Pathfinder Core Rulebook

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Pathfinder Core Rulebook

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This comprehensive 640-page guide to the Pathfinder roleplaying game provides everything you need to set out into a world of limitless fantasy adventure! Choose from ancestries like elf, human, and goblin and classes like alchemist, fighter, and sorcerer to create a hero of your own design, destined to become a legend! The new Pathfinder rules are easier to learn and faster to play, and they offer deeper customization than ever before!

This indispensable volume contains the core rules for players and Game Masters, and is your first step on a heroic new journey!

The Pathfinder Core Rulebook includes:

  • More than 600 pages of game rules, advice, character options, treasure, and more for players and Game Masters!
  • Six heroic player character ancestries, including elf, dwarf, gnome, goblin, halfling, and human, with variant heritages for half-elf and half-orc!
  • More than 30 backgrounds like bartender, soldier, or apprentice to further immerse yourself in your hero's backstory!
  • Twelve character classes, including the alchemist, barbarian, bard, champion, cleric, druid, fighter, monk, ranger, rogue, sorcerer, and wizard!
  • Hundreds and hundreds of spells, class feats, and other exciting abilities to help you customize your character to become the hero YOU envision her to be!
  • Streamlined and revised rules to help ease new players into the game while providing the depth of character options and tactical interest that have defined Pathfinder from the beginning!

Written by: Logan Bonner, Jason Bulmahn, Stephen Radney-MacFarland, and Mark Seifter

ISBN: 978-1-64078-168-9

Online Resources: Rules and mechanics from this book can be accessed for free on Paizo's official online resource: Archives of Nethys. Click here!

Errata
Last Updated - 10/30/2019

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Rulebook Subscription.

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4.30/5 (based on 23 ratings)

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Fantastic Game

5/5

It's been a long while since I've played Roleplaying games due to some tumultuous times in my life. However, I started trying to pick up 5th edition here recently and truthfully I wasn't a huge fan. Then I saw that Pathfinder 2e was coming out. I absolutely fell in love with this system. The book is fantastic! Very fun to develop characters and I'm excited to see how the game continues to evolve.


A great re-boot of a gaming system.

5/5

Pathfinder 2.0 is a reboot of a venerable franchise based upon a prior iteration of D&D. Looking at it next to the current 5th edition of D&D you can call them two different branches of the same tree. This review assumes that the reader is unfamiliar with Pathfinder or s/he has only a passing knowledge of it, I'll leave it to grognards in other reviews to shake out the minutae of what changed from the previous iteration of the game ;-)

Pathfinder is a fantasy cooperative role-playing game that is rules-heavy. If you prefer less complicated games - you might want to try D&D 5ed instead. But if you find yourself liking a crunchier game with more options - PF 2ed might be just right your alley. It hits a nice middle ground between complexity and simplicity. You can play an Elven warrior or a Dwarven wizard and customize your character with a wide array of options.

The gameplay itself is tactical, fast-paced and exciting. I've ran two games of it so far and found it right up my alley.

Production values of the book itself are top notch. Artwork is fantastic with evocative images and gorgeous landscapes spilling out of the book left and right. An overview of a fantasy setting - Paizo's renowned Golarion world - is provided. Trust me, Paizo's world building is outstanding and sets the bar very high.

Sprinkled throughout the books are examples, diagrams, tables and explanations which make this daunting 640 pg tome easier to consume. Additionally, and maybe to poke a stick into some reviewers below, I've found the "revolutionary" references to the game being a social experience that requires some sensitivity refreshing.

If you're looking for a mainstream fantasy RPG with some crunchy bits but with gameplay smooth enough to make recreating the Matt Mercer and Co. experience possible, check this out. You won't be disappointed, and with Paizo's legendary record of high quality game setting books and published adventures/campaigns, you're into fun for years to come.


Everything 4e Promised and 5e Couldn't Accomplish

5/5

(edited 10/25/19)

I entered the RPG hobby at 4e and transitioned over to Pathfinder after Essentials came out. Then, I jumped from Pathfinder 1e into 5e, because the flaws Pathfinder inherited from its predecessor (3e) (i.e., the infamous "Ivory Tower" game design) could only be concealed by a shiny, new veneer for so long. I soon grew disillusioned with 5e, which I felt was flimsy and bland; I got all the mileage I could out of it in a very short time.

