EU stories especially the one where Chewie ends up being Bigfoot.

Also, if I recall correctly, the entire premise behind the original novels was that they came by way of transmission (or perhaps direct travel and access from) R2-D2 to earth which was the excuse/idea behind why we have access to the information in the first place.

It's been more than a decade, so I could be wrong, but I seem to recall this... hold on.

*checks his "special sources", aka "wookipedia*

So, it looks like I was wrong, as I don't see anything like that.

However, there are a few oblique references to the Real World (most non-canon, several however definitively canon) and one pretty much spells it out (being the existence of the ET species, as The 8th Dwarf mentioned), not the least of which is that it directly tells us "a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away"... which, you know, implies time and space relative to our own universe/existence.

Other rather well-loved/classic science fiction/fantasy series that include earth rather directly: Battle Star Galactica (in which, secretly, that's the entire point of the journey) and pretty much all of the old Forgotten Realms and Greyhawk stuff (not the least of which was Mordenkainan's fascination with making super-lifelike movies for the world of earth with 'real monsters' and 'real magic' for special effects, or that Elminster used to meet and talk with Ed Greenwood in their interviewed articles). Middle Earth was implied to be Real Earth's history, the Chronicles of Narnia revolved around the idea that Earth was one of Many Worlds, Marvel Comics implies that the Real Earth (ours) is part of its multiverse (and was originally designed to supposedly be our world, by their advertisements), while numerous other well-written and interesting novels, worlds, and elements create ties to our own earth.

Now, all that said, anyone is entirely within their rights not to like it. It can be immersion-breaking.

Further, many other authors and designers do it poorly.

But I'm interested in how Paizo's going to handle it and I look forward to it.


Arnwyn wrote:
Gorbacz wrote:
Well, you might want to ask for money from those courses back, because they taught you nothing :)

Now, now. It's a good idea to avoid saying such stupid things. :)

Quote:
maybe childish is a strong word,

Yeah, that's what I thought.

Quote:
but certainly unwise. I can still get my kick out of statblocks, NPCs, ideas and support material.

Oh, so you admit such a person is interested in the material! Excellent. (But then, that has nothing to do with what I said. I commented on the information given - if the person wishes to expand their comments, they are free to do so.) Of course, I'm also sure you're aware that a person can cancel a sub to avoid one issue they don't like, then re-up when they get to issues they like. My statement: "Not buying something you're not interested in is normal consumer behavior. Believing it to be "childish" to not buy something you're not interested in is abnormal consumer behavior" is correct.

Anyways, as much as I love talking about consumer behavior, I'd rather hear any tidbits that fall from Paizo/Brandon about how they handled this adventure, especially the mechanics. My post wasn't really anything to quibble about.

As someone with more than a few courses on this subject under his belt (or so my many years in school for business and economics tell me), let me chime in with just this:

You can't use consumer behavior patterns as related to typical products for Paizo customers. But not because they're gamers. Because it's a periodical company and it's closest comparison in a standard market would be magazine customers.

When someone buys a car,they make a big investment and make sure it is fully customized how they want it. Car companies will go out of their way to make sure the product is what the consumer wants because of the potential margin of sale.

Most products on the market are not customizable but the investments both in terms of cost to the producer and to the consumer are typically much much smaller. In these cases, there are multiple avenues a consumer can take from finding substitutions to searching out atypical alternatives to just deciding that they don't need the product. This is why products are tailored to a demographic.

Magazines are also tailored to a demographic but they also designed to gain new readership, sometimes they attempt to expand their demographics, and they are a product that often includes a potpourri of various offerings rather than providing a single function or form of utility. Even novels are a single utility item - they're tailored for a specific genre and audience. You don't like teen supernatural romance? Then you don't buy that type of fiction.

