1001 Things to do to freak out and confuse players


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Sczarni RPG Superstar Season 9 Top 16, RPG Superstar 2015 Top 32

Almost forgot.

135. Have the party wake up naked, in the middle of nowhere, and shackled together. This is a great way to start an adventure, and an awesome excuse for the party to adventure together.


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Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber
Dragonborn3 wrote:


15. Have a herd of deer chase down and feast upon a wolf.

I did something similar, freaked the players out. They were teleported to a new world. While walking around in the forest, they saw a dozen squirrels in a tree and a bear below. The bear rared up and began eating leaves off the tree. The dozen squirrels kamikazed down onto the bear and began ripping it apart with needle sharp teeth. Deer had razor sharp metal hooves and antler tips, and needle sharp teeth. Cougars had a real weakness for blueberries and apples. You don't want to know what the cows liked. :)

They got used to this, and then as they explored they came to a shimmering wall of light 10 feet wide, and the ground under it was glassy, as if the rock had been glazed. No living things in the wall. Once determining that they could go through it, they walked on and continued exploring.

Upon finding a bear, they were shocked when it turned on them and tried to eat one of them. :) They were confused for the first 10 gaming sessions.

One did you an ability to speak with animals. For some reason, the squirrels all had mexican accents. Not sure where that came from, but I ran with it.


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136. Have your players hear screams in the distance. When they try to figure out who's screaming, tell them they stumble on a goblin that seems to be suffering terribly, but that has no apparent wounds. When they finish him off, the goblin, who was a female in labor, lets out four slimy baby goblins who then start screaming. Bonus points if your players start arguing about keeping and raising the baby goblins.

137a. Have the PCs meet a very important character, such as a king, and then make him publicly ask sexual favors from the least expected PC. Bonus points if the chosen PC is a same-sex dwarf.

137b. Ask a player to make a Ride check during the sex scene.

138. Have your players attack a group of half-naked goblins wielding clubs. The goblins then drop their clubs and start attacking the PCs with all the expertise they acquired from their ten monk levels.

139. Have them protect a Chaotic Evil character who insists on killing innocent people because they have big noses.

140. Have an arab-looking man with a purple turban appear out of nowhere, stab a PC and then disappear just like he came in without ever explaining this phenomenon. Have your players meet this same man if they ever travel in the ethereal plane.

Shadow Lodge

141. Adventure hooks that are never explained, even if the PC's attempt to explore them.


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142. Striped Dragons.

Sczarni RPG Superstar Season 9 Top 16, RPG Superstar 2015 Top 32

143. Have the party come back to a large town after hunting for the bad guy all day only to find the bad guy is attacking the town with his small army of goons. Set up on a grid map a street scene with plenty of buildings. Set a few buildings on fire and have a couple dozen d8s represent commoners freaking out.

At the bottom of the initiative count, roll every d8. The number rolled indicates the direction the die will travel that turn. 1 is North, 2 is North East, 3 is East, and so on. Move the commoner until they run into an obsticle, person, bad guy, or fire. If a commoner runs into fire, they catch on fire and will keep running for 5 rounds. If they reach the end of the map they are safe, but you should only have a few spaces on the edge that are not taken by buildings.

If burning commoners run into bad guys or the PCs, the fire spreads to the new victim. (be nice and have them roll reflex saves. Just make the DC 25.) Any burning commoners running into or entering a non burning building catch that building on fire.

Make it clear that the PCs need to save as many commoners as possible, while doing their best to fight off the small army of goons and save the burning buildings.

Chaos will ensue as the couple dozen commoners quickly catch fire, catch buildings on fire, and eventually catch the PCs on fire.

Sczarni RPG Superstar Season 9 Top 16, RPG Superstar 2015 Top 32

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144. Traps are expected to be in areas no larger then 10x10 areas. Throw PCs for a loop and have entire rooms that are one big trap.

145. Set up a dungeon that is maze like, with many false passages, and would be difficult to navigate no matter what part the party starts in. Let the party reach the very end, then flood the dungeon. If there was a map drawn out for the party to see, erase it before flooding it. All doors opened in the dungeon are closed tight and need to be reopened. Bonus if the dungeon is in the middle of a desert.