I never truly got over 4e, and I missed Paizo's unmatched prewritten content support; it's for these reasons I picked up Pathfinder 2e. It's almost as if Paizo said "we beat them at their own game for 3e, let's it for 4e too!" Jester David said it best in his review that PF2 "should appeal to D&D fans who are unhappy with 5e’s 'rulings not rules' attitude and want a game with less arbitration and firmer rules. It should also appeal to many fans of 4th Edition who might be in the market for a new game."

Between all of this and Paizo's continued dedication to inclusivity and helping players foster safe spaces at their tables, PF2 is hands-down my new dedicated system.


An Endzeitgeist.com review

5/5

The core rules for the second edition of Pathfinder clock in at 642 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page inside of front cover, 2 pages ToC, ¾ of a page SRD, 2 pages advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 634 ¼ pages of content, so let’s take a look!

So, Pathfinder Second Edition. I believe I should first specify where I’m coming from: I’m a huge fan of the first edition. Heck, I’ve reviewed literally thousands of PF1-books. I’ve also spent a lot of time with Pathfinder Playtest, and had complaints regarding that book that rendered me rather conflicted about the second edition.

Opening the second edition’s covers, we notice something good from the get-go: The book explains, in a concise and easy to grasp manner, with bolding of key components, the basics of the game. This is very much welcome, and in contrast to PF Playtest, which beat you over the head with complex concepts without explaining key-terms – so we’re off to a promising start. Indeed, the most crucial improvement on a formal level over PF Playtest is easily organization, something I loudly complained about back then – for example, we get tables that list ancestries and classes and their key ability scores, flaws, secondary ability scores, etc. This makes grasping the game easier for newbies. This extends to a step-by-step guide to make characters that is simpler and easier to grasp – the presentation if more concise, and we do get a spread-sheet summary of basics of races and classes, a quick reference, and step-by-step go through the filling out of the character sheet.

This being a review of the core game, I believe it is not helpful to go into the details of every bit of rules-relevant component; instead, I’ll attempt to convey what Pathfinder’s second edition is, and what it isn’t.

To make this abundantly clear from the get-go: Pathfinder’s second edition does not have much in common with the first edition, and it does not attempt to ape D&D 5th edition either. It is a game of its own. Both are mindsets I initially admittedly had – I expected either a further development of the first edition’s rules, or a 5.75 of sorts, similar to what Pathfinder’s first edition did with D&D 3.5 back in the day. If you expect either of these things, you may be somewhat flabbergasted by this game – this is not what Pathfinder second edition is all about.

There are similarities, sure – there still are feats, races are now called ancestries, and the ability score modifiers apply to the same extent as before – Strength 16 means you have a +3 modifier, for example. There are still feats that can only be taken by certain species, and indeed, these are more important now – ancestry feats are an important thing, and in Pathfinder second edition, matter more than for many races in PF1. Indeed, the ancestries have core benefits, the heritages, which actually have a significant impact on the playing experience. So that’s a plus.

While I have commented on the improved organization of the book, there is one aspect where it fails hard from a didactic point of view: It explains its combat actions etc. LONG after the ancestries, backgrounds and classes, which means that many of the rules featured in them will make no sense to you, unless you’ve read that section as well. Why not explain encounter mechanics first, and THEN let the players make informed choices? This is an unnecessary complication, one I believe was made to maintain the ABC of ancestries, background, classes in the beginning, which ultimately is a gimmick, but nothing more. In this way, the book mirrors the organizational shortcomings that annoyed me to bits in 5e.

First, you explain the game. THEN you let folks make characters. Not that hard per se, right?

While we’re on the subject matter of things that I don’t like: The new default speed, unless you’re playing an elf or dwarf, is 25 feet. This may not be an issue for people using and thinking in the imperial system, but I was born and raised with the metric system, which also makes mathematically more sense to me. That being said, I never had issues grasping the basic size relations in RPGs - 30 feet equals 9 meters. 20 feet equals 6 meters. Elegant. Simple.

