Oriental Adventures


3.5/d20/OGL


Was just reading through Dragon 128, and the article about OA piqued my intrest. Does anyone have it? If so, do you like it?
What specifically is good or bad? How can it be easily adapted to FR or Eberron? (While I'm at it, I 'll throw Greyhawk in as well) What parts can easlily be adapted, and what can't?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks,

WaterdhavianFlapjack


WaterdhavianFlapjack wrote:

Was just reading through Dragon 128, and the article about OA piqued my intrest. Does anyone have it? If so, do you like it?

What specifically is good or bad? How can it be easily adapted to FR or Eberron? (While I'm at it, I 'll throw Greyhawk in as well) What parts can easlily be adapted, and what can't?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks,

WaterdhavianFlapjack

I have it but I can't easily decide what the correct answer to your question is.

Really the best answer is probably for you to try and take a look at it yourself.

OK if you insist on contining to read my post after the best advice has already been given be aware that I'm rambling...

The book is big but its also clearly made for 3.0 and not 3.5. Genrally most of the core classes in the book are available in a more balanced fashion in the Complete series. Evne some of the better prestige classes, such as the Tattoo'd monk made it into the complete series. Whats left is pretty focused on running either a classical OA campaign (with the rather unusual races one might remember from the 1st edition book) or for running a campaign in the Legend of the Five Rings world.

I felt that it did not really do all that great a job of unmixing these two campaign worlds. I don't know much at all about Legend of the Five Rings and I kind of felt like I came away still not knowing anything much about the look and feel of that world but know with a lot of rules some of which where applicable in that world and others that where not.

If there is a Forgotten Realms book for 3.5 you might consider snatching it up.

My feeling is that this book is not really appropreate for anything resembling orthodox Greyhawk - and if all you want is teh classes then the Complete Series has better versions. I don't know about Eberron but I doubt it easily fits there either.

Nor can I say I felt all that much otherwise found in the book really clicked that much with me. The Monsters might work if your running Legend of the Five Rings but otherwise its really like one has just acquired a collection of truely bizzare monsters all of whom are actually nature spirits.

I picked it up because I have occidental and oriental lands side by side and in fact mixed together under the auspices of a single Emperor in my homebrew. One would think this would make the book ideal for me - but it was not so. Most of the good parts are in the 'Complete Series' now updated to 3.5. I stole a handful of ideas and a single monster (Bakemono - oriental goblins) which I thought where realy pretty cool. Thats all I got from this book.

Its an interesting read however so you might like it for that - and if you can find it second hand then it might be a steal. Its well written and all - just not all that useful.

Maybe the most telling aspect of this is how quickly the marraige between D20 and Legend of the Five Rings ended. I'd suspect that part of the reason Legend of the Five Rings soon made a new version of the RPG with their copy right that had nothing to do with D20 was because this book fails to really transport you to a fantasy Asia. You better be a skilled DM indeed to be able to make Fantasy Asia come alive with just this material.


I've always had a little problem with Oriental Adventures (as a former co-worker put it "Orientals are rugs and salads"). I mean I loved the fact that they tried to define martial arts, had the proficiency system, and the info in the back in the 1st ed book. However, it never really felt right.

With the 3.0 version they married it to Legend of the Five Rings and promptly sued for divorce.

The main problems are that this new Lo5R setting for OA isn't compatible with any of the old stuff, there are very heavy Japanese overtones (a small section in the back that has some mention of changing it to give another Asian feel), and that there is a ton of backstory from the old Lo5R that new DMs have to deal with, as that is the context in which it was written.

I also have some problems in interpretation. Such as, the Wu Jen seem to be the closest thing to Taoists, especially those Taoists who climb mountains to contemplate their belly buttons. They do that to cultivate themselves and attune themselves into the Way of Nature. This should mean that they should be an odd mix of Wizard, Sorceror, and Druid. What you have (even in the Complete Arcane) is a Wizard with a cool spell list and odd taboos. Another thing is the fact that while they have the 5 elements you are meant to be unbalanced in its use when the whole point of cultivation is to become IN balance.

I guess what it boils down to is: "What do you want in an Asian setting?"