Magazines try to do something different each month and they can change over time. They also offer different forms of utility to the reader from article to article and issue to issue. Consumers in the magazine market often exhibit atypical behaviour, especially subscribers, even if they exhibit typical behaviour when purchasing other products. The very nature of product subscription differentiates it from standard product relationships - it's actually more akin to brand loyalty programs than standard product loyalty. You're asked to buy in every month or year and in return you will receive a set of tools from which you can derive at least some utility. The entire product package may not be to your liking but there is something for everyone.

Case in point - Playboy - Some people subscribe for the pictures, some people subscribe for the articles (or so they say). Cosmo - some people want fashion and makeup tips, some people want relationship advice, and some people want whatever else it is they put in Cosmo. People who are into magazine subscriptions (such as the AP) rarely unsubscribe due to one lousy article or one bad issue, unless there is a huge shift in the direction of the magazine in which case some people may fall out of the shifted demo.

Now Paizo has allowed for more flexibility in their subscription contract to allow for consumers to join and exit on a monthly basis which changes consumer behaviour a bit. It's almost a hybrid. Because of that there is more typical consumer behaviour in AP purchasing patterns than a standard magazine product and because of that it gives the illusion that Paizo APs are subject to typical consumer psychology, but that's not the case, not entirely anyway. It still has a lot of magazine trappings that, in turn, skews consumer psychology toward the magazine model and brand loyalty programs.


Something to consider is that the Earth you are visiting is remote as hell Siberia. I think it would be pretty easy to refluff the names and some descriptions so they don't match Earth, and simply play it off as landing on a unknown world which has a higher level of technology.

I mean, yeah it is set around World War One Earth, but you are not in the French trenches, or running around NYC or anything.


The Block Knight wrote:
/snip/

Very interesting.

I'm not sure how applicable it is given the nature of Paizo's offerings (though I can see the similarity, as you certainly point out). While one probably won't unsubscribe due to a bad magazine issue, that's because that issue already arrived and is in the past. With APs, we know in advance (far in advance) what we're going to get. Further, the APs really are 'books' and are priced as such (as in, much more expensive than a magazine), thus increasing the incentive to unsubscribe if something is coming up that the consumer has no use for (and that's an overall 'has no use' - if he/she is happy to use other parts of the book, and thus continues subscribing, then he/she is not acting atypically). Paizo themselves have also made clear that the APs are "NOT magazines". (I'd go so far as to say that just because something is subscription-based, doesn't make it like a magazine in the context of consumer behavior.)

Though I do agree that the APs have "magazine trappings" that can make people act as if they are subscribing to a simple magazine. I'm just not entirely sure of the magnitude (especially after re-reading the posts that prompted my original comment).

The Block Knight wrote:
As someone with more than a few courses on this subject under his belt (or so my many years in school for business and economics tell me)

Not sure if you're suggesting that's all I have ("a few courses") or if you're actually specialized in consumer behavior...

Shadow Lodge

He's talking about himself.


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To the notion that going to Earth breaks immersion:

Immersed:

The creaking wood finally settles down. All around, the contents of the hut sway, from the herbs pinned to the beams to the sloshing fluid inside of Baba Yaga's cauldron. Eventually their momentum settles, and the roughest ride the hut has undertaken yet is clearly at an end. Though nearly boiled over, the cauldron begins to calm, leaving the group with a disquieting silence. Where had they gone this time?

Wide-eyed and unable to ask the question verbally, Lini creeps across the floor towards the front door of the hut. A look back to Valaeros confirms his uncertainty as well, though he hides it behind the purposeful unsheathing of his blade as he follows her. "Wait here," the swordsman recommends to the others, not bothering to look back at them as he follows the gnome.

Just behind Valaeros, Droogami pads along, head down and ears folded back, sniffing at the air. As Lini reaches for the latch she can feel her hand trembling, pushing the door open only to once again be struck by a surging gout of arctic wind and biting snow. By now she should've been used to this greeting, but she'd hoped that perhaps -- just perhaps -- the hut would have come to rest on a sunny beach somewhere along the Varisian coast.

