Help me become Immortal


Lost Omens Campaign Setting General Discussion


My character has a sole ambition, to live forever. Okay, two. To live forever AND remain beautiful. Becoming the next incarnation of Sauron or whatever is not her idea of a good time. Have you seen his nails?!? Ack!

I talked to my dm, and he told me to come here and ask about the different ways a character could attain immortality in Golarion. So here I am.

I was originally going to play a rogue, but he suggested I switch classes to bard instead, because that would help me doing research and stuff.

The character is pretty much open to anything, so long as it doesn't involve serving a deity. She's not particularly religious. She could hunt for the fountain of youth, find the elixir of awesome life-extendedness or something, or she could go in a totally different direction. She's morally flexible enough to be turned to the 'dark side' if tempted down that path; seducing men to steal their life force, that sort of thing.

Anyhoo, that's what she wants to do, and I have no idea how to go about doing it. I bought the pdf of the main book, but it's like three hundred pages long or something, and it'll take me forever to read it. But if there's something in the book, just point me to the right page.
You get a cookie if you can tie it in to the Runelords, cuz that's what we're going to play.

OH! Almost forgot!

I have one more question.
The dude who is the dm has this god-complex or something going on. He said his character from a different game became a god, and now, in this game, players get extra stuff if they worship is god-character. Does that sound weird to you? It sounds a little weird to me.

I'm really new to this, and keeps dropping all this lingo I don't get, b/c he's got 20+ years experience and blah blah blah. I haven't even been ALIVE that long.

Oh! and the game is on a forum. That's pbp right? See...I'm getting it.

peace!
~sara


Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber

Actually one of the easiest ways to achieve immortality, of a sort, that I've found is as a druid. They stop aging so there is your preservation of beauty and if you use the reincarnated druid archetype they essentially become unkillable (read that: They don't stay dead) at a meager 5th level. They worship nature so you avoid the whole worship your DM's god-character (which is weird). If you want to extend the benefits, the druid gains an animal companion... take a rat or a monkey and give it the same name as your DM's god-character. Most outsiders and undead can only be destroyed by violence and thus are essentially immortal. Monks eventually gain the outsider type.
Personally I think your DM is just trying to trick you into playing a bard... I don't see how that meets your goal.


Hmm..see, that's good advice! He could have said that with his 20+ years experience!

I don't want to sound ungrateful or anything, but I was kinda searching for something, I dunno, more mysterious. Maybe this is the wrong game for that sort of thing.
I pictured my character searching through dusty tomes for lost rituals of eternal youth, being tempted down all sorts of bad paths in order to enact said rituals, exploring how much she really wants it, ya know?

If you can live forever just by playing a druid, that sorta takes the fun out of it!

He mentioned in a PM to me that I could contract with all sorts of fiendish types, which sounded promising, until he started insinuating how perverted he could be. At least buy me dinner first. I'm kinda weirded out.

I'm thinking about dropping from the game now.


The nacreous gray sphere ioun stone stops your aging and you can no longer be magically aged but you still die when your time is up. You can also implant ioun stones:

SRD; Implanting Ioun Stones wrote:


Not all the secrets of the ioun stones lie with the Azlanti. While the First Humans mastered the intrinsic powers of the stones, uncovering new attributes and binding them to devices, the Thassilonians explored the interaction of ioun stones and the mind and body, and in time devised a means of implanting an ioun stone within the flesh. This process, originally believed to be irreversible, protected the ioun stone from harm and theft while still providing its full powers to the owner.

Binding a stone to a single owner is a lengthy process. To begin the ritual, the owner meditates with but a single stone in orbit around him. The body must be cleansed by fasting for a period of at least 3 days. If the fast is broken or interrupted, the process must begin anew. At the end of the fast, the owner makes a DC 20 Charisma check; taking 10 is not permitted on this check. Success indicates the stone has bonded with the owner, and may be implanted. Extending the fasting increases the chance of bonding with the stone, but the character may suffer the effects of starvation and thirst if he persists after several failures; the character gains a +1 circumstance bonus to the Charisma check for each full day past the third spent in fasting, to a maximum of +5. Failing the check means the owner must start over.

