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Liberty's Edge

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That's some great news, regarding severance, that is. Of all the people I've known to be laid off from a position only one of them was offered any form of severance pay and that was after my uncle threatened legal action as the dept he led wasn't actually eliminated but rather recreated/reformatted and in the process the company (A parts supplier and materials testing manufacturer for the big 3 automotive companies) took the opportunity to get rid of anyone who had been working there since the 90's and had accrued a nice legacy padding of pay raises on top of the yearly performance evaluation (It was % based so his yearly raise was MUCH higher than most others who hadn't been working there for 20+ years) to replace them all with fresh meat at half the cost, even for more highly skilled and educated techs. After a few months, they eventually relented and gave him something like 3 months' pay plus the cost of the legal representation he had to pay.

Everyone else I know who lost their job due to layoffs or a company closing up shop simply got their last paycheck plus the value of whatever PTO they had banked. Like many other things in this world, labor laws need a COMPLETE rewrite.


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Themetricsystem wrote:

That's some great news, regarding severance, that is. Of all the people I've known to be laid off from a position only one of them was offered any form of severance pay and that was after my uncle threatened legal action as the dept he led wasn't actually eliminated but rather recreated/reformatted and in the process the company (A parts supplier and materials testing manufacturer for the big 3 automotive companies) took the opportunity to get rid of anyone who had been working there since the 90's and had accrued a nice legacy padding of pay raises on top of the yearly performance evaluation (It was % based so his yearly raise was MUCH higher than most others who hadn't been working there for 20+ years) to replace them all with fresh meat at half the cost, even for more highly skilled and educated techs. After a few months, they eventually relented and gave him something like 3 months' pay plus the cost of the legal representation he had to pay.

Everyone else I know who lost their job due to layoffs or a company closing up shop simply got their last paycheck plus the value of whatever PTO they had banked. Like many other things in this world, labor laws need a COMPLETE rewrite.

The law is explicit. It's the easy workarounds that are the problem.

The TL;DR version of Federal law is that any company with over 100 workers has to give 60 days' notice or 60 days' pay for a "mass layoff or plant closing", where a "mass layoff" is 50 workers or more for small companies (150 workers or less) or 500 workers or more for larger companies.

Rather than a complete rewrite, I'd love to simply get rid of the minimums. If you let someone go without cause, you owe them 60 days' notice or 60 days' pay. Tech companies take that approach and it's an absolute expectation in the industry -- companies that don't pay severance don't get new employees, as it should be.

Word is that our layoff was well under the 500-person minimum. Yet Global Megacorporation did the right thing and paid severance. Because it's expected, and it would be a black eye for them if they didn't.


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Random thought of the day:

I'm unashamed to admit I'm addicted to the "Young Adult Romance Comic" Lore Olympus. But as in virtually ALL "Young Adult" content, almost all of the conflicts and issues could be resolved by people simply talking to one another.

Which, as I know, is very, very hard at times.

So what I'd love to see is these "Young Adult" series show the protagonists finally talking it out, realizing their errors, and resolving their conflicts.

Unfortunately, it's much easier to have them never speak to each other, letting the conflict fester and rot forever, because it makes for "better" entertainment.

But I do wonder what lessons young adults take away from such plots.

I'm a big fan of Aesop's Fables. Short, to the point, with a clear lesson at the end.


NobodysHome wrote:


I'm a big fan of Aesop's Fables. Short, to the point, with a clear lesson at the end.

They also cheat by taking both sides. Androclese lion and the frog and the scorpion have the same basic premise but consider the opposite lesson to be wisdom.

(I hug the scorpions and just run wild empathy off of con...)


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I just want clients and other businesses that come to us to actually listen and implement our advice.

Not saying they definitely will never get hacked, but in the last 6 months 4 businesses have come to us after a ransomware attack. In all four cases, they would not listen when we told them their VPN was vulnerable. In all four cases, the attackers got in through the VPN.

