Warforged Conversion


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I'm sure it's been done before, but here is what I changed when one of my players wanted to have a warforged character:

+2 Str, +2 Con, -2 Cha. I know it goes against the usual pattern of a + to each a physical and a mental stat, but this just seemed to fit better.

Light Fortification is also obsolete in Pathfinder due to constructs not being crit immune anymore so I removed this feature. This is also why I didn't feel guilty about giving him bonuses to two physical stats.

I left everything else as written.

I also decided that I didn't want him to have the Mithral Body feat (Eberron Campaign Setting) at 1st level (which is technically a 1st level only feat) but I promised him that I'd find a way to upgrade him with something like it later in the adventure when the rest of the party starts getting magical armor.

I'm thinking about giving him low-light or dark vision or something to make up for the loss of Light Fortification. Thoughts?

Sczarni

i would say they seem fine to me, they were balanced in 3.5 and seeing how races got a small boost in pathfinder i would say you are safe with your conversion.

The Exchange

I actually think that -2 Wisdom would be the more appropriate penalty to keep as opposed to the charisma penalty, and I also think it hurts just a little more (penalty to will saves, perception, ect.) so it would be a bit easier to justify the bonuses to two physical scores. Also, anyone that makes a warforged isn't going to care about their charisma, so I think this caters a bit to meta-gaming as is.

Not sure why you disallow the mithral body feat... It's equivalent to scale mail, more or less, at the cost of a feat. Also, consider that Warforged cannot wear armor, so he might get screwed a bit because of this. Even more, when he gets it enchanted he will have to be there for the entire duration (which starts with days, but at later levels he will need significant down time) as opposed to the other party members that can just ditch their armor and buy new ones. It's up to you, of course, but I do hope that you reconsider, otherwise you are dooming him to leather armor (effectively), which can spell death for front-line characters.

Darkvision might be okay...normal constructs have both low-light and darkvision, so one out of the two would be fine.


The character in question is actually an alchemist, so he's only proficient with light armor. I might have allowed it if he was a class that wore heavier armor right from the start, but for him I think I'd rather just allow him to upgrade his parts later to keep him more in line with the rest of the party. He thought the trade off of having to wait a little while for it, but not having to spend a feat on it was worth it.

Also, if you're thinking that warforged alchemist makes zero sense, he decided to flavor his potions and such as being small gears and parts he carries around with him that he uses to temporarily change his mechanics. I also added the "Repair" line of spells to the formulae list for him.

The Exchange

Oh, he won't have to spend a feat on it and he's not planning on being a front-line fighter? That does change circumstances somewhat.

Warforged can drink potions. If they branch into the prestige class that makes them a construct then they can't, but at base they can benefit from magic items that they must consume.

I stand by the -2 wisdom though. Maybe even keep both of the penalties and adding the +2 Strength to their arsenal.


I myself went with +2 con +2 int -2 cha, as warforged as a whole are fast to pick up on things, but they do not really know how to interact with other races or even their own really. I also felt 2 physical boosts where out of line and a physical and a mental fit the other races


Oh, we both know he can drink potions and I never plan to keep him from doing that, he just really liked the idea of giving his character more of a robot flavor by changing up the descriptors for his alchemy. It doesn't affect the rules in any way and puts an interesting spin on the class so I don't mind.

The reason I picked charisma is because a lot of people might find it strange to talk to what is essentially a sentient robot. I hadn't even considered them in my setting until the player expressed interest in playing one, so they're not exactly common but I found a way to accommodate his character anyways. I opened the game with another player helping the village tinkerer put the final touches on building the warforged character. He's been roleplaying having to learn the rules of society and such really well. In this way I guess either penalty would make sense as you can explain some of his socially awkward behavior as low charisma or low wisdom or some combination of the two. I picked charisma this time because it seemed to highlight how being a warforged affects his interactions more with other people who find him strange. He's not exactly going to be the party's diplomat.

I didn't want to give him two penalties because I wanted to make it as in line with the rest of the Pathfinder races as possible. I already consider the Composite Plating to be more of a detriment than a benefit since it limits him so much (which is why I'm willing to let him upgrade later anyways), and he's losing his Light Fortification as a result of changes to the construct type that we decided would only logically pass down to the living construct type. Furthermore, the slam attack he gets is going to be mostly useless for him as well. Adding any further penalties would be a bit harsh and I actually feel that I should be giving him something extra, hence why I'm considering low-light and/or dark vision.


