Just do it!


RPG Superstar™ 2010 General Discussion

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Legendary Games, Necromancer Games

Every year of this contest I really come out and proclaim loudly that you should take a shot! You can't win if you don't try. It sounds simple, but it isn't actually. So many people stop themselves. Its true in all phases of life.

Don't make an excuse, make a wondrous item!

Seriously, this is the place to do it. This is the place to pull out the stops and give it a try. Don't worry about later rounds. Just give the first round a try. It will be such a great learning process for you even if you dont advance. And then you can say you took a swing. Seriously, some of the things I am most proud of are things I attempted, even if I didnt do them well or succeed. It is something in and of itself just to try.

Put aside the gamer ego. Put aside the fact that we do something that inherently can't be judged or measured, and the comfort that comes with that. Break out of the comfort zone and do it. I guarantee you that you will impress yourself and you will be glad you did.

So come on. Bust out the rule book. Put pencil to paper. Write it. Rewrite it a bit. Let it simmer and percolate in your brain. Give birth to it and hold it up to the world. Create! Its an amazing process and a wonderful feeling.

This community has the talent. YOU have the talent. Give it a try.

The Exchange

I have not been paying much attention, when is the last day to turn in an entry again?

Legendary Games, Necromancer Games

http://paizo.com/paizo/messageboards/paizoPublishing/rpgSuperstar

1/1/2010


Clark Peterson wrote:
It will be such a great learning process for you even if you dont advance.

This is true, but only to the extent that wondrous items that didn't make it will still receive commentary after the competition closes. Hint, hint ;)

RPG Superstar 2013 Top 16 , Marathon Voter Season 6, Marathon Voter Season 7, Marathon Voter Season 8, Dedicated Voter Season 9 aka Darkjoy

Clark Peterson wrote:
Every year of this contest I really come out and proclaim loudly that you should take a shot! You can't win if you don't try. It sounds simple, but it isn't actually. So many people stop themselves. Its true in all phases of life.

It is true, Clark says this every year AND he is completely right!

Nothing kickstarted my freelancing career as this contest did. It's about entering and learning about good design.

Contributor, RPG Superstar 2009, RPG Superstar Judgernaut

Roman wrote:
This is true, but only to the extent that wondrous items that didn't make it will still receive commentary after the competition closes. Hint, hint ;)

I disagree, Roman. You can learn just as much (if not more!) from reviewing the commentary on the items that did make the Top 32. It's not nearly as useful to understand why your particular item doesn't make it. Usually, it becomes readily apparent as soon as Clark or one of the other judges describes the "Bad Item Stereotypes" or the "Things They're Seeing This Year." And knowing what you may have done wrong in your specific item isn't necessarily as insightful as knowing what to do right.

But that's just my two-cents,
--Neil


From another thread:

NSpicer wrote:
Jason Nelson wrote:
Actually... what the judges are most interested in is, IS YOUR DESIGNER COOL? The item is just the first piece of evidence they have to work with in making that evaluation...
I'd like to reiterate the point Jason has made. The judges aren't just evaluating your item. They're evaluating you...much like the voting public will be doing, too. Your work products from round-to-round certainly help them in that regard. But the bottom line is that they're looking for the next RPG Superstar, not the best 32 magic items for a new sourcebook. So, keep that in mind as you work on your submissions (in every round), and in how you present yourself on the boards via your interaction with everyone and the kinds of questions or comments you make.

I would like to say that from a pessimistic viewpoint this reads with a subtext of 'Don't bother entering if you've entered before but not got anywhere. This contest is about you, as a person, not about any skill-sets which you may or may not have.'

(My rationale is that skill-sets are possible to acquire but changing who I am is *much* more difficult if not impossible - and if the judges weren't interested in me as a person last year, then they aren't likely to be now.)
Coming from someone speaking with the authority of last year's winner I find it exceedingly disheartening.
:(

Edit(ed):
I seem to be getting too stressed/depressed by this contest for my own good. See you all around some other time, hopefully.

Contributor, RPG Superstar 2009, RPG Superstar Judgernaut

Charles Evans 25 wrote:
I would like to say that from a pessimistic viewpoint this reads with a subtext of 'Don't bother entering if you've entered before but not got anywhere....'

[sarcasm]Of course, that's what I said, Charles. Clearly, I should have given up all hope as soon as I got rejected during the first year of RPG Superstar. There's no hope at all after that.[/sarcasm]

Charles Evans 25 wrote:
'...This contest is about you, as a person, not about any skill-sets which you may or may not have.'