I'm not saying I'm definitely going to start a new "business" that "sells" cyber security "protection", but that sure is a pretty file server you have there. Be a shame if something were to happen to it...


Vanykrye wrote:

I just want clients and other businesses that come to us to actually listen and implement our advice.

Not saying they definitely will never get hacked, but in the last 6 months 4 businesses have come to us after a ransomware attack. In all four cases, they would not listen when we told them their VPN was vulnerable. In all four cases, the attackers got in through the VPN.

I'm not saying I'm definitely going to start a new "business" that "sells" cyber security "protection", but that sure is a pretty file server you have there. Be a shame if something were to happen to it...

It was a couple of years ago, but there was a wonderful article about how the vast majority of Amazon Web Services hacks and exploits were because customers never bothered to change the default settings to implement, oh, any kind of security whatsoever.


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Yup.

We've been begging our customers to allow us to put MFA on their VPN authentication. They keep saying no, because they think it's both a hassle and a waste of money.


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As a non techie customer

you don't want me to reuse passwords
you want me to change the password often
It has to have numbers and special characters
You have special rules about which special characters are or aren't allowed
No one will agree on which characters these are
EVERY page lies about which are required, allowed, or verbotten. You cannot pick a password from any websites instructions.

This means that we HAVE to use autofill or just reset from google every time. Which is itself a huge security risk but one that was set up in the search for security.

XKCD there are TWO keys.


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We normally have the door to the department open.

We closed it to keep the heat in.

Since then, four separate people have walked smack into it, some more than once, so Safety Limey has had to border it in hazard tape and stick a colourful sign to it saying, 'WATCH OUT FOR THE DOOR'.

Today, we also witnessed two individuals, old enough to know better, checking whether the squirty cream in the fridge was still OK or not by squizzing it straight into their gobs, then walking around with their pie-chutes overflowing with artificial dairy based dessert topping.

Still, some people pay a great deal to see stuff like that, so maybe we shouldn't complain.

Grand Lodge

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Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Pathfinder Accessories, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I have my browser suggest a strong password and store it for any site I don't use regularly. And some that I do.

It's not best practice, but best practice isn't practical. I rely on my accounts not being high value to protect them.


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BigNorseWolf wrote:

As a non techie customer

you don't want me to reuse passwords
you want me to change the password often
It has to have numbers and special characters
You have special rules about which special characters are or aren't allowed
No one will agree on which characters these are

EVERY page lies about which are required, allowed, or verbotten. You cannot pick a password from any websites instructions.

This means that we HAVE to use autofill or just reset from google every time. Which is itself a huge security risk but one that was set up in the search for security.

XKCD there are TWO keys.

You are going to set me off on quite the tirade, but I'll try to limit it to two points:

(1) Forcing users to change their passwords has been proven (many times) to decrease security because users will be far more likely to use easy-to-remember words or patterns.
(2) Anyone who claims to be a software engineer and then doesn't allow special characters should be relieved of their position. Without severance. The code to parse strings properly is borderline trivial.

EDIT: FWIW, Sonic.net allows every character I've cared to try, so my password is a roughly 50-character nonsense sentence complete with punctuation and one nonsense word. Easy to remember, easy to give to anyone else, never changes, and I dare anyone to try to crack that before any random 8-character string with a limited set of allowed characters.


NobodysHome wrote:

Random thought of the day:

I'm unashamed to admit I'm addicted to the "Young Adult Romance Comic" Lore Olympus. But as in virtually ALL "Young Adult" content, almost all of the conflicts and issues could be resolved by people simply talking to one another.

Which, as I know, is very, very hard at times.

So what I'd love to see is these "Young Adult" series show the protagonists finally talking it out, realizing their errors, and resolving their conflicts.

Unfortunately, it's much easier to have them never speak to each other, letting the conflict fester and rot forever, because it makes for "better" entertainment.