Even if you think in meters, that’s something you can learn to understand pretty quickly. 25 feet…equals 7.5 meters. Utterly opaque. I am willing to bet that, no matter how much I play the game, I will NEVER have a firm mental grasp of how much 7.5 meters are. Slightly less than 9 meters. By approximately half of a small person, and less than half of an opaque average value for human sizes- …yeah, that doesn’t help me at all. I can have a rough idea, but I’ll never be able to precisely see the distance in my mind’s eye. Why am I harping on this? While I often use battle maps, I can narrate complex tactical situations in mind’s eye theater, and with this…I won’t be able to do that. It might seem petty to you, but it’s a big strike for me as a person. That being said, I will not have this influence the final verdict, because it’s not an issue for people accustomed to the imperial system, and I can’t assume that my problem here is shared with all people accustomed to the metric system. As an aside: The change of default speed also provides a basic form of incompatibility with previously released content – one that can really trip up the GM, so please be aware of that. And yes, I get why. It’s got something to do with the changed 3-action economy and the size of the average flip mat. It still is something that proved to be problematic for me.

Anyhow, some more notes on ancestries, and namely, how they work: There are feats, and heritages. Heritages require that you choose one, and in a way, I don’t get why they’re the way they are. Let’s take the death warden dwarf. That heritage makes successes on saving throws versus necromancy critical successes instead. Umbral gnomes or cavern elves get darkvision as their heritage benefit. Notice something? You do choose, but the choices per se seem like there will be a ton of redundancy in the future. How many races will have a heritage that nets darkvision? How many will have a heritage that transforms a success into a critical success? The answer is, to spoil that for you: A TON. And I’m already bored by seeing them, because, you know, you get ONE heritage. Contrast those with e.g. the Whisper elf, who gets a 60-foot cone instead of a 30-foot cone when using Seek. That is…kinda more interesting. But, again, it is something we’re bound to see from other ancestries. In a way, heritages feel a bit like arbitrarily-restricted ancestry feats. In a way, these heritages don’t feel too tied to the species. Humans, in case you were wondering, still are very potent – their heritages include becoming trained in a skill, or get a bonus general feat. Oh, and a level 1 human feat can net you a 1st level class feat, which is a HUGE advantage for any character. So yeah, humans are very potent.

But I’m getting lost in the details, so let’s once more return to the big picture, shall we? Pathfinder’s second edition

Pathfinder’s second edition is a game that has a very tightly-wound math. This may not be evident at first glance, but upon delving deeper, it becomes readily apparent. This is at once one of the greatest strengths of the system, and one of its greatest weakness – which of the two apply to you and yours ultimately is contingent on personal preference. Let me elaborate: From the very core of the game, we have critical successes and failures contingent on beating or failing to beat a DC by +10 or -10, respectively. This degrees of success or failure paradigm is something I very much enjoy, However, it also makes a few things clear: There is a bounded accuracy paradigm at play here – and this is very prominently by the proficiency system: Untrained characters get +0, trained characters +2, expert +4, master +6, and legendary +8. Additionally, the character’s level is added to all but the untrained proficiency in respective checks. These proficiency ranks feature as a deeply ingrained component of the game in pretty much everything. It should become apparent that, at +8, the proficiency bonus alone can’t elevate a success to a decisive success. That being said, my math tests resulted in a general notion that legendary will make you only fail on 1s on relevant skills. Oh, take 10 is gone, so a degree of reliability is gone – which, I assume, will in the long run help in the regard of making proficiency rank matter more.

This brings me to a core design component I enjoyed in a way, but also somewhat bemoaned: In Pathfinder’s first edition, starting at mid levels, the specialization chasm began, at the very latest, to loom very widely. The rogue would have ridiculous amounts of Stealth, while the other characters wouldn’t; you’d be either excellent at something, or suck to the point where rolling the check was a waste of time. Pathfinder’s second edition gets rid of this issue by emphasizing two things: With a smaller range for the math to work in, ability score modifiers become more important. So does the level. If you’re a level 10 character, the difference between being trained and an expert in something becomes much less important. +2 difference vs. +10 gained by levels. Even a legendary proficiency would offer less of a boost than the full character level. Being trained, however, is very important, because it unlocks the level boost – in the example above, being untrained vs. trained means a difference of a whopping +12. This system allows for the creation of more streamlined adventure writing and means that high-level characters will be more universally useful, instead of being specialists. I don’t yet have enough playing experience to discern whether I prefer this take, or the first edition’s hyper-specialization. That being said, there are more ways to become better than in the Playtest, so there is a bit more difference between being sucky and being good. Still, one can’t expect the same range of different skillsets in Pathfinder 2nd edition.