It's about both, Charles. As I said in my post above it's not just about the item. It's also about you, as a designer. That should be obvious.

Charles Evans 25 wrote:
My rationale is that skill-sets are possible to acquire but changing who I am is *much* more difficult if not impossible, and if the judges weren't interested in me as a person last year, then they aren't likely to be now.

The judges don't even know who submitted an entry during the Top 32 selection process, Charles. So how could their interest (or lack thereof) in you "as a person" have any bearing on whether you're given a chance to compete? It has zero relevance.

Instead, they use your item submission to evaluate your potential as a designer. My comment was pointing out that they're looking past the item at the skillset and potential of the person who put it together. That's what shines through in addition to the quality of the work product.

Charles Evans 25 wrote:
Coming from last year's winner I find it exceedingly disheartening. :(

*sigh*

I'm afraid there's not a whole lot more I can do to explain things for you, Charles. At some point, you've got to get past looking at things from a "pessimistic viewpoint"...motivate yourself...take confidence in your own abilities...and then work hard to learn the ropes and absorb every bit of knowledge and insight from the previous years of the competition so you can apply it. Unfortunately, I can't help anyone with that. That's the part where you have to show initiative and "gamer chops" as Sean likes to call it. That's where an RPG Superstar (or even a Top 32 contestant) separates themselves from the pack.

Best wishes,
--Neil

Star Voter Season 6, Dedicated Voter Season 7, Marathon Voter Season 8, Marathon Voter Season 9

Charles Evans 25 wrote:

From another thread:

NSpicer wrote:
Jason Nelson wrote:
Actually... what the judges are most interested in is, IS YOUR DESIGNER COOL? The item is just the first piece of evidence they have to work with in making that evaluation...
I'd like to reiterate the point Jason has made. The judges aren't just evaluating your item. They're evaluating you...much like the voting public will be doing, too. Your work products from round-to-round certainly help them in that regard. But the bottom line is that they're looking for the next RPG Superstar, not the best 32 magic items for a new sourcebook. So, keep that in mind as you work on your submissions (in every round), and in how you present yourself on the boards via your interaction with everyone and the kinds of questions or comments you make.

I would like to say that from a pessimistic viewpoint this reads with a subtext of 'Don't bother entering if you've entered before but not got anywhere. This contest is about you, as a person, not about any skill-sets which you may or may not have.'

My rationale is that skill-sets are possible to acquire but changing who I am is *much* more difficult if not impossible, and if the judges weren't interested in me as a person last year, then they aren't likely to be now.
Coming from last year's winner I find it exceedingly disheartening.
:(

I had the same interpretation at first. It is hard not to take any critique of one's as work personal. If you have read any of Neil's other posts though I think you can safely say that is not what he meant. "Knowing" Nspicer, this is not the case, the judges (and any publisher) are judging your item, design, style, or writing, but not you.

The item is anonymous so who you are only counts in later rounds or how you show through your writing. Here I think being professional and positive in all your posts is the advice to take. By March we the community will 'know' you and be voting on that as much your designing skills.

Take heart, his advice and the community as a whole wants you to succeed! (where it otherwise, would there be an RPG SuperStar? :)

Contributor, RPG Superstar 2010 Top 4

I'd like to thank Darkjoy.

Darkjoy and I sparred a little the first year, but Darkjoy keeps dusting himself off and trying again and again.. with a positive attitude.

I find myself saying, "Is there any reason I should expect any less of myself?" No.

And there are many like Darkjoy, I just hold him up as an example because I remember that first year. He asked me to try the second year, and I said I would.. but then I never did.

Not so this time. I'll be there, whether my entry makes the first round or not.

Success or failure in the first round is no indictment on your potential, nor is it an indictment on you as a person. Win or lose, it's a foundation upon which to grow, learn, and develop.

This is not an opportunity to fail, its an opportunity to win! That I believe is part of the message Clark Peterson is trying to impart.

Somebody once told me, 'No editor wants to enable a writer to do anything but their very best; but practically speaking writers screw up and make mistakes. I'd rather see a writer pick themselves up and start writing again, rather than curl up in a ball and never try again. The former is something you can build upon, the later is just a waste.'

Thanks again to Clark, Neil, Jason, and all my fellow contestants who keep trying!