But I do wonder what lessons young adults take away from such plots.

I'm a big fan of Aesop's Fables. Short, to the point, with a clear lesson at the end.

Has it started updating after the hiatus?!

*clicks on the saved bookmark*


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NobodysHome wrote:
BigNorseWolf wrote:

As a non techie customer

you don't want me to reuse passwords
you want me to change the password often
It has to have numbers and special characters
You have special rules about which special characters are or aren't allowed
No one will agree on which characters these are

EVERY page lies about which are required, allowed, or verbotten. You cannot pick a password from any websites instructions.

This means that we HAVE to use autofill or just reset from google every time. Which is itself a huge security risk but one that was set up in the search for security.

XKCD there are TWO keys.

You are going to set me off on quite the tirade, but I'll try to limit it to two points:

(1) Forcing users to change their passwords has been proven (many times) to decrease security because users will be far more likely to use easy-to-remember words or patterns.
(2) Anyone who claims to be a software engineer and then doesn't allow special characters should be relieved of their position. Without severance. The code to parse strings properly is borderline trivial.

EDIT: FWIW, Sonic.net allows every character I've cared to try, so my password is a roughly 50-character nonsense sentence complete with punctuation and one nonsense word. Easy to remember, easy to give to anyone else, never changes, and I dare anyone to try to crack that before any random 8-character string with a limited set of allowed characters.

That's it. We need to start introducing haiku-passwords.


Drejk wrote:
NobodysHome wrote:

Random thought of the day:

I'm unashamed to admit I'm addicted to the "Young Adult Romance Comic" Lore Olympus. But as in virtually ALL "Young Adult" content, almost all of the conflicts and issues could be resolved by people simply talking to one another.

Which, as I know, is very, very hard at times.

So what I'd love to see is these "Young Adult" series show the protagonists finally talking it out, realizing their errors, and resolving their conflicts.

Unfortunately, it's much easier to have them never speak to each other, letting the conflict fester and rot forever, because it makes for "better" entertainment.

But I do wonder what lessons young adults take away from such plots.

I'm a big fan of Aesop's Fables. Short, to the point, with a clear lesson at the end.

Has it started updating after the hiatus?!

*clicks on the saved bookmark*

Yay! I managed to read decipher the name written in Greek letters! It's been a while. Or a few whiles. Or more like eighteen years...


Meep. That's the last new strip. Not a lot of comic binge, sadly.


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Drejk wrote:
NobodysHome wrote:
...my password is a roughly 50-character nonsense sentence complete with punctuation and one nonsense word...
That's it. We need to start introducing haiku-passwords.

I'm pretty sure that one of those same studies pointed out that, "Mary had a little lamb. Bwok! Bwok! Bwok!" is far more secure than any 8-character password in existence, and the user will NOT forget it.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Pathfinder Accessories, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

There's a lot of competing theories about it, with a password like that supposedly crackable with dictionary attacks thanks to it using full words. Really, any computer can crack a password with rapid calculations, the best defense is lockouts to prevent brute force attacks. But nothing is foolproof, we invent better fools faster than better security.


Drejk wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
Drejk wrote:
Against The Giants didn't have their swag, did they?
Are you talking about the D&D module, or the band?
I forgot that the band was named after a D&D module.

I'm honestly surprised that anyone else has heard of the band...


Limeylongears wrote:

We normally have the door to the department open.

We closed it to keep the heat in.

Since then, four separate people have walked smack into it, some more than once, so Safety Limey has had to border it in hazard tape and stick a colourful sign to it saying, 'WATCH OUT FOR THE DOOR'.

Today, we also witnessed two individuals, old enough to know better, checking whether the squirty cream in the fridge was still OK or not by squizzing it straight into their gobs, then walking around with their pie-chutes overflowing with artificial dairy based dessert topping.

Still, some people pay a great deal to see stuff like that, so maybe we shouldn't complain.