Once the owner establishes this bond with the stone, he can have it implanted in his body, which takes 1 hour. This requires a DC 25 Heal check (with a –5 penalty if the owner is the one performing the surgery) and a DC 25 Knowledge (arcana) check to succeed. Failure inflicts 1d6 points of Constitution damage and means the implantation process must start again. Success binds the stone on the surface of the owner’s skin in a location of his choice (usually the head, arm, or hand), where it becomes one with the owner’s flesh, deals him 1d2 points of Constitution damage (which he can heal naturally or with magic), and gives him the full benefits of the ioun stone. Once implanted, an ioun stone may not be sundered or targeted by effects and cannot be removed without the owner’s consent while he is alive (barring complete removal of the implanted body part).

Rumors exist of stranger, darker magics that allow spellcasters to channel spells through their implanted stones, or that cause the stones to shatter if the owner is killed, but those with any actual knowledge of these procedures are dead, hidden, or not talking.

...which makes it harder for it to be removed. As for living forever, that one is more difficult. Very carefully worded wish spells can increase your lifespan quite a bit, and as a 20th-level wizard you can take the Immortality arcane discovery to cover both bases.

EDIT: After reading your post about how your DM likes to pervert things, I'd stay away from the wish route.

Curse of the Crimson Throne Spoiler:
In this adventure path the Queen's whole endplot revolved around doing exactly what your character wants to do so that should give you an idea on the difficulty level involved. With her she had to sell her soul to a devil and then activate an ancient artifact which she was going to fuel with the deaths of thousands of people to achieve "eternal youth".


Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber

Well, it's not the wrong game for that sort of thing (It might be the wrong DM for that kind of thing). I was just thinking expediency. Numerous spellcasters research dusty tomes and forbidden rituals to become a lich... of course the beauty aspect of things tends to go by the wayside, but hell you could always cloak that with an illusion if you were a spellcaster (or get a Hat of Disguise). The world of Golarion also has a country that produces an elixir that extends life... an accomplished rogue with enough resources, moxy, and power could attempt to steal a draught or two, although it wouldn't be easy. The possibilities are endless and most don't require consorting with fiends (although you could if you want to, souls are enticing things) or horny DMs. Find another group that suits you, it is a great game. Hell if you lived in Virginia I'd add you to my group (you sound creative, devious, and character driven... which I enjoy in my groups). Best of luck.


Oh yeah! I forgot about the Sun Orchid Elixer.

Dark Archive

Or you could just take the living monolith prestige class.
At 10th level the become immortal and stop aging. They also get a massive boost in survivability with all their special powers.

Livng Monolith


That's funny. The bad girl from the Crimson Throne shoulda just taken that prestige class and have done. Woulda made things a whole lot easier :)

Well, I dropped from the game, on account of general GM creepiness.
If anyone has an online home for a mischievous bard, lemme know!


cmky wrote:

That's funny. The bad girl from the Crimson Throne shoulda just taken that prestige class and have done. Woulda made things a whole lot easier :)

Well, I dropped from the game, on account of general GM creepiness.
If anyone has an online home for a mischievous bard, lemme know!

Sorry to hear about the bad DM. There are good ones out there, just keep hunting.

[spoiler]The Big Bad Evil Guy (BBEG) of Crimson Throne is from the city of Korvosa, located in Varisia (land of wandering gypsies, ancient ruins, and feuding city-states). The Living Monolith prestige class is A) esoteric knowledge, B) from Osirion (pseudo-Egypt a continent away), and C) though one could work it to become a Living Monolith in Varisia, it would take some serious changes to the story aspects of the prestige class. The BBEG had her reasons for choosing her course of action and they served her well (until the PC's come and end her).

That being said, there are always other ways to become immortal in Pathfinder. Talk it over with your DM if you'd like to go "off the map" in terms of what can be accomplished by a PC. Maybe your character can start researching a powerful ritual that grant them everlasting youth. Maybe they will bind their body and soul to a large forest, keeping them young and healthy as long as they stay within the tree line. Or perhaps she can simply embrace vampirism. Anything you can imagine and your DM approves can be a great motivator and great fun for you.


