Cloth armor


Rules Questions

Sovereign Court

Pathfinder Card Game, Maps, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I was wondering...
If you bought masterwork clothes, could you then enchant them like armor to provide magical armor protection?
I'm thinking you can, you just treat clothes as a +0 AC, no Max dex or Armor Check suit of armor.

Scarab Sages

Tim Statler wrote:

I was wondering...

If you bought masterwork clothes, could you then enchant them like armor to provide magical armor protection?
I'm thinking you can, you just treat clothes as a +0 AC, no Max dex or Armor Check suit of armor.

Interesting idea


Tim Statler wrote:

I was wondering...

If you bought masterwork clothes, could you then enchant them like armor to provide magical armor protection?
I'm thinking you can, you just treat clothes as a +0 AC, no Max dex or Armor Check suit of armor.

Bracers of Armor are essentially Cloth clothing. I myself have always ruled that a Wizard, etc could make Magic Robes with Armor bonus. I Just use the bracers or armor rules.

Sovereign Court

I doubt that it would have any issues with regard to balance, though I guess that they would be mechanically more similar to bracers of armour reslotted as robes than actual armour.

Edit: ninja'd

Liberty's Edge

You'd most likely want to call it reslotted bracers just so that the armor is counted as a force affect (counts against incorporeals' touch attacks). Also to get up to +8 instead of +5 if you don't want extra properties.


There is no problem, just use the rules in the PHB for adding an ac bonus to an item, 2000gp x the ac bonus squared i think. Double if it takes no body slot.

Sovereign Court

Clothes are NOT AC 0 armor. If they were, then monk's wouldn't get their class bonuses whenever they were wearing clothes. There are very game-mechanic-specific effects granted to "armor" that are not granted to "clothes".

An Armored Kilt grants 0% spell failure, and 0 ACP, so already kinda mimics the idea of enchantable armor that is light enough to not impact the mechanics of the player. If the max dex of +6 on the Armored Kilt, or the 5% spell fail chance on Padded, are a problem for you, then I likely suggest house ruling in a new kind of armor, rather then considering generic clothes as armor.

The other viable options, as many others have suggested, would be to just make a robe or vest that grants a force-based armor bonus to AC, ala Bracers of Armor.


Laughing Goblin wrote:
If the max dex of +6 on the Armored Kilt, or the 5% spell fail chance on Padded, are a problem for you, then I likely suggest house ruling in a new kind of armor, rather then considering generic clothes as armor.

Or get a mithril armoured kilt!

Liberty's Edge

Laughing Goblin wrote:

Clothes are NOT AC 0 armor. If they were, then monk's wouldn't get their class bonuses whenever they were wearing clothes. There are very game-mechanic-specific effects granted to "armor" that are not granted to "clothes".

An Armored Kilt grants 0% spell failure, and 0 ACP, so already kinda mimics the idea of enchantable armor that is light enough to not impact the mechanics of the player. If the max dex of +6 on the Armored Kilt, or the 5% spell fail chance on Padded, are a problem for you, then I likely suggest house ruling in a new kind of armor, rather then considering generic clothes as armor.

The other viable options, as many others have suggested, would be to just make a robe or vest that grants a force-based armor bonus to AC, ala Bracers of Armor.

Robe of the Archmagi.

Grants a +5 armor bonus, does not specifically mention it's a force bonus so it's not. Thus, it acts exactly like a "+5 shirt" would if you treated it as a +0 armor.
It's pretty obvious that something that gives 0 armor at its base wouldn't be counted as armor, but if magic makes it give protection then it gives it protection. The difference between +5 shirt and +5 shirt of armor (ala bracers of armor) is that the latter is a force field around you and the former just makes the shirt deflect things. Same/similar effect, different flavor.
The definition of armor isn't "Something listed under the armor section", it's "something mundane that gives an armor bonus".
The only reason to disallow enchanting something that doesn't already give an armor bonus as armor is flavor. No balance reasons whatsoever.

Sovereign Court

Pathfinder Card Game, Maps, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Still, if you do allow a person's shirt to be enchanted, YOu at least need to pay masterwork cost first. But flavor wise I like the idea.
Either as re slotted bracers or as standard armor with no base bonus.

Liberty's Edge

Tim Statler wrote:

Still, if you do allow a person's shirt to be enchanted, YOu at least need to pay masterwork cost first. But flavor wise I like the idea.

Either as re slotted bracers or as standard armor with no base bonus.

That masterwork shirt better be damned sexy ;)


Tim Statler wrote:

Still, if you do allow a person's shirt to be enchanted, YOu at least need to pay masterwork cost first. But flavor wise I like the idea.

Either as re slotted bracers or as standard armor with no base bonus.

