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NobodysHome wrote:
The Game Hamster wrote:

I can understand the principle of needing a house code, especially in cities where a fire or something could spread rapidly, but denying a permit to a house owner on the grounds of not being a professional seems a bit illegal here in the US.

It would be a bit like saying you can't change your car wheel or brakes if you aren't a professional mechanic

Think "lawyer".

"Oh, yes. It's perfectly legal for you to change your brakes. You just need to apply for this permit."
"Oh, I'm sorry. Your permit was denied. No, we don't have an explanation. If you want, you can file an appeal and we'll get to it in 6 months."

Banning through red tape, rather than legal grounds.

Lawyers are a special kind of demon. Fortunately they hate getting whacked by a flaming wet mop.


Is it actually possible for Todd to be naked?
or that a special level of hell?


The Game Hamster wrote:
Vanykrye wrote:
The Game Hamster wrote:


Do you own your home?
I don't know how it works there, but they shouldn't really be able to do anything, or complain if you are...

Permits are an issue here too, for the very same reasons. The previous owner of our house was a retired contractor, so we thought certain things were done correctly but when we started investigating, well, not so much. And then problems started cropping up.

As far as whether or not the city/county/state can complain about changes done to a house by the owner...well...yeah, depending on where you live and what changes you're making, they absolutely can. It's very much subject to local laws more than at the state level, but it's also subject to what neighborhood you live in. Certain neighborhoods have additional by-laws describing exactly what you can and cannot have added to your yard, what colors you can and cannot paint your house, etc, etc, etc. In the neighborhood my dad lived in Indiana, he had to get his neighbors' approvals for building a deck on the back of his house (had to provide the plans to his neighbors, they had to sign off on it, etc), and the city laws stated it could not be permanently attached to the house because of the difference between "permanent structures" and "mobile structures". So even though he sunk the posts 6' into the ground, he attached it to the house with wood screws that were completely removable, therefore it was not considered a permanent structure and the city was satisfied.

I can understand the principle of needing a house code, especially in cities where a fire or something could spread rapidly, but denying a permit to a house owner on the grounds of not being a professional seems a bit illegal here in the US.

It would be a bit like saying you can't change your car wheel or brakes if you aren't a professional mechanic

Your argument is entirely valid. It really is with the analogy of vehicle brakes done incorrectly is a risk to others. It's also just not how it works. It's more like "Yes, you know how to drive a car, but you don't have a license so you can't, and nobody has lobbied the local governments to require separate licensing for automobile repair."

I ran electrical for additional outlets in a basement of a previous place I lived. None of it is permitted because I'm not a licensed electrician, even though it was completely up to code.


I get red tape. I really do. Getting something and being happy with the situation are two different things. I'll just continue to complain about stupid restrictions here in the corner.


NobodysHome wrote:
captain yesterday wrote:

Coworker is now afraid of dust, so he's at the doctor getting a lung exam and to be fitted for a super duper dust mask.

Considering I'd have to go clean shaven if I did that I opted out of it.

I think it depends on what you're doing. When I had to pull the asbestos-infested linoleum out of the kitchen, I did the full bunny suit and dust mask in spite of reading all the research that the particular type of asbestos included in linoleum had never been shown to cause any problems.

When I started knocking all the plaster and drywall out of the garage to try to make it habitable for Impus Major (still not even halfway done with that particular project), the plaster generated so much dust that I was happy to have the dust mask. The drywall was clean enough I didn't. So it was a "dust mask on, dust mask off" project...

EDIT: And before LisaMarlene yells at me again about not hiring her handyman, it's a big, "Where the money comes from" issue. Yes, we have a $100,000 HELOC for home improvement. But any project we pay for out of that fund has to go to someone who is:
(a) Licensed by the state
(b) Licensed by the city
(c) Granted a work permit by the city to do the listed work.
Albany is notorious for disallowing garage-to-bedroom conversions, so as long as I do the work myself I don't need a permit (I got into an argument with a former city clerk about this, but state law said that "owner improvements" don't need permits, so if the city's requiring permits for owner improvements I think they're on shaky legal ground) and I don't have to pay for it out of the HELOC.

