Deep 6 FaWtL


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Freehold DM wrote:
NobodysHome wrote:
Tequila Sunrise wrote:

No kidding, sounds familiar. "Well the highest score was a 50, so my 28 is now a 78!" :/

I guess the dark side of competition isn't limited to the private sector. Big names mean big expectations, eh? My experience in my no-name local community college was that those who put in the time learned our sh!t, and those who didn't flunked 'cause nobody was monetarily motivated to see us pass. If they had a four-year program I would've stayed for my B.S..

It's too bad that big-name schools are incentivized by keeping their rep, rather than actually teaching well. See also: Schools that hire based on papers published, rather than for interest and competence at actually teaching.

** spoiler omitted **...
this is only more fuel for the flames of my math hatred.

Thou canst not burn the sun...

...but if you run around nekked enough, the sun can indeed burn you...
...and not in good places!


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::reads every post on previous page::
::mumbles "what the actual f@#%" about 78 times::
::goes away::


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NobodysHome wrote:
Tequila Sunrise wrote:

No kidding, sounds familiar. "Well the highest score was a 50, so my 28 is now a 78!" :/

I guess the dark side of competition isn't limited to the private sector. Big names mean big expectations, eh? My experience in my no-name local community college was that those who put in the time learned our sh!t, and those who didn't flunked 'cause nobody was monetarily motivated to see us pass. If they had a four-year program I would've stayed for my B.S..

It's too bad that big-name schools are incentivized by keeping their rep, rather than actually teaching well. See also: Schools that hire based on papers published, rather than for interest and competence at actually teaching.

** spoiler omitted **...

Once again proving the stupidity of School administrators Bureaucrats.


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On a completely separate note, NobodysWife's colleagues at work were going nuts over the Amazon Prime deal of the day last week. So of course I had to have one. (Full disclosure: My current crock pot is 26 years old, and I don't own a pressure cooker at all, so it's actually an appliance I have a use for. Unlike a certain... *cough cough* Shiro's Player *cough cough* person who buys them just because.)

Today's my first test run: Fresh marinara sauce made from scratch. I've always used canned tomatoes, tomato paste, and (unseasoned) tomato sauce. This morning I just threw a bunch of tomatoes, wine, and salt into the pot and slow cooked it for 4 hours. Over lunch I added oregano, marjoram, thyme, garlic, and italian sausage and set it for another 4 hours.

After work I'll taste it and see whether it goes in our bellies or the trash. Whee!


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That sounds delicious.

I was home schooled K-12, so the conversation on the previous page to me, just reinforces why it was better that way. Also, moved a lot. I certainly learned a lot more than the majority of people my age that I meet, and the ones who learned more/comparable to me and the few responsible teenagers that actually wanted to learn something.
Does that mean homeschooling is without it's problems? Of course not, to claim such would be silly, but any family with an ounce of honesty is just naturally going to teach their kids more than any public school (not going into private schools here) district I have come across.


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Gee, didn't someone mentioned his outrage at throwing food recently?


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There's always a risk when trying out a new recipe. But, with my restaurant experience, I think the slow-cooked sauce will work.


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That tomato sauce does sound delicious. Let me know how the new gadget works out for you. :)
I've been looking at it for myself, but I decided against. I've already gotten rid of a pressure cooker and a crock pot. Both produced bland mush no matter what I put in them. Not sure what I'm doing wrong. It's one of those things where I describe what I'm doing and it's exactly what should work. But it doesn't. No explanation. Then again, I get away with a lot that shouldn't work but does when it comes to roasting and baking, so I guess it's just balance. :P


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Drejk wrote:
Gee, didn't someone mentioned his outrage at throwing food recently?

Outrage at throwing out edible food. If I accidentally steam brussels sprouts for 4 hours, I'm sure as heck not going to make anyone eat them!


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lynora wrote:

That tomato sauce does sound delicious. Let me know how the new gadget works out for you. :)

I've been looking at it for myself, but I decided against. I've already gotten rid of a pressure cooker and a crock pot. Both produced bland mush no matter what I put in them. Not sure what I'm doing wrong. It's one of those things where I describe what I'm doing and it's exactly what should work. But it doesn't. No explanation. Then again, I get away with a lot that shouldn't work but does when it comes to roasting and baking, so I guess it's just balance. :P

Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking. Boeuf a la Mode (p.309).

