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BigNorseWolf wrote:

The idle on the chainsaw just does not adjust down. both the ones at school and in the park liked to idle up enough to run the chain and play planes trains and automobiles if you left it running but didn't set the brake.

These days I just have a giant folding silky saw. Its way easier on my back, safer, and not that much slower than a cheap home chainsaw even discounting that its much faster to set up ( my neighbor and I had a tree drop on our fence and we were re enacting the paul bunyan race). Unless I need to turn multiple trees into firewood there's no point to prepping the chainsaw.

Yeah, I hate Stihl chainsaws. They break down constantly, and as you mentioned, definitely have a problem with the idle. A guy I used to work with cut the shit out of himself on a Stihl Farm Boss due to the aforementioned problem of leaving it running.

If I was in business for myself, I'd definitely invest in a Silky saw, but for whatever reason, companies I've worked for never seem to want to spring for one.

As far as chainsaw brands are concerned, I'm a fan of Echo saws (or just Echo equipment in general). All their stuff is light, fuel efficient, and tends not to break down much.


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Limeylongears wrote:
How long before a practical chain-axe becomes a reality, that's what I want to know.

Based on the historical documents, I would assume somewhere around the late 30th millennium.

Liberty's Edge

David M Mallon wrote:
Themetricsystem wrote:
(fun fact, gas-powered lawn care tools like leaf blowers/mowers account for 12% of all airborne carbon emissions in the US)

This isn't even close to being correct. Source

As for ease of use, speaking as a landscaping and lawn care professional, while electric equipment might be good enough for Harry Homeowner, compared with what's usually needed on the professional level, it's basically junk.

Yeah, you're talking about net greenhouse gasses, I'm talking about carbon emissions alone. If ya want a Source, here ya go.

Unless someone is clearing forests for logging or moving several 4+ acre plots of lawn without being able to take a 2-hour charging break in between there is no good reason to keep contributing to poisoning the earth, besides I have a feeling the small landscaping company he works for isn't felling major timber on any industrial scale.

At the end of the day though, the practicality concerns are totally valid and that's not something I think will ever really change given that lawns in general are almost certainly never going away despite how destructive and wasteful they are on the pollution and biodiversity side of things. People are just generally accepting that it's the norm and don't have any idea how much pollution their upkeep causes or how utterly damaging they are to nature. :(


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Themetricsystem wrote:

Unless someone is clearing forests for logging or moving several 4+ acre plots of lawn without being able to take a 2-hour charging break in between there is no good reason to keep contributing to poisoning the earth, besides I have a feeling the small landscaping company he works for isn't felling major timber on any industrial scale.

At the end of the day though, the practicality concerns are totally valid and that's not something I think will ever really change given that lawns in general are almost certainly never going away despite how destructive and wasteful they are on the pollution and biodiversity side of things. People are just generally accepting that it's the norm and don't have any idea how much pollution their upkeep causes or how utterly damaging they are to nature.

I don't know too much about the logging industry, but huge practicality concerns are definitely there on the landscaping end. In my experience, just for one example, a mid-grade electric string trimmer battery lasts, at maximum, about 20 minutes (with about one hour of charging time), and can come with a price tag of upwards of $300 per battery. And even were it not for the short battery life, they just can't compare to the reliability and horsepower of their gas-powered cousins. Not to mention the fact that the batteries themselves contain lithium and cobalt, which are pretty damn damaging to the planet all on their own.

If we're really looking for a solution here, rather than switching over to expensive, less-functional electric equipment, I'd put my weight behind an effort to get people to turn their lawns into gardens.


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David M Mallon wrote:
Limeylongears wrote:
How long before a practical chain-axe becomes a reality, that's what I want to know.
Based on the historical documents, I would assume somewhere around the late 30th millennium.

Starfinder weapon

chainaxe, granfordhuskybruks

Item level 8 unwieldy Advanced melee weapon. 4d8 slashing with the unwieldy property and severe wound critical ability...

price 12,000 credits (costs an arm and a leg)


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Themetricsystem wrote:
If ya want a Source, here ya go.

This isn't a comment on the validity of the article, merely an observation from experience: anyone who recommends Kobalt brand tools as a "quality option" needs to have their head examined.


David M Mallon wrote:
BigNorseWolf wrote:

The idle on the chainsaw just does not adjust down. both the ones at school and in the park liked to idle up enough to run the chain and play planes trains and automobiles if you left it running but didn't set the brake.

