The LGBT Gamer Community Thread.


Gamer Life General Discussion

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Crystal Frasier wrote:
Ashiel wrote:
Crystal Frasier wrote:

It varies from person to person, but:

1) Most trans people don't want their old name shared, especially without their permissions. To most people, especially women who've transitioned and live fulltime, it is a vulnerability, like sharing their medical information or allergies without their permission.

Is there a place I can find the statistics on this sort of thing?
It was a giant mistake for me to come back into this thread

:(

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

Please don't go! I may know next to nothing about LGBT topics and events but your posts (as well as almost everyone else on here) are always insightful and I enjoy reading them because they give me understanding and also keep me from making faux pas' when dealing with people so that they're comfortable instead of on edge or insulted or hurt.


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Crystal Frasier wrote:
It was a giant mistake for me to come back into this thread

It sucks - a lot - to be triggered painfully by stuff people say that they have no way to realize is triggering. Sucks for people on the other side of that, too, because I'm pretty sure Ashiel had absolutely no intention of being hurtful or disrespectful. Though I certainly agree that even saying a deadname is a very bad thing, and it would be MUCH kinder to edit it out. Think of it like something out of Lovecraftian horror, since that's pretty much the level of badness it has the power to invoke.

Sometimes you can solve things in a group of friends by explaining what your boundaries are and how to respect them. But sometimes even doing that takes more emotional energy than you have to spare.

So please take care of yourself any way you feel like you have to. Ultimately that's what's important. Everyone here will really miss you, though, because you contribute quite a lot here in the way of hope and inspiration. So thank you for what you have given already. It has made a difference to many.


For a change of pace...

Accurate depiction of typical reaction of a man learning that an attractive woman is lesbian (comic series occasionally not safe for work, this particular strip is safe, though).


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Albatoonoe wrote:

Okay, so I have a question. I guess it's sorta directed towards other bisexuals, but if anyone else feels this way, feel free to chime in.

Do you ever feel like you're not "queer enough" to be apart of the great LGBTQIA community? I came into my bisexuality pretty late, and I've still had the strong attraction to women (possibly being heteroromantic), so I've always been hesitant to put myself out there among other queer folk. Hell, I was even hesitant to post in this thread.

For that last letter, obviously I can't speak for all asexuals. I don't even know if we have groups (less incentive to form them i suppose...) but I don't think asexuality is has enough in common to really go there.

It seems to me that the lgbt community has more in common with mainstream society than us. Ya'll have the same feelings of love for each other, the person you have them for is just a little different. You can understand Romeo and juliette and get something out of the play, know what they're feeling and empathize with it. To me its like watching aliens concerned with touching ears.

Secondly and more importantly asexuality is way, way too easy for me to say I understand what you're going through.

Besides some virgin jokes (which i find hilarious) nobody's bothering us. hell, people don't even realize we exist. I didn't know what an ace was till i saw this thread. So a fundamental part of the LGBT experience in our time just doesn't apply to me.

There's a little awkwardness because society is built around an emotion that you don't have, don't understand, and have to consciously remind yourself that its there, but besides that... holy bleep is this easy. Forget no persecution, I don't even need to date. I rented a tux for 60 bucks and walked to my prom. That was it. No commitments, no long term roomates, no having to spend two thirds of my day with worrying about what someone else is going to think about what I'm doing. The difficulty setting is just too low for it to be in the same catagory.


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Crystal Frasier wrote:


Not to mention, invoking a trans woman's deadname grants you the power to summon her. But not to bind her. It's just safer for everyone involved.

Hi, folks,

If I can vent a little bit, some of what’s come up recently in this thread has suddenly become relevant in my life over the past couple of days. I’m at the conference for the national organization for people in my field of study here in Canada. It’s a small enough group that I can recognize most names if not faces, and have at least talked with a whole bunch of them, and I’ve just had a couple of misadventures.

Spoilered for self-indulgent loquacity:
First, I ran into an old professor, who was perceptive enough to note that my presentation is a lot more conventionally feminine now, and that my name (on a tag, of course) had changed, but proceeded to announce breezily in the hearing of everyone around us, “So – I was going to say [X], but I see that’s changed.”

I don’t hugely mind, personally – there are more immediately annoying things in my life at the moment – but it rather rankled on principle. In fairness, I don’t think his background has really made it likely that the issues could have occurred to him.