So until it gets hopeless, I don't want to have to try to fight the city to get permits...

i would rather have you alive and whole than have 100000 dollars. Please dont take this kind of risk, friend.


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lisamarlene wrote:

Had my fourth interview with the school in Dallas this morning, and I now have an offer and a contract sitting in my inbox waiting for a decision.

Technically 3k annually less than my current base salary, but for fewer hours and a lot less work, responsibility and stress (just teacher. Not director, not admissions, etc.). Plus tuition is half of our current school, so it means more money in my paycheck.
I want to accept, but it's a family decision.

warm, lisamarlene decision supportive hugs


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The Game Hamster wrote:

also, since I have a steady job now, I may be back for good?

maybe.
we will see.

WOOOOOOOOOOOOO


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Welp, I'm headed to my local laundry-mat.
I wish I had any credit at all, because then I could actually get a credit card for stuff like that.
aka: I wish I had a financial history so that I could make poor decisions with my money right now.


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NobodysHome wrote:

And as long as I have a couple of minutes, permitting is another one of those "intent of the law" vs. "how the law is enforced" things that drive me crazy.

I love permitting laws because I am living in a house where a previous owner did utterly incompetent, unpermitted work. Every time I open a wall I find a new horror story. I would absolutely, positively happily get permits for all of my work if all it was was:
"Here's what I want to do."
"OK. That'll be $120."
"OK. I'm done. Please inspect it."
"OK. Looks good. It's signed off."

Instead the entire process has been subverted into supporting political causes, the construction industry, the licensing industry, and so forth.
"Here's what I want to do."
"Nope. You're not a licensed electrician. You're not allowed to do that work."
"But I have a degree in physics from U.C. Berkeley, I've been building computers for 20 years now, and I'm actually planning on using higher-end components for every aspect of the circuit. Just have your guy inspect it at the end and he'll agree that it meets all modern coding standards."
"Nope. You don't have a license. Doesn't matter how well you do it. You're not allowed to."
...
"Well, can I at least drywall my garage?"
"Nope. We don't want people subletting rooms, so instead of making that illegal, we'll disallow any construction instead. So we're just going to deny any permits that would make the garage habitable, because we can."

Such attitudes turn most everyday homeowners into lawbreakers.

All I want is an insulated garage with lights and outlets. The city won't allow it because they suspect I may someday rent it out, so they make it illegal. And thus I'm a lawbreaker, even though I don't want to be one.

Feh.

pats chaotic seat next to him

Pull up this here chair, friend...


The Game Hamster wrote:
Vanykrye wrote:
The Game Hamster wrote:


Do you own your home?
I don't know how it works there, but they shouldn't really be able to do anything, or complain if you are...

Permits are an issue here too, for the very same reasons. The previous owner of our house was a retired contractor, so we thought certain things were done correctly but when we started investigating, well, not so much. And then problems started cropping up.

As far as whether or not the city/county/state can complain about changes done to a house by the owner...well...yeah, depending on where you live and what changes you're making, they absolutely can. It's very much subject to local laws more than at the state level, but it's also subject to what neighborhood you live in. Certain neighborhoods have additional by-laws describing exactly what you can and cannot have added to your yard, what colors you can and cannot paint your house, etc, etc, etc. In the neighborhood my dad lived in Indiana, he had to get his neighbors' approvals for building a deck on the back of his house (had to provide the plans to his neighbors, they had to sign off on it, etc), and the city laws stated it could not be permanently attached to the house because of the difference between "permanent structures" and "mobile structures". So even though he sunk the posts 6' into the ground, he attached it to the house with wood screws that were completely removable, therefore it was not considered a permanent structure and the city was satisfied.