I've decided that before I can accurately balance this race I need to make clear my Pathfinderized living construct type.

Living construct traits:
—Living constructs have both low-light vision and darkvision.
-Living constructs are immune to poison, sleep effects, paralysis, disease, nausea, fatigue, exhaustion, energy drain, and the sickened condition.
—Living constructs cannot heal damage naturally and receive only half the normal effect from healing spells and supernatural abilities that cure hit point damage or ability damage, however they receive the full benefit from spells such as the repair damage line of spells.
—Living constructs are affected by heat metal and chill metal as if they are wearing metal armor. They are also affected by repel metal or stone, repel wood, and rusting grasp, but not spells such as stone to flesh, stone shape, warp wood, and wood shape as they affect objects only.
—Living constructs with 0 hit points do not risk further injury from strenuous activity. When their hit points are less than 0 but greater than their –con score, they are inert, unconscious, and helpless, and cannot perform any actions, but do not lose additional hit points unless more damage is dealt to them.
—Living constructs do not need to eat, sleep, or breathe, but can still benefit from the effects of consumable spells and magic items such as heroes’ feast and potions, and living construct spell casters must still rest for 8 hours before preparing spells.


Warforged:
+2 con, +2 int, -2 cha
Medium
Base speed: 30ft
Living Construct type
Composite Plating: +2 armor bonus, upgradable at any level by a specialist at the cost of a feat, money, kittens, whatever is appropriate for your game (see Mithral and Adamantite Body), occupies the body slot, enchant-able, arcane spell failure as if wearing light armor
Automatic languages: Common

I was thinking maybe +1 hp/level or the toughness feat would round it out nicely, but they're already immune to so many things they're probably fine without :<

Liberty's Edge

Whatever you do, be careful about allowing the Warforged Juggernaut PrC. I played one in an Eberron campaign (and took the Leadership feat to have my own dedicated artificer), and all I have to say is, wow.

Mages will not sleep easy if you unleash that monster...

;)


houstonderek wrote:

Whatever you do, be careful about allowing the Warforged Juggernaut PrC. I played one in an Eberron campaign (and took the Leadership feat to have my own dedicated artificer), and all I have to say is, wow.

Mages will not sleep easy if you unleash that monster...

I've played a Warforged Juggernaut before. I'd wonder, seriously, about how those mages managed to live long enough to be an enemy for me at that level, if they allow themselves to be within charge and/or grapple range before they've put together a magical defense capable of giving me very serious pause.

Juggernaut's major achilles heel is mobility - they're very scary if they're allowed to get into melee range (or allowed to grapple) but a simple levitate spell means that mage is pretty much another party member's problem.

What you really want to wonder about is Warforged Bards. Just how good can they be with a wind instrument, or even a lute, when they only have three chubby metal fingers on each hand, and don't breathe? I'm not sure how much courage you can eke out of a high Perform (Cowbell) roll.


I always picture warforged as being custom built to be whatever class they're going to be. I imagine a warforged bard who uses wind instruments as having the required number of smaller, more dexterous fingers, and some kind of built in mechanism that blows out steam for him to play his instrument with. That or maybe mechanical lungs that he only uses to play the flute or whatever.

I kind of want to try a warforged druid who turns into robot versions of animals sometime.


Summon Monster VI wrote:

I always picture warforged as being custom built to be whatever class they're going to be. I imagine a warforged bard who uses wind instruments as having the required number of smaller, more dexterous fingers, and some kind of built in mechanism that blows out steam for them to play their instrument with. That or maybe mechanical lungs that they only use to play the flute or whatever.

I kind of want to try a warforged druid who turns into robot versions of animals sometime.

You'll need to use one of the fancy no-metal feats from races of eberron, then, since a default warforged druid would have access to none of the druid class features on merit of wearing metal armour (whether they want to or not).

I don't think you need to go so far as to envision custom-built warforged bards - they were built for war, so most of the non-combat classed warforged are either fairly new (and built in illegal forges) or have multiclassed into those professions. The flute thing is more of a joke than a serious consideration - and a bard doesn't have to sound wonderful to produce his or her magical effects ;)

Liberty's Edge

VoodooMike wrote:
houstonderek wrote:

Whatever you do, be careful about allowing the Warforged Juggernaut PrC. I played one in an Eberron campaign (and took the Leadership feat to have my own dedicated artificer), and all I have to say is, wow.