These days I just have a giant folding silky saw. Its way easier on my back, safer, and not that much slower than a cheap home chainsaw even discounting that its much faster to set up ( my neighbor and I had a tree drop on our fence and we were re enacting the paul bunyan race). Unless I need to turn multiple trees into firewood there's no point to prepping the chainsaw.

Yeah, I hate Stihl chainsaws. They break down constantly, and as you mentioned, definitely have a problem with the idle. A guy I used to work with cut the s*&# out of himself on a Stihl Farm Boss due to the aforementioned problem of leaving it running.

If I was in business for myself, I'd definitely invest in a Silky saw, but for whatever reason, companies I've worked for never seem to want to spring for one.

As far as chainsaw brands are concerned, I'm a fan of Echo saws (or just Echo equipment in general). All their stuff is light, fuel efficient, and tends not to break down much.

Good advice! I'll tell the boss about Echo!


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Fortunately for my particular job I just destroy grass, I don't fix it after I'm done.


After years of "guaranteed battery" in drills sawzalls etc never lasting more than a year i haven't moved to portable anything except drills. Everything else is either plug in or muscle power.


I don't know about the rest of Stihl 's products but I definitely prefer their chop saws over anything else I've used over the years.

The brand of tools I personally dislike the most is Husqvarna.


captain yesterday wrote:
The brand of tools I personally dislike the most is Husqvarna.

Hey, they're not all bad. For example, they used to make decent sewing machines. And the chains on their saws will stay on for at least thirty seconds before falling off or breaking.


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I've had my Husqvarna sewing machine since I got it second-hand in 1998. It's had one tune-up in all that time and I can't imagine wanting to trade up.


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lisamarlene wrote:
I've had my Husqvarna sewing machine since I got it second-hand in 1998. It's had one tune-up in all that time and I can't imagine wanting to trade up.

See? I know what I'm talking about at least 2% of the time.


captain yesterday wrote:
Good advice! I'll tell the boss about Echo!

Careful-- the backpack blowers will knock you on your ass if you don't plant your feet.


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David M Mallon wrote:
captain yesterday wrote:
Good advice! I'll tell the boss about Echo!
Careful-- the backpack blowers will knock you on your ass if you don't plant your feet.

With a backpack blower I had a big wig walk right into my path of work while I was wearing the full hardhat, mesh visor, and earmuff set up and get completely pig penned on their way into the building.

Boss went to yell at me for it. Instead of the obvious "you want me to see him in this get up?" I went with "I was told thats how you get ahead around here"

He tried 3 times to stop laughing to yell at me and couldn't.


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David M Mallon wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:
I've had my Husqvarna sewing machine since I got it second-hand in 1998. It's had one tune-up in all that time and I can't imagine wanting to trade up.
See? I know what I'm talking about at least 2% of the time.

Chirpy and upbeat is my standard response to dick-measuring. I thought the tone of the page was getting a little ugly.


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No, just a fun conversation about what brands suck for which particular kind of tool. I personally never even knew they made a sewing machine.


Funny coincidence - a friend of mine just posted a photo of an ad for a chainsaw or a trimmer (not sure) she saw.

Yeah, it's Stihl, MS 162, with the ad saying "It's your time"


lisamarlene wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:
I've had my Husqvarna sewing machine since I got it second-hand in 1998. It's had one tune-up in all that time and I can't imagine wanting to trade up.
See? I know what I'm talking about at least 2% of the time.
Chirpy and upbeat is my standard response to dick-measuring. I thought the tone of the page was getting a little ugly.

Dick-measuring? I'm so confused...


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David M Mallon wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:
I've had my Husqvarna sewing machine since I got it second-hand in 1998. It's had one tune-up in all that time and I can't imagine wanting to trade up.
See? I know what I'm talking about at least 2% of the time.
Chirpy and upbeat is my standard response to dick-measuring. I thought the tone of the page was getting a little ugly.
Dick-measuring? I'm so confused...

That's reserved for lunch time in the privacy of your own truck.


David M Mallon wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:
I've had my Husqvarna sewing machine since I got it second-hand in 1998. It's had one tune-up in all that time and I can't imagine wanting to trade up.
See? I know what I'm talking about at least 2% of the time.
Chirpy and upbeat is my standard response to dick-measuring. I thought the tone of the page was getting a little ugly.
Dick-measuring? I'm so confused...

