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*Gets dressed* Takes another hit for the team.


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Nylarthotep wrote:

Depends entirely on how it is taught. I write for a living. There are many times when what I write is judged by the client by volume and appearance rather than substance.

So, if the class actually teaches a variety of things:
How to add fluff without unnecessarily obscuring your message;
How to manage larger volumes of words to present a topic coherently; or
How to develop additional material from your references for inclusion to prove further a point

then it may have value.

If, however, those are not taught, then perhaps you do get meandering meaningless essays.

But there are real world use cases where volume may matter and being adept at generating volume is a valuable skill.

Wooooow... it's amazing that clients still do that.

I've been generating professional content for 18 years now (plus a dissertation before that), and no one has ever told me, "We're expecting this much length in pages, or these many words."

I've had, "I expect your course to fill a 6-hour session," but never a particular count.


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First and foremost, I can't believe I forgot to say it, but I'm praying for your mom, gran, for what it's worth. I just didn't SAY that earlier, but trust me, I was.

Anyway, I'm not sure about other states, but in Florida, colleges have a thing called the "Gordon Rule" - where one of their former senators had a daughter who graduated college and couldn't write a decent essay, so they legislated that X amount of words must be written before getting ANY degree (even a STEM degree), amounting to a mandatory set of minimum word essays. Heaven forbid that this lawmaker simply accept that maybe his own child was just inept - no, the rest of us had to suffer.

I'm sure something similar is in place in Cali, thus leading to the Imp's dilemma.

The irony is when I pointed this out to a professor, he doubled down insisting we weren't writing ENOUGH words, and gave us more, because surely throwing more busy work at people will lead to learning. (In a related note, this is exactly why I hate math - I used to love it, until I had homework piled on me - I never did a single HW assignment, got A's on my tests, and yet had a D in the class - so f@%& math)

Boy, did I learn to b@#&~~&+ extend my essays.

Young male child under the age of consent and adulthood, did this individual writing to you at this exact point in time absorb the knowledge necessary to falsely convey a sense of extension to otherwise completed assignments in order to solidify the requisite words.


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And yeah, gran! Good luck with your mom's recovery.

I could tell many tales of my own mother, but I can summarize her with:

- Climb a near-vertical talus-covered cliff face with a 45-pound pack on her 105-pound frame at 68? No problemo. (FWIW, this was a group of uber-experienced hikers and climbers and we made it 0.5 miles in a 15-hour day. It was... a bit steep.)

- Walk down the sidewalk in Seattle? Nope. Trip and an ER visit with a broken kneecap.

And she fully recovered and is still hiking at 88, so I figure your mom'll spend some time in discomfort (recovery is never fun), but on the bright side I'm sure she'll heal up just fine!


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NobodysHome wrote:
Nylarthotep wrote:

Depends entirely on how it is taught. I write for a living. There are many times when what I write is judged by the client by volume and appearance rather than substance.

So, if the class actually teaches a variety of things:
How to add fluff without unnecessarily obscuring your message;
How to manage larger volumes of words to present a topic coherently; or
How to develop additional material from your references for inclusion to prove further a point

then it may have value.

If, however, those are not taught, then perhaps you do get meandering meaningless essays.

But there are real world use cases where volume may matter and being adept at generating volume is a valuable skill.

Wooooow... it's amazing that clients still do that.

I've been generating professional content for 18 years now (plus a dissertation before that), and no one has ever told me, "We're expecting this much length in pages, or these many words."

I've had, "I expect your course to fill a 6-hour session," but never a particular count.

It really depends on what you are writing. Many publications have hard targets with tolerance of approximately 5-10%. Roleplaying publications can usually pad the book a bit with graphics, but decent graphics are expensive*, more expensive than text. Digital publications leave for more leeway, but they still usually aim at a specific page count because customers pay for content and might feel cheated if the promised big book is in reality a mere 32 pages-long booklet...

*at least taking into account that RPG market is abysmally tiny comparing to other branches of entertainment business, with whole RPG market world-wide having worth in the same order of magnitude as a single AAA-game or a blockbuster movie. EDIT: I mean 10-100 million range (x × 10^1 million), to be precise, not those insanely expensive pieces that go above 100 million.

And then, there is copywriting for purpose of search engine optimization, where the text needs to contain multiple references to the product that is pushed up in search rankings, while maintaining the pretense of being a readable text.