Mages will not sleep easy if you unleash that monster...

I've played a Warforged Juggernaut before. I'd wonder, seriously, about how those mages managed to live long enough to be an enemy for me at that level, if they allow themselves to be within charge and/or grapple range before they've put together a magical defense capable of giving me very serious pause.

Juggernaut's major achilles heel is mobility - they're very scary if they're allowed to get into melee range (or allowed to grapple) but a simple levitate spell means that mage is pretty much another party member's problem.

What you really want to wonder about is Warforged Bards. Just how good can they be with a wind instrument, or even a lute, when they only have three chubby metal fingers on each hand, and don't breathe? I'm not sure how much courage you can eke out of a high Perform (Cowbell) roll.

I should have mentioned the wings of flying and boots of speed, but yeah. There are ways to neutralize one, but a well equipped Juggernaut is a PITA for enemy wizards.


VoodooMike wrote:
I don't think you need to go so far as to envision custom-built warforged bards - they were built for war, so most of the non-combat classed warforged are either fairly new (and built in illegal forges) or have multiclassed into those professions. The flute thing is more of a joke than a serious consideration - and a bard doesn't have to sound wonderful to produce his or her magical effects ;)

That's all Eberron fluff though. In a custom setting I tend to take a lot of creative liberties with how things came to be and generally work. In the game I'm running now, nobody even calls the warforged character a warforged. The guy who built him just thinks of him as a sentient robot, one of the other PCs has nicknamed him "Frying Pan," and we all crack jokes about how he can make toast. One of the characters was trying to explain to someone else what exactly the warforged character was and he said that it's something that the NPC seems to have built out of some pots and an old stove. Of course he doesn't actually look that haphazardly put together, but it goes to show that in this world he's not just a warforged, he is something wonderful and mysterious that nobody short of a mad scientist like the guy who built him will ever fully understand. The name "warforged" only applies in the sense that it's the race we used to create this unique character.


Well.. Bards don't need to use a Perform that requires an instrument anyways, so it's a moot point. Perform (act, dancing, oratory, etc) are all valid. I had one character that had Perform (oratory) and basically talked like a drill seargent to "motivate" everyone around him.

Regarding the balance... I think the immunities give a LOT. Sure they can't heal naturally, and less from normal healing, but they have auto-stabilization, a whole line of curative spells that do work fully, and immunities to a lot of the non-hitpoint problems everyone else has to face.

Keep in mind a lot of people feel the "Scent" quality is a bit much player race. By comparison, these guys do not need to eat, sleep or breathe (nullifying a number of spells on top of many out-of-combat rammifications).

It seemed to work in Eberron, so taking away Light Fortification, but on the flipside, removing the Wisdom penalty, I feel keeps this within reason for Pathfinder.


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houstonderek wrote:
I should have mentioned the wings of flying and boots of speed, but yeah. There are ways to neutralize one, but a well equipped Juggernaut is a PITA for enemy wizards.

A well-equipped anything is a pain in the ass for enemy anythings. There's nothing especially true in that statement when it comes to juggernauts and wizards.

Summon Monster VI wrote:
In a custom setting I tend to take a lot of creative liberties with how things came to be and generally work. In the game I'm running now, nobody even calls the warforged character a warforged. The guy who built him just thinks of him as a sentient robot, one of the other PCs has nicknamed him "Frying Pan," and we all crack jokes about how he can make toast.

In a custom setting where you don't want to carry over any previous fluff there's little reason to "convert" the race at all. Just invent your own from scratch. IOW - if you don't care about the concept behind a race then why care about the stats and qualities? Races are more than mechanics in games, theoretically.

Kaisoku wrote:
Regarding the balance... I think the immunities give a LOT. Sure they can't heal naturally, and less from normal healing, but they have auto-stabilization, a whole line of curative spells that do work fully, and immunities to a lot of the non-hitpoint problems everyone else has to face.

The healing thing is pretty huge, actually. Warforged tend to have high HP, but it is hard for them to get themselves back up to their maximums. This gets especially hard if you go the Juggernaut route and become completely immune to healing magic. It is akin to playing a no-magic campaign where your players have to rest for a week or three between encounters to heal up.