If you want a Neo-Japanese setting then the 3.0 book might work for you. If you want anything else, then maybe you can take a bye on this and look for something else.


Take the regular old D&D classes, weapons, skills and feats. Change all the names to japanese-sounding words and you get the Oriental Adventures. Sure, a few new things, but mostly the same stuff with hard to remember names. They could do the same thing with a middle-eastern theme. Just take the same stuff and add lots of Ks and Hs to the names. My verdict is : Stay with the classic.

Ultradamato Hirisukse


Thanks guys. Decidely set on not getting OA. Now, setting my sights on Magic of Incarnum and Green Ronin's The Psychic Handbook...

(See my two other recent threads. Please? :P)

WaterdhavianFlapjack


Jeremy Mac Donald wrote:
Really the best answer is probably for you to try and take a look at it yourself.

Jeremy was right on with the OA assesment; I have the book and enjoyed reading it. It sits on a shelf next to my Draconomicon gathering dust. I'll never use it, not because I won't want to, but because the players would probably agree with UltraDan's comments. The ironic thing is they wouldn't want to play OA, but have no problems "tapping into its juice" by using Complete Warriors "Kia Shout", Kensai, and other OA classes and feats from the Complete Warrior book.

If its something that irks me its a Samurai or Kensai in a decidedly Anglo-Saxon fantasy setting.


I’ve Got Reach wrote:
Jeremy Mac Donald wrote:
Really the best answer is probably for you to try and take a look at it yourself.

Jeremy was right on with the OA assesment; I have the book and enjoyed reading it. It sits on a shelf next to my Draconomicon gathering dust. I'll never use it, not because I won't want to, but because the players would probably agree with UltraDan's comments. The ironic thing is they wouldn't want to play OA, but have no problems "tapping into its juice" by using Complete Warriors "Kia Shout", Kensai, and other OA classes and feats from the Complete Warrior book.

If its something that irks me its a Samurai or Kensai in a decidedly Anglo-Saxon fantasy setting.

One of my players wanted to try a Kensai character. I let him do it and basically told the other players that his character was from a land far away. It just added to the whole mysteriousness about the character. I didn't say I'd never use it... I just wouldn't base my world on it, sticking to terms we can all understand.

Ultradan


I disliked the OA 3.0 book because it was so heavily tied into the Legend of the Five Rings books. There wasn't any real attempt at separation between the two, and for as much background history that L5R has, it was just better all around to get the Rokugan setting book for D20.

That being said, I like the L5R setting (and have used it), but OA really should have stood on its own two tabi-booted feet.

Now I just hope SOMEONE will convert over the Kara Tur, Maztica, and Zhakara settings from FR...that would rock.


Lilith wrote:


Now I just hope SOMEONE will convert over the Kara Tur, Maztica, and Zhakara settings from FR...that would rock.

Well I hope they manage to pull it off correctly. Of those three settings the only one I thought really worked was Maztica. That was a very good balance of old and new.

D&D is tough when all of a sudden all our presumptions are thrown to the four winds and everything is different. Actually I think campaigns for both worlds might work well in Forgotten realms if one starts with the presumption that explorers from the core area are entering into their lands. One could then start by running a campaign with the begining characters as explorers and kind of shift over as the campaign continues - maybe force teh players to make oriental characters if their first, western one, dies.

In fact that could make a pretty good Adventure Path - Forgotten realms explorers head for the Orient and are drawn into a mission of exploration and negotiation - later they come to realize that their trading company or whatever has been duped or is being used as a patsy and the players have to stop the UPE's nefarous plot to use something found in the Orient to further its schemes in the Core realms.

Involves lots of waterbourne adventuring as well. Last few adventures take place back in the core realms but know the party includes a number of players that are Samurai's and such that where picked up during the majority of the campaign that took place in varous parts of Kura-Tur.

anyway my core take is that if one wants to introduce westerners to fantasy X land it works best to interface the two settings. It gives western players a chance to familerize themselves with the land if only by comparing and contrasting its culture with the one they do understand.