On the plus-side, this mechanic extends to basically everything, replacing BAB, saves, etc. – which makes explaining the game quicker and provides a sense of unification of previously disparate concepts.  E.g. the highest two proficiency ranks are restricted to the higher levels, while you can potentially start with up to third rank. This means that levels and ability scores are more important than the proficiency, but I do like that you can now be bad at something.

Now, backgrounds deserve some applause, in that they very much matter in contrast to the traits of PF1, and they provide very tangible benefits – but on the other hand, I fail to see the difference between many heritages and backgrounds. It may just be me being somewhat anal-retentive – I think that heritages should reflect biological components, and the other stuff should be ancestry feats and/or backgrounds, but that may be me. That being said, there are MANY more backgrounds than in the playtest, which is a GOOD thing.

Speaking of good things: Beyond feats, there are some serious decisions at first level; this is a huge advantage over 5th edition, where the choices , for many classes, start mattering at 3rd level. So yeah, good thing. Speaking of things that this does well: In contrast to Pathfinder Playtest, each of them comes with a sidebar that lists suitable choices for you – want to play chirurgeon alchemist? Check the sidebar. Want to play an animal rager barbarian? Check the sidebar. This is an excellent way for new players to prevent choice-paralysis. That being said, layout is not 100% as efficient as I’d expect it here – each of the classes has its cool icon, and there is necessarily some overlap between the classes and their presentation; if a class feat exists for two classes, it’ll be there multiple times. That being said, I once again understand the choice, and for a core book, this is smart: Each class chapter contains all the rules for each class, which means you can print out everything for one class, be done.

On the downside, you will be rereading the same paragraph over and over. If I have to read “In addition to the abilities provided by your class at 1st level, you have the benefits of your selected ancestry and background, as described in Chapter 2.” One more time…These feel like filler. On the other hand, the class tables are condensed to a point where they lose any ability to parse them efficiently. They have a whopping 2 (!!) columns: One for the level, and the rest is a frickin’ wall of text. WHY? My eyes glaze over whenever I try reading one of them. How hard would it have been to have a column for ancestry feat, one for skill feats, one for class feats, one for ability boosts and one for class features? Not hard. And it’d allow for swift and simple parsing of information.

On the plus-side: Each class offers a TON of choice, including e.g. monks and wizards. Wizards of different arcane theses (a super-important 1st level choice) will feel radically different from each other. Monks and fighters, on the other hand, do not get such a choice and instead relegate the customization to a combination of fixed class features and class feats – there is a lot of diversity here, but unlike most of the classes, these two do not have the same subclasses. The fighter is pretty novel, in that it clearly has had some fans of a certain OotS-fighter among the design team – the class now clearly rewards playing smart and knowing when to use what class feat. It is no longer a grab bag and a “hit it”-class – meaningful choices abound. This is good.

Not so good: Let’s talk about the druid – it has been nerfed, but the primal list now includes spells such as lightning bolt…and the class has a choice between orders: Shapechanger, blaster, leshy familiar + healing, or animal companion – you must choose one. You can get the stuff later, but you’ll have to spend class feats on those if you don’t get the order. Oh, and the class feat shows up at 2nd level, not at first. So you can quickly, potentially, have more than one order’s abilities, but it’ll cost you. I like the druid class per se, but compared to the ranger, the companion option is much better when taking the entire package into account. Still, less overpowered than in Pathfinder’s 1st edition. The cleric wasn’t changed too much, but THANKFULLY, we can now decide between being an old-school cleric, or being essentially a white mage. This is another decision I very much applaud. While we’re on the subject of divine classes: Paladins are now a subset of the champion class, which is essentially the defensive tank martial. So yeah, we have a functional defense class. As an aside on defense: Shields now actually NEGATE hits. Shields matter. Big time.