146a. Place plenty of harmless encounters on your random encounter list. For example, have one result be, "A sheep herder and his flock." Have the encounters happen at night. Few things are more confusing then waking up surrounded by sheep.

146b. Place encounters that look like the harmless ones but are very dangerous. For example, have a variant of the shambling mound that looks like a herd of sheep. Nothing is more confusing then being eaten by a herd of sheep.

Dark Archive RPG Superstar 2013 Top 32

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147. Change GMs each session and provide absolutely no communication between GMs as to what the hell is going on. Each GM must interpret plot hooks and story elements introduced by the previous GM entirely on their own.


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148. The PCs are pestered by a madman who talks about stuff that isn't there, e.g. trees on the roofs of buildings etc. Later, they find an innocuous secret door in someone's house that leads to exactly the same room they just left. However, what they don't know is that they have entered a parallel but overlapping dimension, when they leave the house they can see all the stuff the madman sees. However, the differences all appear to be cosmetic.

If they remain in this dimension have things proceed normally until they are asked to meet a bearded man in a tavern. However, in their dimension he is clean shaven.

Bonus points if you can fix it so they end up with the party split across separate dimensions.


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Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber

149. Have one of the PCs approached by a set of twins, one dressed in blue, the other in green. First they are approached by the one in blue. The one in blue tells him that there is a man in the tavern up the road that is an exact duplicate of the PC. She goes on that this man is a demon who is using his appearance to go unnoticed in the mortal world. Have her explain that the demon has a lock of his hair, and the stronger the demon comes, the weaker the PC will become until he dies. Just before he enters the tavern, have the one in green (exact twin, even same outfit, but in green) approach him and tell him that there is a man in the tavern who looks just like him. This man is his great grandfather, and has been summoned forward in time by an evil sorceress who has plotted to have the character cause a rift in time by killing his own great grandfather. When he enters the tavern, the character see's his exact duplicate, including gear, and makes a Fort save or be sickened for 1d6 rounds.

Bonus points if you can get the character to kill himself and his great grandfather at the same time, or, if you can get him to help the demon return to his own time (the ritual lets the demon steal the rest of the PCs lifeforce all in one gulp). Depends on which story is true.

Super Duper Bonus Points if his Great Grandfather IS a demon who has traveled forward in time to steal his life force. :)


One of my players decided to take the 'woke up and had no memory' backstory. So I said fine, so long as I get to make use of it. The loud 'Muahahahaa!' when he said yes should have been his FIRST clue that things were going to go bad.

So, the player is a halfling, who has learned that his mother (one of the BBEG's cohorts) is an insane elven transmuter who specializes in making twisted half breed creatures. i.e. half-dragon bats, half-skum goblins, halflings, etc.

This leads us to # 150: In this week's game, though he doesn't know it, his mother is finally going to meet him in person. At which point she will talk about how mommy's little boy is all grown up. And sexy. And maybe he should father some half-brothers with her right now.

In the future, I expect full backstories from him, if only to prevent his characters from being propositioned to father children with their own mommies. Mid dungeon crawl.

And bonus points for me if I borrow a corset for this scene to better show off my fuzzy man boobs while playing his crazy mother who wants to have his babies. Too much punishment for a lame backstory?

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure, Rulebook Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber
Gerrinson wrote:
Too much punishment for a lame backstory?

Yep. I'd be packing my books up as soon as you started the reveal.

Sczarni RPG Superstar Season 9 Top 16, RPG Superstar 2015 Top 32

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Gerrinson wrote:
Too much punishment for a lame backstory?

My next character is actually going to use the "lost memory" trope. It isn't a lame backstory, in and of itself. What is lame is if the player keeps using it, or other easy cop outs. I personally have most of the mundane details already written out (family, city of origin, and occupation before losing memory.) What I don't have is why he lost his memory, or why he is far, far away from home. I will be leaving that to the GM.

Speaking of messing with PCs with memory loss:

151. The PC who constantly hits the tavern and tells you he will drink until he drops, also constantly wakes up in strange and potentially compromising places. The sillier, the better. Waking up in a field with d100 plastic pink flamingos, in a store window wearing the latest in woman's fashion, or in on the roof of the city hall are great examples.