We need an adventure path based on the historical Silk Road. It would go from Faerun through Zakhara to Kara-tur, connecting all three continents with a single trade route. PCs could help build forts and caravansaries along the route, work as merchants or guards, clear monsters and other hazards in the path of the road, and have other adventures while exploring new lands they've never been to before...


Samuel Wright wrote:
We need an adventure path based on the historical Silk Road. It would go from Faerun through Zakhara to Kara-tur, connecting all three continents with a single trade route. PCs could help build forts and caravansaries along the route, work as merchants or guards, clear monsters and other hazards in the path of the road, and have other adventures while exploring new lands they've never been to before...

I like it as a campaign setting but I'd need something more to make it into an adventure path. Some continuing link. Maybe a critical caravan has to get from X city to Y city to Z city and back again and for some reason UPE wants its stopped and is pulling out all the stops to make that happen - the brave adventurers start out as low level gaurds and become major muscle while they take a trip of a lifetime.

One could read a translation of Marco Polo's accounts for insperation and attempt to explain the foriegn lands as Morco Polo's contemporaries saw it - so outlandish and fantastic that one is simply assumed to be lying outright when they tell their story back home.


I've never really used the OA, but I plan on getting it very soon, along with several others like Silver Marches and the Underdark included. I like getting supplements to campaign settings to help me get a better view of how the world as a whole works. If you focus on just one aspect then you miss out on so much more. My campaign runs all across whatever world we happen to be in at the time, I like to include as much of the world's history as possible. I think that it helps to thicken the plot lines.


dragonlvr wrote:
I've never really used the OA, but I plan on getting it very soon, along with several others like Silver Marches and the Underdark included. I like getting supplements to campaign settings to help me get a better view of how the world as a whole works. If you focus on just one aspect then you miss out on so much more. My campaign runs all across whatever world we happen to be in at the time, I like to include as much of the world's history as possible. I think that it helps to thicken the plot lines.

Well get the other suppliments first. OA is thin on the ground with background - especially non Legend of the Five Rings background.

I mentioned before that I know nothing about the Legends of the Five Rings world - the problem is I still don't. I get the impression that if you happened to be famileir with that world you could read this stuff and say uh-hu alot 'cause it would click but if you now nothing then you just get odds and ends with little to fill in the details.

I think basically whats missing is the mundane - its a book full of classes, races, magic and monsters. But there is almost no mundane material at all. What do people do if they are not legendary Samurai in this world? Beats me - thats not covered.


For actual background stuff, L5R stuff at least, you need to get the Rokugan book. As for the rest of the stuff in OA, most of it has been reprinted and (technically) updated to 3.5. So unless you are still playing 3.0, you really can forget OA.

The Complete Warrior: Samurai, Kensai, Ronin (all Japanese)
The Complete Divine: Shugenja, I think there was something to do with the Void
The Complete Arcane: Wu Jen (Chinese, wow), Some Void oriented prestige class here too... maybe
The Complete Adventurer: Ninja

These are most of the 3.5 updated classes and prestige classes. Heck... just looking through your Dragon back issues should give you plenty of setting info.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I couldn't DISAGREE more with most of what everyone has said. HOWEVER, I have some prejudicial reasons: My campaign world was born in 1st edition.

Sharpe wrote:
... just looking through your Dragon back issues should give you plenty of setting info.

I hated the rokugan stuff, but loved the rest. HOWEVER, I was also the "OA DM" for our group back in the mid 80s, so it was easy for me to take most of the Kara-Tur (the "official" Asian side of FR) and 1st edition background and use it with the updated material.

The 3.5 update in Dragon #318 fixed most things---although I didn't agree with a couple changes (Vanara racial abilities and changing Hengeyokai from the "spirit" subtype).

Last but not least, (WARNING: Rant approaching!!)
I despise the use of the "complete" books. It's not that I'm against anything extra (the "Races of..." series is pretty darn good), but if the "complete" stuff is so great and necessary then why isn't it in the core books? Oh, yeah, now I remember: WotC is owned by Hasbro and they want my money, so they they create a 100 supplements. "New" items, spells, PrC, etc should all be things that players and DMs develop together or pull from issues of Dragon magazine---not a glop of marketing bound in a market-flooded book.
<sigh....>
(OK, sorry for the soapbox....)