Contributor, RPG Superstar 2009, RPG Superstar Judgernaut

Watcher wrote:
Success or failure in the first round is no indictment on your potential, nor is it an indictment on you as a person. Win or lose, it's a foundation upon which to grow, learn, and develop....Somebody once told me, 'No editor wants to enable a writer to do anything but their very best; but practically speaking writers screw up and make mistakes. I'd rather see a writer pick themselves up and start writing again, rather than curl up in a ball and never try again. The former is something you can build upon, the later is just a waste.'

Exactly!

RPG Superstar 2014 Top 4, RPG Superstar 2013 Top 32 , Dedicated Voter Season 6, Marathon Voter Season 7, Star Voter Season 8

I'm going to toss in my two coppers with everyone else who is encouraging people to "just do it." This is truly an amazing opportunity and there is no reason not to try. Whether or not your item is selected, you've gained a valuable learning experience and the opportunity to improve not only your creative skills but your role-playing skills as well.

As Watcher says above: it's an opportunity to win, not to fail. It's also more than that: an opportunity to learn, to have fun, and to participate in the creation of a really awesome game.

(I just wish I'd known about it last year or the year before!)

Sovereign Court

The way I see it, this is just a way for me to take part in an interesting thought exercise that will have useful output! No matter what, I'll be able to use the item in my home game.

Obviously, making the top 32 would be awesome, but the contest seems fun in and of itself!

My bet is, if you're having fun with it, you'll be more creative and have an even better chance of making that top 32 list!

At least, that's what I'm telling myself. :)

Legendary Games, Necromancer Games

Charles Evans 25 wrote:

I would like to say that from a pessimistic viewpoint this reads with a subtext of 'Don't bother entering if you've entered before but not got anywhere. This contest is about you, as a person, not about any skill-sets which you may or may not have.'

(My rationale is that skill-sets are possible to acquire but changing who I am is *much* more difficult if not impossible - and if the judges weren't interested in me as a person last year, then they aren't likely to be now.)
Edit(ed):
I seem to be getting too stressed/depressed by this contest for my own good. See you all around some other time, hopefully.

Wow, Charles that just couldn't be further from the truth. As I have said many times, we are not judging you as a person. We are judging one specific thing that you created. We know nothing about you or even your skill set. We are judging the execution of one item.

Let's take an analogy. I am a huge Laker fan. I love Kobe and Pau Gasol. Both are excellent free throw shooters, but both miss free throws on occasion. Let's say I get to watch Kobe shoot one free throw and he misses. All I can say is that he missed THAT free throw. I cant say anything about him. I cant even say if he is good or bad at free throws generally. All I can say is he missed that one. Now, missing that one didn't stop him from later sinking the game winning 3 at the buzzer in the way that only one of the greatest of all time can do.

Same thing with contestants here. I just get to see you shoot one free throw. Or in this case, I get to see just one wondrous item. I can no more say anything about you or your ability in general than I could about Kobe missing a free throw. You could design a bad wondrous item and be the best designer in the world.

Don't let the fear of missing the free throw keep you from shooting, or the fear that in missing the free throw it somehow makes a broader statement about you. It doesn't.

I have shot and missed more times in my life than I care to count. But I'll tell you what, I am shooting again. :)

What I am saying is your assertion is just not correct: in judging one item we by definition cannot be judging either you or your skill set. All we are judging is the execution on that one item. That's it. And please understand that not making the cut last year doesn't mean the judges weren't interested in you as a person. You just can't pull that meaning from not making the cut. I want to strongly encourage you to rethink that conclusion.

Shadow Lodge Star Voter Season 6, Star Voter Season 8

I didn't make it last year, so I didn't put much thought into my submission(which hasn't been submitted yet) and I think it turned out pretty good. "Just do it!" is a great peice of advice.

RPG Superstar 2013 Top 16 , Marathon Voter Season 6, Marathon Voter Season 7, Marathon Voter Season 8, Dedicated Voter Season 9 aka Darkjoy

Watcher wrote:

I'd like to thank Darkjoy.

You just made my day, Watcher!

I truely enjoy competing in this contest, maybe I'll be picked this year, maybe I won't but next year I'll enter again.

What I remember from year one is that Clark told me that I made a B+ item, perfectly good publishing quality but not Superstar.

Last year Clark told me that my #2 item had serious mojo, which is an improvement, because Clark is a mojo-loving kind of guy ;>

(My number #2 item and others were published recently, entering has other benefits as well)

So Watcher, you better enter this year and Charles, I remember that you felt crushed after submitting for Pathfinder Society as well, I also recall that you've resubmitted for that as well. This is the same, you have 3 weeks left to think of something, just do it.