There was a study space in the Physics building at my old uni that was much quieter to work in than the main student lounge, but it was built around an old atrium, with the doors outside converted into an emergency exit only.

Apart from the usual decals announcing, “Alarm will sound on door opening,” there was also a separate warning typed and taped up on some printer paper … and still, by the end of my time at that school, instead of the nice double glass doors letting some more light in, they were papered over in increasingly desperate signs reading variations on, “No, SERIOUSLY, guys, the alarm WILL go off if you open this door!!!”

I mean, I get that the scientific method is all about empiricism, but I would think that building infrastructure is something that we’ve collectively more or less got figured out?
Unless there’s a secretive cabal that derives unholy glee from putting up unnecessary and/or false safety warnings on bits and bobs that I don't know about.


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We don’t talk about such things.


NobodysHome wrote:
BigNorseWolf wrote:

As a non techie customer

you don't want me to reuse passwords
you want me to change the password often
It has to have numbers and special characters
You have special rules about which special characters are or aren't allowed
No one will agree on which characters these are

EVERY page lies about which are required, allowed, or verbotten. You cannot pick a password from any websites instructions.

This means that we HAVE to use autofill or just reset from google every time. Which is itself a huge security risk but one that was set up in the search for security.

XKCD there are TWO keys.

You are going to set me off on quite the tirade, but I'll try to limit it to two points:

(1) Forcing users to change their passwords has been proven (many times) to decrease security because users will be far more likely to use easy-to-remember words or patterns.
(2) Anyone who claims to be a software engineer and then doesn't allow special characters should be relieved of their position. Without severance. The code to parse strings properly is borderline trivial.

EDIT: FWIW, Sonic.net allows every character I've cared to try, so my password is a roughly 50-character nonsense sentence complete with punctuation and one nonsense word. Easy to remember, easy to give to anyone else, never changes, and I dare anyone to try to crack that before any random 8-character string with a limited set of allowed characters.

My honest suggestion is to get a password manager - there are both free versions and paid versions. Remember one password for the manager, and remember the password(s) for signing into your physical device(s). The longer the password the better.

Have the password manager autogenerate random passwords and store them for everything else. Most password managers can be ran from multiple devices without extra cost, including phones.


Qunnessaa wrote:
Limeylongears wrote:

We normally have the door to the department open.

We closed it to keep the heat in.

Since then, four separate people have walked smack into it, some more than once, so Safety Limey has had to border it in hazard tape and stick a colourful sign to it saying, 'WATCH OUT FOR THE DOOR'.

Today, we also witnessed two individuals, old enough to know better, checking whether the squirty cream in the fridge was still OK or not by squizzing it straight into their gobs, then walking around with their pie-chutes overflowing with artificial dairy based dessert topping.

Still, some people pay a great deal to see stuff like that, so maybe we shouldn't complain.

There was a study space in the Physics building at my old uni that was much quieter to work in than the main student lounge, but it was built around an old atrium, with the doors outside converted into an emergency exit only.

Apart from the usual decals announcing, “Alarm will sound on door opening,” there was also a separate warning typed and taped up on some printer paper … and still, by the end of my time at that school, instead of the nice double glass doors letting some more light in, they were papered over in increasingly desperate signs reading variations on, “No, SERIOUSLY, guys, the alarm WILL go off if you open this door!!!”

I mean, I get that the scientific method is all about empiricism, but I would think that building infrastructure is something that we’ve collectively more or less got figured out?
Unless there’s a secretive cabal that derives unholy glee from putting up unnecessary and/or false safety warnings on bits and bobs that I don't know about.

My experience is a lot more varied. NY has a long history of silent alarms, cctv, and horny teens, so for awhile at my college at least there was a bit of a "you can't f##+ here" patrol, which resulted in people moving to specific stairwells away from prying eyes for carnal purposes that wouldn't set off alarms.