Any-who, like I originally said. I think it's a GOOD book. For it to be GREAT you'll have to have some background info or a well-thought out Campaign World. And personally, I don't think Samurai, Kensai, Ninja, or Shugenja should ever show-up on a European continent....well, unless their part of an invading army! ;-)

P.S.
An "oriental" Adventure Path would be VERY cool!

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I've been toying with the idea of setting a campaign (or at least a few adventures) in an asian setting with a sort of fantasy ancient china feel.

Anyone know of any good v3.0, 3.5 or just general d20 supplements to use for rules, inspiration? I've always had the impression (which this thread seems to confirm) that OA focuses more on a fantasy japanese version.


NorthernOkie wrote:

Last but not least, (WARNING: Rant approaching!!)

I despise the use of the "complete" books. It's not that I'm against anything extra (the "Races of..." series is pretty darn good), but if the "complete" stuff is so great and necessary then why isn't it in the core books? Oh, yeah, now I remember: WotC is owned by Hasbro and they want my money, so they they create a 100 supplements. "New" items, spells, PrC, etc should all be things that players and DMs develop together or pull from issues of Dragon magazine---not a glop of marketing bound in a market-flooded book.
<sigh....>
(OK, sorry for the soapbox....)

Thats interesting.

Though I disagree with it.

I think the races books are the weakest while I find the complete books interesting - I wouldn't use everything in them - but at least there is useful material in them - to date I haven't found any material in the races books I would really be jazzed about using.

Now my rant - As to the revelation that WotC is a publishing company that wants to sell more books rather than a non-profit organization dedicated to providing gamers with free content - duh. The model that WotC uses is one of the reasons that they D&D is a better quality game than most of the other produced - they pay talented people to produce it. Clearly they are people who love the game - but you don't get the calibre of content by just asking people to post. Look at the message boards, which also cost money - most of the content people post on those is crap. Writing, screening, editing, layout, production, art, shipping - all those things cost money. It is hardly a surprise that WotC wants to make some money for the money they layout - is that wrong no - should you pay - yes. Would you work for free?

As to why the content isn't in the core books - well for the same reason that Paizo has a reason to be - there are always new ideas to explore, new concepts. Or is it your expectation that everything imagined or that ever will be imagined for the game should be developed, play tested, layed out with professional level art, and shipped - for free - with nothing to follow.

My rant, when gamers snivel about having to pay for something they want. Especially something as reasonably priced as a book - or even collection books - for petes sake you can by 3 books a year for about $100 what hobby costs less than that - not running - good shoes will eat more than that, the gym - no way, scuba diving - no way, skiing - no. With drinks and candy taking a date to the movies a couple times costs almost that much - and thats with no dinner.

An even bigger peeve is when the people grousing about book cost would like nothing more than to get paid themselves to write game content.

End of my soapbox.

And yes an oriental adventure path would be cool - question - would that thread be better if based on european type adventurers explorering/discovering an oriental setting - or oriental type PCs in their home setting?


OA has much good stuff in it. I would have rather seen an update for Kara-Tur than the Rokugan stuff, however. And lots more China/Tibet/Central Asia focused material. And some serious working over of the monk class to provide a large number of "martial arts style" options that would fit a variety of orders (good, neutral, and evil) in a campaign world.

Have just been reading accounts of Marco Polo and Ibn Battuta and Zhang Qian (a 2nd century BC Chinese traveller to Persia) with my students. This fastidiousness about East is East and West is West and never the twain shall meet is completely bogus, in my opinion. East and West met quite frequently in the Middle Ages, and there is no reason why they shouldn't in a fantasy setting. My homebrew campaign world includes both European and Asian flavored places, but I often take inspiration from things I've learned in Asian history and tweak them to fit my "European" inspired societies. Some elves practice matriliny and "walking marriage" just like the Moso people of China. The King of Coram (whose distant ancestors were horse-riding nomads like the Mongols) uses a system just like the Tokugawa shoguns' sankin kotai to keep a tight rein on his vassal dukes. Samurai are just knights who use different weapons and follow a different honor code--why can't a DM adapt the class to fit a "non-Japanese" setting of his own devising? My PC in the FR campaign I'm involved in is a Sohei from Shoulung, journeying to Cormyr and Waterdeep on a quest of vengeance. What's wrong with that, as long as I do a good job of playing the role of a traveller from afar who doesn't understand much of the local culture and doesn't speak Common all that well?