I can understand the principle of needing a house code, especially in cities where a fire or something could spread rapidly, but denying a permit to a house owner on the grounds of not being a professional seems a bit illegal here in the US.

It would be a bit like saying you can't change your car wheel or brakes if you aren't a professional mechanic

i believe this depends on the state you live in.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

Building wall number 2 today, no pillars I gotta butt up against so should be easier.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

"I keep expecting Elon Musk to put on a suit and save Hawaii like Tony Stark" -Coworker, getting sidetracked talking about electric cars.


The Game Hamster wrote:

Welp, I'm headed to my local laundry-mat.

I wish I had any credit at all, because then I could actually get a credit card for stuff like that.
aka: I wish I had a financial history so that I could make poor decisions with my money right now.

about to walk out of the house when I realized I looked like the poster child for the Emo groups. Black pants, black tee, black button-up.

But it's Laundry-day, and what I've got, so...
I supposed my relatively short brown hair with blondish highlights helps a little. well that and my distinct lack of makeup


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As long as they aren't skinny jeans that are two sizes too small you should be fine.

Unless you're wearing a The Cure T-shirt, then you're screwed either way.


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Freehold DM wrote:
i would rather have you alive and whole than have 100000 dollars. Please dont take this kind of risk, friend.

LOL. I'm not sure whether to appreciate the kindness, or question just HOW incompetent you think I am that I'm going to seriously injure myself insulating and drywalling my garage.

That drywall, it can be deadly! Especially when wet!


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

Back to work! The wall won't build itself.


Cap'n Zoolander, FaWtLy Fashion wrote:

As long as they aren't skinny jeans that are two sizes too small you should be fine.

Unless you're wearing a The Cure T-shirt, then you're screwed either way.

No cure T-shirts over here, but I will be playing on their pin-ball machines since the mrs. Pac-man is out of commision.


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NobodysHome wrote:
Freehold DM wrote:
i would rather have you alive and whole than have 100000 dollars. Please dont take this kind of risk, friend.

LOL. I'm not sure whether to appreciate the kindness, or question just HOW incompetent you think I am that I'm going to seriously injure myself insulating and drywalling my garage.

That drywall, it can be deadly! Especially when wet!

Pictures NH rolling around, screaming on the ground, terminally wrapped in insulation, with a drywall sheet lying on top of him.

Points and laughs...


*itches just thinking about getting wrapped in insulation*


The Game Hamster wrote:
*itches just thinking about getting wrapped in insulation*

Because this is for a "living" space I'm using the denim stuff. You can put it in a huge pile and roll around in it, and it's actually quite comfy.

The fiberglass stuff is for attics and other non-living spaces. It vents toxic fumes.


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Or even better, he's using spray-in insulation, and the gun is just locked in the on position, there's a person-sized lump on the floor partially covered in spray foam, and the gun is just flying around the room like an out of control balloon...

While I was typing this amusing (to me, at any rate) little vignette up, the secretary called one of my techs to have him come down and close the paper drawer on her printer for her. The complete lack of self-sufficiency astounds me. How do they tie their shoes without strangling themselves?


NobodysHome wrote:
The Game Hamster wrote:
*itches just thinking about getting wrapped in insulation*

Because this is for a "living" space I'm using the denim stuff. You can put it in a huge pile and roll around in it, and it's actually quite comfy.

The fiberglass stuff is for attics and other non-living spaces. It vents toxic fumes.

I've messed with both. A death with the denim one would be allot less inconveniently scratchy.


lisamarlene wrote:

Had my fourth interview with the school in Dallas this morning, and I now have an offer and a contract sitting in my inbox waiting for a decision.

Technically 3k annually less than my current base salary, but for fewer hours and a lot less work, responsibility and stress (just teacher. Not director, not admissions, etc.). Plus tuition is half of our current school, so it means more money in my paycheck.
I want to accept, but it's a family decision.