There is always the Starstone test. Is it called the starstone, I can't remember, but that is how Cayden Caylean made it


Perform the rituals to become half(Demon) and choose a demon lord that doesn't go into the suggestive perverted stuff. IE avoid Nocticula and her brother by a berth of at least 3.2 miles.

Also, regular druids and monks don't get immortality they just avoid the affects of aging. You might consider Monk of the Four Winds. They get immortality or an Alchemist who chooses the unaging discovery.

Undeath and the Sihedron amulet might work. IT has a continual preserve corpse effect.

Shadow Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber

wizards can figure it out at 20th with one of the wizard research abilities from ultimate magic, an alchemist can select to be eternally young as his ultimate discovery making it so only death by violent means can take you (and you convert to young when you do it so don't worry about aging in the interim), a few of the oracle lines let you pull it with heavens, raksashas, and the genies immediately coming to mind. Remember though you gotta get to 20th to pull it off but in the right game with the right gm it can be soo worth it. In the interim I would ask if you have chosen to be an elf or not as the long life expectancy and lack of physical wear (they grow old but never look old) has crossed your mind as a racial choice?

Ohh also something to remember as a new player is that the things that you know about character classes and how they progress does not mean that your character knows them, to them this could be something new and foreign happening to them all the time. One example is like playing a abyssal sorcerer who has just awakened to her powers, though you know she will get claws and be able to summon like a mad man to her it could be this wholly new (and possibly terrifying) ordeal she is going through for the course of your adventures. This can really be said of any of the classes as well.


Actually, as Undead Revisited points out, becoming a lich is actually a very viable option, because as long as the lich in question keeps up with the habits of eating and drinking, they will retain their lively appearance. A modified regeneration spell could also be used to rejuvenate the flesh, especially when you get carved up.


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Dear Sir,

I write to you about a matter of utmost importance. I, Prince Tegresin the Totally Not Evil, have come into possession of eternal life but cannot withdraw on it from Pharasma's Central Bank of Such and Such at this time. If you would be willing to serve as a proxy in this matter I would share it happily with you, however I will need free access to your soul to totally not entrap and devour it. Please get back to me at your earliest pleasure sir.

>:)

... fiendish deals, always a classic way to go.


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Paizo Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories, Starfinder Society Subscriber
Vuvu wrote:
There is always the Starstone test. Is it called the starstone, I can't remember, but that is how Cayden Caylean made it

... and he can't remember, either ...

Grand Lodge

Alchemists can get it at 20th level too


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
ThatEvilGuy wrote:
Oh yeah! I forgot about the Sun Orchid Elixer.

The problem with the Sun Orchid Elixir is that it doesn't grant eternal youth. It functions much like the Druid Reincarnate spell in that it re-sets your (effective) age to young-adult or whatever.


For my necromancer I've been planning eventual lichdom, I was also thinking of combining this with a amulet that contains a few constant effect spells, such as gentle repose to prevent any rotting and also includes other similar style spells to keep a nice 'I'm still alive really' look.


Irnk, Dead-Eye's Prodigal wrote:
ThatEvilGuy wrote:
Oh yeah! I forgot about the Sun Orchid Elixer.
The problem with the Sun Orchid Elixir is that it doesn't grant eternal youth. It functions much like the Druid Reincarnate spell in that it re-sets your (effective) age to young-adult or whatever.

Consider that if you can afford it once, you can probably invest well enough to afford it again and again and again...

Once you start winning the aging game, it's not too hard to figure out how to keep winning.

Liberty's Edge

HappyDaze wrote:


Consider that if you can afford it once, you can probably invest well enough to afford it again and again and again...

Well, the people who sell it are devout Pharasmins, so they probably won't keep selling it to you forever.

But yeah, immortality is very doable if that's your primary goal.


Deadmanwalking wrote:
HappyDaze wrote:


Consider that if you can afford it once, you can probably invest well enough to afford it again and again and again...

Well, the people who sell it are devout Pharasmins, so they probably won't keep selling it to you forever.

But yeah, immortality is very doable if that's your primary goal.

I got the impression that the people that sell it don't care who they sell it to as long as it's not a Thuvian and they bid high. The quote was this:

“We are all children of Pharasma,” she said. “Our journey begins with birth and ends with death. It is something we should embrace, not fear. Let these foreigners shatter the path of fate, but let us accept what Pharasma has woven.”