Of course these cultural boundary crossings have to have a good backstory to create verisimilitude, but hey, it's fantasy. Use your imagination, people! Mix and match a little--it's fun!


Peruhain of Brithondy wrote:
Of course these cultural boundary crossings have to have a good backstory to create verisimilitude...

That was my point exactly.

As an aside there is a huge mall here named for Ibn Battuta - divided into sections based on his travels (China, India, Persia, Tunisia, Egypt, and Andalusia) - its kind o neat there are a number of exhibits on Ibn Battuta's travels (and those of muslim explorers in general) its pretty neat - they even have a DVD for sale (English and Arabic) of the animated adventures of Ibn Battuta.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
mothman wrote:

I've been toying with the idea of setting a campaign (or at least a few adventures) in an asian setting with a sort of fantasy ancient china feel.

Anyone know of any good v3.0, 3.5 or just general d20 supplements to use for rules, inspiration?...

The 1st edition Shou Lung resources have a very Chinese feel to them. Also there have been a couple of adventures in Dungeon that have heavy Asian flavors even though they are not set in OA or rokugan. The topic was just being discussed in another thread by this person:

Occam wrote:

There are a few 3e Dungeon adventures explicitly Asian in feel, that would work with little or no adaptation:

"Rana Mor" (Dungeon 86) (SE Asian)
"The Winding Way" (Dungeon 117)
"The Palace of Plenty" (Dungeon 130)

In addition, I have plans to adapt these 3e adventures to an Oriental setting:

"Forsaken Arch" (Dungeon 120)
"Lost Temple of Demogorgon" (Dungeon 120)
"Within the Circle" (Dungeon 130)

Kyr wrote:

.... It is hardly a surprise that WotC wants to make some money for the money they layout - is that wrong no - should you pay - yes. Would you work for free?

...Or is it your expectation that everything imagined or that ever will be imagined for...

Great thoughts, Kyr. (It is truly refreshing when one finds an intelligent poster on a message board.) My earlier post did come off as a rant against the costs; however, that's not what I intended at all. What I hoped to imply was the "flooding of the market" so to speak. I was an avid gamer throughout 1st edition and into 2nd but then it seemed like (during 2e) that suddenly there were all of these supplements and quintessentials and then the TSR financial troubles seemed to start. Nothing happens in isolation, (and it's true that life became very busy for me about tht time, so who really moved away from the table???) but I've always equated that flood of tomes and poorly bound "extras" with the fading of a beloved game.

Of course, the good news is that 3rd+ edition has brought the game roaring back. I suppose I see all of the new "extras" and get nervous---I'm not against spending money for something well-done. I just don't want Hasbro to "overexpand" the system again, so to speak.

"kyr wrote:


And yes an oriental adventure path would be cool - question - would that thread be better if based on european type adventurers explorering/discovering an oriental setting - or oriental type PCs in their home setting?

That's a great question....personally, I'd like a "PCs in their home setting" format. however, I have to admit that the "exploring/discovering" backdrop would probably have a much greater audience.

Most of us OAers are used to having to manipulate and change things to fit our Campaign views anyway, right? :-)

Sovereign Court

Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Adventure, Companion, Lost Omens, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Society Subscriber

I own OA and several L5R books. I can't confirm what was said above: OA and Rokugan aren't identical. And OA isn't bad, just because it doesn't support Kara-Tur.

OA only contains rule information.
The Rokugan campaign setting adds some new classes, though.
So equating OA to L5R isn't really true.
If you look for a rich campaign setting, you might prefer L5R over some of the old settings. After all Kara-Tur didn't sport many products.

To the question of oriental flavour alternatives:
Expeditious Retreat Press (known for their "A Magical Medieval Society" book) recently published a book on the Silk Road. I didn't see that book yet, though.