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It's a combination of bewildering, frustrating, and terrifying to fully clean out your pantry after 10 years of living with it:

The Bewildering: I found a paper lunch bag full of mayonnaise packets. Seriously. Around 1 cup of mayo in individual serving packets. Where did they come from? Why so many? And after so many years, do I dare even open one to see how bad they are?
There were a lot of others. I threw away over 100 ketchup packets, maybe 30-40 soy sauce packets, some random barbecue sauces, and other miscellaneous, "Well, the restaurant sent them home with us, so we should use them to avoid being wasteful, then we'll forget about them for eternity," items.
The other one that got to me was a sandwich bag full of Oreos. Why?

The Frustrating: We have four jars of paprika and herbs de provence. We have 6 bottles of red wine vinegar. We have 4 bottles of opened sesame oil. Because the pantry was so poorly-organized, we have a staggering amount of redundancy. I even have multiple bottles of rarely-used things such as Lee Kum Kee garlic black bean paste. I think we'll save more money not re-buying stuff we already have than from sinking the time into doing this purge.

The Terrifying: Canned goods with expiration dates over 10 years ago, rust-covered and that audibly pop when you open them. Botulism, much?

Ah, well, the work is almost done, and even Impus Minor gasped last night and exclaimed, "Oh my god! You cleaned the pantry! Nice job!"

Such is life...


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NobodysHome wrote:

It's a combination of bewildering, frustrating, and terrifying to fully clean out your pantry after 10 years of living with it:

The Bewildering: I found a paper lunch bag full of mayonnaise packets. Seriously. Around 1 cup of mayo in individual serving packets. Where did they come from? Why so many? And after so many years, do I dare even open one to see how bad they are?
There were a lot of others. I threw away over 100 ketchup packets, maybe 30-40 soy sauce packets, some random barbecue sauces, and other miscellaneous, "Well, the restaurant sent them home with us, so we should use them to avoid being wasteful, then we'll forget about them for eternity," items.
The other one that got to me was a sandwich bag full of Oreos. Why?

The Frustrating: We have four jars of paprika and herbs de provence. We have 6 bottles of red wine vinegar. We have 4 bottles of opened sesame oil. Because the pantry was so poorly-organized, we have a staggering amount of redundancy. I even have multiple bottles of rarely-used things such as Lee Kum Kee garlic black bean paste. I think we'll save more money not re-buying stuff we already have than from sinking the time into doing this purge.

The Terrifying: Canned goods with expiration dates over 10 years ago, rust-covered and that audibly pop when you open them. Botulism, much?

Ah, well, the work is almost done, and even Impus Minor gasped last night and exclaimed, "Oh my god! You cleaned the pantry! Nice job!"

Such is life...

What a waste.


I have started playing Prey (2017). It is soooo good.


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It's quite unbelievable that company that made such fine game later made Redfall...


Drejk wrote:
It's quite unbelievable that company that made such fine game later made Redfall...

Arkane Studios had a long and storied history of excellent games. Then they partnered with Bethesda to excrete Redfall. I have my opinion of where everything went wrong...


Actually, they partnered with Bethesda much earlier - apparently Dishonored itself was based on a Bethesda's idea, but was heavily redesigned by Arkane, and the latter were bought by company also owning Bethesda around that time—they managed to produce multiple great games (Dishonored 1, Dishonored 2, and Prey) despite that.

The Prey itself shows Bethesda logo whenever it starts.


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TriOmegaZero wrote:

I have my browser suggest a strong password and store it for any site I don't use regularly. And some that I do.

It's not best practice, but best practice isn't practical. I rely on my accounts not being high value to protect them.

I'm so broke..."Nigerian princes see my bank account and actually do leave money in it..."

Shadow Lodge

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I'm so anonymous, Google asks Jeeves about me.


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TOZ wrote:
I'm so anonymous, Google asks Jeeves about me.

that's carbon dating yourself.