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The Vagrant Erudite wrote:
(In a related note, this is exactly why I hate math - I used to love it, until I had homework piled on me - I never did a single HW assignment, got A's on my tests, and yet had a D in the class - so f#@% math)

Duh. I am not hating math, but it might be exactly the reason why I hadn't learned more of it...


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Teaching writing is a very weird concept to me because I'm struggling to remember having it explicitly taught. So having a section of junior high this year is helping me with that, and it's kind of opening my eyes to how these page length requirements come about.

We're trying to drill into our 8th graders an expectation that a paragraph contains eight sentences, and I'm going to go format-happy to demonstrate:

They include a topic sentence. This is followed by a concrete detail. The detail is followed by two sentences of commentary. These sentences elaborate on how the detail reinforces the topic sentence. A second concrete detail is provided. As before, commentary sentences help. They give a little more depth. Conclude your paragraph by tying it all together.

Dogs make excellent pets. They are extremely friendly. This means families with children can have dogs without worrying. The dogs will get along well with them. They are also easily trained. This makes them less likely to make messes in the house. It also makes them good guards for protection. This is why dogs are great pets.

When I get them as juniors, I tell them to aim for 11 sentences - take the above outline but include a third concrete detail + commentary. These can be stretched by the integration of a direct citation because these are often longer than a sentence and now require an explanation of how they are relevant to the paragraph.

A bog-standard essay in MLA format will have 5 paragraphs. I tell my kids that their intro/conclusions only need to be about 3-4 sentences; they're just holding the door so the meat of the essay can get through. This gives 33 sentences in the body at minimum (three details to expand upon the three points in the thesis statement), approximately 40 sentences in the entire paper. Work in some text evidence, and you've probably got that up to 45, and none of it is padding. It easily gets you into the 3-5 double-spaced pages range without a wasted word, which I have found is usually enough space to start getting into some pretty good analysis.

But I've found that a lot of my kids hate using the outline I give them to build to this point. A lot of them are the same kids whose papers are disorganized messes. There's little willingness to try with the outline even with my tiny, menacing presence looming over themvaguely at shoulder-height to offer help.

I don't really know where I was going with this. Just sort of musing.


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Oh, I have hated the maths.

I have hated ALL the maths.

I STILL hate all the maths. Even though I usually have to do some (at least a little) every day. ;P

(You try running a stage without computing proper amp/voltage requirements, OR calculating the amount of weight needed to properly counterbalance an over-sized set piece at least ONCE a (working) day!)
;P


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Horatio, Claptrap Writer wrote:
It was an extremely dark and awfully stormy lunar cycle...

Destiny gasped deeply, breathily, loudly and suddenly, her full, red, plump, crimson, mobile, sensuous, enticing, beckoning lips parted, showing icy white ivory teeth like the snowy white tops of perfectly formed gum-mountains. The silvery, pale, delicate, twinkling, scintillating glow of the moonlight highlighted her sharp, sculpted, supermodel cheekbones and the exquisitely sloped bridge of her nose as she gazed longingly, yearningly, hopefully, melancholyly at the rugged silhouette that appeared in the open doorway...


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The best of wishes for your mom's recovery, gran.


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While I know opinions on Adam Ruins Everything vary here, I was trying to convince GothBard that there was nothing wrong with eating canned soup with an expiration date from 3 years ago, so I put on his episode of Adam Ruins Expiration Dates to prove my point. (My mother's an avid earthquake survivalist, so I've always lived by the rule, "If it's canned and it smells OK and tastes OK, it's fine, no matter how old it is.")

It turns out that:

(1) Yes, I was right: The USDA rates canned goods as storable "indefinitely"; until the can breaches or there's a fundamental chemical breakdown, properly-canned food lasts "forever".

(2) The more striking statistic, also from the USDA, was that 40% of all food purchased in the U.S. is discarded instead of eaten. I'm sure the restaurant industry has a lot to do with that (have you ever tried to eat even half of an entree from Claim Jumper?), but expiration dates are the other major culprit. "Oh! That milk expired yesterday! Don't drink it! It'll make you sick!"
(And Adam's take on that by drinking a half gallon of "spoiled milk" to point out that it tastes horrible but is utterly harmless delighted me, because I'm constantly telling the kids, "Moldy fruit can't hurt you. It can just taste nasty. So if it tastes OK, just eat it.")

Anyhoo... speaking of spoiled food, time to go shopping!