If you put that in a crock pot and it turns out anything less than divine, throw out the crock pot.

EDIT: And yeah, pretty much everything I've tried in a crock pot that involves water has failed miserably. On the other hand, stews, pot roasts, chilis, and tomato sauces tend to come out divine. I think it's an art just figuring out what works and what doesn't, because the cookbooks make it sound like you can throw anything in there, and really, I see three uses for the pot:
(1) Speeding up my mashed potatoes by "properly" speed-cooking the potatoes
(2) Letting me do marinara sauce and chili from scratch
(3) Exploring variations on pot roasts
If you have to add water, don't bother even starting. Wine, brandy, stout, and even strong broth are OK. But water? Never!


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NobodysHome wrote:
Drejk wrote:
Gee, didn't someone mentioned his outrage at throwing food recently?

Outrage at throwing out edible food. If I accidentally steam brussels sprouts for 4 hours, I'm sure as heck not going to make anyone eat them!

*gags* Oh, gosh, just the thought....I don't want to eat that kind of home cooking ever again!

Growing up, everything was boiled beyond all recognition. Blech. So gross.


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lynora wrote:
NobodysHome wrote:
Drejk wrote:
Gee, didn't someone mentioned his outrage at throwing food recently?

Outrage at throwing out edible food. If I accidentally steam brussels sprouts for 4 hours, I'm sure as heck not going to make anyone eat them!

*gags* Oh, gosh, just the thought....I don't want to eat that kind of home cooking ever again!

Growing up, everything was boiled beyond all recognition. Blech. So gross.

I think I've mentioned my mother was an immunologist. Everything had to be cooked sufficiently to destroy all possible pathogens. That meant 25 minutes in a 425-degree broiler for 1/2" pork chops or salmon.

Nom! Chewy!

And yeah, vegetable mush was the standard until I took away my parents' permission to EVER cook vegetables again.

Seriously. At about 14. I forbade them from ever using *my* kitchen for vegetables. Pretty uppity for a 14-year-old.


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NobodysHome wrote:
lynora wrote:

That tomato sauce does sound delicious. Let me know how the new gadget works out for you. :)

I've been looking at it for myself, but I decided against. I've already gotten rid of a pressure cooker and a crock pot. Both produced bland mush no matter what I put in them. Not sure what I'm doing wrong. It's one of those things where I describe what I'm doing and it's exactly what should work. But it doesn't. No explanation. Then again, I get away with a lot that shouldn't work but does when it comes to roasting and baking, so I guess it's just balance. :P

Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking. Boeuf a la Mode (p.309).

If you put that in a crock pot and it turns out anything less than divine, throw out the crock pot.

I don't eat beef. I think it smells and tastes gross. *shrug* I blame my childhood of jaw-breakingly tough pot roasts. I just can't tolerate it any more. Not even the smell.

If it gives you any idea, I can't even make applesauce in a crockpot. I can make applesauce in the freaking oven, but not a crockpot. It's just...yeah, I gave up. It shouldn't even be possible. *shrug*


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Two things I have discovered since I bought my slow cooker last fall:
Curries always come out amazing. Likewise Korean short ribs (and the correct cut is ridiculously cheap at Ranch 99).
Alton Brown's crock pot lasagna recipe is the worst thing ever. (Shut up, Freehold.) And it's from the same book as so many wonderful things, like the best marshmallows. But it made me quote Westley, and I cried out, "Dear God, what is that thing!?!"


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lisamarlene wrote:

Two things I have discovered since I bought my slow cooker last fall:

Curries always come out amazing. Likewise Korean short ribs (and the correct cut is ridiculously cheap at Ranch 99).
Alton Brown's crock pot lasagna recipe is the worst thing ever.(Shut up, Freehold.) And it's from the same book as so many wonderful things, like the best marshmallows. But it made me quote Westley, and I cried out, "Dear God, what is that thing!?!"

how can I remain silent when a beautiful woman speaks such salacious words?


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NobodysHome wrote:
I hate to be a bubble-burster, but the reason I'm in tech is that in California, community colleges are paid based on how many students pass their courses.