The immunities are big on paper but not as bad in-game. The base racial immunities are immunities that certain classes and PrCs will give you over time. To get the heavy immunities you need to use the juggernaut PrC, and that comes with the price of being unable to heal in any useful fashion.

Similarly, while Adamantine Body seems huge on paper, you have to remember that it is only huge at very low levels (a feat in exchange for slightly weaker adamantine full-plate). As you get into the mid to high single digit levels the other fighters can get a hold of fancy full-plate as well, and their adamantine full plate will have the full 3/adamantine DR rather than the reduced 2/adamantine, and doesn't cost them a feat, only gold, which becomes more and more disposable as the game goes on. Likewise, they can trade up when better armour is found - the warforged cannot.

Most people who think warforged are overpowered are people who have never played in a serious campaign that included warforged PCs.


Just as a clarification to keep this on topic, I don't intend, nor did I even consider warforged juggernaut.


I've personally found the immunities quite impacting.

Poison and Disease are gained fairly quickly and easily by some classes. Sleep effects is something Elves get, sure.

But then we have immunity to Paralysis, which means immunity to Hold spells (a staple save-or-die-soon spell). Nausea/Sickened immunity covers most of the "cloud" spells (with poison covering the others).

Energy drain makes a number of undead encounters (and some high level spells) much easier.

Fatigue/Exhaustion immunity helps against a number of spells and enemies, and gives them Tireless Rage at level 1 if they wanted.

Each little immunity might not have a large list of things that you are protected against (usually a couple spells and maybe a few monsters), but when you add the 8 or so different immunities together, you get a lot of protection.

Keep in mind.. I'm saying that the race doesn't need anything extra because of this list of immunities. The OP was talking about giving them the Toughness feat, etc. I don't think it's necessary.

.

Also, a note on the healing. While in general, the healing thing might be a problem, this particular character is being given access to the Repair spells, effectively making him his own cleric.
Plus, he'll have automatic access to potion making, and easy access (one feat) to making wands of this spell.

So for this unique character, the healing factor is less impacting.


We did +2 Str, +2 Con, -2 Wis in our games. We kept all the immunities except for energy drain (as that is an eberron plot hook, for the "are they really alive?" story line). I would suggest that you NOT add the "Repair" chain of spells to your alchemist and live with the limitations of only getting half healing from spells. You can still use craft checks to repair yourself, and if you have a wizard in the party, that PC can learn them instead, fostering more of a dependent relationship. The immunities can be very powerful, and even SKR mentioned that they should have been a +1 ECL level race.

ED: Oh and as for warforged barbarians, they really should have an exception to the exhaustion immunity as its just plain unfair for them to have tireless rage at level 1. I'd either say they go into a "low-power" mode, or they take 1d6 sub-dual damage in leu of the exhaustion.


I would even consider to allow Warforged Druids. Autobots transform! ;)

I wouldn't allow that they look like the real animal that they shape into. After all they're still constructs.
Maybe the Gorgons are Warforged Druids which can't change back to their normal form. :D
There are many opportunities.^^
Maybe i'm using this for my campaign. Thanks for this really interesting thread.

P.S.
A warforged sorcerer would also be fun to play. But that doesn't seem to fit with the bloodlines.

Dark Archive

Bolber wrote:

I would even consider to allow Warforged Druids. Autobots transform! ;)

I wouldn't allow that they look like the real animal that they shape into. After all they're still constructs.
Maybe the Gorgons are Warforged Druids which can't change back to their normal form. :D
There are many opportunities.^^
Maybe i'm using this for my campaign. Thanks for this really interesting thread.

P.S.
A warforged sorcerer would also be fun to play. But that doesn't seem to fit with the bloodlines.

Destined, Arcane, elemental, abyssal, and infernal all work out fine to me. the first 2 just make sense. Elemental is the "powering spirit that animates" them, and the last 2 are straight up posession type


I don't know if anybody has thought about this, but here it goes. If the race was considered balanced enough for 3.5e then leave it alone except for 2 things. Remove the things that no longer apply to constructs, and then ad a +2 to Str, or some stat. Just the +2, don't move anything else. The reasoning is that for the most part the core races received a +2 to their existing stat array. They were balanced in 3.5e with +2, -2. Now they are balanced with +2, +2, -2. The warforged was balanced with +2, -2, -2 in 3.5e. They should be just fine with +2, +2, -2, -2. It could be used to negate the Chr or Wis even, making it +2, -2. But I think the net should be a +2 to a stat better than they had in 3.5e.