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NobodysHome wrote:

While I know opinions on Adam Ruins Everything vary here, I was trying to convince GothBard that there was nothing wrong with eating canned soup with an expiration date from 3 years ago, so I put on his episode of Adam Ruins Expiration Dates to prove my point. (My mother's an avid earthquake survivalist, so I've always lived by the rule, "If it's canned and it smells OK and tastes OK, it's fine, no matter how old it is.")

It turns out that:

(1) Yes, I was right: The USDA rates canned goods as storable "indefinitely"; until the can breaches or there's a fundamental chemical breakdown, properly-canned food lasts "forever".

(2) The more striking statistic, also from the USDA, was that 40% of all food purchased in the U.S. is discarded instead of eaten. I'm sure the restaurant industry has a lot to do with that (have you ever tried to eat even half of an entree from Claim Jumper?), but expiration dates are the other major culprit. "Oh! That milk expired yesterday! Don't drink it! It'll make you sick!"
(And Adam's take on that by drinking a half gallon of "spoiled milk" to point out that it tastes horrible but is utterly harmless delighted me, because I'm constantly telling the kids, "Moldy fruit can't hurt you. It can just taste nasty. So if it tastes OK, just eat it.")

Anyhoo... speaking of spoiled food, time to go shopping!

Actually, "spoiled milk", aka, soured milk is considered a perfectly edible food around here (though it's steadily loosing ground to various yogurts and other milk-based products that were rarer before nineties, unless one made them from milk oneself). My father loved it when I was kid, I hated it and don't expect that changed much.

EDIT: Also, the popularity of pasteurized milk pushed it away, because making sour milk requires non-pasteurized milk.

Molds are more complicated, because a lot of them produces toxins that might or might not be lethal, but unless you are microbiologist you are unlikely to discern them from the harmless ones.


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It's still a dick move to give someone three years expired canned goods as a Christmas present.

Yes, this has happened to us, more than once, each time from a different family member, on both sides of the family.


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I thought the issue at hand was that botulism carries no taste or scent?


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Freehold DM wrote:
I thought the issue at hand was that botulism carries no taste or scent?

So, I was going to vehemently contradict you, but there's at least one web site that corroborates your statement. Unfortunately, it's, "asktheexperts.com", while both Harvard Health and the Mayo Clinic indicate that you should check for a bulging lid or a bad odor. So, while the bacterium itself may not generate any odor, it generates gas (the bulging lid), and the more-reliable sites tend towards, "If it was industrially canned and there's no bulging nor odor, it's almost certainly OK."


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So wait, all I need to make a quick grand for a botox treatment is an old can of beans and a syringe!


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First world problems:

I have too many games and not enough time, strength, and computer power.
There are too many games and books I don't have that I'd love to play/read.
More games and books I'd love to play/read are coming at faster that I can even play/read.

So, what do I do about it?

...

Repeat the same zones in Lord Of The Rings Online, leveling my 9th and 10th characters... (not counting multiple characters on different servers that I stopped frequenting since I got all ten classes on my primary server)

And now I am installing Far Cry 4 to play it once again.

<.<
>.>

*sigh*

Have I mentioned that I could use a better computer to play more games more comfortably?

*eyes Impus Major's laptop*

He isn't really using it, is he?


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Ugh. Black Friday sale on Uplay...

Their shop is shi**y, though...


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NobodysHome wrote:
Freehold DM wrote:
I thought the issue at hand was that botulism carries no taste or scent?

So, I was going to vehemently contradict you, but there's at least one web site that corroborates your statement. Unfortunately, it's, "asktheexperts.com", while both Harvard Health and the Mayo Clinic indicate that you should check for a bulging lid or a bad odor. So, while the bacterium itself may not generate any odor, it generates gas (the bulging lid), and the more-reliable sites tend towards, "If it was industrially canned and there's no bulging nor odor, it's almost certainly OK."

why are you vehemently disagreeing? You really cant taste botulism, you can smell it sometimes, but if it is stored in plastic with a pinhole leak to allow the gases to dissipate over time, you really arent going to get much. It should also be noted senses of smell vary WILDLY from person to person.


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Freehold DM wrote:
NobodysHome wrote:
Freehold DM wrote:
I thought the issue at hand was that botulism carries no taste or scent?