How are living expenses in Dallas in comparison to California (besides "lower!") and Whingey Wizard's work options?


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Freehold DM wrote:
i would rather have you alive and whole than have 100000 dollars.

Hmmmm...

*checks exchange rates*

Is that a bounty?


Drejk wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:

Had my fourth interview with the school in Dallas this morning, and I now have an offer and a contract sitting in my inbox waiting for a decision.

Technically 3k annually less than my current base salary, but for fewer hours and a lot less work, responsibility and stress (just teacher. Not director, not admissions, etc.). Plus tuition is half of our current school, so it means more money in my paycheck.
I want to accept, but it's a family decision.

How are living expenses in Dallas in comparison to California (besides "lower!") and Whingey Wizard's work options?

Rents are significantly lower. Restaurants are quite a bit cheaper. going out someplace nice for New Year's Eve is about half the price it is here. Private school tuition is about half what is here. Also no state income tax like California does and sales tax is a couple of percent lower.


Vanykrye wrote:

Or even better, he's using spray-in insulation, and the gun is just locked in the on position, there's a person-sized lump on the floor partially covered in spray foam, and the gun is just flying around the room like an out of control balloon...

While I was typing this amusing (to me, at any rate) little vignette up, the secretary called one of my techs to have him come down and close the paper drawer on her printer for her. The complete lack of self-sufficiency astounds me. How do they tie their shoes without strangling themselves?

They wear shoes with zippers? Or maybe resort to slippers?


captain yesterday wrote:
Back to work! The wall won't build itself.

You'd be surprised what you can accomplish by shaving your eyebrows and trashing your apartment!

Compulsively shaves his eyebrows.


Scintillae wrote:

Tomorrow shall be interesting. All the kids are turning in their chromebooks and getting end-of-year checkout taken care of, which means we have to find something to keep them from climbing the walls. Since the librarian has declared a moratorium on book checkout so inventory can actually happen, silent reading day is out.

Heck with it. We're playing Pictionary. googles prompts

Watch Anime.


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John Napier 698 wrote:
Scintillae wrote:

Tomorrow shall be interesting. All the kids are turning in their chromebooks and getting end-of-year checkout taken care of, which means we have to find something to keep them from climbing the walls. Since the librarian has declared a moratorium on book checkout so inventory can actually happen, silent reading day is out.

Heck with it. We're playing Pictionary. googles prompts

Watch Anime.

My Hero Academia.

list it as a reading exercise
Edit: if they are over 13, have them play DDLC, to give them existential nightmares.


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lisamarlene wrote:
Drejk wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:

Had my fourth interview with the school in Dallas this morning, and I now have an offer and a contract sitting in my inbox waiting for a decision.

Technically 3k annually less than my current base salary, but for fewer hours and a lot less work, responsibility and stress (just teacher. Not director, not admissions, etc.). Plus tuition is half of our current school, so it means more money in my paycheck.
I want to accept, but it's a family decision.

How are living expenses in Dallas in comparison to California (besides "lower!") and Whingey Wizard's work options?
Rents are significantly lower. Restaurants are quite a bit cheaper. going out someplace nice for New Year's Eve is about half the price it is here. Private school tuition is about half what is here. Also no state income tax like California does and sales tax is a couple of percent lower.

And Texas has cheaper gasoline, cheaper utilities like electricity (and a more stable power grid without rolling black/brownouts every summer), etc, etc, etc. Texas does have a lot of good things going for it. But it's still Texas.

From a financial standpoint, this is just a no-brainer. But the kids don't know nor care (nor should they) about the money aspects. Dallas-Ft Worth has a pretty good job market going right now. Whingey would/could/should probably be able to find something appropriate for him relatively soon (I feel like I threw enough qualifiers at that, but I do believe it to be true, and belief is all that matters, facts be damned (Vany, the facts are on your side on this one!) (Oh! Cool!)).