Not at all, I like hearing other perspectives on important things. No wonder you quit, that is quite the passion-killing incentive!

(No doubt it sounded good on paper, to someone at some point.)

Do you have an opinion on standardized testing? I have mixed opinions, thanks in part to my mother, who is a retired English teacher.


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I love standardized testing.

Made the teacher teach things that were outside of their comfort zone in a standardized way, as opposed to the things they wanted to teach in ways that only made sense to them .

That said, I failed the math regents twice. So there is that.


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Two items of note and then off to the store with me:

(1) The sauce came out with a wonderful, complex flavor -- everything I was hoping for, but it's fairly dilute; the "crock pot killer": Since the lid is watertight, you get no concentration. Fortunately, I have a couple of hours to spare so I just put in on a regular stovetop at a low simmer with no lid so that it'll lose some of that excess moisture, and I predict wonderfulness.

(2) I greatly admire the Japanese (and other Asian) model that every classroom teaches the same topic on the same day. Not only does it ensure that transfer students are instantly "caught up", but, as Freehold says, it ensures teachers are at least covering what they're supposed to be teaching. I'm not even going to get started on Impus Major's Spanish teacher assigning more than a dozen ART PROJECTS over the course of a year of Spanish, but reining in freewheeling teachers who feel that they can teach "whatever" would go a loooooooong way in improving my son's experience.

For every incredible teacher out there who teaches in a totally new and novel way that never touches the syllabus, yet inspires students to greatness, there are two dozen who think they're doing that, only to be making their students hate math (or English, or Spanish).

I am firmly against mandating *how* a teacher teaches. Puppets, pantomime, group work, lecture with slides; every teacher has a personal style of teaching, and every good teacher can make their style work for whatever the subject matter is. But I am a strong proponent of standardizing the subject matter so, as I say, teachers don't get "creative".

For example, Impus Major is in his third year of high school English. I'm sure he could not tell you what a "gerund" is. He certainly can't properly format an argumentative essay. But boy, is he good at BS'ing about "hidden meanings" in Shakespeare or Orwell...

UPDATE:
(1) Impus Minor just declared the sauce, "The best spaghetti sauce [he's] ever tasted!", and he's our picky one! But he did admit that it had to thicken up a bit.

(2) Thinking about it on the way to and from the store, a lot of teachers oppose standardized syllabi because it takes away their "creative freedom". But as a parent, having standardized topics and homework would eliminate the whole, "Well, Impus Minor has xxx for chemistry, so he has 4 hours of homework tonight, but Gluteous Maximus has yyy, and she doesn't believe in homework, so he has none."
If it were well-designed (a nigh-impossible task given the administrative quagmire that is public education), you could balance homework, provide teachers with a complete syllabus and homework set, and teachers could actually, y'know, TEACH. What a concept!


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Was the lid on or off of the Slow Cooker? Next time, make the sauce without the lid until the sauce reaches the desired consistency, then put the lid on to prevent the loss of additional moisture.


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John Napier 698 wrote:
Was the lid on or off of the Slow Cooker? Next time, make the sauce without the lid until the sauce reaches the desired consistency, then put the lid on to prevent the loss of additional moisture.

I'm not sure this particular model allows for "lid off" cooking -- it's a "smart cooker". I'll actually read the instructions and find out. :-O


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I love my slow cooker. It's one of the cheapest kitchen appliances I've ever bought ($20 about 7 or 8 years ago), and it's still going strong. I use it mainly for soups, stews, and chilis, but I also make pot roast in it from time to time, Italian beef on occasion, and faux-b-q pork. In fact, I just did some faux-b-q the other day and have been enjoying it immensely. I've tried doing baked beans in it before, and they just became mush, so I'm not doing that again. But I do love how simple it is to make some tasty stuff.

I'll share a couple of quick recipes.