I wouldn't expect any official re-incarnation of Kara-Tur. The original setting didn't receive long support. Any succesosor would have an even harder time. Chances are high, though, that it will be revisited in Dragon, won't it?

Wolfgang Baur claimed in an interview that Al-Qadim was supposed to be a short lived setting right from the start. If this is the case then it did remarkably well. I think there are fan sites which sport 3rd edition conversions for that setting.

Maztica: I guess, it's the same with this setting. On the other hand the adventure paths seem to move further and further to the west. Why shouldn't future adventure paths reach a "new continent"?

In the meantime OA/ Kara-Tur/ Maztica/ Al-Qadim will stay settings for DMs who are willing to spend a bit more effort on preparation, though...

Greetings,
Günther


Peruhain of Brithondy wrote:
Have just been reading accounts of Marco Polo and Ibn Battuta and Zhang Qian (a 2nd century BC Chinese traveller to Persia) with my students. This fastidiousness about East is East and West is West and never the twain shall meet is completely bogus, in my opinion. East and West met quite frequently in the Middle Ages, and there is no reason why they shouldn't in a fantasy setting.

Yeah, I think there is a lot of misconception about cultural contact in the ancient world. Most people assume that no-one really travelled before modern transport, which is totally false. It's probably because the west is very far away from the east that our historians assumed if they didn't know about say, China, then that meant no-one did but the Chinese. Which is a bit silly. Bodhidarma for example (the monk who brought Buddhism to China) was from a monastery in Persia. In pictures he is always shown with a big curly beard and an arab face. So not only was the guy who brought Buddhism to China from what we now call Iran, there was a Buddhist monastery in Iran for him to have come from a couple hundred years after the Buddha.


I never was able to get my hands on the book. If anything, I would love to see the races and monsters from it updated to 3.5 in a new Monster Manual or something. Everything else has either been updated in the Complete series (more or less) or isn't what I would care about.

I especially love the dragons, mainly because they're so different from the normal dragons. Heck, I think one of them looked more like a sphinx, and another looked like a fish or something. That's a surprise for the PCs if anything I've ever seen.


kahoolin wrote:
Peruhain of Brithondy wrote:
Have just been reading accounts of Marco Polo and Ibn Battuta and Zhang Qian (a 2nd century BC Chinese traveller to Persia) with my students. This fastidiousness about East is East and West is West and never the twain shall meet is completely bogus, in my opinion. East and West met quite frequently in the Middle Ages, and there is no reason why they shouldn't in a fantasy setting.
Yeah, I think there is a lot of misconception about cultural contact in the ancient world. Most people assume that no-one really travelled before modern transport, which is totally false. It's probably because the west is very far away from the east that our historians assumed if they didn't know about say, China, then that meant no-one did but the Chinese. Which is a bit silly. Bodhidarma for example (the monk who brought Buddhism to China) was from a monastery in Persia. In pictures he is always shown with a big curly beard and an arab face. So not only was the guy who brought Buddhism to China from what we now call Iran, there was a Buddhist monastery in Iran for him to have come from a couple hundred years after the Buddha.

Yes their were contacts in medieval and even ancient times - with established trade routes - no argument you win. My point was that such contacts were rare - hence the value of the trade goods and their scarcity - the contact east west was limited - and although stories and good and knowledge flowed back an forth to the betterment of all - for the most part institutions did not - for example institutions training in eastern martial arts styles, or japanese sword/armor crafting technique - di individual items travel - yes but as novelties, trophies, and objects d'art - not as gear - thus the opportunity for the introduction of monks or samurai (which as most westerners know them were more a renassiance time frame deal anyway) there is little opportunity to for a local elven merchants son to become a Ninja. Can there be appropriate backstories, sure - family was part of a diplomatic mission overseas, some story of being raised abroad (my kids are being raised abroad), but temples to asian gods, buddha, monasteries - didn't pop up in Europe during the Middle Ages. It seems to me that the amount of even information, the most transportable item, about Asia, was so thin that amon most people it was non-existant, hyperbole, or just flat out erroneous.