The hard part, like LM already mentioned...it's the friends and family issue. Granted, Skype/similar takes some of the sting out, but there's more to it than that. Aging parents and their care can be a huge consideration (we have a nightmare coming for that one). What the Texas schools are going to try to teach the youngin's that LM will have to monitor and actively combat is another big consideration, or at least I really think it needs to be. All those things that a lot of younger adults don't have to worry about quite yet can weigh heavily on those of us hovering around mid-life (admitted generalization, does not apply to all people under 28ish, your mileage may vary, I am not calling LM "old", etc, etc, etc).


Vanykrye wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:
Drejk wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:

Had my fourth interview with the school in Dallas this morning, and I now have an offer and a contract sitting in my inbox waiting for a decision.

Technically 3k annually less than my current base salary, but for fewer hours and a lot less work, responsibility and stress (just teacher. Not director, not admissions, etc.). Plus tuition is half of our current school, so it means more money in my paycheck.
I want to accept, but it's a family decision.

How are living expenses in Dallas in comparison to California (besides "lower!") and Whingey Wizard's work options?
Rents are significantly lower. Restaurants are quite a bit cheaper. going out someplace nice for New Year's Eve is about half the price it is here. Private school tuition is about half what is here. Also no state income tax like California does and sales tax is a couple of percent lower.

And Texas has cheaper gasoline, cheaper utilities like electricity (and a more stable power grid without rolling black/brownouts every summer), etc, etc, etc. Texas does have a lot of good things going for it. But it's still Texas.

From a financial standpoint, this is just a no-brainer. But the kids don't know nor care (nor should they) about the money aspects. Dallas-Ft Worth has a pretty good job market going right now. Whingey would/could/should probably be able to find something appropriate for him relatively soon (I feel like I threw enough qualifiers at that, but I do believe it to be true, and belief is all that matters, facts be damned (Vany, the facts are on your side on this one!) (Oh! Cool!)).

The hard part, like LM already mentioned...it's the friends and family issue. Granted, Skype/similar takes some of the sting out, but there's more to it than that. Aging parents and their care can be a huge consideration (we have a nightmare coming for that one). What the Texas schools are going to try to teach the youngin's that LM will have to monitor...

Having just moved across state-lines myself, I can say that other considerations such as unexpected expenses and getting a house/apartment can be costly, or (pleasantly, in my case) surprising. Also, U-hauls get expensive pretty fast, and they are still usually the cheapest way to move.


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lisamarlene wrote:
Drejk wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:

Had my fourth interview with the school in Dallas this morning, and I now have an offer and a contract sitting in my inbox waiting for a decision.

Technically 3k annually less than my current base salary, but for fewer hours and a lot less work, responsibility and stress (just teacher. Not director, not admissions, etc.). Plus tuition is half of our current school, so it means more money in my paycheck.
I want to accept, but it's a family decision.

How are living expenses in Dallas in comparison to California (besides "lower!") and Whingey Wizard's work options?
Rents are significantly lower. Restaurants are quite a bit cheaper. going out someplace nice for New Year's Eve is about half the price it is here. Private school tuition is about half what is here. Also no state income tax like California does and sales tax is a couple of percent lower.

I'll just out-and-out say it: A factor of two is almost certainly a gross underestimate.

When we moved from Davis to Albany (all of 65 miles), our weekly grocery costs tripled. The price of real estate is so staggering here that the costs are passed on to you in a hundred different ways: Gas prices. Grocery prices. Movie tickets. Etc., etc., etc.

So take the offer, double it, and that's probably a bit less than they're really offering you.

Unfortunately, as Vankyre said, then there's the whole "having to live in Texas" thing.

In addition to the heat, the politics, and the religion (all forbidden here), I personally cannot stand Texans' attitude of, "Texas is the best place in the world, and if you say anything negative about it I'll kick your a$$."

