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Memory AND nudity.


Scintillae wrote:
Vanykrye wrote:
One of the trends I've been noticing in our younger new employees - a definite lack of ability to use or build upon prior knowledge/experience, coupled with a seeming unwillingness to try.

Yep...it's pulling teeth to get some of these kids to extrapolate if an answer isn't explicitly laid out for them. Seems to be a lot of learned helplessness - if they don't figure it out, someone else will tell them what to do.

M

one thing that kind of leapt out at me from my tutoring years was the very real suspicion a lot of students had for teachers with respect to extrapolation- many viewed it as some sort of trick, especially when working with the lower charisma score teachers. Not that you or NH have low charisma scores, I was just going on memory.


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Freehold DM wrote:
Scintillae wrote:
Vanykrye wrote:
One of the trends I've been noticing in our younger new employees - a definite lack of ability to use or build upon prior knowledge/experience, coupled with a seeming unwillingness to try.

Yep...it's pulling teeth to get some of these kids to extrapolate if an answer isn't explicitly laid out for them. Seems to be a lot of learned helplessness - if they don't figure it out, someone else will tell them what to do.

M
one thing that kind of leapt out at me from my tutoring years was the very real suspicion a lot of students had for teachers with respect to extrapolation- many viewed it as some sort of trick, especially when working with the lower charisma score teachers. Not that you or NH have low charisma scores, I was just going on memory.

I'm not sure what the root cause is, just that it's a very widespread trend across my kids. If make them pull three things a character did out of the text, they'll do it. If I ask them to describe that character based on those actions, I get crickets. And if I go further and ask them to compare that character to a different character, hooboy.

It's so bizarre. They're very, very opinionated, but they by-and-large display no ability (or willingness, hard to judge at times) to form their own conclusions. Fear of being wrong, I suppose.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Scintillae wrote:
Freehold DM wrote:
Scintillae wrote:
Vanykrye wrote:
One of the trends I've been noticing in our younger new employees - a definite lack of ability to use or build upon prior knowledge/experience, coupled with a seeming unwillingness to try.

Yep...it's pulling teeth to get some of these kids to extrapolate if an answer isn't explicitly laid out for them. Seems to be a lot of learned helplessness - if they don't figure it out, someone else will tell them what to do.

M
one thing that kind of leapt out at me from my tutoring years was the very real suspicion a lot of students had for teachers with respect to extrapolation- many viewed it as some sort of trick, especially when working with the lower charisma score teachers. Not that you or NH have low charisma scores, I was just going on memory.
I'm not sure what the root cause is, just that it's a very widespread trend across my kids. If make them pull three things a character did out of the text, they'll do it. If I ask them to describe that character based on those traits, I get crickets.

This got longer than I originally thought it was going to be...

And similarly, in the "sciencey" side, you can't learn D without first understanding A, B, and C, in order. But when teaching D, and later E, a teacher has to teach on the basis that A, B, and C, and then later D, are all understood. When the kids, or employees, keep asking about steps A and B as if they haven't seen them all year...there is no progress.

In my work, besides being the surly and grumpy old IT guy that will sometimes point out all the ways in which you're clearly being stupid...which I've done today ("My monitor isn't displaying anything!" "You might want to turn on your computer. It works better that way.")...I do try to get people to learn the things they can do for themselves so that they don't have to rely on others and therefore don't just sit around wasting time. I know NH doesn't have a lot of good things to say about Microsoft products on the whole, but since Windows 95...aside from Windows 8/8.1...there has been a pretty good consistency for finding applications. Go to Start. All Programs...find what you want. Win 10 took out the All Programs step, and added a relatively decent Search feature (which gets hosed if your company has restrictive policies in place, but that's your company's fault, not Microsoft's). It's basically been this way for the last 20 years. In other words, it's not new technology. Yet, on a near daily basis, I have people swearing up and down that if there isn't an icon on the desktop for it, then it doesn't exist on the computer.

And yet phones are honestly no different, whether it's Android or iPhone, there's a central repository of all applications, and then there's what's on your main or extended screens of icons you've placed/moved around.

The basic principles are the same, Windows has been around a lot longer than smartphones, yet people just stare blankly at the computer.

The same thing with websites. For work related ones, they act like I can just go into some other company's website and play with the code until the site works as they think it should. Yet, if you ask them to do their Christmas shopping, they have no issues going all over Amazon or any other online shopping and get everything they need at the lowest price they can find, and if a site isn't working right they actually chalk it up to it being a problem with the site, and not something wrong with their own computer.