152. Upon taking a critical hit from a bludgeoning weapon, tell the player their PC lost 1d6 memories. A d100 table should probably be made of possible types of memories for them to lose.

153. When the players forget the name of an important town, NPC, or plot hook, change the name and see if they notice. Keep changing it as they forget. If they start to catch on, play dumb.


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154. Ring of wishes that grants the previous thing that was wished for.

155. Ring of wishes that grants the next thing that will be wished for.

Shadow Lodge

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156. After the PCs return to the tavern after a hard day, they discover that no one is paying attention to them. When they look around, they find that everyone is spending all their time celebrating and caring for a swarm of bunnies. The bunnies are decked out in high-quality magical gear.


Gerrinson wrote:
This leads us to # 150: In this week's game, though he doesn't know it, his mother is finally going to meet him in person. At which point she will talk about how mommy's little boy is all grown up. And sexy. And maybe he should father some half-brothers with her right now.

I feel dirty for thinking that idea is awesome punishment, though I agree with TOZ that I would get up and leave immediately if I saw you were wearing a corset.

157: Set up a continent on your homebrew planet where all of the "civilized" races are feral and savage (IE: humans, dwarves, elves, etc) and races like orcs and ogres have advanced societies, even beyond that of what they know. Perhaps there are goblins with Eberron-like magical technology (trains and such). The first orc caravan they attack lands them in prison while they await trial, where they are treated unreasonably fairly. Make return to their native lands difficult or tedious.

Liberty's Edge

158: Have your party take up a classic "Village under attack by mysterious... thing" quest. While searching the forest/fields/desert, have them come across a series of medium sized footprints. If they decide to follow them, they will eventually come across a gigantic monster several levels too high for the party to handle who just happens to have dainty feet.

Liberty's Edge

/bump

..cause it needs a bump.

Grand Lodge

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Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

159: fill in your dungeon with cryptic messages written in an obscure language that only one character in the party can read (Orc, for instance, if the party has a Half-Orc) that SEEM to indicate some sort of advice for later on in the dungeon. Then, when the PCs try to follow the advice, have the result be in the negative. Bonus points if you reveal that the final boss of the dungeon scrawled the notes himself, making the party assume someone helpful scrawled them...


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CalebTGordan wrote:


128. Have a few goblins standing on a bridge with weapons. They demand payment to use the bridge. Charge a single copper piece. The bridge happens to be one the PCs must cross constantly, and the goblins keep showing up if payment is made. Bonus if you have the goblins show up on every bridge.

Oh good Garl Glittergold. I'm using this. I'm going to insert five goblins to inexplicably claim a toll on each and every bridge.

Fun Fact: If you call it a 'toll', players are more likely to go along with it, even if it's still banditry. They reflexively assume the goblins are somehow part of the law enforcement.
If the PCs attack the goblins anyways, I'll give each goblin an artifact. If the PCs somehow win and get ahold of the artifacts, I will send Nethys against them to get them back. Yeah, I'm hoping the PCs don't somehow win. ;P

Sczarni RPG Superstar Season 9 Top 16, RPG Superstar 2015 Top 32

Kobold Cleaver wrote:
CalebTGordan wrote:


128. Have a few goblins standing on a bridge with weapons. They demand payment to use the bridge. Charge a single copper piece. The bridge happens to be one the PCs must cross constantly, and the goblins keep showing up if payment is made. Bonus if you have the goblins show up on every bridge.

Oh good Garl Glittergold. I'm using this. I'm going to insert five goblins to inexplicably claim a toll on each and every bridge.

Fun Fact: If you call it a 'toll', players are more likely to go along with it, even if it's still banditry. They reflexively assume the goblins are somehow part of the law enforcement.
If the PCs attack the goblins anyways, I'll give each goblin an artifact. If the PCs somehow win and get ahold of the artifacts, I will send Nethys against them to get them back. Yeah, I'm hoping the PCs don't somehow win. ;P

I did this, and one of the players that attacked things on sight ended up burning the bridge with a fire arrow. One of the goblins survived, and ended up being just a punk kid goblin. The party found his tribe not too far off, who were confused to why adventurers were offering to pay to raise the two fallen kids. It was so hilarious that most of the party felt bad that some goblins were killed.