So she encourages letting outsiders have access to the Elixir. Does it matter to the sellers if it's a few individuals repeatedly cheating fate vs. many cheating it once each? I doubt it.

Liberty's Edge

HappyDaze wrote:


I got the impression that the people that sell it don't care who they sell it to as long as it's not a Thuvian and they bid high. The quote was this:

“We are all children of Pharasma,” she said. “Our journey begins with birth and ends with death. It is something we should embrace, not fear. Let these foreigners shatter the path of fate, but let us accept what Pharasma has woven.”

So she encourages letting outsiders have access to the Elixir. Does it matter to the sellers if it's a few individuals repeatedly cheating fate vs. many cheating it once each? I doubt it.

Well, they apparently won't sell to Razmir (according to James Jacobs among others, as is being discussed in the Sun Orchid Elixir thread right now) so there's apparently some decision making based on the individuals involved as well. So, it's a grey area GM's call sorta thing, but after five or six times in a row, they might object. Especially if that results in a fun adventure of some sort.


Deadmanwalking wrote:
HappyDaze wrote:


I got the impression that the people that sell it don't care who they sell it to as long as it's not a Thuvian and they bid high. The quote was this:

“We are all children of Pharasma,” she said. “Our journey begins with birth and ends with death. It is something we should embrace, not fear. Let these foreigners shatter the path of fate, but let us accept what Pharasma has woven.”

So she encourages letting outsiders have access to the Elixir. Does it matter to the sellers if it's a few individuals repeatedly cheating fate vs. many cheating it once each? I doubt it.

Well, they apparently won't sell to Razmir (according to James Jacobs among others, as is being discussed in the Sun Orchid Elixir thread right now) so there's apparently some decision making based on the individuals involved as well. So, it's a grey area GM's call sorta thing, but after five or six times in a row, they might object. Especially if that results in a fun adventure of some sort.

Not selling to Razmir isn't currently in print. It's just JJ's opinion, one that often gets shot off quickly and seems rash when later examined. I'll put this one in there too.


I believe they don't sell to Razmir because he's a bully and they may know that he's masquerading as a God or don't believe his claims. He probably approaches them with, "I'm a Living God, you need to give me the elixir as is my right as a god" attitude and they don't appreciate it.

To the OP, sorry you dropped out, but some options for you to keep in mind is the Monk of the Four Winds archetype, the Living Monolith prestige class, the Reincarnated Druid archetype, and depending on the ruling of your GM at the time, the Immortality Arcane Discovery and the Eternal Youth Grand Discovery. I mention the last two as, technically, neither one of them stops one from dieing from old age as neither actually states you don't die of old age. They just state you no longer accumulate age penalties. So, RAW, they don't make you live forever, but your GM may allow it as that seems to be the RAI. The Druid archetype is similar in that it doesn't state you don't die of old age, but it does state that if you are killed (implying in combat) then you are reincarnated, and you are still susceptible to death effects, which don't allow you to reincarnate.

The Monk of the Four Winds is the best Immortality option from Paizo published material. If you're willing to use 3rd party material, there is also the Eternal template and the Pactbound Soul feat.


Not selling to anyone should only be done for one reason - the party in question attempted (successful or not) to break the rules of the auction. If Razmir attempted this in the past, then it would make sense for him to be banned, but otherwise it doesn't seem right to me.

Consider also that Razmir runs a rather backward country in the armpit of central Avistan. He probably can't reasonably compete with the economic powerhouses of Qadira (and the Casmaron Empire), Vudra (through Jalmeray), or even the 'fading' empires like Taldor and Cheliax and Osirion. The ruling parties of such places might be able to make offers that exceed the net value of all of Razmiran.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Three words: sun orchid elixir. Also, the alchemist class allows one to create an immortality serum that also stops them aging. Or, if you want to do it halfway: become a vampire. You'd have the "stay beautiful" part covered pretty nicely, and you are technically immortal, since unless you are actively killed, you never age. But then you'd also be undead, so you wouldn't really be alive...thus, halfway.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
HappyDaze wrote:

Not selling to anyone should only be done for one reason - the party in question attempted (successful or not) to break the rules of the auction. If Razmir attempted this in the past, then it would make sense for him to be banned, but otherwise it doesn't seem right to me.