I think that Lisa misread the tone of your exchange, mistaking your professional exchange about merits of different gear for trying to one up each other with what you have in work.


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Fantasy Monster: Buzzing Golem.

A golem made of bee hives.


Drejk wrote:

Funny coincidence - a friend of mine just posted a photo of an ad for a chainsaw or a trimmer (not sure) she saw.

I get it!


David M Mallon wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:
I've had my Husqvarna sewing machine since I got it second-hand in 1998. It's had one tune-up in all that time and I can't imagine wanting to trade up.
See? I know what I'm talking about at least 2% of the time.
Chirpy and upbeat is my standard response to dick-measuring. I thought the tone of the page was getting a little ugly.
Dick-measuring? I'm so confused...

You mean you weren't?


My Trash Bag Ninja costume is all ready for tomorrow. Whoopee.


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My neice has gone from football player to harry potter at the last minute.

Now i need a matching costume

Picks up stuffed dragon

hagrid costume set


Freehold DM wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:
I've had my Husqvarna sewing machine since I got it second-hand in 1998. It's had one tune-up in all that time and I can't imagine wanting to trade up.
See? I know what I'm talking about at least 2% of the time.
Chirpy and upbeat is my standard response to dick-measuring. I thought the tone of the page was getting a little ugly.
Dick-measuring? I'm so confused...
You mean you weren't?

Outside of a literal sense, I don't even know what that means.


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David M Mallon wrote:
Freehold DM wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:
I've had my Husqvarna sewing machine since I got it second-hand in 1998. It's had one tune-up in all that time and I can't imagine wanting to trade up.
See? I know what I'm talking about at least 2% of the time.
Chirpy and upbeat is my standard response to dick-measuring. I thought the tone of the page was getting a little ugly.
Dick-measuring? I'm so confused...
You mean you weren't?
Outside of a literal sense, I don't even know what that means.

It refers to situation when two or more men try to outdo each other by shows or stories of stereotypical manly behaviors - or ownership of things considered manly - like comparing owned cars/bikes, guns, paychecks, power tools.

Hypothetical Manly Drejk: Hey guys, look at this Chevrolet I bought!

Hypothetical Manly Dave: Chevrolet? How cute. *starts his Lamborghini*

Hypothetical Manly Cap: Vrrrom-vroom mother-flippers! *speed by in Ferrari*

Hypothetical Even More Manly Freehold: I need a new car...


"I was soooo bored. I had nothing to do aaaaaalllll dddddaaaaayyyyyyy."

Bull-f&!#ing-shit. Both dryers are stuffed (literally stuffed, like I'm surprised they were able to close the door on the one) full of towels waiting to be folded. And the washer is full of towels waiting to be dried and folded. So, no. You do NOT get to complain to me about having "nothing to do". You had work to do, and you chose not to do it.

I can't even complain to anyone (not that it would do any good if I did, anyways) because she's part of management.


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Drejk wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
Freehold DM wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:
David M Mallon wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:
I've had my Husqvarna sewing machine since I got it second-hand in 1998. It's had one tune-up in all that time and I can't imagine wanting to trade up.
See? I know what I'm talking about at least 2% of the time.
Chirpy and upbeat is my standard response to dick-measuring. I thought the tone of the page was getting a little ugly.
Dick-measuring? I'm so confused...
You mean you weren't?
Outside of a literal sense, I don't even know what that means.

It refers to situation when two or more men try to outdo each other by shows or stories of stereotypical manly behaviors - or ownership of things considered manly - like comparing owned cars/bikes, guns, paychecks, power tools.

Hypothetical Manly Drejk: Hey guys, look at this Chevrolet I bought!

Hypothetical Manly Dave: Chevrolet? How cute. *starts his Lamborghini*

Hypothetical Manly Cap: Vrrrom-vroom mother-flippers! *speed by in Ferrari*

Hypothetical Even More Manly Freehold: I need a new car...

I would just attempt to outrun the Ferrari with my Freeholdian speed.

Sovereign Court

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And I am so manly that I don't even need to participate in these sorts of things!

Spoiler:
I'm not actually very manly.


It's Parent-Teacher Conference Day!


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lisamarlene wrote:

It's Parent-Teacher Conference Day!

Call in dead. It's the only way to be sure.