Contributor, RPG Superstar 2009, RPG Superstar Judgernaut

Darkjoy wrote:
...Charles, I remember that you felt crushed after submitting for Pathfinder Society as well, I also recall that you've resubmitted for that as well. This is the same, you have 3 weeks left to think of something, just do it.

I'll echo that. I encouraged Charles back when he despaired after the Pathfinder Society open call, too. And Clark has repeatedly done so during the RPG Superstar competitions. You just have to keep climbing back on the horse and applying the lessons-learned. There are lots of people who have done "good, but not quite great enough" items in the past...and they're this close to making the Top 32. I'm rooting for all of them.

And, besides all that, it's a HUGE amount of fun!

Scarab Sages Contributor, RPG Superstar 2008 Top 4, Legendary Games

NSpicer wrote:
Darkjoy wrote:
...Charles, I remember that you felt crushed after submitting for Pathfinder Society as well, I also recall that you've resubmitted for that as well. This is the same, you have 3 weeks left to think of something, just do it.

I'll echo that. I encouraged Charles back when he despaired after the Pathfinder Society open call, too. And Clark has repeatedly done so during the RPG Superstar competitions. You just have to keep climbing back on the horse and applying the lessons-learned. There are lots of people who have done "good, but not quite great enough" items in the past...and they're this close to making the Top 32. I'm rooting for all of them.

And, besides all that, it's a HUGE amount of fun!

This right here is the phrase that pays.

I think I overstated my point earlier. Since the initial submit is blind judging, the judges only know what they see on the screen. I didn't mean to imply that judges could infer anything about the PERSON from that tiny 200-300 word blip, but that they can and do make inferences about that person's ability to follow directions, creativity, possible or probable creative influences, writing style and skill, and knowledge of game rules and game history - the kind of toolbox they might bring to the table as a contestant.

It's not a perfect picture, obviously. It's just a snapshot, like watching Kobe shoot a free throw, but you can see that Kobe knows which basket to shoot it into, that he knows how to put on the uniform, to follow the rules of free throws in not stepping over the line or taking too much time, the form he has on his shot, what he does after he releases the ball... none of which guarantees that any particular shot is going to go in, but all of which can give you a decent inkling of whether Kobe has the skill set to BE a good free-throw shooter (or knows what to do if the free throw misses), whether he makes this one or misses it.

So Charles and anybody else who might be feeling anxious, DON'T! Take your shot, man, and keep shooting! You might have missed last time and the time before that, but buck up little camper, because this time you just might make it!

As Watcher said above, this isn't a chance to fail, this is a chance to succeed! Why are you going to win? Why NOT you?

Every year on American Idol tryouts the judges ask contestant after contestant "Why are you here?" The correct answer is, "because I am going to be the next American Idol!" Believe it! It just might be you!

Contributor

I was going to post this last night, decided against it after I had finished typing it, but now I've decided to post it.

There's this guy who kept submitting stuff to Dragon and Dungeon. And he kept getting rejected. Over and over again. So he refined his work and practiced. And they started accepting his submissions. And he got published over and over again in the magazines, to the point where he had an article published almost every month for a year. And Wizards decided to hire him full-time as a designer. And we teased him for a while because (due to the lag from printing) he was STILL getting stuff published in the mags for several months after being hired. His name is James Wyatt.

There's this guy who was working in a biochem lab synthesizing RNA. He was bored with it. As a long-time gamer, he heard about a job opening at TSR, a job to run their online presence. He applied. Someone else (me!) got the job. So he applied for a different job at TSR, a design job, and got hired to the D&D core team. And began to crank out really awesome D&D stuff. Adventures, sourcebooks, box sets. His name is Bruce Cordell.

Don't let an initial failure--whatever the reason for it--deter you from trying again, or from changing your tactics. You lose NOTHING by submitting this year no matter how far you did or didn't get in previous competitions. Hopefully you learned something from last year's competition and can apply that to your submission this year. But you can't win if you don't try.

Read the rules, both the general rules and the R1 rules. The rules give you some guidelines about how to avoid some common pitfalls. Read Neil's advice. His advice gives you some more. There are submissions we've already eliminated because they failed to follow the R1 rules, and there are submissions we've already eliminated because they failed to follow some of the boldfaced comments from Neil's advice--advice based on his own personal experience and collected by watching the competition from the last two years.