Instead, there is windswept snow brushing up against crumbling old walls of an ancient monastery. Dried and dead vines frosted with ice creep up their towering heights and strange noises echo from within. Sharp pops and cracks fill the air, and Lini's eyes narrow both against the wind and in scrutiny of the structure.

"Musket fire?" Valaeros asks after her, following the gnome out into the snowy courtyard. Spinning around, Valaeros sees the hut nestled down beside a crumbling statue of an unfamiliar man in some manner of military uniform. His attention flicks to a battlement where the ghost of movement catches his eye. "Wait," he hisses as Lini starts to move further away.

Wordlessly, Lini reaches back to Droogami, but then hesitates as her fingers curl into the leopard's bristling fur. "That's not muskets," she murmurs, her keen hearing picking up something else under the popping noise. "Squeaks and... rumbling?"

By now, Feiya has come to the door, leaning on her staff and watching the pair in the courtyard. Her brows furrow, patience thins and she asks, "Where are-- " before the sudden explosion of stone deafens the lot of them and cuts her off.

One of the monastery walls bursts open in a shower of snow, stone dust and debris. Drawing one arm up to shield himself, Valaeros can feel pieces of brick and mortar deflecting off of his armor. "Get back in the hut!" His cries go unheard over the now louder sound of gunfire, but not a kind any of the hut's masters could ever have anticipated.

As the snow and smoke clears, the trio can clearly see what destroyed the monastery wall. Something lurches over the broken rock, an iron-plated war machine of a dozen wheels linked together by sheets of metal. It rumbles, belches smoke and picots a turret on its top around towards the hut. Valaeros stares slack-jawed at the war machine before divine out of the way as the barrel blasts smoke and flame out, causing a portion of the courtyard behind Valaeros to explode.

He collapsed into the snow on his side, ice clinging to his hair. When his vision clears, he can see Lini atop Droogami, fingers curled into fur, riding the leopard towards the war machine with a single scimitar in the air, screaming.

"Who -- What are they?" Feiya asks, not of the war machine, but the men in gray uniforms following it out. Their faces are shrouded in unusual masks with circular lenses and strange bags and hoses at their mouths. They hiss and rasp wheezing breaths, firearms of unfamiliar make raised to the ready and firing with rapid succession back inside the monastery.

"I got no idea," Valaeros says in astonishment. It's been a regular phrase and sentiment on this journey.

It's never the sunny beach.

Long story short, play up the mystery and strange-in-a-strange-land aspect of it. Don't even tell your players they're on Earth, let them figure it out for themselves. Describe unfamiliar languages, unfamiliar clothing and weapons. They are on an alien world no different or less fantastical from Akiton, Verces or Aucturn unless you make it less fantastical and unique.

Don't think of it as Will Smith punching them in the face when they come out of the hut shouting, "Welcome ta Earff."

I mean, not unless you want to.


Nicely done, Lucent!

Now, what would be funny is if a Soviet Will Smith cold-cocked Valeros, saying that in Russian. grins


Turin the Mad wrote:

Nicely done, Lucent!

Now, what would be funny is if a Soviet Will Smith cold-cocked Valeros, saying that in Russian. grins

Funnier? Alain!


Spiral_Ninja wrote:
Turin the Mad wrote:

Nicely done, Lucent!

Now, what would be funny is if a Soviet Will Smith cold-cocked Valeros, saying that in Russian. grins

Funnier? Alain!

Priceless. :)

Shadow Lodge

I LIKE it.

The last two lines make it even more brilliant.


Lucent can you be my GM?


The 8th Dwarf wrote:

Lucent can you be my GM?

Yeah, no kidding. I expect to stalk ... er, "peruse" Lucent's posts on RoW if/when I can persuade a group to let me "GM" them through the crockpot of carnage, foolishness, mayhem and violence that this already glorious is shaping up to be!

