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Paizo Employee Creative Director

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Kalindlara wrote:

I'm assuming you've read The Shining and seen the Kubrick film.

1: Have you seen the miniseries version of The Shining? If so, what did you think?

2: Have you read Doctor Sleep yet? What are your thoughts on that book (or the premise, if you haven't read it yet)?

Thank you! ^_^

1) I watched a little bit of the miniseries and didn't like it. It was made in an era where television was still too timid to properly do a Stephen King story for one, and for another the production values and acting and direction seemed bland to me. I much prefer Kubrik's version for film, and prefer King's novel overall.

2) I have; I read King's books more or less the week they come out these days. I quite liked Doctor Sleep a lot, especially how it was not so much a sequel as it was a continuation of a character's arc, not the first story's arc. It's a great way to go back to previous characters and themes without disrupting or undoing or tarnishing the first story's plot. Which is the mistake that 99% of sequels make.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

DebugAMP wrote:
When books like Occult Adventures come out (which I'm a huge fan of btw) and add new classes that come equipped with truely unique roles, how do you imagine them fitting into the existing pieces of Golarion? Do you generally think of them as always being there and just rare enough that they haven't played into major affairs... (dramatic pause and sound effect) until now... or do you think of them as belonging to an area of the world that you are currently detailing, and that current events are just now making them prominent figures?

I imagine that those classes were already there. We had witches and alchemists in Golarion before we released Advanced Player's Guide, but until we released that book, we simply didn't discuss them in rules terms. That's why we didn't do an Irrisen adventure path until that book was out. Likewise, there were ninja and samurai in the world before we did Ultimate Combat, but we didn't do anything significant with them until that book was out. (In fact, the main reason Ultimate Combat has so much about samurai and ninja and the like is BECAUSE we wanted to do Jade Regent.)

Same with Occult Adventures. There have been occultists and psychics and all that in Golarion from the start, but they're mostly focused in regions that are not the Inner Sea—areas like Castrovel, Vudra, and certain parts of the Darklands, for example.

What this means, essentially, is that the later a book comes out with new classes, the more rare, overall, those classes generally are in the world.

It's easy to lose track of that when you see players on the boards going on about playing psychics in dozens or hundreds of threads... but remember that in any one instance of Golarion in an active campaign, there are only a few player characters active at a time. Even if an entire party is made of mediums, they might be the ONLY mediums in the nation the adventure takes place.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

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Darius Darrenbar wrote:

James,

Presently started playing Wrath of the Righteous a few weeks back and I'm thinking about cross classing my dwarven Paladin of Torag into Spiritualist, given the number of necromatic spells in the spiritualist spell-list could multi-classing (or at least casting) be considered as a violation of the Paladin's code?

Necromancy isn't evil. There's a lot of evil spells in that school, though, so as long as you don't prepare or cast any of the spells that are tagged with an "EVIL" (or "CHAOTIC" for that manner) descriptor, you won't be violating your paladin code by casting those any more than, say, casting wizard spells.

Which is to say you can violate all SORTS of codes with a fireball if you want... but the actual casting of a fireball (or many necromancy spells) isn't intrinsically an evil (or chaotic) act.

Now... if you're a paladin of a specific faith or order that SPECIFICALLY says "Thow shalt not engage in necromancy!" then that's a different story, but I'm pretty sure none of the official Golarion paladin codes do anything like that.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Alayern wrote:
Have you read Ernest Kline's Ready Player One by any chance? I think you would adore the first plot-centric setting.

Nope; never heard of it.

Alayern wrote:

Iomedae, "The Inheritor" was Aroden's herald and champion before his mysteeeerious death. Since then she has forsaken his human-centric views and has become the arcehtypal paladin goddess, all about righteousness and valor and defense of the innocent yadda yadda.

1. But what does her church do when it comes to actual inheritance?
Such as, when a member of their faith dies and would logically (and/or legally) pass on their belongings/status to their offspring or a specified recipient.

2. Do they consider the process holy in any way?
3. Do they just leave it to the Abadarans?

My personal take is that (especially given her sobriquet) they probably do something about it, even if it isn't a major focus for the church.

1) She's called the Inheritor, but that doesn't mean her faith has any particularly unusual views on the act of inheriting. Two different things. Her title refers to her inheriting Aroden's faith, more or less. I suspect in time, as Aroden slips further from memory, her title will shift to something less defined by who came before and more defined by who she is now.