Complete disconnect.


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Freehold DM wrote:
NobodysHome wrote:
Freehold DM wrote:
Scintillae wrote:

Dear internet,

Please stop making video tutorials for everything. I understand that the visual aid is sometimes helpful, but I would prefer you just give me a printed set of instructions as I can read faster than your video can teach. It's even more annoying when it's to use a Google template because I have to keep tabbing over from what I'm working on and derailing my train of thought.

interesting.

People learn in different ways. It never fails to fascinate me.

That in and of itself interests me -- if you prefer to watch the video first before seeing the written directions, you'd be the first person I've met who's like that.

Admittedly, I hang around with engineers. But their response is always, "Give me the written steps so I can scan through them quickly and see how complicated they are and how much I need them. THEN, if it looks like the process is complicated, I'll track down the video."

I share Scint's hate of everything being video-ized these days. Especially news articles. I prefer the printed word first so I can see just what I'm getting into. If it's complicated, then I appreciate the video.

this worries me, as you have an advanced degree in math. What is teaching someone how to solve equations real time if not literally showing someone how to do something? Especially given the number of times teachers have told me "forget what the book says, do this"(which is also something nearly EVERY engineer I have ever met says in between breaths and heartbeats), to say nothing of the number of times errors have been caught in workbooks and written notes and the revolutions had to be staged in order to get the someone to realize that.

Teaching and self-learning are two totally-disparate things. It's why I continue to argue against recorded training, and point out that every study or feedback analysis shows that live, in-person training is far more effective than remote training is far more effective than video training, because determining what the student doesn't know is the second-hardest part of teaching. (Figuring out how to explain it in a way they personally will understand is the hardest.)

Both Scint and Vanykrye put it very well: If I am trying to learn how to change the battery on an iPhone myself, the *only* thing I need to know is how to open the case and whether there are any hiccups with removing the battery (for example, is it soldered in or do I need to provide an alternate power supply while I'm working?).
I can learn that by scanning a document in about 30-40 seconds.

If I'm stuck with a video, they first list all the tools you need. Then give all the precautions. Then warn you again how you're voiding the warranty. Then go sloooooooowly step-by-step through every agonizing bit of it. The shortest videos are at least 5 minutes; nearly 10 times as long as I need to spend.

I like to compare it to news: I "read" about 20-30 news articles in the morning. I open tabs with interesting headlines, scan the articles, pick out the key facts, and close the tabs. Typically again 30-40 seconds per article. If it's a video article, to get all the facts I have to watch all 3-4 minutes of the video, and suddenly my usual 15-minute news break becomes over an hour long. So I don't watch news videos.

The problem is, self-help should be referential; you should be able to go anywhere in the document to examine exactly the issue you have, and only the issue you have. Videos do not provide this service.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

Yay, I made it through the whole work day without any toes falling off.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Freehold DM wrote:
Memory AND nudity.

That's probably my favourite Rush album.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Limeylongears wrote:
Freehold DM wrote:
Memory AND nudity.
That's probably my favourite Rush album.

Pretty sure that was the alternate title for Hemispheres.


Freehold, I sent you a PM yesterday. Just FYI.


NobodysHome wrote:
Freehold DM wrote:
NobodysHome wrote:
Freehold DM wrote:
Scintillae wrote:

Dear internet,

Please stop making video tutorials for everything. I understand that the visual aid is sometimes helpful, but I would prefer you just give me a printed set of instructions as I can read faster than your video can teach. It's even more annoying when it's to use a Google template because I have to keep tabbing over from what I'm working on and derailing my train of thought.

interesting.

People learn in different ways. It never fails to fascinate me.

That in and of itself interests me -- if you prefer to watch the video first before seeing the written directions, you'd be the first person I've met who's like that.

Admittedly, I hang around with engineers. But their response is always, "Give me the written steps so I can scan through them quickly and see how complicated they are and how much I need them. THEN, if it looks like the process is complicated, I'll track down the video."

I share Scint's hate of everything being video-ized these days. Especially news articles. I prefer the printed word first so I can see just what I'm getting into. If it's complicated, then I appreciate the video.

this worries me, as you have an advanced degree in math. What is teaching someone how to solve equations real time if not literally showing someone how to do something? Especially given the number of times teachers have told me "forget what the book says, do this"(which is also something nearly EVERY engineer I have ever met says in between breaths and heartbeats), to say nothing of the number of times errors have been caught in workbooks and written notes and the revolutions had to be staged in order to get the someone to realize that.