My warforged conversion is at mediafire.com/ElghinnLightbringer, if your interested.


Sean Reynolds said on his website that the Warforged probably should have been +1 LA. I'm sure that would affect such matters if you believe him.


Arakhor wrote:
Sean Reynolds said on his website that the Warforged probably should have been +1 LA. I'm sure that would affect such matters if you believe him.

Not really. I've read that article.

Liberty's Edge

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Arakhor wrote:
Sean Reynolds said on his website that the Warforged probably should have been +1 LA. I'm sure that would affect such matters if you believe him.

He had a fire lit up his rear when he wrote that, plus he thrives on being "controversial" and stirring the pot

I've played as, with, and over warforged in both 3.5 and PF and they work out fine. For us we used the simple +2 to any stat and base rules after that. As a great man once said "Keep it simple, stupid"


I like what Themetricsystem did with the +2 to any stat. it makes a lot of sense.

in the novels warforged are built for many purposes (I know, novels dont consider rules for the rpg in most cases). not just front line grunt, though many more were made for this role than any other.

I would probably allow either the +2 for any stat as a specialist warforged, or the +2 str, +2 con, -2 cha (minus lesser fortification)for the standard grunt.


Warforged work just fine as Druids... they get all their powers and spells as long as they dont take mythril body or adamantine body. :) Any other bits of metal is like the little bits of metal carried by any person Druid or not :) That was mentioned in Eberron I think in the articles.


Shizvestus wrote:
Warforged work just fine as Druids... they get all their powers and spells as long as they dont take mythril body or adamantine body. :) Any other bits of metal is like the little bits of metal carried by any person Druid or not :) That was mentioned in Eberron I think in the articles.

There is also an Ironwood Body feat which was designed pretty much specifically for Warforged Druids. I believe it is in Races of Eberron.


I did a -2 Cha, +2 any mental stat, +2 any physical stat
The -2 to charisma is because they don't socialize well.

I think a -2 to wisdom is also a valid option.


Fullmetal Alchemist ! (;


Thats right, Ironwood Body feat... :)


Here is where they talk about Wareforged in the WotC articles :)
http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dnd/ebds/20051024a

Says Warforged Druids turn into living animals when in Wildshape and lose the construct subtype while shapchanged... :)


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Due to their unique nature and their special abilities, I gave the Warforged a +2 Con and a -2 Cha. This seemed to work for my group.


Summon Monster VI wrote:

I always picture warforged as being custom built to be whatever class they're going to be. I imagine a warforged bard who uses wind instruments as having the required number of smaller, more dexterous fingers, and some kind of built in mechanism that blows out steam for him to play his instrument with. That or maybe mechanical lungs that he only uses to play the flute or whatever.

I kind of want to try a warforged druid who turns into robot versions of animals sometime.

I like this idea.

But you'd think if each warforged were custom built for their class, they would get an ability bonus that would favor members of that class.

so that would lead me to think +2 to any one ability score.

or +2 to Str, Dex, or Con; -2 Wis or Cha
or
+2 to one Int, Wis, or Cha; -2 Dex or Con.

player's choice at creation.

could also represent the component nature of the warforged.


One of the big draws of Warforged in Eberron is that they were customizable for any task, and tougher than normal men regardless. I prefer to give them +2 Con (tough), -2 Cha (have "Who am I?" problems), and +2 to any single stat other than Con (customizable -- and yes, this can cancel out the Cha penalty).

Yes, that makes them ideal Fighters or Barbarians. The flavor of the race supports that.

Scarab Sages Reaper Miniatures

The Aluum from Inner Sea Guide screams warforged to me. It's a 14HD CR10 monster, but I'm sure that somebody could deconstruct it to make it a race.

Although, taking the 3.5 version probably works quite well as is.

Liberty's Edge

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Someone did a full Ebberon conversion - all the races, feats, domains, dieties, the artificer, etc; Least Dragonmarks done up as traits, very nice overall.