So, I was going to vehemently contradict you, but there's at least one web site that corroborates your statement. Unfortunately, it's, "asktheexperts.com", while both Harvard Health and the Mayo Clinic indicate that you should check for a bulging lid or a bad odor. So, while the bacterium itself may not generate any odor, it generates gas (the bulging lid), and the more-reliable sites tend towards, "If it was industrially canned and there's no bulging nor odor, it's almost certainly OK."

why are you vehemently disagreeing? You really cant taste botulism, you can smell it sometimes, but if it is stored in plastic with a pinhole leak to allow the gases to dissipate over time, you really arent going to get much. It should also be noted senses of smell vary WILDLY from person to person.

I said I was going to vehemently disagree, because I was always taught the bulge/smell test, so I was under the impression that the botulism bacteria reeked. But apparently it doesn't, so I was incorrect.

But the whole, "Canned foods last indefinitely" thing is endorsed throughout my research, so I'm sticking by my guns there.


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11 GB out of 25 GB installed.

I should clean disk out of things I don't play...


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Aaaand installed!

System reboot to clear the memory of Chrome/LotRO mess and time to kill some royal army soldiers!


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"I'm going to save up for a publisher's license, so I can publish my own comic book" - Tiny T-Rex, entrepreneur.


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I'm just getting ready to go to the grocery trifecta (three grocery stores on four corners of Midvale and University avenues, the fourth store is a large antique store).


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Irony: I'm happy for the rain because it might finally allow my lawn to dry out.


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(Of course, I'm making the rash assumption that my uphill neighbor will stop watering during a rainstorm, but I could be wrong...)


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Our outdoor house is starting to look like an outdoor house.

Scooter is coming out to build the outdoor kitchen next week, Booger will be hooking up the electric after after that and then Sparky comes back to hook up the gas lines.

That's how you know someone is good at their job in the Midwest, if they have a nickname.

Edit: Full disclosure, I've been known by various nicknames myself since I was a toddler (as shocking as that might seem).


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gran rey de los mono wrote:

Been a day of ups and downs:

On the plus side, I had a good time at my Formula De game tonight. It was the final half of the final race of the season. I had two cars in the race, one started 1st, the other in 7th. My car that started in 1st won by a huge margin (over half a lap), and my car that started in 7th fought its way all the way up to 2nd. Wasn't good enough to snatch the championship away from the points leader, but still a good way to end the season.

On the negative side, my Mom is in the hospital. She and my Dad were grocery shopping today, and as they left the store, she fell. She may have tripped on something, I don't know, but she's also clumsy enough to have tripped over nothing. It's happened before. So she spent a couple of hours in the ER before being admitted for at least overnight. She has several small fractures in the bones in her face, broke her left humerus (upper arm), and may have also broken her right humerus. So, that's not good.

Gran, I'm so sorry. I hope your mother heals quickly.


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For completely coincidental reasons, my mother-in-law and I ended up having The Talk about medical decisionmaking this evening and the need to get her wishes formalized on paper.

Not the big scary extreme measures/end-of-life ones, but the "temporary setback from which you will likely recover but you're still in the hospital, in your eighties" medical wishes.

For her, this is a big deal, since (whether it's physiological or psychosomatic, the effect is the same either way) virtually every medication she's been prescribed for various ailments over the last twenty years has given her migraines. She's granola A.F. and we do NOT see eye to eye on many issues (she believes in homeopathy, for crying out loud), but the one thing she and I DO agree on is a person's right to make an informed choice. Which will very likely at some point put me in the position of arguing with a doctor, "Yes, you and I both know that she ought to agree, but she doesn't, so we're not doing this."

This really pisses me off. But I will do it anyway.


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~sighs~ I just found out today that one of my friends died last week. He had heart problems and some strokes. He was a nice guy and put up with me, so that is always a plus.


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LiSA x Eir Aoi | IGNITE + Rising Hope Sword Art Online theme music.


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Damn, Sharoth. That's rough. My prayers and best wishes for you.


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About to go home. Good night, everyone.


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*LAUGHS MANIACALLY*

You can have my silenced, scoped Z93 when you take it from my dead, cold, gunpowder-stained hands!

Now, after that short-short spend playing just to get the most basic gear I can go to sleep...

.
..
...

What do you mean it took five hours?!

Ah, well, at least I have a proper sniper rifle now...


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And a decent assault rifle *pats P416 after attaching a red dot scope on it*


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Sharoth wrote:
LiSA x Eir Aoi | IGNITE + Rising Hope Sword Art Online theme music.

Cute


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If you're ever having a bad day, just remember: You are a brain, piloting a bone mech, wearing meat armor.


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Yeah, but it's cursed armor that I keep trying to switch from heavy to light, that just won't let me.