Note, you can change who stands at the bridge. Kobolds might be a better choice in Golarion. Mites also work well. Both choices suggest the bridge is trapped, and thus a toll would be safe and appreciated.


Mites aren't trappers. Mites are vermin tamers. :P
And your mistake was in using a destructible bridge. ;)

Sczarni RPG Superstar Season 9 Top 16, RPG Superstar 2015 Top 32

160.
Have a god show up constantly throughout a campaign, but disguised each time as a different NPC. At the end of the campaign reveal the god and all of their disguises.

Bonus if one of the PCs sleeps with them.
Bonus if the god is one or more NPCs that directs them in the main quest, and is a main villain directing everything in the background.

(One of my past GMs did this, and it blows my mind every time I think about it. And yes, one of the PCs slept with her.)


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161
Have the PCs come across a village that looks like its been destroyed by a herd. Only there are no tracks, just half oval depressions.
Have PC's track shapes through woods.

Have another herd of things move in from behind.

Force PCs to defend themselves.

The first PC that his gets washed in a milky-water substance that has a distinct flavor.

Describe what the thing looks like: Hairy and brown, some with 2 or three block spots in a single location. Inside has a white lining, with white-ish cream.

Coconuts. And they are migrating...

Sovereign Court Contributor

dungeonmaster heathy wrote:

4. A dude in a room in a dungeon; 20x20 feet; in a gimpsuit, barking at them.

They won't know where to begin.

OK. I did this one. My player responded with, "Daddy? Daddy!"

RP hilarity ensued.

Sovereign Court Contributor

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162. (from a real session)
Each and every time one character (call him Jonas) in the group talks to any NPC, relay to all the players what Jonas hears in his head. He hears an emotionless voice: "Kill him," God said.

One day, I guarantee, Jonas will listen. Just to find out what will happen. No player can resist this forever.

Thank you Brandon Sanderson.


163. The horse trader sells horses and gear to the adventures who are going to the local dungeon. An agent for the merchant watches the dungeon entrance, and when adventurers leave their horses behind unattended, he steals them and returns them to the horse trader. Rinse repeat.

164. For wandering monsters, have griffons or dragons swoop out of the sky and attack and fly off with one horse.

I did this repeatedly, long ago, with the group of players I have been gaming 20+ years with. To this day, they never buy horses and instead walk everywhere.


Louis Agresta wrote:

162. (from a real session)

Each and every time one character (call him Jonas) in the group talks to any NPC, relay to all the players what Jonas hears in his head. He hears an emotionless voice: "Kill him," God said.

One day, I guarantee, Jonas will listen. Just to find out what will happen. No player can resist this forever.

Thank you Brandon Sanderson.

Wouldn't that be a shame if it turns out some telepathic critter was tagging along doing that purely for the giggles?

Alternatively, he gets a wish if he does the deed...

Sovereign Court Contributor

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Turin the Mad wrote:
Louis Agresta wrote:

162. (from a real session)

Each and every time one character (call him Jonas) in the group talks to any NPC, relay to all the players what Jonas hears in his head. He hears an emotionless voice: "Kill him," God said.

One day, I guarantee, Jonas will listen. Just to find out what will happen. No player can resist this forever.

Thank you Brandon Sanderson.

Wouldn't that be a shame if it turns out some telepathic critter was tagging along doing that purely for the giggles?

Alternatively, he gets a wish if he does the deed...

Or treat it like a curse: every time he agrees to an evil act whispered by the voice, it increases the will save DC to resist the next evil whisper.

Up to a character level relative cap of course. Can't rip free will entirely away from a player, curse or not.

Will saves made in secret, by the GM, who one day just relates:

"Kill him," God said. *Jonas rolls eyes*

GM: Do you do it?

Jonas: Of course not. Pshaw.

GM: After rolling his eyes and shaking his head, Jonas raises his hand and rams his sword into the inn keeper's chest, like jamming a plunger into overripe cheese. Blood gushes until the bright brass bar top floods dark to match the oaken rail. Silence descends in the common room. Then someone screams...