Sadly, it cannot be posted/pinned here because of copyright infringement (Ebberon is not a part of the OGL), and I do not remember the person's name so I cannot give proper credit.

I do, however, have copies of all of the pdfs. Here's that version of the Warforged:

Warforged Racial Traits
• +2 Constitution, +2 Intelligence, -2 Charisma: Warforged are resilient of body and sharp of mind, but their
difficulty in relating to other creatures makes them seem aloof or even hostile.
• Living Construct Subtype (Ex): Warforged are constructs with the living construct subtype. A living construct is a
created being given sentience and free will through powerful and complex creation enchantments. Warforged are
living constructs that combine aspects of both constructs and living creatures, as detailed below.
- Immunity to poison, sleep effects, paralysis, disease, nausea, fatigue, exhaustion, effects that cause the
sickened condition, and energy drain.
- Cannot heal damage naturally.
- Can be affected by spells that target living creatures as well as by those that target constructs. Damage
dealt to a warforged can be healed by a cure light wounds spell or a repair light damage spell, for
example, and a warforged is vulnerable to disable construct and harm. However, spells from the healing
subschool and supernatural abilities that cure hit point damage or ability damage provide only half their
normal effect to a warforged.
- A warforged takes damage from heat metal and chill metal as if he were wearing metal armor.
- A warforged with 0 hit points is disabled, just like a living creature. He can only take a single move
action or standard action in each round, but strenuous activity does not risk further injury. When his hit
points are less than 0 and greater than negative his Constitution, a warforged is inert. He is unconscious
and helpless, and he cannot perform any actions. However, an inert warforged does not lose additional hit
points unless more damage is dealt to him, as with a living creature that is stable.
- Can be raised or resurrected.
- A warforged does not need to eat, sleep, or breathe, but he can still benefit from the effects of consumable
spells and magic items such as heroes’ feast and potions. Although living constructs do not need to sleep, a
warforged spellcaster must rest for 8 hours before preparing spells.
• Medium: As Medium constructs, warforged have no special bonuses or penalties due to their size.
• Warforged base land speed is 30 feet.
• Natural slam attack that deals 1d4 bludgeoning damage.
• Composite Plating: The plating used to build a warforged provides a +2 armor bonus. This plating is not natural
armor and does not stack with other effects that give an armor bonus (other than natural armor). This composite
plating occupies the same space on the body as a suit of armor or a robe, and thus a warforged cannot wear armor or
magic robes. Warforged can be enchanted just as armor can be. The character must be present for the entire time it
takes to enchant him. Composite plating also provides a warforged with a 5% arcane spell failure chance, similar to
the penalty for wearing light armor. Any class ability that allows a warforged to ignore the arcane spell failure
chance for light armor lets him ignore this penalty as well.
• Automatic Languages: Common. Bonus Languages: Any.


BobChuck wrote:

Someone did a full Ebberon conversion - all the races, feats, domains, dieties, the artificer, etc; Least Dragonmarks done up as traits, very nice overall.

Sadly, it cannot be posted/pinned here because of copyright infringement (Ebberon is not a part of the OGL), and I do not remember the person's name so I cannot give proper credit.

I do, however, have copies of all of the pdfs.

Would it be possible for you to share those pdfs with me? I do own all of the original Eberron books myself and have been tinkering with a conversion, but I'd be very interested to see someone else's efforts...

(email is doskious.steele (at) yahoo (dot) com)


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Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber

We basically left them as is, but changed the stats as follows :

Floating +2, placed wherever the player wishes (ala Human, Half-elf, Half-orc).

Our reasoning was this : Each warforged is built to spec for his designated job position, so it makes no sense for a sorcerer designated warforge to have negative charisma mods, nor for a scout (Rogue) spec to have +2 str instead of +2 dex. So this makes them feel more like assembly line units.

Dark Archive

I am calling the "Servitors" in my game, since they were created to fulfill various roles. There are several types of Servitors, including "Primitive Servitor", that is essentially a mechanical eidolon, and the Summoner that controls it has a Mechanist archetype. The advanced Servitors may take various "kits" that differentiate them, according to the purposes they were built for. That was inspired by Ironborn from Monte Cook's Book of Iron Might and Ironborn of Questhaven by Rite Publishing. I also like to allow players to play "prototype" Servitors. One of them played a Artificer called Catalogue, that later went into Spellcarved Soldier. He had a gold plating instead of armor, so he didn't have +2 to AC, but he had +4 to Charisma because of all that bling. His penalties were -2 to Constitution, because the gold is soft, and -2 to Wisdom, because he was so involved with various infusions, spells and magic items, that he was a bit absentminded.