Faux-b-q:

Ingredients:
1 3lb-ish pork roast (I usually use a picnic shoulder, but loin works too)
1 medium onion
Apple cider vinegar
BBQ sauce

Slice the onion into roughly 1/4 inch slices. Place enough of them on the bottom of the slow cooker to make a platform for the roast to sit on. No need to cover the entire bottom if the roast is small enough. Pour in enough apple cider vinegar to come about 1/8 inch or so up the side of the cooker. Place the roast, fattiest side up, on top of the onions, try not to let it touch the sides or bottom of the cooker. Pour a little bit of BBQ sauce on top of the roast, maybe a 1/4 cup. Put the lid on, set on Low, and let it go for 10 hours. When done, take the meat out, shred it, and serve how you like. Personally, I like to take some of the meat, put it between two slices of bread, add some sauce and maybe a little raw onion, then put it in a skillet over medium heat with a foil-wrapped brick on top to press it down. Flip it over a few times to warm it all through and toast the bread to a crisp golden-brown. Obviously, if you have a nice rub you like, you could do that as well as or instead of the sauce, but I like how this works.

Pot Roast:

Ingredients:
1 Chuck roast, 3lb or so
Onions, cut into wedges
Carrots, peeled and cut into 3-4 inch lengths
Potatoes, peeled
Beef Broth
Salt
Pepper

Season the meat with salt and pepper. Place in bottom of slow cooker. Put in the carrots, onions, and potatoes. Add enough beef broth to almost cover the meat. Set on low, let run 10 hours, serve.
Simple, and yet so good. Sometimes, if I don't think there's enough juice, I'll take what there is, put it in a saucepan and add more broth, then simmer for 15 or 20 minutes, just long enough to take out the "raw" flavor of the broth.

Also, I think I shared a chili recipe a while back, if anyone's interested in that.


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lisamarlene wrote:

::reads every post on previous page::

::mumbles "what the actual f@#%" about 78 times::
::goes away::

Yeah, the last page did get kind of weird. Unlike the other 3,293 pages, which are all perfectly normal.


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NobodysHome wrote:
Drejk wrote:
Gee, didn't someone mentioned his outrage at throwing food recently?

Outrage at throwing out edible food. If I accidentally steam brussels sprouts for 4 hours, I'm sure as heck not going to make anyone eat them!

Use the water of boiling then for making a soup? Add other vegetables,blend and make a veggie cream or a sauce?


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My favorite color is purple. I like it more than red and blue combined.


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The Norwegian navy has started putting barcodes on the sides of their ships. That way, when entering port, they can scan-da-navy-in.


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Farewell, boiling water. You will be mist.


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I thought of a good joke about boomerangs earlier, but then I forgot it. Oh well, I'm sure it will come back to me.


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What is a potato's favorite horror movie? Silence of the Yams.


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What do you call a potato at a football game? A spec-tater.


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What do you call a potato that's reluctant to jump into boiling water? A hesi-tater.


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What is the most powerful potato? Darth Tater.

Edit: And here he is!


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How do potatoes play Street Fighter? They mash the buttons.


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Why didn't the mother potato want her daughter to marry the newscaster? He was a common-tater.


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What do you call a person who sits and stares at potatoes? A medi-tater.


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What kind of flooring do dinosaurs have in their bathrooms? Rep-tiles.


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What kind of dinosaur was interested in law enforcement? Tricera-cops.


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What was the most civilized dinosaur? The Tea Rex.


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What kind of dinosaur wore cowboy boots and a cowboy hat? Tyrannosaurus Tex.


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I wanted to learn how to play heavy metal, so I built a guitar out of lead.


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I tried to be a professional photographer. I even got a job taking pictures of rice for a national ad campaign. Unfortunately, all the pictures were grainy.


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If a group of crows kills a man, is that murder by murder?


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The Vikings were great mariners. This is evidenced by the old saying "You can lead a Norse to water, but you can't make him sink."


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I have trouble digesting chickpeas. Whenever I eat hummus, I falafel.


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A quarter-acre of undeveloped land may not seem like much to you, but to me it's a lot.


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When notes get in treble, bass-ically they are put behind bars. An alto-nate punishment is to push them off a clef and hope they land flat on some sharp objects.


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The programmer hated to go outside because of all the bugs.


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I don't know if I just got hit with freezing rain, or what, but it sure hurt like hail.


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Never discuss infinity with a mathematician. They'll go on about it forever.


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Would you call a bald lake crytpid the Lock-less Monster?


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I used to know a guy who collected candy canes. He said they were worth a mint.

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