Lucent, when you get a group to play through RoW, you *must* post a campaign journal here on the boards. I especially look forward to when you are recalling a PC getting ground into tread-jam ... ^_____^


Arnwyn wrote:


The Block Knight wrote:
As someone with more than a few courses on this subject under his belt (or so my many years in school for business and economics tell me)
Not sure if you're suggesting that's all I have ("a few courses") or if you're actually specialized in consumer behavior...

Yeah, no, as Orthos assumed, I was talking about myself. I didn't mean to imply anything about you, sorry if it came off that way. I specialized in marketing which is what I was hinting at.


Turin the Mad wrote:
The 8th Dwarf wrote:

Lucent can you be my GM?

Yeah, no kidding. I expect to stalk ... er, "peruse" Lucent's posts on RoW if/when I can persuade a group to let me "GM" them through the crockpot of carnage, foolishness, mayhem and violence that this already glorious is shaping up to be!

Lucent, when you get a group to play through RoW, you *must* post a campaign journal here on the boards. I especially look forward to when you are recalling a PC getting ground into tread-jam ... ^_____^

I plan on running Reign of Winter once my homebrew Dark Tapestry/Dominion of the Black adventure path Ascension is done (which is a long ways off, admittedly). For those of you curious, you can find it here Pathfinder: Ascension. The campaign journals are in the link for both the prologue and sessions.

As far as RoW goes, I've been excited about this one for a long, long time. I think only an official Dominion AP or a Mana-Wastes western AP would be higher on my to-GM list.


Heh, it is a steamy load, alright... a steamy load of awesome! Android gunslinger with a machine gun!


Hey there Turin ... it seems Lucent (whose brief story-crafting I truly enjoyed and mirrors my own thoughts on bringing the PCs to Earth) anyway ... seems Lucent and I are of a like mind ... planning to GM it when current campaigns conclude. (I am into "The Hook Mountain Massacre" from RotR AE) and figure will conclude/wrap up RotR around November 2013 (take a "holiday" break) and the idea is to resume in January with RoW.

So, perhaps both of us can entertain with Campaign Journals.

Of course I know there will be GMs that will begin RoW much sooner ... so you'll likely have all the Campaign Journal stories you can handle.

This entire AP is just shaping up to be another AWESOME campaign from the folks from Paizo ... really looking forward to it.

Boy Oh Boy ... I really can't wait. :)

Dean


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Mark me down as someone else who really doesn't like this concept. I mean, I'm holding onto a slim hope that the execution will somehow save it for me, but I sincerely hope that they never do anything like this again.


I am just going to enjoy the look on my players faces when the finally clue in they are on earth. I don't expect Paizo to put a big "Welcome to Russia" sign outside the hut.


While I probably won't use the visit the earth or that other planet in the star system...I will "let them" end up in the world of greyhawk where Iggwilv came from...the land of black ice perhaps...

Besides, so many of Iuz's high level followers are out for blood...the player's high level characters killed Iuz off...and pert near turned the valley of the mage into part of the sea of dust (think yellowstone super volcano!)

When they screw up they do it BIG!

The offspring of the group that killed their master showing up is a gift from their dark gods grave!

There is always SOMETHING I can use from any Pathfinder adventure...even the ones with trips to WW1 earth and distant planets.

Paizo Employee Developer

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selunatic2397 wrote:

While I probably won't use the visit the earth....

Murlynd wasn't too good to visit Earth. ;)

Spoiler:
In case the winky smiley wasn't enough, I am just picking on you. I couldn't resist with this Greyhawk talk. (My second favorite setting)


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There is no way on Pelor's green Oerth that I will let my players get Murlynd's magic magnum revolvers!


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The Walker Dragoon was the most powerful pistol on Earth during WW1, If this is c. 1914 that pistol would be.....around 56 years old, so quite likely available.

The .41 russian was a close second to this chambering and was semi common during the WW1, soooo.... KABLOOOOWIE let your players have a pair of those!

3d6 TWF touch attacks! DRAW PARDNER!


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If it is immediately after WWI, during the Revolution, then maybe the PCs run into the Young Indiana Jones. :P

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