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gran rey de los mono wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:

It's Parent-Teacher Conference Day!

Call in dead. It's the only way to be sure.

I did that once. They called me a couple of days later and asked if I was coming in that day.


Jurassic Bard wrote:

And I am so manly that I don't even need to participate in these sorts of things!

** spoiler omitted **

Also not generally the most flattering contest for reptiles


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HAPPY HALLOWEEN EVERYBODY


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gran rey de los mono wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:

It's Parent-Teacher Conference Day!

Call in dead. It's the only way to be sure.

Nah. I've already made one mom cry.

I wasn't being mean, I swear.


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So... how do I manage to die in ALL of Shiro's Call of Cthulu campaigns?

Yesterday's game was a classic (spoilered for length):

Call of Cthulu, Benny Hill Version:
Shiro gave us a softball scenario: We'd figured out the plot, grabbed the McGuffin, and were fleeing on a train at 100 mph as Cthulu himself (or a close facsimile thereof) pursued us. Questionable decisions and appalling rolls turns what should have been an easy, "We win! Waffles!" moment into one of the funniest scenes since Hi shot the rope holding up Whingey Wizard to save the rest of the party, and Whingey whinged about it for weeks. (Sacrificing other party members to save the world is a long-standing CoC tradition.)

Questionable Decision #1: The Fake Russian decided to go to the back of the train to try to use molotov cocktails and a revolver to deter Cthulu.

Of course, the thick fog that had been pursuing us the entire time started forming in the back of the train, and unearthly creatures formed between the Fake Russian and the rest of the group. I told the rest of the party we needed to separate the train cars to escape, but they didn't want to sacrifice the Fake Russian this early in the fight/flight.

Questionable Decision #2: The rest of the group, except for myself and GothBard (who had the McGuffin), raced into the back train car to engage the enemy instead of just getting the Fake Russian free, bringing him forward, and cutting the car.

At this point:
(a) The fog started materializing in the front car where GothBard and I were.
(b) Cthulu got a hold of the back car.

Hilarious Decision #1: Mama Cat "tested" the separation lever by pulling it "only once", severing the back train car.

Hilarious Decision #2: To purge the front car of the fog, I decided to break a forward window to let the high-speed air purge the car.

And then we get to the rolls:
(1) I rolled minimum damage on the window, failing to break it.
(2) I told GothBard to shoot it out. Since this was "movie physics" and I was next to the window, I had to make a Strength check to avoid being sucked out. I rolled a 78%, higher than the 55% needed, so I got sucked into the window. Since I hadn't failed catastrophically, Shiro ruled that my belt buckle caught on the window frame.
(3) Since I was outside the window, I had full vision of Cthulu. I made my sanity save to prevent instant permanent insanity, but then rolled a natural 10 on 1d10 and went temporarily insane.
(4) The people in the back had to make Dexterity checks to make it to the front car. They rolled a 92, then a 94, then a 95. All of them fell prone in the Cthulu car.
(5) Mama Cat tried to throw a fire hose across the gap to let the rest of the party climb. She rolled a 78 on her throw of 25, completely missing the trailing car.
(6) I had to make a simple strength check to get back in the car. I rolled a 00. My character tumbled out of the window, got swatted by Cthulu, then rolled under the train wheels.

And it continued. The Fake Russian couldn't roll under an 80 to make his Strength check. Mama Cat consistently failed her rolls to try to help.

At the end of the scenario, when all we had to do was stay in the front car to stay safe, we'd lost 3 of the 6 party members.

Epic.


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It really is a halloween horror movie.... lets hide behind the chainsaws!


NobodysHome wrote:

So... how do I manage to die in ALL of Shiro's Call of Cthulu campaigns?

Yesterday's game was a classic (spoilered for length): ** spoiler omitted **...

never once had fun with call of cthulhu. It's always been little more than killing everyone else in the party under the veneer of saving the world, usually in the most obnoxious way possible.


Freehold DM wrote:
NobodysHome wrote:

So... how do I manage to die in ALL of Shiro's Call of Cthulu campaigns?

Yesterday's game was a classic (spoilered for length): ** spoiler omitted **...

never once had fun with call of cthulhu. It's always been little more than killing everyone else in the party under the veneer of saving the world, usually in the most obnoxious way possible.

Pulp Cthulhu is pretty fun!