Just because you don't manage to win your first marathon doesn't mean you shouldn't ever run another marathon.


NSpicer wrote:
Roman wrote:
This is true, but only to the extent that wondrous items that didn't make it will still receive commentary after the competition closes. Hint, hint ;)

I disagree, Roman. You can learn just as much (if not more!) from reviewing the commentary on the items that did make the Top 32. It's not nearly as useful to understand why your particular item doesn't make it. Usually, it becomes readily apparent as soon as Clark or one of the other judges describes the "Bad Item Stereotypes" or the "Things They're Seeing This Year." And knowing what you may have done wrong in your specific item isn't necessarily as insightful as knowing what to do right.

But that's just my two-cents,
--Neil

Yes, but in order to read that you needn't actually participate, which was what Clark was implying - you can read the comments on the 32 items that do make it regardless. That's not to say you shouldn't participate, of course, as you still get the excitement of designing something and submitting it, as well as being part of the competition, even if you don't make it into the top 32. Besides, my comment was more of a jest/attempt to persuade Clark to also release the feedback on those items that do not make it to the top 32. ;)

Legendary Games, Necromancer Games

Sean K Reynolds wrote:

There's this guy who kept submitting stuff to Dragon and Dungeon. And he kept getting rejected. Over and over again. So he refined his work and practiced. And they started accepting his submissions. And he got published over and over again in the magazines, to the point where he had an article published almost every month for a year. And Wizards decided to hire him full-time as a designer. And we teased him for a while because (due to the lag from printing) he was STILL getting stuff published in the mags for several months after being hired. His name is James Wyatt.

There's this guy who was working in a biochem lab synthesizing RNA. He was bored with it. As a long-time gamer, he heard about a job opening at TSR, a job to run their online presence. He applied. Someone else (me!) got the job. So he applied for a different job at TSR, a design job, and got hired to the D&D core team. And began to crank out really awesome D&D stuff. Adventures, sourcebooks, box sets. His name is Bruce Cordell.

Don't let an initial failure--whatever the reason for it--deter you from trying again, or from changing your tactics. You lose NOTHING by submitting this year no matter how far you did or didn't get in previous competitions. Hopefully you learned something from last year's competition and can apply that to your submission this year. But you can't win if you don't try.

Great examples, Sean!!!!

Legendary Games, Necromancer Games

Roman wrote:
Besides, my comment was more of a jest/attempt to persuade Clark to also release the feedback on those items that do not make it to the top 32. ;)

I can't unilaterally release the feedback on the ones that don't make the top 32, but I will do this year what I have done the prior two years--I will, if specifically requested by the item's author--summarize my concerns and thoughts about the specific item. I see someone already started a thread for me to do that.

Contributor

And I'm going to save all of my comments for easy referral later. Bow down, mortals, and beware the BIG REFERENCE TABLE OF REASONS FOR REJECTION! BWAHAHAAAAAAA!!!!!

*ahem*

Hi.


Clark Peterson wrote:
Roman wrote:
Besides, my comment was more of a jest/attempt to persuade Clark to also release the feedback on those items that do not make it to the top 32. ;)
I can't unilaterally release the feedback on the ones that don't make the top 32, but I will do this year what I have done the prior two years--I will, if specifically requested by the item's author--summarize my concerns and thoughts about the specific item. I see someone already started a thread for me to do that.

Thanks! I will definitely ask you for your comments to enhance the learning experience derived from this contest. :)

Of course, I don't want to pre-judge not getting into the top 32 and thus automatically receiving feedback. I am merely being realistic given that there might be thousands of submissions.


Charles Evans 25 wrote:

From another thread:

NSpicer wrote:
Jason Nelson wrote:
Actually... what the judges are most interested in is, IS YOUR DESIGNER COOL? The item is just the first piece of evidence they have to work with in making that evaluation...
I'd like to reiterate the point Jason has made. The judges aren't just evaluating your item. They're evaluating you...much like the voting public will be doing, too. Your work products from round-to-round certainly help them in that regard. But the bottom line is that they're looking for the next RPG Superstar, not the best 32 magic items for a new sourcebook. So, keep that in mind as you work on your submissions (in every round), and in how you present yourself on the boards via your interaction with everyone and the kinds of questions or comments you make.

I would like to say that from a pessimistic viewpoint this reads with a subtext of 'Don't bother entering if you've entered before but not got anywhere. This contest is about you, as a person, not about any skill-sets which you may or may not have.'