I also bumped into someone I had fallen out of touch with, who promptly thought they had mistaken me for the person they knew me as, and whisked away embarrassed before I could think of a tactful way of handling the situation, especially because I was supposed to head off to meet another friend just then (of course!). I thought it was rather surprising, because I don’t think I’ve changed that much, and most of my other casual acquaintances have taken the changes in my presentation and the name I normally use (I’m still slowly working on the legal stuff) in stride. I hope that doesn’t sound too gloat-y; I don’t mean it to. I really was just a bit nonplussed to be not-quite recognized. I suppose a rather odd email should go on my to-do list. Sigh.


On the other hand, a bunch of people had nice things to say about the paper I read, and so far the balance is still squarely on the wonderful side for this conference.


3 people marked this as a favorite.
The Minis Maniac wrote:
Crystal Frasier wrote:
Ashiel wrote:
Crystal Frasier wrote:

It varies from person to person, but:

1) Most trans people don't want their old name shared, especially without their permissions. To most people, especially women who've transitioned and live fulltime, it is a vulnerability, like sharing their medical information or allergies without their permission.

Is there a place I can find the statistics on this sort of thing?
It was a giant mistake for me to come back into this thread
:(

On a related note, I don't quite recall if she discusses things statistically - though I think she does - Viviane Namaste in Invisible Lives considers barriers to an ordinary life in many trans* folks' lives, particularly in my hometown, including the number of people who are even reluctant to, say, go to a pharmacy to get medication they might need because they don't trust that their names will be respected. Her work, and the sources she cites, would probably be the place I would start to look, but I doubt there's much numerical data. It's such an intuitive thing that I doubt anyone's been moved to collect any.


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BigNorseWolf wrote:
For that last letter, obviously I can't speak for all asexuals. I don't even know if we have groups (less incentive to form them i suppose...) but I don't think asexuality is has enough in common to really go there.

I for one am amused by the lack of activity in my friends' private lives. I can say that I'm getting laid almost as much as they are and I don't even want to do it!


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BigNorseWolf wrote:
For that last letter, obviously I can't speak for all asexuals. I don't even know if we have groups (less incentive to form them i suppose...) but I don't think asexuality is has enough in common to really go there.

I didn't even know there was such a thing as an asexual until I saw a documentary on them a couple of years back.

More pointedly I have a gamer friend who is asexual, and I am pretty sure the first time he heard the term was when I mentioned it to him.

I understand there are asexual groups on the net.

Which gives me a genius idea. I am sure there is no equivalent of Grinder for asexuals. I am going to set one up and make my fortune!


You have to call it Ainder (either Ane-der or Ein-der). :)

Dark Archive

8 people marked this as a favorite.

Today is the big day here in Ireland, the Thirty-Fourth Amendment of the Constitution (Marriage Equality) Bill 2015. Wish us all good luck, the polls have been turning against progress all week, and we'll be tense until we get the final word tomorrow.


Second turn of presidential elections on Sunday here...

The two options are:
[] We don't want the marionette of hateful conservative party to become a new president.
[] We don't want the bland, not much in touch with reality, and not very useful current president to stay for the second turn.

Both options are not supportive for civil unions, not to mention marriage equality, but the current president and his clique are a tiny bit less hateful toward the gays.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber
Crystal Frasier wrote:
Ashiel wrote:
Crystal Frasier wrote:

It varies from person to person, but:

1) Most trans people don't want their old name shared, especially without their permissions. To most people, especially women who've transitioned and live fulltime, it is a vulnerability, like sharing their medical information or allergies without their permission.

Is there a place I can find the statistics on this sort of thing?
It was a giant mistake for me to come back into this thread

And I'm sad now, too.

Dark Archive

Drejk wrote:

Second turn of presidential elections on Sunday here...

** spoiler omitted **

Both options are not supportive for civil unions, not to mention marriage equality, but the current president and his clique are a tiny bit less hateful toward the gays.

Blech. Good luck Drejk. May the lesser of two evils prevail, until a much better alternative presents itself. :/


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Nuuu... Crystal, don't go!


Arakhor wrote:
You have to call it Ainder (either Ane-der or Ein-der). :)

I am probably having a mental blank but I don't get the Ane-der bit.