2) No.

3) No. Abadar's faith has no particular hold or control over inheritances.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

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HWalsh wrote:

Ok non-rules related (well non-FAQ related) question regarding what it means to become a God.

So, let's say a PC enters, and passes, the test of the Star Stone. They took the risk and it paid off.

However you don't want to say, "Congratulations! Roll up a new character!"

Also, heck, Iomedae was a God and was Aroden's Herald. Some of those heralds (as you even said) were CR 15. Going on the idea that it takes time to build up divine power and hit the big leagues what would be a suitable template to apply?

The idea is "more" but not so much more that it destroys the power level of the party.

I was thinking apply the half celestial template or the Holy/Unholy template. What do you think?

The best way to handle this is to use Mythic Adventures and allow the character to become mythic, but require them to take the Divine Source universal path ability. You might even want to immediately advance the character to tier 3 mythic power to do so, even if the character wasn't mythic before hand.

The standard herald is a CR 15 outsider. That isn't the steadfast rule. Rovagug's herald is a CR 25 magical beast (the Tarrasque), which breaks that rule as well. In Aroden's case, his herald was not something that mortals could conjure with a greater planar ally spell. That's fine, but it's just another exception to the rule.

Once a player character becomes a god, even if they're only a quasi-deity as a result of gaining the Divine Source path ability... unless the other player characters become gods as well, the god character WILL wreck the power level of the party. That's unavoidable.

Having the character who passed the test gain tier 3 mythic power and requiring that character to gain Divine Source as their third power is a great solution, because you can then give the other players 3 ranks in mythic and presto... party balance is maintained.

At that point, in order to become a demigod, the PC would need to progress up to 9th tier (minimum) in order to gain 4 domains granted. And even THEN the character is still a quasi-deity. In order to transition to full demigod (which is a unique creature that cannot be built by advancing levels—you build a demigod in the same way you'd build a CR 26 to CR 30 monster), they'd have to undertake an additional series of mind-boggling quests.

The assumption in-world is that this is the point where a character would take the Test of the Starstone, and upon finishing it, they emerge a demigod. This is basically how Iomedae and Norgorber did it—they were high powered mythic characters of at least tier 9 with fully charged Divine Source, I suspect, when they took the test, and they came out no longer represented in game by a collection of player character levels and tiers, but by a single solitary custom-built monster stat block. At this point, they no longer work as PCs at all, and should be retired from play and live on as NPC deities in your campaign's continuity.

Cayden Calien is an exception that proves the rule. I suspect he skipped the mythic stuff ENTIRELY. He went into the Test drunk. Probably a pretty high level character, but maybe not. He went in not mythic, and came out a demigod. Skipped Mythic entirely.

The Test of the Starstone can do that if it wants.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

skypse wrote:

Hi James!

In the Red Mantis Assassin PrC, if the player holds 2 Sawtooth sabres and uses the level 6 ability of Mantis Form to transform into a mantis, does his damage drop from 1d8 to 1d6 because the swords become claws, does he keep the damage from his swords to 1d8 or does the damage increase to 2d6 due to the size increase to large creature?

When a red mantis assassin becomes a mantis, yes, his swords merge with his body and he uses claws instead of swords when he attacks. He trades out the advantages of being a humanoid with weapons for the advantages of being a Large vermin with darkvision, grab, lunge, mandibles, and sudden strike.

The fact that her sawtooth sword magical enhancements stack onto the claws is a fun bonus that makes her mantis form a bit more interesting than a normal vermin shape II spell. This doesn't transfer over the base saber damage, since the base damage is no longer from a saber but from a mantis claw.

So, if you have two +3 flaming burst unholy sawtooth sabres in your hands, when you mantis form, you treat your 1d6 claw attacks as if they were +3 flaming burst unholy claws.

Obviously, some qualities won't transfer well or at all. You can't have dancing claws, for example.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
James Jacobs wrote:


Obviously, some qualities won't transfer well or at all. You can't have dancing claws, for example.

I heard a story of small town once that said my claws couldn't dance. We showed them, though. So don't you tell me that my claws can't dance! </footloose>

Liberty's Edge

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Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Pawns Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
James Jacobs wrote:

At that point, in order to become a demigod, the PC would need to progress up to 9th tier (minimum) in order to gain 4 domains granted. And even THEN the character is still a quasi-deity. In order to transition to full demigod (which is a unique creature that cannot be built by advancing levels—you build a demigod in the same way you'd build a CR 26 to CR 30 monster), they'd have to undertake an additional series of mind-boggling quests.