(My rationale is that skill-sets are possible to acquire but changing who I am is *much* more difficult if not impossible - and if the judges weren't interested in me as a person last year, then they aren't likely to be now.)
Coming from someone speaking with the authority of last year's winner I find it exceedingly disheartening.
:(

Edit(ed):
I seem to be getting too stressed/depressed by this contest for my own good. See you all around some other time, hopefully.

If this contest is stressing you out, then try breaking in another way. Winning RPG Supe is huge, but it is not the be-all and end-all. In fact, your chance of breaking into the industry by winning this is relatively small (though you have nothing to lose by entering). There are always other opportunities. I broke in earlier this year by submitting several pieces to a Goodman open call. KQ and LPJ just ran open monster design contests. KQ is always accepting queries, and so are many other third-party companies. I dialed one up a few weeks ago, just to ask about freelancing, and got paid for an assignment. I never expect to be accepted, because I'm not a big name and the numbers are against any one submission making it-I just do my best, fire it off, and forget it. I never expected it to happen, but eventually I started selling a few things. There is no better feeling in the world than forgetting you submitted something and being told a couple of months later that it was accepted and you are getting paid. If you really want it and you are willing to seek out opportunities (or make them for yourself), you can be successful.

Scarab Sages

Clark,

The words you spoke in the original post are so true. I am giving it a swing as well and I dont care if I fail. If I were to make the top 32, I would be so stoked and beside myself with excitement that I would by my favorite merlot and celebrate by myself, even if all my D&D buddies couldnt make it over...

I hope there is alot of competition this year and I also second Clark's supplication for everyone to give it a shot.

I really want to do well, but I want to succeed against the most competition. That makes it so much better.

Good luck everyone. Even if I fall flat on my face, 32 people will succeed against my submission. In the end, that is all I can do.

:D

I hope you all like my item.

Curt

Scarab Sages

Sean K Reynolds wrote:
... BIG REFERENCE TABLE OF REASONS FOR REJECTION! BWAHAHAAAAAAA!!!!!

Someone needs to steal this from Sean's computer and make it available to the masses. Not for any value it may have to would-be designers, but for the sheer humor of what are surely witty quips and phrases.

Dark Archive

I was hesitating, but damn if this thread makes me want to toss my entry in. One of the greatest things the internet has ever done my creativity: keep me from avoiding opportunities and chances.

Yep. Clark, I shall submit and see what the community can teach me on the design side.

RPG Superstar 2013 Top 16 , Marathon Voter Season 6, Marathon Voter Season 7, Marathon Voter Season 8, Dedicated Voter Season 9 aka Darkjoy

Sean K Reynolds wrote:


Read the rules, both the general rules and the R1 rules. The rules give you some guidelines about how to avoid some common pitfalls. Read Neil's advice. His advice gives you some more. There are submissions we've already eliminated because they failed to follow the R1 rules, and there are submissions we've already eliminated because they failed to follow some of the boldfaced comments from Neil's advice--advice based on his own personal experience and collected by watching the competition from the last two years....

Bad thing about entering early is that the judges say stuff like this and I instantly think: is it over already? But I am used to that second guessing game now, so it doesn't phase me all that much.


If I don't make it past round-one I might still follow along with the competition and create my own entries based on the sekrit challenges. I entered because it sounded fun and I wanted the challenge to refine my game design writing, and that's not dependent on "winning" (although I wouldn't get the great professional feedback). So I'm not feeling too stressed about January, looking forward to seeing the variety of submissions, and wondering what's next. :)

If you haven't submitted something - why not go for it? It'll be fun. :)

The Exchange

Charles , I remember meeting you at Paizocon UK and you should post an entry, mate. There are many reasons why that people have cited already, but here's my take on this.

Personally I know what you mean because I didn't enter last year and I can find of excuses for that but the bottom line was I didn't enjoy the contest as much (mine was one of the magical coins from the first year - but this time it will be different).

For me taking part is also about being part of this community. Who wouldn't want to reach the final 32? Let alone win and be published.

Then there's what Gary Gygax once wrote that the greatest DMs are those that strive to do better. This contest will make me think and I bet its the same for you. Entering will just make you better at the game and where's the harm in that?

Good Luck Everyone

Shadow Lodge Star Voter Season 6, Star Voter Season 8

Dragonborn3 wrote:
I didn't make it last year, so I didn't put much thought into my submission(which hasn't been submitted yet) and I think it turned out pretty good. "Just do it!" is a great peice of advice.

