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gran rey de los mono wrote:
Sharoth wrote:
captain yesterday wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:
captain yesterday wrote:

My family insists on putting raisins in the stuffing.

I f#+!ing hate raisins.

No wonder you hate them.
The worst part is they act like I'm the weird one for hating raisins.
You do have a good raisin for hating raisins.
It's his raisin d'etre.

I am not sure if I have him fig-ured out.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber
Woran wrote:
Drejk wrote:
Woran wrote:

Ive been massively disapointed in american chocolate.

I mean, even your peanut butter is gross.

Even?

Especially.

Ok, I might not be fond of peanuts in the first place, except when salted and dry-roasted, and even then not that much.

Yes. Even. Because what you classify as bread, we would classify as cake.

So. Much. Sugar. Groooooooosssssssssssssssssssssssssssss

Hey now, I've seen The Great British Baking Show, Europeans eat some f$+&ed up s!+# don't act all high and mighty. :-)

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Maps, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps Subscriber

Milk chocolate - Dark chocolate - White chocolate in that order.

I like my coffee with some milk, but no sugar.

I dont really like tea.

Scarab Sages

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Maps, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps Subscriber
captain yesterday wrote:
Woran wrote:
Drejk wrote:
Woran wrote:

Ive been massively disapointed in american chocolate.

I mean, even your peanut butter is gross.

Even?

Especially.

Ok, I might not be fond of peanuts in the first place, except when salted and dry-roasted, and even then not that much.

Yes. Even. Because what you classify as bread, we would classify as cake.

So. Much. Sugar. Groooooooosssssssssssssssssssssssssssss

Hey now, I've seen The Great British Baking Show, Europeans eat some f#$~ed up s~#* don't act all high and mighty. :-)

Hey, the British claim a lot of weird things as food.

We dutch people just stick to a cheese sandwhich.


lisamarlene wrote:

This question is completely random, and will mean nothing to FaWtLers outside the USA, but I'm taking an informal survey related to a minor running joke in the book I'm working on.

The topic is Thanksgiving turkey *stuffing*, and the plot point has to do with pinatas and turkey farming and a protagonist with a screw loose, and we're just not going to go there right now.

I'm looking for a percentage of folks that go with what I think of as the "traditional" sage-onion-and-celery (or, more accurately, celery, onion, and "poultry seasoning"), and of those folks, the subset that add mushrooms. (My mother's family, for example, is staunchly pro-mushroom, and only sourdough croutons will do, but they had been in northern California since the late 1800's.)

If your family does something other than this, say with cornbread, or chestnuts, or oysters, or sausage, would you please say what the main ingredients are/were, and what region of the country your family comes from?

-.-

^.^
o.o
-.-

\_o_/


I just got weirded up by a person that I haven't seen in years PMing me on facebook with "what's up"...

Uh, a small talk? I can't really into small talk...

Advantage of facebook is that I don't have to respond immediately.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Drejk wrote:

I just got weirded up by a person that I haven't seen in years PMing me on facebook with "what's up"...

Uh, a small talk? I can't really into small talk...

Advantage of facebook is that I don't have to respond immediately.

The correct answer to "What's up?" is "The ceiling."


Drejk wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:

This question is completely random, and will mean nothing to FaWtLers outside the USA, but I'm taking an informal survey related to a minor running joke in the book I'm working on.

The topic is Thanksgiving turkey *stuffing*, and the plot point has to do with pinatas and turkey farming and a protagonist with a screw loose, and we're just not going to go there right now.

I'm looking for a percentage of folks that go with what I think of as the "traditional" sage-onion-and-celery (or, more accurately, celery, onion, and "poultry seasoning"), and of those folks, the subset that add mushrooms. (My mother's family, for example, is staunchly pro-mushroom, and only sourdough croutons will do, but they had been in northern California since the late 1800's.)

If your family does something other than this, say with cornbread, or chestnuts, or oysters, or sausage, would you please say what the main ingredients are/were, and what region of the country your family comes from?

-.-

^.^
o.o
-.-

\_o_/

Okay, here's a similar question for you, Drejk:

How many different ways have you seen people in Poland stuff the carp for Wigilia? Just on the expatriate Polish cooking listserves here in the States, I've seen variations on "traditional" recipes containing carrot, celery, and onion; recipes using mushrooms, recipes using apples and onion... it goes on.

EDIT:
I'm not actually asking for an answer, because smalltalk. :)
I'm just attempting to provide context.

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