The assumption in-world is that this is the point where a character would take the Test of the Starstone, and upon finishing it, they emerge a demigod. This is basically how Iomedae and Norgorber did it—they were high powered mythic characters of at least tier 9 with fully charged Divine Source, I suspect, when they took the test, and they came out no longer represented in game by a collection of player character levels and tiers, but by a single solitary custom-built monster stat block. At this point, they no longer work as PCs at all, and should be retired from play and live on as NPC deities in your campaign's continuity.

Cayden Calien is an exception that proves the rule. I suspect he skipped the mythic stuff ENTIRELY. He went into the Test drunk. Probably a pretty high level character, but maybe not. He went in not mythic, and came out a demigod. Skipped Mythic entirely.

The Test of the Starstone can do that if it wants.

Yay!

Mythic Realms didn't mention anything about the results being different for the three who became gods... implying that they had to work their way up through the mythic tiers and then actually become gods some OTHER way not directly tied to the Starstone at all.

This makes much more sense. If anything, it suggests that someone who completes the Test and comes out with mythic power actually got a consolation prize.

Though... are people generally aware that the Test can grant a lesser, but still world-changing, power level? Wouldn't that raise questions about Razmir's claim to have gained divinity from the Starstone? That is, since he is still around even people who believe that he took the Test might think he is 'only mythic'.


It's impossible to think about thousands of people simultaneously. When you're writing, do you imagine you're writing to or for a specific group or person? Like do you imagine your readers as your own gaming group, the regulars on the messageboards, or your conceptualization of the average Paizano?

Paizo Employee Creative Director

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CBDunkerson wrote:

Mythic Realms didn't mention anything about the results being different for the three who became gods... implying that they had to work their way up through the mythic tiers and then actually become gods some OTHER way not directly tied to the Starstone at all.

This makes much more sense. If anything, it suggests that someone who completes the Test and comes out with mythic power actually got a consolation prize.

Though... are people generally aware that the Test can grant a lesser, but still world-changing, power level? Wouldn't that raise questions about Razmir's claim to have gained divinity from the Starstone? That is, since he is still around even people who believe that he took the Test might think he is 'only mythic'.

No. People are not generally aware of ANYTHING regarding the Test. The information in a book like Mythic Realms is NOT common knowledge to most folks in world. It's the exact opposite—stuff that ONLY the most awesome of heroes and villains will learn. Which is why it's in a book called "Mythic Realms" and not "Commonplace Realms."

Paizo Employee Creative Director

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Dustin Ashe wrote:

It's impossible to think about thousands of people simultaneously. When you're writing, do you imagine you're writing to or for a specific group or person? Like do you imagine your readers as your own gaming group, the regulars on the messageboards, or your conceptualization of the average Paizano?

I disagree that it's impossible to "think about thousands of people simultaneously." One of the advantages of creating Adventure Paths for over a decade and reading feedback and listening to criticisms and reader/player reactions to the same for so many years is that I DO get a better take on how the majority of folks play the game and what works and what doesn't work. When I develop or write an AP, I keep that information in mind.

But at the same time, I do try to write or develop adventures that I myself would enjoy running or playing, and by extension adventures that my closest gaming pals like Wes or Jessica or Erik or Rob or whoever might enjoy playing/reading as well. In this way, I generally do NOT factor in the opinions of regulars on the boards or the like, and instead favor the opinions and expectations of people I know and trust and admire.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Pawns Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
James Jacobs wrote:
No. People are not generally aware of ANYTHING regarding the Test. The information in a book like Mythic Realms is NOT common knowledge to most folks in world. It's the exact opposite—stuff that ONLY the most awesome of heroes and villains will learn. Which is why it's in a book called "Mythic Realms" and not "Commonplace Realms.

Ok, but to people in Absalom it's 'that big building over there'. Sure, people don't know what goes on inside... but just outside is the largest city on Golarion.

