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Kirth Gersen wrote:
PINK PTERODACTYLS!

Pshhsh...saw them all the time in college.

Scarab Sages

Leonardo Da Vinci invented scissors.


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Pathfinder Adventure Subscriber

Scissors from 2nd century Asia Minor

Silver Crusade

The best place to hold up during the inevitable zombie apocalypse is in an amish/mennonite town


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Tin Foil Yamakah wrote:
The best place to hold up during the inevitable zombie apocalypse is in an amish/mennonite town

Wouldn't a tropical island in the middle of the Pacific, those without airports, be a better place?

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

That Firefighters still save kittens.


Pathfinder Adventure Subscriber

The last reported sighting in Sweden of the Æsir god Oden was in 1247, before the Battle of Sparrsätra


Like vanilla? Beaver Butts Emit Goo Used for Vanilla Flavoring


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Technicolor Yanni wrote:
Like vanilla? Beaver Butts Emit Goo Used for Vanilla Flavoring

I hate you for posting that.


Bill Lumberg wrote:
Technicolor Yanni wrote:
Like vanilla? Beaver Butts Emit Goo Used for Vanilla Flavoring
I hate you for posting that.

Oh hell, I ate vanilla icecream last night. This is why I don't like to know what they put on my food.

Lets join our hate to see if we can make her fall off her chair.

Silver Crusade

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
Bill Lumberg wrote:
Technicolor Yanni wrote:
Like vanilla? Beaver Butts Emit Goo Used for Vanilla Flavoring
I hate you for posting that.

Oh hell, I ate vanilla icecream last night. This is why I don't like to know what they put on my food.

Lets join our hate to see if we can make her fall off her chair.

I like to drink my vanilla straight from the beaver's butt.

The Exchange

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Celestial Healer wrote:
Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
Bill Lumberg wrote:
Technicolor Yanni wrote:
Like vanilla? Beaver Butts Emit Goo Used for Vanilla Flavoring
I hate you for posting that.

Oh hell, I ate vanilla icecream last night. This is why I don't like to know what they put on my food.

Lets join our hate to see if we can make her fall off her chair.

I like to drink my vanilla straight from the beaver's butt.

So much for the "whats for lunch" thread.


From Snopes: "Processed forms of castoreum are also used as food additives; in the latter case primarily as enhancers of strawberry and rasperry flavorings in products such as iced tea, ice cream, gelatin, candy, fruit-flavored drinks, and yogurt."

(1) Everything that exists is processed something else. Your plastic spoon is processed oil.

(2) Vanilla flavor still typically comes from vanilla beans.

(3) A tiny bit of processed chemical that once may or may not have come from a beaver, used to enhance strawberry flavor, isn't as gross-sounding and hence not as interesting, even if it's more accurate.


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Celestial Healer wrote:
Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
Bill Lumberg wrote:
Technicolor Yanni wrote:
Like vanilla? Beaver Butts Emit Goo Used for Vanilla Flavoring
I hate you for posting that.

Oh hell, I ate vanilla icecream last night. This is why I don't like to know what they put on my food.

Lets join our hate to see if we can make her fall off her chair.

I like to drink my vanilla straight from the beaver's butt.

I don't think we'll be going for that ice cream any time soon.


That s+&+ is bananas.


The average severed head and one million dollars in $100 bills are approximately the same weight.


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Kryzbyn wrote:
That s@!@ is bananas.

no, its vanilla.


Saint Caleth wrote:
The average severed head and one million dollars in $100 bills are approximately the same weight.

equivalent exchange!


Saint Caleth wrote:
The average severed head and one million dollars in $100 bills are approximately the same weight.

"Did you bring the money?"

"Yes, boss. One million dollar in $100 bills, as you asked. I weighed the bag before we left to make sure"

"Good, now hand it over"

<Checks the bag>

"What the hell, Chuggs!"


Kirth Gersen wrote:
A tiny bit of processed chemical that once may or may not have come from a beaver, used to enhance strawberry flavor, isn't as gross-sounding and hence not as interesting, even if it's more accurate.

Well, if we're going to quibble, I think your clarification is more precise but not any more accurate than the article.

{goes back to grinding finer edge on Axe of Hair-Splitting}

The Exchange

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Today is TACO day!!!!


Pathfinder Adventure Subscriber

*checks chart and character sheet*

Okay... so you have to roll below 6 to hit.

Silver Crusade

It is illegal to catch mice in ohio without a hunting license

Scarab Sages

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My spawn mead was really smooth.