Sorcerers have drastically different feeling as well, with the bloodline influencing the magic tradition from which you draw your spells – divine, primal or occult sorcerers? Very much possible. In case you’re new to the tradition concept: Spell-access is now by tradition – arcane, divine, occult, primal. Smart future-proofing. As an aside: if you were like me and hated the Playtest sorcerer, it has grown tremendously – for the first time, they feel like a class of their own, with flexibility being tantamount. No longer late spells gained, and in fact, they get more castings per day and spells. Oh, and the barbarian? We are no longer locked into totems. That’s a very good thing – instead, we choose instincts for the barbarian – a good piece of advice here: Please do read the entire class here. This class, ironically, rewards planning more than others, as there is much building on instincts. Love it to bits.

Part II of my review may be found here!


Absolutely love this system!

5/5

I began tabletop RPG's with 4th Ed D&D. I really enjoyed myself because I didn't know any better. Then one of my buddies introduced me to 1st Ed Pathfinder and I saw all the flaws of 4th Ed, and there were many. I played Pathfinder 1e for a year or so when 5e came out and swept up my group and we never looked back...until 2e launched. I love this system! I really missed the pathfinder world, and I really missed the crunch of pathfinder. 2e does an excellent job of easy play (especially for the dm) without sacrificing the crunch and complexity of that Pathfinder is famous for. I really love this system, and now my group and I are running our first adventure on roll20 and it is awesome. Love this system, love Paizo. 5 stars


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Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Yay!

Dark Archive

1 person marked this as a favorite.

In the Equipment section a "lesser potion of healing" costs 3 gold, in the treasure & magical items section it costs 4 gold. Which one is right?


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Marco Massoudi wrote:
In the Equipment section a "lesser potion of healing" costs 3 gold, in the treasure & magical items section it costs 4 gold. Which one is right?

1 gp is not a big deal. But this is not 1st edition. I like the silver based system myself. I would use the higher of the two. I like healing to take more effort. Another idea would be see what other potions of that level cost and match it up. Wait for a second printing in order for them to fix all this stuff.


Anyone know what time it becomes available? Midnight or in the morning?


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Subscriber
Raiderrpg wrote:
Anyone know what time it becomes available? Midnight or in the morning?

I think that I read somewhere on the board that 10:00AM Eastern US time, as that is when Gen Con opens its doors.

Sovereign Court

Pathfinder Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

PDF available yet?

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

10 AM EST, so 11 more hours.


Just over 9 hours to go, can't wait. Like a kid on christmas eve.


So almost 9 hours for me to get the PDF. At least I get it an hour before August 2 hits...


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Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

So, Pathfinder 2 released officially on 1st August - so what other world shaking events occurred on this date?

1498 Christopher Columbus lands on "Isla Santa"
1732 Foundations laid for Bank of England
1785 Caroline Herschel becomes 1st woman to discover a comet
1834 Slavery abolished throughout the British Empire
1893 Henry Perky and William Ford patent Shredded Wheat
1933 National Recovery Administration (NRA) is founded
1944 Anne Frank's last diary entry
1953 Fidel Castro arrested in Cuba
1996 "A Game of Thrones" by George R.R. Martin is published

Any famous Births or Deaths on this day? But of course...

Births:
1901 Pancho Villa [Francisco Guilledo] (118)
1936 Yves Saint Laurent (83)
1942 Jerry Garcia (77)
1972 D-Von Dudley (47)

Deaths:
0030BC Mark Antony, aged 53
1903 Calamity Jane [Martha Jane Canary], aged 51

So there you go, Pathfinder 2 was released the same day that we first got A Game of Thrones.

There you go, some useful(less) trivia to make your day.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Oh the pain! i am on flights all day today I was hoping to have the PDFs downloaded to I could read them on the plane. cest la vie


2h41m

Please hurry Father Time!

Silver Crusade

Wait, the PDF is available already? I thought it was 10, but I'm not looking a gift horse in the mouth!


Paizo Charter Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

It sure is.


Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

I see there is no Lite version yet, that's disappointing.


I don't know where I should report this or if it's intentional, but as of right now (7am Pacific), there's no link from the Store to the PDF.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Watery Soup wrote:
I don't know where I should report this or if it's intentional, but as of right now (7am Pacific), there's no link from the Store to the PDF.

It should be up at the top by the Review and discussion tabs.


Pathfinder Companion, Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Underneath Add PDF, there should be a clickable "(in your downloads)" once you've purchased it.