Well, the second rhymes with "Grinder", but I imagine that you could easily pronounce it as the first, which is also the same 'a' as in "asexual".


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I just caught up with the thread and I'm really sad for Ms. Frasier.

I feel that the main problem with LGBTQ+ communities is that everyone wants to feel like they belong, but each person has their own different set of experiences and personalities. Some people want to make light of their sexuality/gender identity to avoid feeling abnormal, while others want their identity validated and respected instead of steamrolled as it may happen in their daily lives.

We all want the same from the community but we all got different definitions of what that is.

At some point in the future, it'd be ideal if we were all accepted and perfectly integrated into our everyday communities, so that this sort of thing doesn't have to happen.


Qunnessaa wrote:
The Minis Maniac wrote:
Crystal Frasier wrote:
Ashiel wrote:
Crystal Frasier wrote:

It varies from person to person, but:

1) Most trans people don't want their old name shared, especially without their permissions. To most people, especially women who've transitioned and live fulltime, it is a vulnerability, like sharing their medical information or allergies without their permission.

Is there a place I can find the statistics on this sort of thing?
It was a giant mistake for me to come back into this thread
:(
On a related note, I don't quite recall if she discusses things statistically - though I think she does - Viviane Namaste in Invisible Lives considers barriers to an ordinary life in many trans* folks' lives, particularly in my hometown, including the number of people who are even reluctant to, say, go to a pharmacy to get medication they might need because they don't trust that their names will be respected. Her work, and the sources she cites, would probably be the place I would start to look, but I doubt there's much numerical data. It's such an intuitive thing that I doubt anyone's been moved to collect any.

Thank you.

Dark Archive

18 people marked this as a favorite.

So, for those of you not yet aware, yesterday, May 22nd, Ireland had a referendum on whether “Marriage may be contracted in accordance with law by two persons without distinction as to their sex.” And today, May 23rd, the results are in. 62.07% yes, 37.93% no. Same sex marriage is now enshrined in the constitution of Ireland. Woo! :D


2 people marked this as a favorite.

WOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

Silver Crusade

2 people marked this as a favorite.

Great news! I also heard that it is the first time same sex marriage has been made legal in a country via popular referendum.


Meh, a pair of friends and co-players (man and women) were renting a room, but their landlord give them their monthly notice after learning that she is active in local LGBT community... At the moment worst case scenario is, if they don't find anything suitable quickly enough, that they will move in to be my roommates flatmates. We'll have to speak about early details tomorrow before session.

This dreads my inner slightly apathetic nervous introvert loner, though.


LordSynos wrote:
So, for those of you not yet aware, yesterday, May 22nd, Ireland had a referendum on whether “Marriage may be contracted in accordance with law by two persons without distinction as to their sex.” And today, May 23rd, the results are in. 62.07% yes, 37.93% no. Same sex marriage is now enshrined in the constitution of Ireland. Woo! :D

Excellent but also rather surprising.

It is not so long ago Ireland was very conservative socially due to the vast influence of the Catholic church. Then church attendances fell markedly following revelations [yes its the right word] of clerical sexual abuse.
I believe in Ireland abortion is still illegal, where in most comparable countries this has not been so since the 1970's. Or have I got things wrong?


Drejk wrote:

Meh, a pair of friends and co-players (man and women) were renting a room, but their landlord give them their monthly notice after learning that she is active in local LGBT community... At the moment worst case scenario is, if they don't find anything suitable quickly enough, that they will move in to be my roommates flatmates. We'll have to speak about early details tomorrow before session.

This dreads my inner slightly apathetic nervous introvert loner, though.

Is this even legal?

Aren't there laws that they can't kick people out for reasons like that?

Silver Crusade RPG Superstar Season 9 Top 32

GreyWolfLord wrote:
Drejk wrote:

Meh, a pair of friends and co-players (man and women) were renting a room, but their landlord give them their monthly notice after learning that she is active in local LGBT community... At the moment worst case scenario is, if they don't find anything suitable quickly enough, that they will move in to be my roommates flatmates. We'll have to speak about early details tomorrow before session.

This dreads my inner slightly apathetic nervous introvert loner, though.

Is this even legal?

Aren't there laws that they can't kick people out for reasons like that?