Wouldn't they notice if every so often someone came out with awesome, but not deific, powers? Absalom has a monument to people who died and of course temples to the three ascended deities... but what about those 'in between'? Unless they are somehow just forgotten there'd have to be some sort of collective knowledge/beliefs about them. There are even small cults centered around potential 'gods to be'. Those people would surely pay attention if the object of their veneration (or really, anyone) successfully crossed the gap, entered the cathedral, and then returned from the Test with great powers.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

CBDunkerson wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
No. People are not generally aware of ANYTHING regarding the Test. The information in a book like Mythic Realms is NOT common knowledge to most folks in world. It's the exact opposite—stuff that ONLY the most awesome of heroes and villains will learn. Which is why it's in a book called "Mythic Realms" and not "Commonplace Realms.

Ok, but to people in Absalom it's 'that big building over there'. Sure, people don't know what goes on inside... but just outside is the largest city on Golarion.

Wouldn't they notice if every so often someone came out with awesome, but not deific, powers? Absalom has a monument to people who died and of course temples to the three ascended deities... but what about those 'in between'? Unless they are somehow just forgotten there'd have to be some sort of collective knowledge/beliefs about them. There are even small cults centered around potential 'gods to be'. Those people would surely pay attention if the object of their veneration (or really, anyone) successfully crossed the gap, entered the cathedral, and then returned from the Test with great powers.

They absolutely WOULD notice if someone came out of the Starstone Cathedral. So far... that's happened only 3 times. Norgorber, Cayden Caliean, and Iomedae. No one else has made it out—plenty have tried, of course.


Been offline due to troubles with the internet company, but during that time, I finished building Castle Scarwall in Minecraft. Here's the thread about it (if you forgot) with some videos and a link to the imgur album which I'll be uploading more stuff too as soon as I can.

Also, since I had free time and no internet, I went ahead and built Carowyn Manor from Seven Days to the Grave.

Have you ever built anything in Minecraft? If so, what'd you build?

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

Do you think depression is more prevalent in modern society, or is it just diagnosed more?

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Tels wrote:

Been offline due to troubles with the internet company, but during that time, I finished building Castle Scarwall in Minecraft. Here's the thread about it (if you forgot) with some videos and a link to the imgur album which I'll be uploading more stuff too as soon as I can.

Also, since I had free time and no internet, I went ahead and built Carowyn Manor from Seven Days to the Grave.

Have you ever built anything in Minecraft? If so, what'd you build?

Hee; good to see that productivity still functions when the internet is gone! :-D

I've never built anything in Minecraft. I watched Wes try to build a railroad once, and he got hung up on an elevator thing that required some sort of sticky goo that only showed up in the underworld, and when he went down there he fell in lava and died, then went back there to get his stuff and fell into the exact same lava pool. In fact he might have fallen in that lava three times before he quit out of frustration.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

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Samy wrote:
Do you think depression is more prevalent in modern society, or is it just diagnosed more?

I think it's certainly diagnosed more... but I also think that the increase in information and the resulting shrinkage of the world itself may have made it all the easier for us to see the bad in the world, and thus results in more depression.


Pathfinder Lost Omens, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Is Aroden at all related to the Peacock Spirit? They're both deities considered dead, and their holy symbols are an eye with feathers for Aroden, and a feather with an eye for the Peacock Spirit. Also, their most prominent colors are green and gold.


Suppose you have a neutral good settlement with the pious quality. That would mean intolerance towards worshipers of Abathar and Irori, who are generally good neighbors. How would a neutral good person justify this intolerance?

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Simeon wrote:
Is Aroden at all related to the Peacock Spirit? They're both deities considered dead, and their holy symbols are an eye with feathers for Aroden, and a feather with an eye for the Peacock Spirit. Also, their most prominent colors are green and gold.

Nope. Totally different things. To the extent that the Peacock Spirit might not even be a deity.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

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AlgaeNymph wrote:
Suppose you have a neutral good settlement with the pious quality. That would mean intolerance towards worshipers of Abathar and Irori, who are generally good neighbors. How would a neutral good person justify this intolerance?

It would depend on the exact faith of the neutral good settlement, but being good, they would not outlaw or persecute lawful neutral faiths. This is a case where you'd use the word "unwelcome" instead of "outlawed" in the description for Pious. In both cases, the fact that those religions tend to be too self-centered, self-absorbed, or stubborn in their ways and refuse to bend the rules for the sake of good or kindness is what would make them unwelcome in a neutral good society. The neutral good society wouldn't attack a lawful neutral visitor, but they would likely not trust the visitor to leave well enough alone, and would expect the lawful neutral visitor to try to meddle with their ways. If it developed to violence, in most cases it would be because the lawful neutral visitor pushed things too far.