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we revisited our warforged stats last night and I came up with the following (which are intended for an eberron game in the future).

Warforged Redux wrote:


• +2 Strength, +2 Intelligence, -2 Wisdom. Warforged are physically imposing and quick learners, however they come to adulthood at around four years old and lack real world experience.

• Medium: Warforged are medium sized creatures and gain to bonuses or penalties based on size.

• Normal Speed: Warforged have a base speed of 30 feet.

• Tireless: Warforged gain the Endurance feat. In addition, whenever they would normally suffer fatigue or exhaustion, they may instead choose to be able to act normally and suffer 1d6 non-lethal damage. Spells or effects that remove the fatigued or exhausted conditions do not reverse the non-lethal damage that the warforged received. Fatigue or exhaustion from rage like effects are an exception and warforged may not choose to trade the effects of their fatigue or exhaustion from an ending rage for non-lethal damage. Warforged do not sleep and are not affected by sleep spells and effects. A warforged spellcaster must still remain inactive for 8 hours per day to be able to cast spells but these hours need not be consecutive.

• Auto-Stablization: Warforged who are reduced to -1 hp or lower automatically stabilize on their turn.

• Part-Machine: Warforged are humanoids with the living construct sybtype and are affected by spells that effect constructs as well as humanoids. As living constructs they do not have normal anatomy the way other living humanoids do. They require very little to function and are immune to starvation, dehydration, and suffocation. While still vulnerable to poison and disease, their unorthodox anatomies grant them a +4 to saving throws against poisons, disease, and the sickened and nauseated conditions.

Warforged do not heal with rest. Instead they requiring repair by someone with the proper tools and a craft specialization in woodworking, blacksmithing, armorer, or clockworks to gain hit points from rest. The DC for performing repairs on a warforged is 15, and the warforged gains their current level in hit points per 4 hours of repairs. Warforged gain only 1/2 the hit points from magic healing spells and effects. They gain the full amount of hit points from repair spells, and the spell make whole. Warforged heal non-lethal damage normally.

• Ferrous: Though incredibly resilient warforged can fall prey to some dangers that threaten animated object and constructs. They are considered a ferrous creature and suffer damage from the spell rusting grasp or similar effect such as the touch of a rust monster. The spell repel metal or stone and repel wood as if holding an object that they cannot let go. Their bodies require some basic maintenance to avoid rust, mold, and corrosion. A warforged who has not undergone maintenance once during the week suffers a -1 armor check penalty per week neglected.

• Armor Plating: Warforged possess a built-in armor plating of masterwork quality that grants a +2 armor bonus to AC, 5% arcane spell failure chance, and reduces their carrying capacity by 15 lbs. This plating cannot normally be removed though it can be sundered. A warforged is affected by the spells heat metal and chill metal normally and cannot remove their armor plating to avoid its effects.

Warforged may be retrofitted with custom designed masterwork armor plating that resembles other armors. This custom armor plating can be installed with a DC 20 craft (armorer) check, requiring 4 hours and tools and conditions suitable for crafting armor. The cost of creating or commissioning new armor plating is the same as that of masterwork armor of the same type. This plating must be custom made to fit the individual warforged who receives it, and it reduces the warforged carrying capacity by its weight.

• Languages: Warforged begin play speaking common. A warforged with a high intelligence can take any bonus language they want (except secret languages like druidic).

I stayed away from the +2 to any attribute style because IIRC the race started out as just mechanical soldiers. Early on they didn't have sorcerers or specialists because their creators did not know how versatile their creations were. Later in the Last War, warforged proved to their masters that they were quite capable in a variety of tasks, and more specialized types of warforged began to be created, but the great majority are still of the standard "fighter" type.

Now after the War many warforged have taken menial labor jobs employing their tirelessness and natural strength, which has engendered resentment amongst the poor whom they have displaced (they are stealing our jobs!).