Teaching and self-learning are two totally-disparate things. It's why I continue to argue against recorded training, and point out that every study or feedback analysis shows that live, in-person training is far more effective than remote training is far more effective than video training, because determining what the student doesn't know is the second-hardest part of teaching. (Figuring out how to explain it in a way they personally will understand is the hardest.)

Both Scint and Vanykrye put it very well: If I am trying to learn how to change the battery on an iPhone myself, the *only* thing I need to know is how to open the case and whether there are any hiccups with removing the battery (for example, is it soldered in or do I need to provide an alternate power supply while I'm working?).
I can learn that by scanning a document in about 30-40 seconds.

If I'm stuck with a video, they first list all the tools you need. Then give all the precautions. Then warn you again how you're voiding the warranty. Then go sloooooooowly step-by-step through every agonizing bit of it. The shortest videos are at least 5 minutes; nearly 10 times as long as I need to spend.

As demonstrated here, people learn in different ways. Try to force a way of learning on someone for whom that doesnt work, and its going to lead to tears.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

...and hatred of the subject. I used to DOMINATE math. Then I had two teachers in a row who thought homework by the pound was the way to go. I never took another math class again, beyond minimum requirements. I was going to major in engineering and I changed to a social science (i.e. useless field) because of those two b$@+@es. Nevermind I aced all the tests - because I refused to do homework I failed those classes. Stupid c$+*s.

I hope they're at my reunion so I can tell them that story. Maybe ruin their sleep for a few nights.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
The Vagrant Erudite wrote:

...and hatred of the subject. I used to DOMINATE math. Then I had two teachers in a row who thought homework by the pound was the way to go. I never took another math class again, beyond minimum requirements. I was going to major in engineering and I changed to a social science (i.e. useless field) because of those two b!$~@es. Nevermind I aced all the tests - because I refused to do homework I failed those classes. Stupid c+~&s.

I hope they're at my reunion so I can tell them that story. Maybe ruin their sleep for a few nights.

Thoughts of me wrapping my hands around whatever passes for math's throat and squeezing until whatever it considers its eyes roll into the back of what could be argued is its head- and then letting go, letting math catch its apparent breath, and then starting the process all over again, to a potentially ironic infinity, keep me so very warm on -20 degrees F nights that I don't need a blanket.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
The Vagrant Erudite wrote:

...and hatred of the subject. I used to DOMINATE math. Then I had two teachers in a row who thought homework by the pound was the way to go. I never took another math class again, beyond minimum requirements. I was going to major in engineering and I changed to a social science (i.e. useless field) because of those two b~~&~es. Nevermind I aced all the tests - because I refused to do homework I failed those classes. Stupid c+~%s.

I hope they're at my reunion so I can tell them that story. Maybe ruin their sleep for a few nights.

Speaking as the son and grandson of former teachers, I can guarantee they will not lose sleep over you not doing the assigned work a couple decades ago.

Also, calling them b and c over you not doing homework is not a good look, at the very least.

The Exchange

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You see, my aunt has a wooden floor. I like it, but the problem is when some wood was damaged due to neighbours below doing something to their ceiling, and the wood panels needed to be replaced, the person who did it su*ked - the boards were not aligned properly and were not aged well either, so after a while they shrank, and we had to call people in to put putty to cover it up. That's why I am a bit twitchy over the wood.

I don't like cold stone floors, and I can't get thermal heating on a pre- built house.


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Just a Mort wrote:

You see, my aunt has a wooden floor. I like it, but the problem is when some wood was damaged due to neighbours below doing something to their ceiling, and the wood panels needed to be replaced, the person who did it su*ked - the boards were not aligned properly and were not aged well either, so after a while they shrank, and we had to call people in to put putty to cover it up. That's why I am a bit twitchy over the wood.

I don't like cold stone floors, and I can't get thermal heating on a pre- built house.

The best flooring is the bitter tears of your enemies.

Well, maybe that's not quite right. But I'm sure it's the best somethingorother.


4 people marked this as a favorite.

Yeah, I have to admit, the people they hire to be high school math teachers have an unusual knack for generating hatred of the subject.

Albany is supposed to be in the top 10% of all schools in the state, public or private. But the school board has learned that many of the parents choose to opt out of any math classes at Albany High, and instead send them to a private school just for math.

And having carried Impus Major through precalculus now, I understand it.