I couldn'y hold myself back any longer. I have submitted my wondrous item, and have now started to worry about making it to the mysterious second round.

Marathon Voter Season 6, Marathon Voter Season 7, Marathon Voter Season 8, Dedicated Voter Season 9

Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I entered last year too - it was my first time and I think I mustve hit almost every speedbump, spelling mistake, ooops I did that and that and that from the dont do lists along the way.

It didnt stop me having another go this year.

I've just posted and now have that wonderful exciting waiting to go.

And if I dont make it again, I know for darn sure I've improved over last year because of all the feedback so freely given.

And then there's the hope that in a couple years time, a fifth year anniversary "best and worst of submissions" book comes along and I may still get to contribute to something (hey, stranger things have happened you know) :P

But I have submitted. And I know one thing...

Someone out there will read it, they may just like it.

Even if they don't love it, it might spark a thought or three that ends up in some future project. It may even end up in a home campaign without my knowledge.

In short, I have given back something for the last 20 years of fun and friendships I have had and still have to this day.

What better reason than that to have a go.

So go on, you know you want to.


Darkjoy wrote:
Watcher wrote:

I'd like to thank Darkjoy.

You just made my day, Watcher!

I truely enjoy competing in this contest, maybe I'll be picked this year, maybe I won't but next year I'll enter again.

What I remember from year one is that Clark told me that I made a B+ item, perfectly good publishing quality but not Superstar.

Last year Clark told me that my #2 item had serious mojo, which is an improvement, because Clark is a mojo-loving kind of guy ;>

(My number #2 item and others were published recently, entering has other benefits as well)

So Watcher, you better enter this year and Charles, I remember that you felt crushed after submitting for Pathfinder Society as well, I also recall that you've resubmitted for that as well. This is the same, you have 3 weeks left to think of something, just do it.

Can you tell which items and in which book?

RPG Superstar 2013 Top 16 , Marathon Voter Season 6, Marathon Voter Season 7, Marathon Voter Season 8, Dedicated Voter Season 9 aka Darkjoy

Check my profile.

Liberty's Edge Contributor

Well, after reading this thread, and spending a few moments letting my mind wander, I suddenly realized that I do, in fact, want to join in the fun, this year.

The first draft of my wondrous item is complete. Now to let it "ferment" for a day or so before going back to see if the description makes sense when I read it next time. ;)


Oh heck. You all have inspired me too! The past 2 years I've dithered and not submitted. This year I shall! WTH right?

Oh yeah, here's a little inspirational story for...Charles, I think? I only read a few posts deep (waaay too many to go through). ;) So if gobs of inspirational speeches have already occurred, my bad.

So the author of "A Wrinkle in Time" (a famous kid's book, if ya didn't know) gave her book to an agent who submitted it to TWENTY-SIX different publishers. Rejected every time! Her agent sent it back "so sorry, but it sucks."

So she meets an editor at a dinner party a few months later (luck is a huge part of anyone's success BTW. you can increase luck via persistence) who likes her and decides to give her book a try. Secretly, he thinks that "yes, it does suck, but it'll at least pay for itself...probably."

Of course it's a blockbuster hit that's still in publication 40 years later.

Contributor, RPG Superstar 2010 Top 4

Count_Rugen wrote:

Oh heck. You all have inspired me too! The past 2 years I've dithered and not submitted. This year I shall! WTH right?

Oh yeah, here's a little inspirational story for...Charles, I think? I only read a few posts deep (waaay too many to go through). ;) So if gobs of inspirational speeches have already occurred, my bad.

So the author of "A Wrinkle in Time" (a famous kid's book, if ya didn't know) gave her book to an agent who submitted it to TWENTY-SIX different publishers. Rejected every time! Her agent sent it back "so sorry, but it sucks."

So she meets an editor at a dinner party a few months later (luck is a huge part of anyone's success BTW. you can increase luck via persistence) who likes her and decides to give her book a try. Secretly, he thinks that "yes, it does suck, but it'll at least pay for itself...probably."

Of course it's a blockbuster hit that's still in publication 40 years later.

Madeleine L'Engle just to round a good story out...


Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Adventure, Rulebook Subscriber

In my personal experience...

Every year, I enter this contest as a personal challenge to myself.

It's a challenge to defeat my fears of rejection, and my anxiety over the editor's pen.

I've missed writing and artistic opportunities in the past because I was afraid I couldn't deal. I'm not happy with that. I don't want to hold myself back anymore.