The neutral good person would justify the intolerance, basically, by saying that someone who isn't interested in the good of the people and is only interested in the self or a corporation or a guild or a city would be a danger to the settlement. They'd fear oppression, basically. The way a big corporation comes in and takes over a smaller one that and then lays off employees in order to make the recently acquired smaller corporation run more efficiently is a good example of lawful neutral behavior against a neutral good target.

Sovereign Court

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion Subscriber

Do you have moderator powers, or is that something only Community can do?

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Kalindlara wrote:
Do you have moderator powers, or is that something only Community can do?

I had moderator powers a while back, as did most other folks at Paizo, but at some point we grew large enough that having everyone have moderator power was becoming a mess, so that got pulled back to just those folks whose job duties require it.

Sovereign Court

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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion Subscriber
James Jacobs wrote:
Kalindlara wrote:
Do you have moderator powers, or is that something only Community can do?

I had moderator powers a while back, as did most other folks at Paizo, but at some point we grew large enough that having everyone have moderator power was becoming a mess, so that got pulled back to just those folks whose job duties require it.

I see. I presently don't feel safe as a user of this website. If I'm quieter than normal in the future, that is why.


Is what is left of Dou-Bral trapped in one of the cages hanging from the chains of Zon Kuthon's body? Either way what would it take to free him? Could a "freedom" spell save him?


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Kalindlara wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
Kalindlara wrote:
Do you have moderator powers, or is that something only Community can do?

I had moderator powers a while back, as did most other folks at Paizo, but at some point we grew large enough that having everyone have moderator power was becoming a mess, so that got pulled back to just those folks whose job duties require it.

I see. I presently don't feel safe as a user of this website. If I'm quieter than normal in the future, that is why.

I'll beat them up for you Kalindlara, just say the word. :-)


Pathfinder Lost Omens, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
James Jacobs wrote:
Simeon wrote:
Is Aroden at all related to the Peacock Spirit? They're both deities considered dead, and their holy symbols are an eye with feathers for Aroden, and a feather with an eye for the Peacock Spirit. Also, their most prominent colors are green and gold.
Nope. Totally different things. To the extent that the Peacock Spirit might not even be a deity.

Ah, back to the drawing board for far-fetched Aroden theories.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

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Kalindlara wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
Kalindlara wrote:
Do you have moderator powers, or is that something only Community can do?

I had moderator powers a while back, as did most other folks at Paizo, but at some point we grew large enough that having everyone have moderator power was becoming a mess, so that got pulled back to just those folks whose job duties require it.

I see. I presently don't feel safe as a user of this website. If I'm quieter than normal in the future, that is why.

That's really unfortunate. If there's a particular thread or poster that's causing this, you should absolutely let customer service know—they're really good about taking care of things like that. Or alternately, you could PM or email me and I'll do what I can to take care of it—which would more or less just amount to me forwarding the request on to our mods and asking them to handle the situation ASAP.

Sorry this happened. Toxic customers on these boards and on the internet in general may well be my least favorite part of this entire job.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

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MichaelCullen wrote:
Is what is left of Dou-Bral trapped in one of the cages hanging from the chains of Zon Kuthon's body? Either way what would it take to free him? Could a "freedom" spell save him?

Nope.

And no, Freedom won't save him. He's been Zon-Kuthon for a LONG time, and it'd likely take the action of more than one powerful deity to reverse the situation. I mean... if Shelyn, who's been a deity since Azlant if not before, can't fix it, there's pretty much NO WAY a mere mortal spell could do much.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

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Captain Yesterday, Brut Squad wrote:
Kalindlara wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
Kalindlara wrote:
Do you have moderator powers, or is that something only Community can do?

I had moderator powers a while back, as did most other folks at Paizo, but at some point we grew large enough that having everyone have moderator power was becoming a mess, so that got pulled back to just those folks whose job duties require it.

I see. I presently don't feel safe as a user of this website. If I'm quieter than normal in the future, that is why.
I'll beat them up for you Kalindlara, just say the word. :-)

Hardly the way to make the site a safer place. Nor is it really a joking matter.

Grand Lodge

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Has there been any talks for when you guys will release The Concordance of Rivals?

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Therrux wrote:
Has there been any talks for when you guys will release The Concordance of Rivals?

I suspect not, since I have no idea what you're talking about.

Grand Lodge

James Jacobs wrote:
Therrux wrote:
Has there been any talks for when you guys will release The Concordance of Rivals?
I suspect not, since I have no idea what you're talking about.