Mm, probably, but the wage gap(s) is also technically illegal, soooooo


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It's very difficult to prove discrimination, particularly if you're anything less than the perfect model citizen. Anything that can be used to even vaguely justify that decision can create reasonable doubt. Taking someone to court over something so vague and with so little to gain often ends up being more expensive and troublesome than it's worth.


You don't need to prove anything beyond reasonable doubt in a civil case. The standard of proof in civil cases is the balance of probability.

Unfortuntely, you are right about everything else, Shadow Knight. Particularly the costs of litigation.


4 people marked this as a favorite.
Joynt Jezebel wrote:


It is not so long ago Ireland was very conservative socially due to the vast influence of the Catholic church.

To try to bring some levity to the thread:

My sister spent a year in Ireland and told me that legally:
You could marry at 16
You could have sex at 17
You could buy condoms at 18.
We both felt that was rather backwards.

(let's hope I remembered this correctly; if not, mea culpa, and will some other kind, informed person please correct me)


Some time on Google reveals that-

You could marry at 16
You could have sex at 17
There is no age restriction on the purchase of condoms, so you can buy condoms at any age.

The last is according to the ifpa, which I believe stands for Irish Family Planning Association, or something similar. That is now, perhaps it was different when your sister was there.


GreyWolfLord wrote:
Drejk wrote:

Meh, a pair of friends and co-players (man and women) were renting a room, but their landlord give them their monthly notice after learning that she is active in local LGBT community... At the moment worst case scenario is, if they don't find anything suitable quickly enough, that they will move in to be my roommates flatmates. We'll have to speak about early details tomorrow before session.

This dreads my inner slightly apathetic nervous introvert loner, though.

Is this even legal?

Aren't there laws that they can't kick people out for reasons like that?

Depends where they are. Dresk isn't in the US, IIRC, but even here sexual orientation is only protected on a state (or sometimes local) level. This would be perfectly legal in many places, even if no excuse was used and they were told it was because of their LGBTQ connections.

They were given their monthly notice, which I assume matches the terms of the contract.

Silver Crusade

Joynt Jezebel wrote:

Some time on Google reveals that-

You could marry at 16
You could have sex at 17
There is no age restriction on the purchase of condoms, so you can buy condoms at any age.

The last is according to the ifpa, which I believe stands for Irish Family Planning Association, or something similar. That is now, perhaps it was different when your sister was there.

My instinct tells me that if you marry at 16 you don't have to wait a year to consumate!


If you think about 16 year olds for a minute, waiting a year seems unlikely whatever the law is supposed to be.


You don't even have to be married. There's just that little 'legally' bit that gets in the way.

Silver Crusade

thejeff wrote:
GreyWolfLord wrote:
Drejk wrote:

Meh, a pair of friends and co-players (man and women) were renting a room, but their landlord give them their monthly notice after learning that she is active in local LGBT community... At the moment worst case scenario is, if they don't find anything suitable quickly enough, that they will move in to be my roommates flatmates. We'll have to speak about early details tomorrow before session.

This dreads my inner slightly apathetic nervous introvert loner, though.

Is this even legal?

Aren't there laws that they can't kick people out for reasons like that?

Depends where they are. Dresk isn't in the US, IIRC, but even here sexual orientation is only protected on a state (or sometimes local) level. This would be perfectly legal in many places, even if no excuse was used and they were told it was because of their LGBTQ connections.

They were given their monthly notice, which I assume matches the terms of the contract.

Precisely. He's in Poland, but this could just as easily happen in the US.

A quick Internet search indicates only 15 US states have statutes against housing discrimination based on sexual orientation (plus a fair number of municipalities). And this case isn't even sexual orientation, but political belief, which is even less likely to be protected.

Dark Archive

Joynt Jezebel wrote:
LordSynos wrote:
So, for those of you not yet aware, yesterday, May 22nd, Ireland had a referendum on whether “Marriage may be contracted in accordance with law by two persons without distinction as to their sex.” And today, May 23rd, the results are in. 62.07% yes, 37.93% no. Same sex marriage is now enshrined in the constitution of Ireland. Woo! :D

Excellent but also rather surprising.