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I posit that overweight men should be encouraged to wear kilts instead of pants. As a transwoman, I have the male body shape, and I have quite the gut. So, as many overweight men do, I have some degree of trouble keeping my pants up. That body shape just is not conducive to suspending a garment about the hips, and the only things that really work are wearing a belt so tight it's actually painful, or wearing suspenders, which come with their own set of difficulties.

The kilt, however, which I, as a mostly closeted transwoman of Celtic extraction, naturally own multiple examples of, fixes this. A proper traditional kilt (so, not a Utilikilt) goes around your natural waist, which is just above the navel. For someone my size, that does mean a particularly large garment (52 to 54 inches in my case), but the advantage is that this part of the body actually is conducive to holding up a garment, even on overweight men. You fasten the kilt up there, and, wonder of wonders, it actually stays up there. Without having to be painfully tight.

It just works in the "not showing off parts of your rear anatomy" department. Kilts feel like they fit in a way pants never do. Wear underwear, though. As far as we know, most modern Scots do when they wear a kilt, and if you don't, it'll chafe. "Being proper traditional" that way isn't worth it.


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My folks went to Scotland this Spring. They took a bus tour to Loch Ness. My Dad noticed the driver was wearing a kilt and said "I'm sure you get this all the time, but do you wear underwear with a kilt?" The driver responded by gathering the group, telling them to ready their cameras, and then pulling up the side of the kilt to his waist to show that was not, in fact, wearing any underwear.

Scarab Sages

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NobodysHome wrote:

While I know opinions on Adam Ruins Everything vary here, I was trying to convince GothBard that there was nothing wrong with eating canned soup with an expiration date from 3 years ago, so I put on his episode of Adam Ruins Expiration Dates to prove my point. (My mother's an avid earthquake survivalist, so I've always lived by the rule, "If it's canned and it smells OK and tastes OK, it's fine, no matter how old it is.")

It turns out that:

(1) Yes, I was right: The USDA rates canned goods as storable "indefinitely"; until the can breaches or there's a fundamental chemical breakdown, properly-canned food lasts "forever".

(2) The more striking statistic, also from the USDA, was that 40% of all food purchased in the U.S. is discarded instead of eaten. I'm sure the restaurant industry has a lot to do with that (have you ever tried to eat even half of an entree from Claim Jumper?), but expiration dates are the other major culprit. "Oh! That milk expired yesterday! Don't drink it! It'll make you sick!"
(And Adam's take on that by drinking a half gallon of "spoiled milk" to point out that it tastes horrible but is utterly harmless delighted me, because I'm constantly telling the kids, "Moldy fruit can't hurt you. It can just taste nasty. So if it tastes OK, just eat it.")

Anyhoo... speaking of spoiled food, time to go shopping!

Yeah, there are a few things I'll throw out when in doubt (raw meat), but mostly, experation dates are an approximation. Especially if something has been kept closed and dry.

Also, to have an expiration date, you have to back it up with research. So having a longer date will cost a company more money. So the shorter date, that they can easily prove 'the product is good up intill X' is cheaper for them.

Scarab Sages

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Drejk wrote:
NobodysHome wrote:

While I know opinions on Adam Ruins Everything vary here, I was trying to convince GothBard that there was nothing wrong with eating canned soup with an expiration date from 3 years ago, so I put on his episode of Adam Ruins Expiration Dates to prove my point. (My mother's an avid earthquake survivalist, so I've always lived by the rule, "If it's canned and it smells OK and tastes OK, it's fine, no matter how old it is.")

It turns out that:

(1) Yes, I was right: The USDA rates canned goods as storable "indefinitely"; until the can breaches or there's a fundamental chemical breakdown, properly-canned food lasts "forever".

(2) The more striking statistic, also from the USDA, was that 40% of all food purchased in the U.S. is discarded instead of eaten. I'm sure the restaurant industry has a lot to do with that (have you ever tried to eat even half of an entree from Claim Jumper?), but expiration dates are the other major culprit. "Oh! That milk expired yesterday! Don't drink it! It'll make you sick!"
(And Adam's take on that by drinking a half gallon of "spoiled milk" to point out that it tastes horrible but is utterly harmless delighted me, because I'm constantly telling the kids, "Moldy fruit can't hurt you. It can just taste nasty. So if it tastes OK, just eat it.")

Anyhoo... speaking of spoiled food, time to go shopping!