Liberty's Edge

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163. If making PCs for a con adventure, have them know langugages they will have no use for.

"I know how to speak mind flayer? Beholder? But we only 5 th level"


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164. In the middle of a session, ask to look at a player's character sheet, examine it for a moment and then turn to another player and say out loud "yea, you probably could".


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165: Have a rolling boulder trap. Make the PCs require Constitution checks every 5 rounds or so to keep ahead. As you do this, play the Indiana Jones theme.

166: Have an underwater temple with a trapped room. The room is 7 feet high from the platforms to the ceiling, and 30 feet deep filled with water. In the room is a giant squid (hiding) and a platform smack-dab between the ways out of the room. Once you step onto the middle platform, water starts gushing in. The only way to remove water is by standing on a doorway platform; the water will only go back to 30 feet deep, and is slow to drain. The squid will suddenly become a major threat...along with drowning.

167: Cause it to hail, and have it deal 1d2-1 nonlethal damage each round. Should anyone ask why, shrug. If they examine the hail in any way, have them realize they're inexplicably getting teeth rained on them. Have it be a side effect of whatever foul ritual the bad guys are causing.

168: Have the campfire stop producing warmth during the night. When they wake up, the flames are blue and there's a stylized face in the flames. Have this flame be your quest-giver for the next few quests...then inexplicably, have the flames blood-red one time, with a dying body in the flames. Their patron.

Grand Lodge

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Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

169. Make a grim face the next time a character rolls a saving throw, and stay silent until they ask you how bad it is. In answer, explain "it's give-me-your-character sheet bad," and then do so, change nothing, and then watch them look panic-stricken for a couple minutes trying to figure out what just happened...

170. Have the characters encounter a cabal of witches around a cauldron cackling madly, then they notice the PCs and stop casting to start combat. Have your players roll initiative...and before combat starts, drop a large house on top of the three witches. At this point, a small cat walks out the door, meows, and walks away...


The Drunken Dragon wrote:

169. Make a grim face the next time a character rolls a saving throw, and stay silent until they ask you how bad it is. In answer, explain "it's give-me-your-character sheet bad," and then do so, change nothing, and then watch them look panic-stricken for a couple minutes trying to figure out what just happened...

170. Have the characters encounter a cabal of witches around a cauldron cackling madly, then they notice the PCs and stop casting to start combat. Have your players roll initiative...and before combat starts, drop a large house on top of the three witches. At this point, a small cat walks out the door, meows, and walks away...

171. Any entrance scene that turns into an encounter with a normal cat, or duck. Maybe whenever the cat gets spooked it turns into an indestructible piece of an artifact. Like the final piece of the Key of Time, from Dr. Who. The cat will follow the party if one of them feeds it.


172. Interrupt the party's stay at an inn with a pair of Kobold missionaries, looking for converts for their Dragon-god.

172b. Bonus points if they hand out explanatory pamphlets written in Draconic.


173. Bump
A bump is a creature in the giant family that has 4 dice, 20 Strenth and Con, and 6 in all the other stats. It carries a maul which is a max sized hammer. This is a large sized creature and it has to use the hammer 2 handed.


174. https://pbs.twimg.com/tweet_video_thumb/CIIIHlpWEAAn8uk.png

Go to Triangle.


I'm sorry about 174. The link has been disconnected. I think it was of triangle Bill from Gravity falls.


175. The gosh awful tea party. The tea is decaffeinated and even more bitter. The sugar is replaced with salt. The cream is completely curdled. The chairs are covered with hair, making them itchy. The teapot has a live rat in it.


176. A large room of indeterminable black crystal-like stone. When the PCs enter, the door slams shut, blending in with the rest of the room. There is no visible source of light, but an ambient glow, lighting up everything in the room, but absorbed by the stone, giving the effect of walking through a void. Torches and other sources of light do not increase the light level or negate the effect. In the center of the room, is a very large statue made of white crystal-like stone, a very large and perfect sphere. It has one opening, just large enough for any given PC to put their hand in. Light sources that are placed inside the orb are not extinguished, but vanish in the inky black of the hollow sphere.