It is not so long ago Ireland was very conservative socially due to the vast influence of the Catholic church. Then church attendances fell markedly following revelations [yes its the right word] of clerical sexual abuse.
I believe in Ireland abortion is still illegal, where in most comparable countries this has not been so since the 1970's. Or have I got things wrong?

You are quite right. Same-sex sexual activity was only decriminalised in 1993, and we've already come to the stage of same-sex marriage! We're moving quickly having lost most of our faith (pun intended) in the Catholic church, following scandal after scandal after scandal. With this step forward, we hope to see other matters on the ballot box very soon. :)

Dark Archive

Joynt Jezebel wrote:

Some time on Google reveals that-

You could marry at 16
You could have sex at 17
There is no age restriction on the purchase of condoms, so you can buy condoms at any age.

The last is according to the ifpa, which I believe stands for Irish Family Planning Association, or something similar. That is now, perhaps it was different when your sister was there.

While condoms are no longer an issue (since 1992), female birth control is. I have had friends well into their 20's get hassled by doctors and pharmacists over getting birth control. We're working on it.


Lord Synos- Ireland is a strange place.

Here in Australia, the timing of things went-

1 Legalised homosexuality- its state by state, from the mid 1970's [South Australia] to the end of the 80's in more backward places.

2 Freely available birth control and legalised abortion, were both considerably earlier and have not really been an issue since, maybe 1980.

3 Gay marriage we still don't have, it may come soon.

I think Australia is more typical in the timing of reforms, at least among English speaking countries.

On Irish weirdness, there are not that many of you, yet you have so many great writers.

On Catholicism- there are plenty of scandals out here too. I am a bit surprised there are any Catholics left. The new pope seems like a very reasonable man however.


Celestial Healer wrote:
thejeff wrote:
GreyWolfLord wrote:
Drejk wrote:

Meh, a pair of friends and co-players (man and women) were renting a room, but their landlord give them their monthly notice after learning that she is active in local LGBT community... At the moment worst case scenario is, if they don't find anything suitable quickly enough, that they will move in to be my roommates flatmates. We'll have to speak about early details tomorrow before session.

This dreads my inner slightly apathetic nervous introvert loner, though.

Is this even legal?

Aren't there laws that they can't kick people out for reasons like that?

Depends where they are. Dresk isn't in the US, IIRC, but even here sexual orientation is only protected on a state (or sometimes local) level. This would be perfectly legal in many places, even if no excuse was used and they were told it was because of their LGBTQ connections.

They were given their monthly notice, which I assume matches the terms of the contract.

Precisely. He's in Poland, but this could just as easily happen in the US.

A quick Internet search indicates only 15 US states have statutes against housing discrimination based on sexual orientation (plus a fair number of municipalities). And this case isn't even sexual orientation, but political belief, which is even less likely to be protected.

There is no such protection here as far as I know, and with a new president that just won the elections is highly unlikely that it could be introduced within the next five years of his presidenture...

And after seeing friends today I think it might even not be a notice but just not extending the contract for a new period of time - and what law could possibly force the owner into entering a new contract if does not want to? The reason I wrote is mostly the conjuncture based on fragmentary information. Friends know that the landlord is a rather fervent fundamentalist Catholic (apparently, he even told his own daughter to find another housing and refusing to have her rent one of the rooms because she is not righteous enough person...) and that the roommate with high probability told him about friend's activity in LGBT.


And yeah, the candidate that is less bland and inept, and more a servant of angry hateful clique won by a slight margin...


8 people marked this as a favorite.
Crystal Frasier wrote:
Ashiel wrote:
Crystal Frasier wrote:

It varies from person to person, but:

1) Most trans people don't want their old name shared, especially without their permissions. To most people, especially women who've transitioned and live fulltime, it is a vulnerability, like sharing their medical information or allergies without their permission.

Is there a place I can find the statistics on this sort of thing?
It was a giant mistake for me to come back into this thread

Hi Crystal,

Let me just say that as a het cis male, I find your contributions in this thread and elsewhere really valuable. I learned a lot about trans people via this thread that I never knew before, and and it has made me aware of viewpoints or considerations I probably would have never thought about before. While I can totally relate to the idea of not spending free time on a thread that may bring up some unfun real life stuff you deal with daily, I do value your views and it has improved my outlook/conception of LGBTQ issues.