His first teacher is well-known as the single-worst teacher of any subject at any of the schools. I have no idea how he keeps his job. Impus Major would come home utterly despondent because he didn't understand anything the teacher had tried to do in class. Fortunately, that teacher was a master of the homework assignment: The homework assignments were short, to the point, and clearly demonstrated exactly what the student was supposed to learn. I spent 15-20 minutes doing his homework with him, explaining it as we went and why we were learning it, and he got straight As.

He did so well that this year he's with the more "advanced" students with a different teacher. Apparently this teacher is better at explaining things, but his homework is appalling. I have a Ph.D. in math. One assignment recently took me 45 minutes, 35 of which were pushing buttons on a calculator. The problems were, quite literally, "Use your calculator to find log base 4 of 83."
For 40-50 problems.

Training monkeys is NOT what math homework should be about.

So Impus Major got a C on his first exam. He no longer does the homework. I do. And I show him the 2-3 problems that are actually important and work them with him.
On his second exam he got 110% -- not only 100% on the main exam, but the extra credit as well.

Because someone was teaching him, not piling work on him and expecting him to self-teach.


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NobodysHome wrote:
Just a Mort wrote:

You see, my aunt has a wooden floor. I like it, but the problem is when some wood was damaged due to neighbours below doing something to their ceiling, and the wood panels needed to be replaced, the person who did it su*ked - the boards were not aligned properly and were not aged well either, so after a while they shrank, and we had to call people in to put putty to cover it up. That's why I am a bit twitchy over the wood.

I don't like cold stone floors, and I can't get thermal heating on a pre- built house.

The best flooring is the bitter tears of your enemies.

Well, maybe that's not quite right. But I'm sure it's the best somethingorother.

angry bears.

The Exchange

1 person marked this as a favorite.
NobodysHome wrote:
Freehold DM wrote:
Scintillae wrote:

Dear internet,

Please stop making video tutorials for everything. I understand that the visual aid is sometimes helpful, but I would prefer you just give me a printed set of instructions as I can read faster than your video can teach. It's even more annoying when it's to use a Google template because I have to keep tabbing over from what I'm working on and derailing my train of thought.

interesting.

People learn in different ways. It never fails to fascinate me.

That in and of itself interests me -- if you prefer to watch the video first before seeing the written directions, you'd be the first person I've met who's like that.

Admittedly, I hang around with engineers. But their response is always, "Give me the written steps so I can scan through them quickly and see how complicated they are and how much I need them. THEN, if it looks like the process is complicated, I'll track down the video."

I share Scint's hate of everything being video-ized these days. Especially news articles. I prefer the printed word first so I can see just what I'm getting into. If it's complicated, then I appreciate the video.

I need everything in video. Write things down, like what to do to factory reset your phone, I won't get it. Upload a video, or at least a series of pictures and I'll be able to do it. Mainly because anything to do with tech I'm using UMD.

The Exchange

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Scintillae wrote:
Freehold DM wrote:
Scintillae wrote:
Vanykrye wrote:
One of the trends I've been noticing in our younger new employees - a definite lack of ability to use or build upon prior knowledge/experience, coupled with a seeming unwillingness to try.

Yep...it's pulling teeth to get some of these kids to extrapolate if an answer isn't explicitly laid out for them. Seems to be a lot of learned helplessness - if they don't figure it out, someone else will tell them what to do.

M
one thing that kind of leapt out at me from my tutoring years was the very real suspicion a lot of students had for teachers with respect to extrapolation- many viewed it as some sort of trick, especially when working with the lower charisma score teachers. Not that you or NH have low charisma scores, I was just going on memory.

I'm not sure what the root cause is, just that it's a very widespread trend across my kids. If make them pull three things a character did out of the text, they'll do it. If I ask them to describe that character based on those actions, I get crickets. And if I go further and ask them to compare that character to a different character, hooboy.

It's so bizarre. They're very, very opinionated, but they by-and-large display no ability (or willingness, hard to judge at times) to form their own conclusions. Fear of being wrong, I suppose.

I would agree with you. Literature is also subjective. All because you think Romeo and Juliet were a bunch of teens fueled by hormones and should get medicated doesn't mean your literature teacher will think the same.

Some will wax lyrical about their love over each other, but frankly I think both of them should have just gotten a life. There are more fish in the sea.

The Exchange

captain yesterday wrote:
Yay, I made it through the whole work day without any toes falling off.

We need you with all your toes!