Scarab Sages

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Hey all,

I wanted to share my Warforged conversion. Its partly custom work and partly using the Advanced Race Guide. It works out to be an advanced raced (23-25ish points, give or take depending on how you view my changes to the construct sub-type). It is not expected to be a common type of race at all, and was created as a monk though i tried to make the Living Construct subtype flexible to accommodate other variants. I view them in the world as artifacts and one-off rarities. Hand crafted for specific purposes.

(Living Construct sub-type)
+2 Strength, +2 Intelligence, -2 Charisma: Warforged are built for strength and learn quickly but have a hard time interacting with others.

Medium: Warforged are medium sized creatures, gaining no bonus or penalty based on size.

Normal Speed: Warforged have a base speed of 30 ft.

Low-Light Vision: Warforged can see twice as far as normal in conditions of dim light.

Darkvision 60 Feet: Warforged can see in the dark up to 60 feet.

Immunities: Sleep-Effects, Fatigue, Exhaustion, Sickness, Poison, Disease, Bleed and Non-Lethal Damage. Warforged to not grow tired or suffer from "organic" frailties.

Shut-Down: A Warforged that is reduced to 0 or fewer HP auto-stabilizes and shuts down. It will not reactivate until repaired to positive HP.

Cannot Heal Naturally: Warforged cannot heal damage naturally and receive only 50% effect from divine healing. They receive full benefits from Mend and Make Whole however and the use of the Craft Construct feat.

Crafted Body: Warforged are crafted from strong but mundane elements. As such, they are affected by spells that manipulate such elements. Warforged take damage from spells such as Heat/Chill Metal and are repelled by Repel Metal/Stone/Wood. Spells such as Stone Shape or Warp Wood slow a Warforged as per the Slow spell, but otherwise do not harm them.

Resist Ability Damage: Warforged are never permanently harmed by ability drain. All ability damage is treated as temporary and heals at a rate of 1D6 per 24 hrs. Furthermore, if a stat is ever reduced to 0, the Warforged shuts down as if reduced to 0 HP but are not destroyed. Healing happens naturally, but the Warforged does not reactivate until all damage to the stat is healed.

Protected Mind: Warforged are immune to Charm and Compulsion effect, but not to other mind affecting spells such as Illusions or Fear.

Singular Body: Warforged can only be raised from the dead if their body is available. Should a Warforged be destroyed, at least 65% of his original body must be used in repair/reconstruction. This repair must be completed by someone with the Craft Construct feat as if creating a new construct. Then the spell to call his soul back from beyond may be cast normally. Should his body be disintegrated, nothing short of Wish may bring him back from death.

Tireless: Warforged do not need to breathe, eat, or sleep unless they want to gain some beneficial effect from one of these activities. This means that they may still drink potions or eat food to benefit from their effects and can sleep in order to regain spells, but neither activity is required to survive or stay in good help.

Hardened Body: Being made of hardwood, stone, and metal provides the Warforged with a +2 to Natural Armor.

*edited for typos*


Thanks for all the info. We are trying to convert over the Warforge , but bring it in under 15 points. I think we are going o go for the +2 con and Int, -2 cha to start or at least I will suggest that.

Shadow Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Not sure if anyone mentioned it, but board gninja Liz posted an Eberron race conversion

Lantern Lodge

Summon Monster VI wrote:

I'm sure it's been done before, but here is what I changed when one of my players wanted to have a warforged character:

+2 Str, +2 Con, -2 Cha. I know it goes against the usual pattern of a + to each a physical and a mental stat, but this just seemed to fit better.

Light Fortification is also obsolete in Pathfinder due to constructs not being crit immune anymore so I removed this feature. This is also why I didn't feel guilty about giving him bonuses to two physical stats.

I left everything else as written.

I also decided that I didn't want him to have the Mithral Body feat (Eberron Campaign Setting) at 1st level (which is technically a 1st level only feat) but I promised him that I'd find a way to upgrade him with something like it later in the adventure when the rest of the party starts getting magical armor.

I'm thinking about giving him low-light or dark vision or something to make up for the loss of Light Fortification. Thoughts?

Check out the Android from the Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Inner Sea Bestiary © 2012. The description of the race and their history is very close to that of a warforged.


In 4.0 i read about them doing "armor components" that is, in my humble opinion a necessary change. Who wants to be stuck with the same armor the whole game? Not this guy.

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