Sad to hear that Drejk. Maybe someday there will be a better leader for the Republic of Poland (and a better football team that could actually win the World Cup). Ah well, Poland is not yet lost.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Congrats to Ireland and to any Irish Paizoites who this affects.

NZ passed gay marriage by private members bill on a conscience vote, I think last year. Our governing party was mildly against it but enough MPs crossed the floor for it to happen.
So now we get to be where Australians go on same-sex wedding holidays to....
While we had had civil unions that offered much of the same rights since the early 2000s and as a country like to pride ourselves on being socially forward, male homosexuality was only decriminalised here in the mid-80s (while I'm complaining from a social justice angle, personally I am very glad of it as if it had been legal earlier my parent would never have married and had me).

In an unrelated anecdote of LGBT, I was at a tabletop gaming thing waiting for my GM to arrive and chatting to other people waiting when the conversation revealed that 6 of the 10 people waiting had at some point been involved in the university student union's queer support group and that all the letter of LGBT were being represented. I choose to believe that shows that roleplayers are an inclusive lot, and that everyone feels welcome.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
MMCJawa wrote:
Crystal Frasier wrote:
Ashiel wrote:
Crystal Frasier wrote:

It varies from person to person, but:

1) Most trans people don't want their old name shared, especially without their permissions. To most people, especially women who've transitioned and live fulltime, it is a vulnerability, like sharing their medical information or allergies without their permission.

Is there a place I can find the statistics on this sort of thing?
It was a giant mistake for me to come back into this thread

Hi Crystal,

Let me just say that as a het cis male, I find your contributions in this thread and elsewhere really valuable. I learned a lot about trans people via this thread that I never knew before, and and it has made me aware of viewpoints or considerations I probably would have never thought about before. While I can totally relate to the idea of not spending free time on a thread that may bring up some unfun real life stuff you deal with daily, I do value your views and it has improved my outlook/conception of LGBTQ issues.

What he said.


Mighty Squash wrote:
NZ passed gay marriage by private members bill on a conscience vote, I think last year.

It was earlier than that. How do I know? A female couple I was friends with went to NZ and got married, and it much longer ago than last year.


After the presidential elections results were published Robert Biedroń expressed mild disappointment about the results on Facebook and hope for better election results in 2020... It started an avalanche of posts with questions if this means he will be candidate in the next elections and with declaration of support if he will.

He is doing good job as a city mayor for now, and if he keeps it up he might be a serious contender.

Shadow Lodge

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Good artcle in the Guardian: When you're trans, every choice to be more feminine could mean life or death by Jetta Rae


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MMCJawa wrote:
Crystal Frasier wrote:
Ashiel wrote:
Crystal Frasier wrote:

It varies from person to person, but:

1) Most trans people don't want their old name shared, especially without their permissions. To most people, especially women who've transitioned and live fulltime, it is a vulnerability, like sharing their medical information or allergies without their permission.

Is there a place I can find the statistics on this sort of thing?
It was a giant mistake for me to come back into this thread

Hi Crystal,

Let me just say that as a het cis male, I find your contributions in this thread and elsewhere really valuable. I learned a lot about trans people via this thread that I never knew before, and and it has made me aware of viewpoints or considerations I probably would have never thought about before. While I can totally relate to the idea of not spending free time on a thread that may bring up some unfun real life stuff you deal with daily, I do value your views and it has improved my outlook/conception of LGBTQ issues.

There needs to be moar fav buttons for this.

Contributor

4 people marked this as a favorite.


Biological markers of asexuality: Handedness, birth order, and finger length ratios in self-identified asexual men and women.

Interesting paper looking at human asexuality as a discrete thing and any possible physical/neurological basis for it. You don't often see much on this particular topic in the hard sciences, so while very preliminary, it's important.


The article is indeed interesting, if very scientific.

Also interesting is that there are probably more asexuals than transgendered people.

This article- http://www.gendercentre.org.au/resources/polare-archive/archived-articles/h ow-many-of-us-are-there.htm
is of the view that the rate of males with gender identity disorder [the author's term] is about 1 in 250 in those born male. The number in those born female is I believe lower.

Asexuals are more numerous, 1% or more of the population. But they recieve almost no publicity, certainly less than transgendered persons.

Why? My guess is asexuality is more invisible, less obvious and much easier to hide. And there is no asexuals in porn I know of.

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