It's the book that goes into detail for the neutral planes. It was mentioned in the book of the damned entry of hell unleashed.


Pathfinder Companion, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I'm not sure if you're the one to ask about this, but in Inner Sea Gods, Nethys' section (page 107 if it matters), one of the unique creatures that serves Nethys is called Yamasha (unique succubus), but her entry says she's a ' hawk-winged neutral succubus-like creature'. Is this supposed to imply she actually is/was a succubus, but was transformed like the one from Wrath of the Righteous, or is she merely a creature that uses a modified version of a succubus' statblock, but was never a succubus, being something unique instead? Or should I be asking someone else instead? I figured that Inner Sea Gods fell into your realm, and you are the one to ask about demons and succubi, so thought it might be worth asking here.


James Jacobs wrote:
AlgaeNymph wrote:
Suppose you have a neutral good settlement with the pious quality. That would mean intolerance towards worshipers of Abadar and Irori, who are generally good neighbors. How would a neutral good person justify this intolerance?

It would depend on the exact faith of the neutral good settlement, but being good, they would not outlaw or persecute lawful neutral faiths. This is a case where you'd use the word "unwelcome" instead of "outlawed" in the description for Pious. In both cases, the fact that those religions tend to be too self-centered, self-absorbed, or stubborn in their ways and refuse to bend the rules for the sake of good or kindness is what would make them unwelcome in a neutral good society. The neutral good society wouldn't attack a lawful neutral visitor, but they would likely not trust the visitor to leave well enough alone, and would expect the lawful neutral visitor to try to meddle with their ways. If it developed to violence, in most cases it would be because the lawful neutral visitor pushed things too far.

The neutral good person would justify the intolerance, basically, by saying that someone who isn't interested in the good of the people and is only interested in the self or a corporation or a guild or a city would be a danger to the settlement. They'd fear oppression, basically. The way a big corporation comes in and takes over a smaller one that and then lays off employees in order to make the recently acquired smaller corporation run more efficiently is a good example of lawful neutral behavior against a neutral good target.

Let's say the faith was Arshea, and the settlement would be the one set up by the PCs in Kingmaker. Immigrant resentment towards Abadar as a "god for nobles", and the church refusing to heal diseases for free would be causes to resent Abadarans, but how would Irori's faithful bother Arsheans? Also, what else could Abadarans do to bother Arsheans?


James,
I was looking at the Bestiary 5, and the Orang-Pendak caught my eye as a possibility for use to simulate the Mangani from the Tarzan novels.

How would you simulate the Mangani or would you just stat them up yourself?

Thank you for all your time, we appreciate it!


What happens, at least in Golarion, to the souls of petrified people? Since reversing the petrification brings the body back to life, does that mean the soul is held in stasis until that time, even if it could be thousands of years later?

Similarly, does this mean that Resurrection and True Resurrection would not work on a person that's petrified, since they're not really 'dead?' (And the alternative is that you could 'resurrect' a target, then unpetrify their statue and have a clone running around.) I am aware that this could count as a rule question, so feel free to not answer if you feel that is the case.

How about what happens if the statue is shattered? It occurs to me that petrifying a target, then smashing the statue down into gravel and spreading it across the world could be a nasty way to deny a person an afterlife or resurrection. After all, it's still possible (Though incredibly unlikely, probably requiring a wish) to gather all the shards back together and reform the statue.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Therrux wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
Therrux wrote:
Has there been any talks for when you guys will release The Concordance of Rivals?
I suspect not, since I have no idea what you're talking about.
It's the book that goes into detail for the neutral planes. It was mentioned in the book of the damned entry of hell unleashed.

Ah.

As far as I know, nope, no talks yet.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Luthorne wrote:
I'm not sure if you're the one to ask about this, but in Inner Sea Gods, Nethys' section (page 107 if it matters), one of the unique creatures that serves Nethys is called Yamasha (unique succubus), but her entry says she's a ' hawk-winged neutral succubus-like creature'. Is this supposed to imply she actually is/was a succubus, but was transformed like the one from Wrath of the Righteous, or is she merely a creature that uses a modified version of a succubus' statblock, but was never a succubus, being something unique instead? Or should I be asking someone else instead? I figured that Inner Sea Gods fell into your realm, and you are the one to ask about demons and succubi, so thought it might be worth asking here.