When a PC puts its hand in the orb, it disappears, reappearing when pulled back out. He feels only open air. The further they put their arm in, the more empty the orb seems. Inside is perfect, smooth, vaguely warm stone. At the same time, roll randomly for a different PC in the room. The random PC is squished flat (no damage, just 'pushed' prone and pinned) by a massive hand appearing from the ceiling, and the PC with their arm in the orb feels a equivalent feeling of squishing the PC flat.

The room the PCs entered is actually inside the orb statue, which has some particularly fun folded dimension shenanigans going on. The way out is for one of the PCs to put their arm in the orb, grip the orb statue in its hand, and crush it (it's indestructible otherwise).

Now, the exact effect of the folded space disappearing and leaving the PCs in the previous room they entered from is up to the individual GM. Here's what I had planned for it though: The character's arm disappears as the folded space collapses in on itself. Said arm then plops at the PC's feet, with both points where the arm was severed covered in swirling black bands of energy.

The PC can then reattach his arm simply by holding it to the stump, but a black band tattoo is permanently left behind with a very thin white line through the center. They can trail the white line to cause the arm to separate. Using the arm as a bludgeoning weapon suffers no penalty deals 1d8 damage (1d6 if small), and has an added effect of ignoring the wielder's strength modifier of DR, and on a crit has the potential to stagger, nauseate, and/or inflict 1 negative level.

Afterwards, start placing random holes in areas of dungeons. Some of them produce similar effects. Others do nothing... Others still are home to unfriendly things, such as parasites that infest that arm and that arm only, deal 2 dexterity damage daily, but may inflict a Fleshworm Infestation spell on a successful unarmed strike with that arm.

Now, you gotta ask yourselves my players... Do you feel lucky?... Well... Do ya? (Why, yes, I do miss the random pools of magic water with indeterminable effects until they are sampled!)

177. A random pool of glowing blue hot water. This water radiates magic, powerful magic... But does absolutely nothing. When the PCs are on their way back out of the dungeon after beating the BBEG, have the BBEG's second in command lounging in the pool with some floozies.


178.A magic item quality-Planar transcendent. X5 gp value. The item can function across dimensions. For example, they find a ring gate, just one. The other in on the elemental plane of mineral. There is a chance of grabbing precious gems, metal ores, ordinary rocks, or even unstable rocks that explode when thrown. The next ring gate has it's twin in the plane of ooze or the far realm.


179. Template stacking on minor enemies. Fey-touched double-advanced primitive mythical... house cat? Sure, why not? (Has a 31 Dexterity, by the way.)


180. The characters come upon a scene of slaughter. There is also a goat that screams.


Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

181. A bored cashier that doesn't say anything when characters go into a dungeon, is invulnerable to all attacks and damage. When the characters come out, there's a rope fence denoting an incredibly strong force wall ushering them to the register, where the cashier is now eagerly waiting to check them out. Paper... or plastic?

Scarab Sages

182. What you see at the 2:03 mark of this.


Goth Guru wrote:
180. The characters come upon a scene of slaughter. There is also a goat that screams.

GoatToucher must have lost to animal rights activists, the goat's screaming of joy.

183. Describe a horror so evil, giving all signs of lovecraftian influence, they'd rather not go into the direction of the grand treasure.


184. A lost little girl. She is actually a very young shoggoth that found a child's corpse, assimilated it, and promptly forgot she ever died. In times of stress she can turn killer blob. Bonus points if a PC starts playing her, not realizing what she is.


185. A teleport trap that puts the recipient six feet underground in a steel coffin. Bonus points if the coffins are swarming with ants that eat them alive.


186) Traditionally melee only monster abilities, like level drain, being delivered through ranged attacks.

I did this with a wight once and one of the players freaked because it wasn't how wights worked. That's what she gets for metagaming with her years of experience.

Of course, if I hadn't done that it would've been wiped out in less than a file round before it could be even that mildly inconvenient...


187) AR Curse. Everyone who enters an area Will saves DC30 or sings,"You can buy anything you want, at Alice's restaurant!"

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