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Carbon is the keyword there.


Quiet day.


Prepping the kids for finals, dealing with the Celica being unable to pass smog, and other nonsense is keeping me quite busy.

The "good" news is that the only place the Celica is failing is in its hydrocarbon emissions, and the catalytic converter is 27 years old. The mechanics recommended replacing it and seeing what happens. And old-school catalytic converters are 1/4-1/3 the price of modern ones.


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It is truly astonishing to me that the kids at DVC are suffering pretty much every mathematical indignity Freehold has been tirading about all these years.

Today was the infamous, "Solve this problem by starting off with the original definitions of everything. I know that wasn't on the study sheet or the sample exam or any of the practice study problems, but I expect you to be psychic and have written those definitions on the 3"x5" card I allowed you to bring into class."

(It was a simple physics thrown object problem and he didn't want the physics students to have an edge, so he insisted they write the and solve the second-order differential equation. Which is far beyond most first-year calculus students.)


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why does math suck, generally speaking? -- because most instructors are bad at it. (the instructing part, more than the math. perhaps. but i can't math enough to tell. none of it made sense past geometry.)


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It's the first of December, so the Christmas Fiends came howling into the office, nailing tinsel and wreaths all over the place, putting gruesome looking model Santas on every available surface, and hanging little shiny balls on every limb of our collection of rather shop-worn artificial trees. They were humming seasonal tunes to themselves while they did it, which might have been quite sweet if they hadn't gone quite so overboard with it all.

Also, one was walking around in a costume which you can wear that makes it look like you are a sack full of presents and Father Christmas is carrying you down a chimney. Unfortunately, Pere Noel's face, heavily bearded, was situated just below the stomach, and midway between both thighs. O dear.


Syrus Terrigan wrote:
why does math suck, generally speaking? -- because most instructors are bad at it. (the instructing part, more than the math. perhaps. but i can't math enough to tell. none of it made sense past geometry.)

Because math requires AN exact answer, it is MUCH easier to shut off the part of your brain that's supposed to be getting expanded and just do the mindless repetition part where this number goes there you do some basic arithmetic and the answer that you don't understand pops out there.

Because you won't use it, there's no incentive to do anything else.

If a subject can't be taught by 9/10 teachers, thats a problem with that subject.


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Hermione's godmother and her wife just found out that they've been approved for an infant adoption and the baby is due in three weeks!
It's been a four-year-long process, first with failed in-vitro, then all the rungs of the adoption ladder, so there is big excitement.
And they don't have *anything* ready yet.
They're going to start working on the nursery tomorrow.
They are going to be amazing parents.


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David M Mallon wrote:
We spent much of the day laying down mulch and sod at a small park downtown, and the architect laid out everything in a weird random pattern that necessitated my foreman going around marking everything out with paint on the ground. In one particular area that was going to be grass, he marked out in two-foot-high letters "<- SOD THIS ->"

The same joke, part 2: we had to drop off some empty pallets today, and one of the places we had to go has a big sign out front that reads:

[names of owners]
SODDING CONTRACTORS


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And this really explains my pantry in a nutshell.

Last night we ordered takeout from Troy Greek cuisine. As per local ordinance, they asked whether I needed any condiments or utensils. I replied, "No, I have everything I need at home, thank you."

The order included 13 ketchup packets and 11 little tubs of sauce. For 4 entrees. And all of those little packets and tubs went directly into the trash. (Try returning them to the restaurant some time -- it's kind of hilarious to see the employee reaction.)

Most places don't bother to ask. Around here they're required to ask, and they do, and then they ignore whatever you say and throw the packets in anyway.

And hence my pantry had a bag full of mayonnaise.


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NobodysHome wrote:

(Try returning them to the restaurant some time -- it's kind of hilarious to see the employee reaction.)