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Freehold DM wrote:
NobodysHome wrote:

So... how do I manage to die in ALL of Shiro's Call of Cthulu campaigns?

Yesterday's game was a classic (spoilered for length): ** spoiler omitted **...

never once had fun with call of cthulhu. It's always been little more than killing everyone else in the party under the veneer of saving the world, usually in the most obnoxious hilarious way possible.

FIFY.


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More seriously, CoC is in the same vein as Bunnies and Burrows: You're at the bottom of the food chain, every encounter is with creatures far too deadly for you to face head-on, so your only hope of survival is retreat, your only chance of victory is coming up with a clever way to retreat, and if one of your comrades decides to be heroic your duty is to take advantage of their foolishness to allow their death to buy you some time.

Definitely not everyone's cup of tea.


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NobodysHome wrote:

So... how do I manage to die in ALL of Shiro's Call of Cthulu campaigns?

Yesterday's game was a classic (spoilered for length): ** one of the funniest scenes since Hi shot the rope holding up Whingey Wizard to save the rest of the party, and Whingey whinged about it for weeks **...

This will never not be one of my favorite gaming moments EVAH.


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My pals, who started selling axes and have now diversified into selling mead and lightsabres, brought some of the lightsabres to Monday fencing. I fought a Large Man with dodgy knees with a blue one (he had a red one), and ended up using it like a rapier. It works OK, especially if your opponent is playing silly devils and just doing twurly wurly reverse grip stuff, but I'm not sure it's Jedi Approved.

Also, my Trash Bag Ninja costume was quite a hit, even though it was very unpleasant to wear, and was far too noisy to allow me to sneak up and eliminate someone silently with a rubber throwing star.


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NobodysHome wrote:
So... how do I manage to die in ALL of Shiro's Call of Cthulu campaigns?

a) How could you not?! That's Cthulhu!

b) ok, ok, you could go insane instead.


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Well, last night was a new low: We turned on the porch light at 4:00 pm (throughout my lifetime, the indicator that you're "open for business" on Halloween) and gave up at 7:40 pm after ONE knock (two adorable young girls). Two large groups of kids skipped over our house -- astonishingly enough, it seems that the modern approach is to be polite and not knock at houses that don't have Halloween decorations up. Who knew? Back in my day, you knocked at every house with a porch light on, and some few of them had cranky adults who said, "Go away!", but the large majority gave you candy.

So we're sitting here with 15 pounds of candy. If it were good candy, that would be great. But it's modern American candy.

As GothBard put it, "The modern Kit Kat bar tastes like sadness."

There's no longer any real chocolate in mass-produced bars. Whether it be Kit Kat, or Snickers, or Reese's, or Milky Way, the chocolate is nothing more than chemical-flavored corn syrup dyed brown.

We'll try to foist the candy off on the kids, but even they don't seem to appreciate it much.

(Dons Grumpy Old Man hat) Yet another example of companies reducing quality so much that I no longer consider their products usable/edible, yet they still make massive profits selling them, so somebody buys them. And I am sad for people with such poor taste buds...


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Usually someone stays home and we'll get a few kids.

This year I was lucky enough to stay home so I just put the candy in a bucket on the porch and left it.

I ended up going through about half of the 5 gallon bucket.

Either we have more kids trick or treating or those few kids made off like bandits.

Either way, I got to play Elden Ring interruption free and got rid of a good deal of candy.


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OK, I'll admit, my *ONE* complaint about early voting is that you can't do "vengeance voting". We got a robodial at 7:15 am this morning, waking GothBard. If we hadn't already voted, I'd've taken the opportunity to change my vote to vote against whatever the robodialer was selling.

Petty? Yes.

But it would feel really good doing it, and of all the propositions and candidates on the ballot this go-round, there's only one race where I care enough that I wouldn't change my vote to punish someone for robodialing in the early morning.


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captain yesterday wrote:

Usually someone stays home and we'll get a few kids.

This year I was lucky enough to stay home so I just put the candy in a bucket on the porch and left it.

I ended up going through about half of the 5 gallon bucket.

Either we have more kids trick or treating or those few kids made off like bandits.

Either way, I got to play Elden Ring interruption free and got rid of a good deal of candy.

Yeah, GothBard wanted to do the whole, "Leave out a bucket and lock the door," thing, but paladin: Doing that rewards the greedy, so I won't. I've never claimed not to have a giant stick up my butt about such things.

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