If you feel the same way, that's exactly why you should enter this contest and do your gosh-darned best. Kick your fears in the teeth! :)

Sovereign Court RPG Superstar 2009 Top 32, 2010 Top 8 , Star Voter Season 6

Sean K Reynolds wrote:

I was going to post this last night, decided against it after I had finished typing it, but now I've decided to post it.

There's this guy who kept submitting stuff to Dragon and Dungeon. And he kept getting rejected. Over and over again. So he refined his work and practiced. And they started accepting his submissions. And he got published over and over again in the magazines, to the point where he had an article published almost every month for a year. And Wizards decided to hire him full-time as a designer. And we teased him for a while because (due to the lag from printing) he was STILL getting stuff published in the mags for several months after being hired. His name is James Wyatt.

There's this guy who was working in a biochem lab synthesizing RNA. He was bored with it. As a long-time gamer, he heard about a job opening at TSR, a job to run their online presence. He applied. Someone else (me!) got the job. So he applied for a different job at TSR, a design job, and got hired to the D&D core team. And began to crank out really awesome D&D stuff. Adventures, sourcebooks, box sets. His name is Bruce Cordell.

You forgot a certain poster on the usenets (an archaeic form of message boards, now mostly used for Dling porn, for you youngins) who and decided to try to get hired just as a net rep...

Contributor

Matthew Morris wrote:
You forgot a certain poster on the usenets (an archaeic form of message boards, now mostly used for Dling porn, for you youngins) who and decided to try to get hired just as a net rep...

For once, I decided to not toot my own horn. :)

The Exchange RPG Superstar 2010 Top 32 aka carborundum

I've had an idea, I've written it up, I've checked it twenty zillion times...

And now I'm going to sleep on it, check the formatting and calculations in the morning, read the description aloud... and send it in!

Whooo!!!!


For what it's worth, I've thrown my hat into the ring (so to speak). it was much harder to put that idea into print format that I expected, but once it was done (and it took me about a week of research and agonizing over when I was done enough to hit 'enter') I did feel much better about it.

God only knows how i'll do, but you know what? I'm just happy that I got over my own inertia and put something out there.

Dedicated Voter Season 7, Dedicated Voter Season 8, Marathon Voter Season 9

Tom Baumbach wrote:
Sean K Reynolds wrote:
... BIG REFERENCE TABLE OF REASONS FOR REJECTION! BWAHAHAAAAAAA!!!!!
Someone needs to steal this from Sean's computer and make it available to the masses. Not for any value it may have to would-be designers, but for the sheer humor of what are surely witty quips and phrases.

He's probably already coded it into a artifact, ala his The Deck of Past and Future Possibilities.


Sean K Reynolds wrote:
...Don't let an initial failure--whatever the reason for it--deter you from trying again, or from changing your tactics. You lose NOTHING by submitting this year no matter how far you did or didn't get in previous competitions. Hopefully you learned something from last year's competition and can apply that to your submission this year. But you can't win if you don't try...
Au contraire:
Joshua, to Professor Falken wrote:
...A strange game. The only winning move is not to play. How about a nice game of chess?...

That aside, I would like to thank Clark for doing his best to clear up some of the confusion over a post which I quoted earlier on this thread from another thread.

Now if you'll excuse me, but despite French Wolf's tempting whispers, I really must be off to try and find a nice game of chess... ;)

The Exchange RPG Superstar 2010 Top 32 aka carborundum

Did it! And now I'm panicking that I should have double checked some last minute changes. Ah well, better luck next year ;-)

RPG Superstar 2009 Top 16 aka Clandestine

I know I'll be giving it a shot this year too ;)

Best of luck to all contestants!

...Wait, I can enter, right?

Paizo Employee Chief Technical Officer

Clandestine wrote:

I know I'll be giving it a shot this year too ;)

Best of luck to all contestants!

...Wait, I can enter, right?

Assuming you still meet the guidelines regarding published work in the industry and such, yes you can. Folks who made the Top 8 in previous years can't enter again, but since you got knocked out at 16, you're ok.

RPG Superstar 2009 Top 16 aka Clandestine

Ah, splendid. I'm glad I remembered correctly. I'm off to brainstorm!

RPG Superstar 2010 Top 32 aka Hydro

I feel kinda bad for the handful of people who got knocked out in the second-to-last round.

Not that making the top 8 isn't an awesome achievement, but they just missed the finals (and some serious bragging rights) while also just missing their chance to try agai.

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