The Exchange

NH wrote:

Both Scint and Vanykrye put it very well: If I am trying to learn how to change the battery on an iPhone myself, the *only* thing I need to know is how to open the case and whether there are any hiccups with removing the battery (for example, is it soldered in or do I need to provide an alternate power supply while I'm working?).
I can learn that by scanning a document in about 30-40 seconds.

Pictures on how to open the case, or it didn't happen. Yes, I'm that bad with tech.

The Exchange

I hates maths, it eats the thoughts out of my head - but the fault is mine because I just don't get it. Me no get no maths which makes me shudder on how I'm going to help my kids in the future. Probably point to husband.

Again probably when push comes to shove I probably did better at maths then he did at O levels.


Romeo and Juliet is boring as f%+#.

Macbeth, however - that's a damn good story. A man going mad over the guilt of murdering someone close to him, not for power itself, but for the power his wife desires...that's just good stuff.

Also, Wyrd Sisters was spawned from it, and not a damn Discworld novel was spawned off those two horny teenagers (one of which was 13, and the other 18, which is just gross).


Just a Mort wrote:
Scintillae wrote:
Freehold DM wrote:
Scintillae wrote:
Vanykrye wrote:
One of the trends I've been noticing in our younger new employees - a definite lack of ability to use or build upon prior knowledge/experience, coupled with a seeming unwillingness to try.

Yep...it's pulling teeth to get some of these kids to extrapolate if an answer isn't explicitly laid out for them. Seems to be a lot of learned helplessness - if they don't figure it out, someone else will tell them what to do.

M
one thing that kind of leapt out at me from my tutoring years was the very real suspicion a lot of students had for teachers with respect to extrapolation- many viewed it as some sort of trick, especially when working with the lower charisma score teachers. Not that you or NH have low charisma scores, I was just going on memory.

I'm not sure what the root cause is, just that it's a very widespread trend across my kids. If make them pull three things a character did out of the text, they'll do it. If I ask them to describe that character based on those actions, I get crickets. And if I go further and ask them to compare that character to a different character, hooboy.

It's so bizarre. They're very, very opinionated, but they by-and-large display no ability (or willingness, hard to judge at times) to form their own conclusions. Fear of being wrong, I suppose.

I would agree with you. Literature is also subjective. All because you think Romeo and Juliet were a bunch of teens fueled by hormones and should get medicated doesn't mean your literature teacher will think the same.

Some will wax lyrical about their love over each other, but frankly I think both of them should have just gotten a life. There are more fish in the sea.

Romeo and Juliet is about an impulsive rebound relationship between, by today's standards, a high school junior and an eighth grader.

Seriously, Romeo spends his first scene complaining how he just got dumped. So womantic.


At least those two dumbasses Darwin'd out with their drama-heavy b+*&!~##. If they were real people, the ending would just be a cleansing of the gene pool. Killing yourself over not being able to be with someone you met, what, a week ago? Ugh. Die then. The world does not need people like that.

I don't know what I hate more, the idiocy, or the needless drama.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

But man was it fun getting hand jobs in the theater to that movie.

As far as the movie goes I hear Leonardo DiCaprio was in it...


4 people marked this as a favorite.
Vanykrye wrote:
The Vagrant Erudite wrote:

...and hatred of the subject. I used to DOMINATE math. Then I had two teachers in a row who thought homework by the pound was the way to go. I never took another math class again, beyond minimum requirements. I was going to major in engineering and I changed to a social science (i.e. useless field) because of those two b~~&~es. Nevermind I aced all the tests - because I refused to do homework I failed those classes. Stupid c+~%s.

I hope they're at my reunion so I can tell them that story. Maybe ruin their sleep for a few nights.

Speaking as the son and grandson of former teachers, I can guarantee they will not lose sleep over you not doing the assigned work a couple decades ago.

Also, calling them b and c over you not doing homework is not a good look, at the very least.

Yeah I'm with VE on the homework thing, I had massive quantities of it too and it taught me to hate math for a decade after high school.

But the gender-specific invectives are unnecessary.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

Looks like this was our most profitable year yet!

I'd like to think Big (Slow) Pete had nothing to do with that.

Who is Mia and feared fired by the way.

I was kinda hoping to get him for snow removal.

"Here's a shovel!" "What do I do?" "Act casual" "Okay... Now what?" "Get in the truck, I'm done here!".

As you can see, I've had variations of Big (Slow) Pete before.


B~@@@! C$#*! F$+$er!

Man, so many words I've learned today!