Nope; she's a succubus-like creature, not a succubus. We didn't have room to stat up every single unique outsider, so by giving approximations, a GM can "fake it" using stats for existing monsters.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

AlgaeNymph wrote:
Let's say the faith was Arshea, and the settlement would be the one set up by the PCs in Kingmaker. Immigrant resentment towards Abadar as a "god for nobles", and the church refusing to heal diseases for free would be causes to resent Abadarans, but how would Irori's faithful bother Arsheans? Also, what else could Abadarans do to bother Arsheans?

I'm no expert on Arshea, so I'd have to re-read the seciton in Righteous about him/her to answer, frankly, but really, it should play out in a way that's dramatic and tells a good story, depending on the viewpoint of the party. Personally, if it were my game, Irori would be threatened by Arshea's free will and acceptance of all sorts of physcalities, while Abadar would be annoyed by Arshea ignoring whatever laws were inconvenient.

That said... these faiths don't normally clash. If you want them to, fine, but they're not intended to be enemies.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Swashbucklersdc wrote:

James,

I was looking at the Bestiary 5, and the Orang-Pendak caught my eye as a possibility for use to simulate the Mangani from the Tarzan novels.

How would you simulate the Mangani or would you just stat them up yourself?

Thank you for all your time, we appreciate it!

I'd make new stats for the Mangani... but first I'd have to read those Tarzan novels.

Of course, if the Mangani are functionally identical to orang-pendak, I'd just use those stats and change the name. The players would never know the difference.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Trigger Loaded wrote:

What happens, at least in Golarion, to the souls of petrified people? Since reversing the petrification brings the body back to life, does that mean the soul is held in stasis until that time, even if it could be thousands of years later?

Similarly, does this mean that Resurrection and True Resurrection would not work on a person that's petrified, since they're not really 'dead?' (And the alternative is that you could 'resurrect' a target, then unpetrify their statue and have a clone running around.) I am aware that this could count as a rule question, so feel free to not answer if you feel that is the case.

How about what happens if the statue is shattered? It occurs to me that petrifying a target, then smashing the statue down into gravel and spreading it across the world could be a nasty way to deny a person an afterlife or resurrection. After all, it's still possible (Though incredibly unlikely, probably requiring a wish) to gather all the shards back together and reform the statue.

Petrified people are not dead. They're in a sort of limbo until either they're restored to life or the statue is destroyed. Once the statue is destroyed, the soul moves on to be judged.

Since they're not dead, you can't resurrect or true resurrect a petrified person.

If the statue is shattered or otherwise subjected to a situation that, if visited upon a real body, would cause death, then the person dies.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
James Jacobs wrote:
Trigger Loaded wrote:

What happens, at least in Golarion, to the souls of petrified people? Since reversing the petrification brings the body back to life, does that mean the soul is held in stasis until that time, even if it could be thousands of years later?

Similarly, does this mean that Resurrection and True Resurrection would not work on a person that's petrified, since they're not really 'dead?' (And the alternative is that you could 'resurrect' a target, then unpetrify their statue and have a clone running around.) I am aware that this could count as a rule question, so feel free to not answer if you feel that is the case.

How about what happens if the statue is shattered? It occurs to me that petrifying a target, then smashing the statue down into gravel and spreading it across the world could be a nasty way to deny a person an afterlife or resurrection. After all, it's still possible (Though incredibly unlikely, probably requiring a wish) to gather all the shards back together and reform the statue.

Petrified people are not dead. They're in a sort of limbo until either they're restored to life or the statue is destroyed. Once the statue is destroyed, the soul moves on to be judged.

Since they're not dead, you can't resurrect or true resurrect a petrified person.

If the statue is shattered or otherwise subjected to a situation that, if visited upon a real body, would cause death, then the person dies.

Does death occur the moment fatal "breakage" occurs to the petrified person or do they need to be unpetrified first?

(Sorry if this falls into rules question territory.)

Dark Archive

Fallout 4 question spoilered for length

Spoiler:
Fallout 4 S.P.E.C.I.A.L. & Perk Build calculator.

Another Fallout 4 Build Calculator with Perk Chart

A rather detailed Build Guide walkthrough with a nasally guy.

I am interested, with 28 points to allocate and NO level limits, what will your starting build look like?