To reiforce the point most Westerners don't travel to other countries in Asia TODAY. Airfares aren't that high, or hotels that expensive - but how many people on a percentage basis actually go to Asia, of those woh do, how many spend enough time there to actually learn the culture - most who do go, stay with their tour group, play with the other tourists in the the hotel, take a few pictures, and go home. Thats fine - but doesn't do alot to cross pollinate cultures. And misconceptions still abound. Even among expatriates (who also tend to hang out with expatriates rather than immersing themselves in the local culture and economy.

My point is that even today exchange is rare, on a percent basis - there are differences, the world is not one big amalgamated culture - thats part of the fun - sure mix and match, but have backstories that make sense and don't pollute the game world by making all things available everywhere.


Kyr wrote:
Peruhain of Brithondy wrote:
Of course these cultural boundary crossings have to have a good backstory to create verisimilitude...

That was my point exactly.

As an aside there is a huge mall here named for Ibn Battuta - divided into sections based on his travels (China, India, Persia, Tunisia, Egypt, and Andalusia) - its kind o neat there are a number of exhibits on Ibn Battuta's travels (and those of muslim explorers in general) its pretty neat - they even have a DVD for sale (English and Arabic) of the animated adventures of Ibn Battuta.

Where are you? I would LOVE to get a copy of that DVD. I'd happily paypal you the $.

On topic: I use the OA source book for a lot of stuff, mostly because none of my players ever have it, so it's more of a surprise :) the Complete books update most of the info, and Heroes of horror really made Taint applicable to non OA games. However, i still use the 3.0 Samauri, as the new one is so hokey as to be pathetic. IMO.


Ender_rpm wrote:
Where are you? I would LOVE to get a copy of that DVD. I'd happily paypal you the $.

We (my family and I live in Dubai in the UAE. Home to some of the most interesting contemporary architecture in the world.

I don't have a paypal account set up - but we are probably going to get the DVD the next time we are at the mall. It is sold out of a kiosk not one of the real stores - down in a section we don't get to too much. The animation doesn't look great - but I think it'll be a good way video for my 3 and a half year old.

Send me an email noel.scott@gmail.com and if the video is any good we'll figure something out.

The exhibits are kind of cool though - well executed - my issue with them is that when Iam actually at the mall the kids are with me and they are too little to spend any time with them.


Check yer email, and thanks!!! Looking forward to heaing about it. Ancient trade, especialy pre-1500, is a fascination for me as a DM and scholar. Just finished Weatherfords book on Genghiz Khan, really amazing what they managed to do with ox drawn wagons.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Hey, guys, it's not OA itself; however, check-out what was said in one of the other threads about Paizo's GameMastery module possibilities:

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> ;>>>>.
NorthernOkie (Pathfinder Charter Subscriber)

With the apparent success of PATHFINDER 1-6 (so far) allowing them to plan out to #7 -12, I think a push for an Asian PATHFINDER would be the way we need to go.

Surely possibilities for mixed classes, races, and a continuous Campaign abounds with an "along the Silk Road" theme/setting---perhaps even opening the door for a PATHFINDER Epic Level adventures???

Indeed, surely only Epic Level heroes would be worthy of changing the fates of entire nations [yes, plural!], correct ???

"Team Jacobs" has already shown that they like to create new lands and cultures by introducing Golarion and Varisia, (and they're good at it!) so to create an Asian World framework that Players and DMs could drop their favorite characters into (even if the class weren't from the OGL) would be perfect!!!
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Mike McArtor (GameMastery Associate Editor), Friday, 07:23 PM

Paizo's R&D is one step ahead of you... sort of.

There won't be a Tian Xia (Golarion's Asia analogue) AP until there has been at least one successful Tian Xia GameMastery Module. I'm pushing (hard) for a Tian Xia gazetteer, so anyone else who would be interested in that should contact Jason and let him know we'd like to see it on the product list (preferably before, say, 2010). ;D
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Woo-hoo!

So, get to the keyboard and let 'em know you're interested in an "asian adventure" !!!


Love. Would love an Oriental setting from Paizo.

Dark Archive

Agreed. I'm all for some OA love.

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