Silver Crusade

No word in the english language rhymes with month, silver, purple or orange


Tin Foil Yamakah wrote:
No word in the english language rhymes with month, silver, purple or orange

sporange, a very rare alternative form of sporangium (a botanical term for a part of a fern or similar plant)

and some Robbie Burns...

For you, no bred to barn and byre,
Wha sweetly tune the Scottish lyre,
Thanks to you for your line:
The marled plaid ye kindly spare,
By me should gratefully be ware;
'Twad please me to the nine.
I'd be mair vauntie o' my hap,
Douce hingin' owre my curple
Than ony ermine ever lap,
Or proud imperial purple.
Fareweel then, lang heel then,
An' plenty be your fa';
May losses and crosses
Ne'er at your hallan ca'.


Freehold DM wrote:
Kryzbyn wrote:
That s@!@ is bananas.
no, its vanilla.

We could compromise with a banana split.


Tin Foil Yamakah wrote:
No word in the english language rhymes with month, silver, purple or orange

We had that pages ago, and I posted a whole bunch of rhyming words for them, so I guess maybe there's some truth to this.

Scarab Sages

For over 200 years, Elgin Street in Bacup, Lancashire was the shortest street in the world.

Silver Crusade

Pope John Paul II was named an honorary Harlem globetrotter in 2000


{drags 8 legs across carpet and zaps the Tin Foil Yamakah} Some spiders use an electrostatic charge to leap into the air and balloon for miles. And their webs can reach toward prey to ensnare it.

Silver Crusade

"What the..." Injects wolfie with a custom concoction of opiates, psylocibin and vitamin C.

At least you will get a leg up on cold/flu season

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

....that Lafayette. (yes THE Lafayette of the American Revolution) was a Musketeer?


Spiral staircases often turn clockwise from the perspective of the person climbing them. The reason for this comes from medieval times, when castles would feature them that way in order to put invaders at a disadvangate: Since most people are right-handed, the stair turning left when climbing up (usually the position of the attacker) left them exposed to those climbing down (usually the defenders).


Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
Spiral staircases often turn clockwise from the perspective of the person climbing them. The reason for this comes from medieval times, when castles would feature them that way in order to put invaders at a disadvangate: Since most people are right-handed, the stair turning left when climbing up (usually the position of the attacker) left them exposed to those climbing down (usually the defenders).

This may have been true until the last few decades, but it certainly isn't anymore, at least in new homes the U.S. I've helped build dozens of wooden circular and spiral (and weirder) staircases for newer homes, and it seemed to be about 50/50... pretty much whatever struck the architects' and/or owners' fancy.

Silver Crusade

Among the buganda people of uganda, the widows of a deceased king have the honor of drinking beer in which the dead kings entrails have been cleaned in.

Shadow Lodge

Likewise, of the few houses I've been in that had spiral stairways, I recall more counter-clockwise than not.


4 people marked this as a favorite.
Ambrosia Slaad wrote:
Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
Spiral staircases often turn clockwise from the perspective of the person climbing them. The reason for this comes from medieval times, when castles would feature them that way in order to put invaders at a disadvangate: Since most people are right-handed, the stair turning left when climbing up (usually the position of the attacker) left them exposed to those climbing down (usually the defenders).
This may have been true until the last few decades, but it certainly isn't anymore, at least in new homes the U.S. I've helped build dozens of wooden circular and spiral (and weirder) staircases for newer homes, and it seemed to be about 50/50... pretty much whatever struck the architects' and/or owners' fancy.

Come back to me with that when the burgundian hordes have taken over your unstrategically constructed staircases!

Jeez. It's like people these days don't even care what happens to their demesnes anymore.


Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
Ambrosia Slaad wrote:
Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
Spiral staircases often turn clockwise from the perspective of the person climbing them. The reason for this comes from medieval times, when castles would feature them that way in order to put invaders at a disadvangate: Since most people are right-handed, the stair turning left when climbing up (usually the position of the attacker) left them exposed to those climbing down (usually the defenders).
This may have been true until the last few decades, but it certainly isn't anymore, at least in new homes the U.S. I've helped build dozens of wooden circular and spiral (and weirder) staircases for newer homes, and it seemed to be about 50/50... pretty much whatever struck the architects' and/or owners' fancy.
Come back to me with that when the burgundian hordes have taken over your unstrategically constructed staircases!

Nooooooo! Not the hordes!!