I'm leaning on putting Intelligence 7+ to start just because there are no level limits and XP boost for high intelligence, which means it will take about five levels for me to get the "starting" build I want but then after that it's all extra XP.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Rysky wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
Trigger Loaded wrote:

What happens, at least in Golarion, to the souls of petrified people? Since reversing the petrification brings the body back to life, does that mean the soul is held in stasis until that time, even if it could be thousands of years later?

Similarly, does this mean that Resurrection and True Resurrection would not work on a person that's petrified, since they're not really 'dead?' (And the alternative is that you could 'resurrect' a target, then unpetrify their statue and have a clone running around.) I am aware that this could count as a rule question, so feel free to not answer if you feel that is the case.

How about what happens if the statue is shattered? It occurs to me that petrifying a target, then smashing the statue down into gravel and spreading it across the world could be a nasty way to deny a person an afterlife or resurrection. After all, it's still possible (Though incredibly unlikely, probably requiring a wish) to gather all the shards back together and reform the statue.

Petrified people are not dead. They're in a sort of limbo until either they're restored to life or the statue is destroyed. Once the statue is destroyed, the soul moves on to be judged.

Since they're not dead, you can't resurrect or true resurrect a petrified person.

If the statue is shattered or otherwise subjected to a situation that, if visited upon a real body, would cause death, then the person dies.

Does death occur the moment fatal "breakage" occurs to the petrified person or do they need to be unpetrified first?

(Sorry if this falls into rules question territory.)

Death occurs the instant the fatal breakage occurs.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

1 person marked this as a favorite.
baron arem heshvaun wrote:

Fallout 4 question spoilered for length

** spoiler omitted **

Dunno yet. I'm pretty much trying to avoid thinking much about it until I sit down to play the game. But it'll probably be akin to most all of my Fallout characters, something like:

S 3
P 3
E 2
C 6
I 4
A 5
L 5

Endurance is almost always my dump stat in Fallout. I might end up dropping Luck and raising Strength because I tend to hoard stuff and need to be able to carry a lot...

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
James Jacobs wrote:
Rysky wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
Trigger Loaded wrote:

What happens, at least in Golarion, to the souls of petrified people? Since reversing the petrification brings the body back to life, does that mean the soul is held in stasis until that time, even if it could be thousands of years later?

Similarly, does this mean that Resurrection and True Resurrection would not work on a person that's petrified, since they're not really 'dead?' (And the alternative is that you could 'resurrect' a target, then unpetrify their statue and have a clone running around.) I am aware that this could count as a rule question, so feel free to not answer if you feel that is the case.

How about what happens if the statue is shattered? It occurs to me that petrifying a target, then smashing the statue down into gravel and spreading it across the world could be a nasty way to deny a person an afterlife or resurrection. After all, it's still possible (Though incredibly unlikely, probably requiring a wish) to gather all the shards back together and reform the statue.

Petrified people are not dead. They're in a sort of limbo until either they're restored to life or the statue is destroyed. Once the statue is destroyed, the soul moves on to be judged.

Since they're not dead, you can't resurrect or true resurrect a petrified person.

If the statue is shattered or otherwise subjected to a situation that, if visited upon a real body, would cause death, then the person dies.

Does death occur the moment fatal "breakage" occurs to the petrified person or do they need to be unpetrified first?

(Sorry if this falls into rules question territory.)

Death occurs the instant the fatal breakage occurs.

Interesting... thankies :3


a) Being them all divine minions of Pharasma, is there some kind of connection between Anubis and the Psychopomp Ushers?

b) Is there any chance of having few more details about the ushers? Particularly their own granted Domains?


So I've looked around the forums a bit along with another player in the game I'm playing in, and the question has come up yet again about the Mythic Vital Strike tree. To keep this simple: in the rules, does the phrase "weapon damage dice" mean:

2d4 = 2 dice or

2d4 = 1 "set" of dice?

In short, with greater mythic vital strike and a scythe, are you multiplying everything by 4 or 8?

Paizo Employee Creative Director

5 people marked this as a favorite.
T.A.U. wrote:

a) Being them all divine minions of Pharasma, is there some kind of connection between Anubis and the Psychopomp Ushers?

b) Is there any chance of having few more details about the ushers? Particularly their own granted Domains?

a) In my headcanon which didn't QUITE get into print, Anubis is one of Pharasma's most powerful servitors, and is thus IS one of the Psychopomp Ushers. Up to you what you want to do with that info in your game.

b) Maybe some day, if we have the right product to do so.

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