Peace out, b%@*@es!

The Exchange

Hey guys, I’m going to Angsana Spa for a massage(60-90 min).
Which package should I go for – it’s before bedtime? I’m leaning towards Javanese… =P

Fusion

A blend of Thai and Swedish massage techniques to soothe all aches, unblock stiffness and enhance flexibility. Invigoration massage oil is used to uplift and refresh the senses.

Javanese

Adapted from ancient Balinese techniques, this deep tissue massage relieves body tension and promotes better sleep patterns. Harmony massage oil works to harmonise the mind, as music is to the soul.

Thai

Unwind to a delicate stretching of your body to improve flexibility, followed by Thai massage techniques of palming and thumbing, without the use of oil, on your meridian lines.

Dreams

Specially created for tired and worn-out bodies, this calming massage soothes tense muscles using warm Clarity oil, a blend of sesame and jojoba oil rich in Vitamin E.

Angsana

A signature massage created exclusively for Angsana Spa, to work on your body's key pressure points to strengthen inner qi or energy. Euphoria massage oil is used, which is ideal for the sensual and romantic soul.


Whichever that you think works best for you, I suppose.


captain yesterday wrote:

But man was it fun getting hand jobs in the theater to that movie.

As far as the movie goes I hear Leonardo DiCaprio was in it...

....You WHAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA?!?!?!??!?!?!??!


3 people marked this as a favorite.

Tired.

Youngest decided to have super-mushy poopy all weekend long. Stomach cramps, fevers, nasty, nasty back-end releases... all in one! Also, though he was "better," because he had a mild fever the night before, he had to stay home on Monday. Tuesday (today!) he returned! Woohoo! Freedom!

... and now my Eldest is having stomach cramps and those not-quite-barfs and cuddling a bucket. Wheeeeeeeeeeee~!


Stomach bug going around?


Clocking out. Good night, everyone.


Clocked in. Good evening, late nighters.


I forgot to grab the 5th book in my series before I went to work so I've finished the 4th and have no were to go :(

The Exchange

Eh. The weather looked like it was going to rain, so instead of running outdoors, I opted for a 30 min jog at 6mph on the treadmill, covering around 2.8 miles. A lot easier running on the treadmill. Usually at best outside I only get 4.6 miles, but again I run longer distances – we’re looking at around 1h outside. 3.6-3.8 miles, depending on the route, with some stop breaks inbetween at traffic lights or at the destination

At least sitting in the car and not really exercising(except for walking) in states hasn’t put me all THAT out of condition.

I did get stitches around the 10 min mark, but I sort of did the exercises to work out your stitches, then pushed on. After 20 min mark it was actually quite ok.

Also, badminton with colleagues later.


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... I need to exercise more... I need more free time.... I need to get payed more... Its a circle of PAIN.

The Exchange

Funny thing is I don't even feel the effects of my run now. Or maybe it'll catch up with me later...


You ran so fast you run hasn't caught up with you yet. Now that is impressive.


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Nekkid Vidmaster7 wrote:
*raises fist* solidarity!

Solid air titties? Where?

The Exchange

I hope it doesn’t catch up with me until I finish playing badminton with my colleagues. But really it sort of feels strange not to have any effects. Tomorrow it’ll be another busy day as we set off for our company retreat since I’m organising transport. I really should get the namelist printed out and put a small pen in my belt pouch so I can check the names as they show up.


Jack Al'Tradies wrote:
Nekkid Vidmaster7 wrote:
*raises fist* solidarity!
Solid air titties? Where?

Muad dib, Muad dib, Muad dib!


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I have another interview tomorrow.

It appears this is one that I can work enough hours to pay bills without losing medicaid. Hope it works out.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Good luck.


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The Vagrant Erudite wrote:

I have another interview tomorrow.

It appears this is one that I can work enough hours to pay bills without losing medicaid. Hope it works out.

F%*~ YEAH!

The Exchange

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Grats VE - hopefully it turns well for you.


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The Vagrant Erudite wrote:

Romeo and Juliet is boring as f$&@.

Macbeth, however - that's a damn good story. A man going mad over the guilt of murdering someone close to him, not for power itself, but for the power his wife desires...that's just good stuff.

Also, Wyrd Sisters was spawned from it, and not a damn Discworld novel was spawned off those two horny teenagers (one of which was 13, and the other 18, which is just gross).

All I remember about Romeo & Juliet is the Renaissance smack-talking and sword-brawling at the beginning.

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