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Cabbage Guy wrote:
Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
Ambrosia Slaad wrote:
Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
Spiral staircases often turn clockwise from the perspective of the person climbing them. The reason for this comes from medieval times, when castles would feature them that way in order to put invaders at a disadvangate: Since most people are right-handed, the stair turning left when climbing up (usually the position of the attacker) left them exposed to those climbing down (usually the defenders).
This may have been true until the last few decades, but it certainly isn't anymore, at least in new homes the U.S. I've helped build dozens of wooden circular and spiral (and weirder) staircases for newer homes, and it seemed to be about 50/50... pretty much whatever struck the architects' and/or owners' fancy.
Come back to me with that when the burgundian hordes have taken over your unstrategically constructed staircases!
Nooooooo! Not the hordes!!

Oi! It is finally ze time to...!

<Disappears among the throng of burgundians>


Burgundian Horde Member #674 wrote:
Cabbage Guy wrote:
Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
Ambrosia Slaad wrote:
Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
Spiral staircases often turn clockwise from the perspective of the person climbing them. The reason for this comes from medieval times, when castles would feature them that way in order to put invaders at a disadvangate: Since most people are right-handed, the stair turning left when climbing up (usually the position of the attacker) left them exposed to those climbing down (usually the defenders).
This may have been true until the last few decades, but it certainly isn't anymore, at least in new homes the U.S. I've helped build dozens of wooden circular and spiral (and weirder) staircases for newer homes, and it seemed to be about 50/50... pretty much whatever struck the architects' and/or owners' fancy.
Come back to me with that when the burgundian hordes have taken over your unstrategically constructed staircases!
Nooooooo! Not the hordes!!

Oi! It is finally ze time to...!

<Disappears among the throng of burgundians>

Noooooo! They're after my cabbages!!


Cabbage Guy wrote:
Burgundian Horde Member #674 wrote:
Cabbage Guy wrote:
Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
Ambrosia Slaad wrote:
Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
Spiral staircases often turn clockwise from the perspective of the person climbing them. The reason for this comes from medieval times, when castles would feature them that way in order to put invaders at a disadvangate: Since most people are right-handed, the stair turning left when climbing up (usually the position of the attacker) left them exposed to those climbing down (usually the defenders).
This may have been true until the last few decades, but it certainly isn't anymore, at least in new homes the U.S. I've helped build dozens of wooden circular and spiral (and weirder) staircases for newer homes, and it seemed to be about 50/50... pretty much whatever struck the architects' and/or owners' fancy.
Come back to me with that when the burgundian hordes have taken over your unstrategically constructed staircases!
Nooooooo! Not the hordes!!

Oi! It is finally ze time to...!

<Disappears among the throng of burgundians>

Noooooo! They're after my cabbages!!

Regardez! Ze man has cabbages! Just what we need for our nefarious plans! Charge! Ch...!

<Gets trampled by the burgundian swarm>


Burgundian Horde Member #674 wrote:
Cabbage Guy wrote:
Burgundian Horde Member #674 wrote:
Cabbage Guy wrote:
Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
Ambrosia Slaad wrote:
Klaus van der Kroft wrote:
Spiral staircases often turn clockwise from the perspective of the person climbing them. The reason for this comes from medieval times, when castles would feature them that way in order to put invaders at a disadvangate: Since most people are right-handed, the stair turning left when climbing up (usually the position of the attacker) left them exposed to those climbing down (usually the defenders).
This may have been true until the last few decades, but it certainly isn't anymore, at least in new homes the U.S. I've helped build dozens of wooden circular and spiral (and weirder) staircases for newer homes, and it seemed to be about 50/50... pretty much whatever struck the architects' and/or owners' fancy.
Come back to me with that when the burgundian hordes have taken over your unstrategically constructed staircases!
Nooooooo! Not the hordes!!

Oi! It is finally ze time to...!

<Disappears among the throng of burgundians>

Noooooo! They're after my cabbages!!

Regardez! Ze man has cabbages! Just what we need for our nefarious plans! Charge! Ch...!

<Gets trampled by the burgundian swarm>

Oh no, not again.


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Klaus van der Kroft wrote:

Come back to me with that when the burgundian hordes have taken over your unstrategically constructed staircases!

Jeez. It's like people these days don't even care what happens to their demesnes anymore.

Yeah, like I could ever afford to live in any of the houses into which we installed stairs.

Scarab Sages

Turnips turn green when sunburnt.


Pathfinder Adventure Subscriber

The league system for football (the kind where you kick the ball into the goal rather than over it) in Sweden contains one team from outside the country's borders: Lemlands IF from the Åland Islands (in Finland).


4 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Subscriber

The Goths were a very pale ancient Germanic tribe who wore a lot of black crushed velvet and eye-makeup.

Scarab Sages

Moisture (not air) causes super glue to dry.


Butterflies can see more colors than humans can.

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