Criticizing California is a national pastime. But it serves a purpose. "Here are all the problems with our state. What are we going to do about them?"

To paraphrase the Dead Kennedys, "How can you say you love your state if you don't have the guts to criticize it?"


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Speaking of politics and enraging Freehold, that front-running Democrat dropped not one but TWO more glossy pamphlets in my mail today, along with "5 million reasons to vote for xxx".

Well, gee. The fact that you have enough money to drop a glossy flyer in my mailbox every single day for an entire month pretty much convinces me you're already firmly ensconced in the corporate pockets, so I'm pretty much bound and determined to vote for anyone but you.

Her campaign manager really needs to be fired.

Unless, of course, this ludicrous overkill gets her elected. In which case it will break my heart just a teensy bit more as I find that yes, my opinion of the general electorate can sink even lower...


Oh, and in trivial news I wrapped up Season 2 of Attack on Titan, and it's my usual complaint about long-running anime: The first season poses some interesting questions, and answers none of them. The second season simply piles additional layers onto the questions. And you get the feeling that you're going to end up like Lost, where they never really had any answers for anything, and they'll just end the series with a great big, "It was all a dream" finale or something.

I have more respect for manga authors than that: I suspect there really are a bunch of underlying explanations for all the mysteries the anime has revealed. But, "Wait for Season 3 and there's a remote possibility we might answer even one of these outstanding mysteries," isn't a real grabber for me. It's more of a, "Oh, well, I guess I won't be watching that series any more," thing.


NobodysHome wrote:

Oh, and in trivial news I wrapped up Season 2 of Attack on Titan, and it's my usual complaint about long-running anime: The first season poses some interesting questions, and answers none of them. The second season simply piles additional layers onto the questions. And you get the feeling that you're going to end up like Lost, where they never really had any answers for anything, and they'll just end the series with a great big, "It was all a dream" finale or something.

I have more respect for manga authors than that: I suspect there really are a bunch of underlying explanations for all the mysteries the anime has revealed. But, "Wait for Season 3 and there's a remote possibility we might answer even one of these outstanding mysteries," isn't a real grabber for me. It's more of a, "Oh, well, I guess I won't be watching that series any more," thing.

Have you tried MHA yet?

It is fantastic at explaining everything with minimal exposition.
also, it's just amazing.


The Game Hamster wrote:
NobodysHome wrote:

Oh, and in trivial news I wrapped up Season 2 of Attack on Titan, and it's my usual complaint about long-running anime: The first season poses some interesting questions, and answers none of them. The second season simply piles additional layers onto the questions. And you get the feeling that you're going to end up like Lost, where they never really had any answers for anything, and they'll just end the series with a great big, "It was all a dream" finale or something.

I have more respect for manga authors than that: I suspect there really are a bunch of underlying explanations for all the mysteries the anime has revealed. But, "Wait for Season 3 and there's a remote possibility we might answer even one of these outstanding mysteries," isn't a real grabber for me. It's more of a, "Oh, well, I guess I won't be watching that series any more," thing.

Have you tried MHA yet?

It is fantastic at explaining everything with minimal exposition.
also, it's just amazing.

Oh yeah, we're all caught up on it. But if you haven't watched One Punch Man, it is, in my humble opinion, far superior.


Oh, and if you're a My Hero Academae fan, you should also consider Black Clover. It is an unabashed rip-off of Fairy Tale and MHA, and makes no bones about the fact that there isn't an original concept anywhere in the series.

Instead, they provide engaging characters and interesting story lines, so you don't mind that you've seen it all before. You still like it in spite of its lack of originality. I think that's pretty high praise for a series, myself.


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One Punch Man is my Favorite anime.
Unless you count Avatar: the Last Airbender.


On a different note. I just lost power thanks to a gully washer of a thunderstorm. I can't see past the end of the apartment complex.