Actually, "spoiled milk", aka, soured milk is considered a perfectly edible food around here (though it's steadily loosing ground to various yogurts and other milk-based products that were rarer before nineties, unless one made them from milk oneself). My father loved it when I was kid, I hated it and don't expect that changed much.

EDIT: Also, the popularity of pasteurized milk pushed it away, because making sour milk requires non-pasteurized milk.

Molds are more complicated, because a lot of them produces toxins that might or might not be lethal, but unless you are microbiologist you are unlikely to discern them from the...

My grandmother drank a glass of sour milk, or 'karnemelk' every day.

I never liked the texture of it. I'm more a yoghurt person.


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Kilts were super popular in Seattle when we lived there, they have a pretty good kilt factory up there called Utilikilts.


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Woran wrote:
Drejk wrote:
NobodysHome wrote:

While I know opinions on Adam Ruins Everything vary here, I was trying to convince GothBard that there was nothing wrong with eating canned soup with an expiration date from 3 years ago, so I put on his episode of Adam Ruins Expiration Dates to prove my point. (My mother's an avid earthquake survivalist, so I've always lived by the rule, "If it's canned and it smells OK and tastes OK, it's fine, no matter how old it is.")

It turns out that:

(1) Yes, I was right: The USDA rates canned goods as storable "indefinitely"; until the can breaches or there's a fundamental chemical breakdown, properly-canned food lasts "forever".

(2) The more striking statistic, also from the USDA, was that 40% of all food purchased in the U.S. is discarded instead of eaten. I'm sure the restaurant industry has a lot to do with that (have you ever tried to eat even half of an entree from Claim Jumper?), but expiration dates are the other major culprit. "Oh! That milk expired yesterday! Don't drink it! It'll make you sick!"
(And Adam's take on that by drinking a half gallon of "spoiled milk" to point out that it tastes horrible but is utterly harmless delighted me, because I'm constantly telling the kids, "Moldy fruit can't hurt you. It can just taste nasty. So if it tastes OK, just eat it.")

Anyhoo... speaking of spoiled food, time to go shopping!

Actually, "spoiled milk", aka, soured milk is considered a perfectly edible food around here (though it's steadily loosing ground to various yogurts and other milk-based products that were rarer before nineties, unless one made them from milk oneself). My father loved it when I was kid, I hated it and don't expect that changed much.

EDIT: Also, the popularity of pasteurized milk pushed it away, because making sour milk requires non-pasteurized milk.

Molds are more complicated, because a lot of them produces toxins that might or might not be lethal, but unless you are microbiologist you are unlikely to

...

Sour milk is only good for one thing in the US, baking.


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captain yesterday wrote:
Sour milk is only good for one thing in the US, baking.

And PANCAKES! And waffles


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The Vagrant Erudite wrote:

First and foremost, I can't believe I forgot to say it, but I'm praying for your mom, gran, for what it's worth. I just didn't SAY that earlier, but trust me, I was.

Anyway, I'm not sure about other states, but in Florida, colleges have a thing called the "Gordon Rule" - where one of their former senators had a daughter who graduated college and couldn't write a decent essay, so they legislated that X amount of words must be written before getting ANY degree (even a STEM degree), amounting to a mandatory set of minimum word essays. Heaven forbid that this lawmaker simply accept that maybe his own child was just inept - no, the rest of us had to suffer.

I'm sure something similar is in place in Cali, thus leading to the Imp's dilemma.

The irony is when I pointed this out to a professor, he doubled down insisting we weren't writing ENOUGH words, and gave us more, because surely throwing more busy work at people will lead to learning. (In a related note, this is exactly why I hate math - I used to love it, until I had homework piled on me - I never did a single HW assignment, got A's on my tests, and yet had a D in the class - so f*~! math)

Boy, did I learn to b++$$*+* extend my essays.

Young male child under the age of consent and adulthood, did this individual writing to you at this exact point in time absorb the knowledge necessary to falsely convey a sense of extension to otherwise completed assignments in order to solidify the requisite words.

Fascinating history.


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CrystalSeas wrote:
captain yesterday wrote:
Sour milk is only good for one thing in the US, baking.
And PANCAKES! And waffles

Why would you pour sour milk on a pancake or waffle?


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber
CrystalSeas wrote:
captain yesterday wrote:
Sour milk is only good for one thing in the US, baking.
And PANCAKES! And waffles

I was rolling those in my definition of baking but I can see I was incorrect as they're made in a pan.

My mistake!


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Yes!!! Sour milk pancakes are DA BOMB!

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