It's a health code thing. Nothings that's left the kitchen can go back there. They don't know if you're the one guy who put a razorblade in an apple back in 1983 and now parents have an excuse to steal check the kids candy for the next 100 years. So if it leaves their control it stays there.

But even a lawsuit is a million times more expensive than a handful of packets they buy in bulk, or the angry customer if they forget it.


BigNorseWolf wrote:
NobodysHome wrote:

(Try returning them to the restaurant some time -- it's kind of hilarious to see the employee reaction.)

It's a health code thing. Nothings that's left the kitchen can go back there. They don't know if you're the one guy who put a razorblade in an apple back in 1983 and now parents have an excuse to steal check the kids candy for the next 100 years. So if it leaves their control it stays there.

But even a lawsuit is a million times more expensive than a handful of packets they buy in bulk, or the angry customer if they forget it.

Oh, I know why they can't take them back. But the employees won't quote health code; they'll just look at you as if you're insane (which I probably am) and refuse them while looking confused. It's fun, but I hate to abuse retail workers in any way, so I've only done it twice, the second time because they gave me packets after I explicitly asked them not to.


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NobodysHome wrote:

And this really explains my pantry in a nutshell.

Last night we ordered takeout from Troy Greek cuisine.

Please tell me the takeaway cartons were shaped like a statue of a horse.


Limeylongears wrote:
NobodysHome wrote:

And this really explains my pantry in a nutshell.

Last night we ordered takeout from Troy Greek cuisine.

Please tell me the takeaway cartons were shaped like a statue of a horse.

You'd think. Plebians.


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NobodysHome wrote:
Plebians.

Given the context, wouldn't that be κακοί?


*Wonders what a statue of a horse is shaped like.*


David M Mallon wrote:
NobodysHome wrote:
Plebians.
Given the context, wouldn't that be κακοί?

That would do it. Or:

Βάναυσοι! Θῆτες! Φαῦλοι! Ταπεινοί!

And so forth.

Oh, and the one I was actually trying to remember: δείλαιοι! :)


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I think I'm doing to Doctor Who purgatory: Halfway through Season 6, and I definitely like the Second Doctor (Patrick Troughton) more than I liked the First Doctor (William Hartnell).

Doctor Comparison:
I think I mentioned that in Season 1 the First Doctor convinced me that he was the inspiration for Dr. Smith on the original Lost in Space: Cowardly, conniving, and using other people for his own purposes. As the episodes progressed, he became more of a kindly grandfather figure, but he still always came across as doddering and not particularly clever, relying on others ("Help me, Susan!") to figure things out. And while I realize that the actor was in slowly failing health, the sheer number of series where he chose to sit still and do nothing while his companions did all the work was pretty alarming.

The Second Doctor started off as annoying as all get-out (the Archer-animated episodes are all the more side-splitting because of it), but they portray him as a brilliant problem solver: Every series is him exploring and questioning and working things out until the moment he realizes everything that's going on, then he quickly solves it.

Yes, he could be Moe Howard's brother. Yes, he throws histrionics almost as often as the worst of the poor actresses who had to star in the early seasons. But I find him a more convincing, more satisfying Doctor than the first. (And I frickin' love Zoe. but she's a mathematician, so go figure. But then I liked Vicki, too, so I think it's just the strong female companions.)


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NobodysHome wrote:

It is truly astonishing to me that the kids at DVC are suffering pretty much every mathematical indignity Freehold has been tirading about all these years.

Today was the infamous, "Solve this problem by starting off with the original definitions of everything. I know that wasn't on the study sheet or the sample exam or any of the practice study problems, but I expect you to be psychic and have written those definitions on the 3"x5" card I allowed you to bring into class."

(It was a simple physics thrown object problem and he didn't want the physics students to have an edge, so he insisted they write the and solve the second-order differential equation. Which is far beyond most first-year calculus students.)

When I started my campaign against math they said I was crazy. WELL WHO'S CRAZY NOW?!?

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