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NobodysHome wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:
Drejk wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:

Had my fourth interview with the school in Dallas this morning, and I now have an offer and a contract sitting in my inbox waiting for a decision.

Technically 3k annually less than my current base salary, but for fewer hours and a lot less work, responsibility and stress (just teacher. Not director, not admissions, etc.). Plus tuition is half of our current school, so it means more money in my paycheck.
I want to accept, but it's a family decision.

How are living expenses in Dallas in comparison to California (besides "lower!") and Whingey Wizard's work options?
Rents are significantly lower. Restaurants are quite a bit cheaper. going out someplace nice for New Year's Eve is about half the price it is here. Private school tuition is about half what is here. Also no state income tax like California does and sales tax is a couple of percent lower.

I'll just out-and-out say it: A factor of two is almost certainly a gross underestimate.

When we moved from Davis to Albany (all of 65 miles), our weekly grocery costs tripled. The price of real estate is so staggering here that the costs are passed on to you in a hundred different ways: Gas prices. Grocery prices. Movie tickets. Etc., etc., etc.

So take the offer, double it, and that's probably a bit less than they're really offering you.

Unfortunately, as Vankyre said, then there's the whole "having to live in Texas" thing.

In addition to the heat, the politics, and the religion (all forbidden here), I personally cannot stand Texans' attitude of, "Texas is the best place in the world, and if you say anything negative about it I'll kick your a$$."

Criticizing California is a national pastime. But it serves a purpose. "Here are all the problems with our state. What are we going to do about them?"

To paraphrase the Dead Kennedys, "How can you say you love your state if you don't have the guts to criticize it?"

Texans.

You'd think they lived in New York, or even Brooklyn with such levels of pride!


NobodysHome wrote:

Oh, and if you're a My Hero Academae fan, you should also consider Black Clover. It is an unabashed rip-off of Fairy Tale and MHA, and makes no bones about the fact that there isn't an original concept anywhere in the series.

Instead, they provide engaging characters and interesting story lines, so you don't mind that you've seen it all before. You still like it in spite of its lack of originality. I think that's pretty high praise for a series, myself.

pah.

Tiger and Bunny ftw.


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NobodysHome wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:
Drejk wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:

Had my fourth interview with the school in Dallas this morning, and I now have an offer and a contract sitting in my inbox waiting for a decision.

Technically 3k annually less than my current base salary, but for fewer hours and a lot less work, responsibility and stress (just teacher. Not director, not admissions, etc.). Plus tuition is half of our current school, so it means more money in my paycheck.
I want to accept, but it's a family decision.

How are living expenses in Dallas in comparison to California (besides "lower!") and Whingey Wizard's work options?
Rents are significantly lower. Restaurants are quite a bit cheaper. going out someplace nice for New Year's Eve is about half the price it is here. Private school tuition is about half what is here. Also no state income tax like California does and sales tax is a couple of percent lower.

I'll just out-and-out say it: A factor of two is almost certainly a gross underestimate.

When we moved from Davis to Albany (all of 65 miles), our weekly grocery costs tripled. The price of real estate is so staggering here that the costs are passed on to you in a hundred different ways: Gas prices. Grocery prices. Movie tickets. Etc., etc., etc.

So take the offer, double it, and that's probably a bit less than they're really offering you.

Unfortunately, as Vankyre said, then there's the whole "having to live in Texas" thing.

In addition to the heat, the politics, and the religion (all forbidden here), I personally cannot stand Texans' attitude of, "Texas is the best place in the world, and if you say anything negative about it I'll kick your a$$."

Criticizing California is a national pastime. But it serves a purpose. "Here are all the problems with our state. What are we going to do about them?"

To paraphrase the Dead Kennedys, "How can you say you love your state if you don't have the guts to criticize it?"

Which is why the Austin Lounge Lizards are my very favorite Texas band.

Here's their "Stupid Texas Song"

The tagline to their ode to Dallas?
"Most cities have soul, but Dallas must have been at the bank when they passed it around."