Consider also that Razmir runs a rather backward country in the armpit of central Avistan. He probably can't reasonably compete with the economic powerhouses of Qadira (and the Casmaron Empire), Vudra (through Jalmeray), or even the 'fading' empires like Taldor and Cheliax and Osirion. The ruling parties of such places might be able to make offers that exceed the net value of all of Razmiran.

There's a more basic reason. If Razmir came openly shopping for the Elixir, it would be a flat out admission that he's no deity.

Now manipulating someone to try to steal it, now that would have interesting consequences.


LazarX wrote:
HappyDaze wrote:

Not selling to anyone should only be done for one reason - the party in question attempted (successful or not) to break the rules of the auction. If Razmir attempted this in the past, then it would make sense for him to be banned, but otherwise it doesn't seem right to me.

Consider also that Razmir runs a rather backward country in the armpit of central Avistan. He probably can't reasonably compete with the economic powerhouses of Qadira (and the Casmaron Empire), Vudra (through Jalmeray), or even the 'fading' empires like Taldor and Cheliax and Osirion. The ruling parties of such places might be able to make offers that exceed the net value of all of Razmiran.

There's a more basic reason. If Razmir came openly shopping for the Elixir, it would be a flat out admission that he's no deity.

Now manipulating someone to try to steal it, now that would have interesting consequences.

There's no reason gods can't shop, and besides the text for Thuvia implies that most buyers shop through agents.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
HappyDaze wrote:
LazarX wrote:
HappyDaze wrote:

Not selling to anyone should only be done for one reason - the party in question attempted (successful or not) to break the rules of the auction. If Razmir attempted this in the past, then it would make sense for him to be banned, but otherwise it doesn't seem right to me.

Consider also that Razmir runs a rather backward country in the armpit of central Avistan. He probably can't reasonably compete with the economic powerhouses of Qadira (and the Casmaron Empire), Vudra (through Jalmeray), or even the 'fading' empires like Taldor and Cheliax and Osirion. The ruling parties of such places might be able to make offers that exceed the net value of all of Razmiran.

There's a more basic reason. If Razmir came openly shopping for the Elixir, it would be a flat out admission that he's no deity.

Now manipulating someone to try to steal it, now that would have interesting consequences.

There's no reason gods can't shop, and besides the text for Thuvia implies that most buyers shop through agents.

Save that a proper God wouldn't have to be haggling for an immortality drug. It's right up there with "Why Does God Need A Starship?" If you read my text I said that he wouldn't do it OPENLY, which means he'd be keeping it a secret even from his agent.


LazarX wrote:
HappyDaze wrote:
LazarX wrote:
HappyDaze wrote:

Not selling to anyone should only be done for one reason - the party in question attempted (successful or not) to break the rules of the auction. If Razmir attempted this in the past, then it would make sense for him to be banned, but otherwise it doesn't seem right to me.

Consider also that Razmir runs a rather backward country in the armpit of central Avistan. He probably can't reasonably compete with the economic powerhouses of Qadira (and the Casmaron Empire), Vudra (through Jalmeray), or even the 'fading' empires like Taldor and Cheliax and Osirion. The ruling parties of such places might be able to make offers that exceed the net value of all of Razmiran.

There's a more basic reason. If Razmir came openly shopping for the Elixir, it would be a flat out admission that he's no deity.

Now manipulating someone to try to steal it, now that would have interesting consequences.

There's no reason gods can't shop, and besides the text for Thuvia implies that most buyers shop through agents.
Save that a proper God wouldn't have to be haggling for an immortality drug. It's right up there with "Why Does God Need A Starship?" If you read my text I said that he wouldn't do it OPENLY, which means he'd be keeping it a secret even from his agent.

It's unlikely that a high-level wizard would have trouble duping someone. It's not like he hasn't pulled off a grand scale deception already. Beyond that, he's got so many loyal followers (some of which certainly know he's not a deity) that he doesn't necessarily have to have an unknowing patsy do this task.

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