I dont see why not, I use it in my campaign as well, it was inspired by the magic vestment spell by the way. Which essentially allows clothes to be enchanted like armor as well, it seemed a natural extension to allow magical item creation as well.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure, Lost Omens, Pawns, Rulebook Subscriber

Hell, 3.5 Monks wouldn't have been as bad off if they had clothing and hand wraps that could be enchanted as armor and weapons respectively. Then they wouldn't have had to jump through hoops with Bracers of Armor and Amulets of Mighty Fists to survive.


Resurrecting this thread to point out that there are definitely reasons players want to do this.

My players just killed their first red dragon, absolutely elating the elemental fire sorcerer gnome who ends virtually every dungeon crawl naked because his clothes burn off.

He's paying a master tanner the entire dragon carcass in exchange for masterwork leather dragonhide clothing. (And considering it got killed by a paladin Smiting Evil with a longbow, the carcass is in pretty darned good shape. Just half a dozen punctures that need to be sewn up.)

The party immediately asked, "Can we add enchantments to that?"

I ruled that it could be enchanted just like armor: It gives a +1 to +5 physical bonus and does not protect against touch attacks. Seems fairly harmless, considering it won't stack with bracers of armor, and bracers of armor cost the same and are actually better (force vs. physical). All he wants is some fireproof clothing, and if they want to spend money enchanting it, I'm OK with that.

So I tend to agree with most on this thread; it's reasonable, it's not game-breaking, but it's not (yet) in the rules anywhere that I could find.

Scarab Sages

Sorry to necro this yet again, but if "Cloth Armor" can be enchanted, does it then allow armor enchantments to be added to it? For example, A monk would be thrilled to have the brawling enchantment added to a shirt.


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Ladies and Gentlemen, I offer the Silken Ceremonial Armor as a solution.

+1 AC, no max dex, no armor check penalty, and no spell failure, so even a wizard (nonproficient) can wear it with no penalty. At 30gp, its basically fine clothing, that can then be made masterwork, and enchanted.

And while "oriental" based, it could easily be designed as any fashion style.

Problem solved.


wanderer82 wrote:

Ladies and Gentlemen, I offer the Silken Ceremonial Armor as a solution.

+1 AC, no max dex, no armor check penalty, and no spell failure, so even a wizard (nonproficient) can wear it with no penalty. At 30gp, its basically fine clothing, that can then be made masterwork, and enchanted.

And while "oriental" based, it could easily be designed as any fashion style.

Problem solved.

For everyone but a monk, but yeah...everyone that matters.


Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber
Imbicatus wrote:
Sorry to necro this yet again, but if "Cloth Armor" can be enchanted, does it then allow armor enchantments to be added to it? For example, A monk would be thrilled to have the brawling enchantment added to a shirt.

"Cloth armor" is not truly armor; you can use magic vestment to add armor enhancement bonuses, but it is still not considered armor. Haramaki and silken ceremonial armor are light armor with +1 armor bonus and 0 armor check penalty/0% arcane spell failure.

Magic "cloth armor" is still not considered armor: It takes up the Body or Chest slot, not the Armor slot. See several of the robes and the snakeskin tunic for non-armor items that grant an armor bonus. Because it is not armor, it cannot have armor abilities other than an "enhancement bonus" (which is what the armor bonus of those Body/Chest items is priced at).

Sorry, a monk still has to choose between the AC bonus class feature and wearing armor with the brawling ability.


I'm holding out for wicker armor, like Joxer wore in Xena.


The best way for an armor bonus for a monk is still going to be Bracers of Armor. Additionally, the Brawling enchantment can be added to Bracers of Armor, so long as they are at least a +1 armor bonus to begin with.

Now, the big question is are you looking for PFS legal, something for a home campaign??


Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber
wanderer82 wrote:
Additionally, the Brawling enchantment can be added to Bracers of Armor, so long as they are at least a +1 armor bonus to begin with.

False.

Ultimate Equipment wrote:
The brawling ability can be applied only to light armor.

Bracers of armor are not light armor. They are a wondrous item that provides an armor bonus.

Liberty's Edge

Owly wrote:
I'm holding out for wicker armor, like Joxer wore in Xena.

Finally a use for Craft (baskets)!


Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber
Owly wrote:
I'm holding out for wicker armor, like Joxer wore in Xena.

You could always use the stats for wooden armor...

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Tim Statler wrote:

I was wondering...

If you bought masterwork clothes, could you then enchant them like armor to provide magical armor protection?
I'm thinking you can, you just treat clothes as a +0 AC, no Max dex or Armor Check suit of armor.

The rules do not support the existence of cloth armor.

You would have to enchant them with the combination of enchat magic arms and armor and the craft wondrous item feat. There are robe magic items that give an armor bonus. Use them for your guidelines.

I'm reluctant to allow these items, as it makes truck of an intended limitation put into the game. Such an item should be twice as expensive as bracers and subject to the same limits of enchantment.


As far as I know all the existing cloth armor items use the same pricing as bracers.


That would just count as leather piecemeal armor. Also, which person from 8-11 years ago are you responding to?


1 person marked this as a favorite.

It's spam, not a response.

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