Since we are on the topic of Anime, any one have an opinion on Darling in the FRANXXX yet?


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NobodysHome wrote:

Speaking of politics and enraging Freehold, that front-running Democrat dropped not one but TWO more glossy pamphlets in my mail today, along with "5 million reasons to vote for xxx".

Well, gee. The fact that you have enough money to drop a glossy flyer in my mailbox every single day for an entire month pretty much convinces me you're already firmly ensconced in the corporate pockets, so I'm pretty much bound and determined to vote for anyone but you.

Her campaign manager really needs to be fired.

Unless, of course, this ludicrous overkill gets her elected. In which case it will break my heart just a teensy bit more as I find that yes, my opinion of the general electorate can sink even lower...

flyers are pretty cheap, man. Even I could afford a few, and thats saying something.

That said, I have fired a non flaming bike made of drywall and asbestos at you. It has a tiny garage attached to the handlebars instead of fuzzy dice.


The Game Hamster wrote:
On a different note. I just lost power thanks to a gully washer of a thunderstorm. I can't see past the end of the apartment complex.

Well, the rain stopped, maybe I'll get power here soon.


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Vanykrye wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:
Drejk wrote:
lisamarlene wrote:

Had my fourth interview with the school in Dallas this morning, and I now have an offer and a contract sitting in my inbox waiting for a decision.

Technically 3k annually less than my current base salary, but for fewer hours and a lot less work, responsibility and stress (just teacher. Not director, not admissions, etc.). Plus tuition is half of our current school, so it means more money in my paycheck.
I want to accept, but it's a family decision.

How are living expenses in Dallas in comparison to California (besides "lower!") and Whingey Wizard's work options?
Rents are significantly lower. Restaurants are quite a bit cheaper. going out someplace nice for New Year's Eve is about half the price it is here. Private school tuition is about half what is here. Also no state income tax like California does and sales tax is a couple of percent lower.

And Texas has cheaper gasoline, cheaper utilities like electricity (and a more stable power grid without rolling black/brownouts every summer), etc, etc, etc. Texas does have a lot of good things going for it. But it's still Texas.

From a financial standpoint, this is just a no-brainer. But the kids don't know nor care (nor should they) about the money aspects. Dallas-Ft Worth has a pretty good job market going right now. Whingey would/could/should probably be able to find something appropriate for him relatively soon (I feel like I threw enough qualifiers at that, but I do believe it to be true, and belief is all that matters, facts be damned (Vany, the facts are on your side on this one!) (Oh! Cool!)).

The hard part, like LM already mentioned...it's the friends and family issue. Granted, Skype/similar takes some of the sting out, but there's more to it than that. Aging parents and their care can be a huge consideration (we have a nightmare coming for that one). What the Texas schools are going to try to teach the youngin's that LM will have to monitor...

It's okay; I'm not as old as Nobody or Shiro or John, but...

Yeah, no, that's good enough.

The good part: the salary is for a 9.5 month contract, paid in 12 installments, and there's no obligation for me to work summers, so June/July I plan to take the kids to Oregon every year.

And, in private school, the kids will be exposed to less of the bs that Texas public schoolchildren are force-fed.

Let's see; is a post about creationism vs. science in education considered political?

I'm a church-going, potluck-and-chancel-choir gal, but I am staunchly opposed to anyone's religion, including my own, introduced in the classroom as fact. We call it a "faith" for a reason.


Just two days since I returned from convention and my FB friend list grew by... 1, 2, 3, 4, 5? Six counting one that sent me invite on the way to the convention.


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I haven't seen so many beautiful women in such short time for ages...

Is it the time for my Middle Age Crisis already?


Drejk wrote:

I haven't seen so many beautiful women in such short time for ages...

Is it the time for my Middle Age Crisis already?

dammit drejk, stop stealing my lines!

sets Black Manliness to "don't crack"

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