Under Product Availability, there should be another link to My Downloads.

And above the Search This Thread box on this page, there should be a Download (1) tab to click, but there's a bug that sometimes hides it in Product Discussion threads.

You can also go to My Account>Digital Content from any page.


Log out of the site and pretend you didn't know the forums existed. When you go to the website, click Store, etc - are you able to find a PDF of the CRB, or only the hard copy? I wasn't. Fortunately, I knew the forums existed and figured there'd be a direct link in here.

I'm not going to make this a capital case because, honestly, it may be intentional on Paizo's part as a business decision. And that's fine. Just wanted to point it out in case it was an oversight.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

They aren't on separate pages, the PDF and hardcopy are on the same product page.

For getting here just go to homepage and scroll down just a bit and you can see the latest releases to click on.


No credit card to buy from the Paizo store and apparently shipping to Europe is delayed by 1 to 4 weeks. FML


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Companion, Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Watery Soup wrote:

Log out of the site and pretend you didn't know the forums existed. When you go to the website, click Store, etc - are you able to find a PDF of the CRB, or only the hard copy? I wasn't. Fortunately, I knew the forums existed and figured there'd be a direct link in here.

I'm not going to make this a capital case because, honestly, it may be intentional on Paizo's part as a business decision. And that's fine. Just wanted to point it out in case it was an oversight.

Right there. As Rysky says, they don't have separate product pages for digital and physical copies; you just click which one you want.

Media Specialist, SmiteWorks USA (Fantasy Grounds)

3 people marked this as a favorite.

Hello, all! This is now available for purchase from Fantasy Grounds or on Steam. Sync your account first to get it a discount equivalent to the PDF Price ($14.99)

Pathfinder 2 - Core Rules
Publisher: Paizo Inc.
Type: Core Rulebook
Get it on Steam


I actually hoped for way more discussion about the book's content before PDF release. But now the blog entry covered that...

Liberty's Edge

Can I buy the PDF other than as part of the ongoing subscription?


Pathfinder Companion, Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Yes, just click Add PDF at the top right of the page.

Shadow Lodge

Unsure if there is a forum for this one yet but i am totally loving this book! I see that the grey maidens feats and pirate feats didn't make it past playtest.....

Maybe they are included in the lost omens character guide???
#hopefulforRedMantis


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Companion, Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Whos_That wrote:

Unsure if there is a forum for this one yet but i am totally loving this book! I see that the grey maidens feats and pirate feats didn't make it past playtest.....

Maybe they are included in the lost omens character guide???
#hopefulforRedMantis

tquomins has compiled the ten archetypes in the Lost Omens World Guide from the various preview blogs:

tqomins wrote:

The list is complete!!

1) Absalom: Pathfinder Agent
2) Broken Lands: Aldori Duelist
3) Eye of Dread: Lastwall Sentry
4) Golden Road: Living Monolith
5) High Seas: Red Mantis Assassin
6) Impossible Lands: Student of Perfection
7) Mwangi Expanse: Magic Warrior
8) Old Cheliax: Hellknight Armiger
9) Saga Lands: Runescarred
10) Shining Kingdoms: Lion Blade


A 50% price increase for PF2 PDFs? Well, there goes my plan to grab the PDFs to see if the hardcovers would be worth buying and the system would be worth switching over from PF1.


3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Companion, Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Ninja in the Rye wrote:
A 50% price increase for PF2 PDFs? Well, there goes my plan to grab the PDFs to see if the hardcovers would be worth buying and the system would be worth switching over from PF1.

One price increase of $5 in ten years doesn't seem unreasonable...

Silver Crusade

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Charter Superscriber
Ninja in the Rye wrote:
A 50% price increase for PF2 PDFs? Well, there goes my plan to grab the PDFs to see if the hardcovers would be worth buying and the system would be worth switching over from PF1.

Also: look at 2e.aonprd.com/ for the official Pathfinder Reference Dokument website. All the content from the Core rulebook (mostly without art and in different order) and Bestiary (not complete yet, but will get Monster Art) is available for free online.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Why does the poor character on page 10 drown halfway through the river despite having beaten the swim DC (16)?


Weissrolf wrote:
Why does the poor character on page 10 drown halfway through the river despite having beaten the swim DC (16)?

I don't think he drowns. I think he only made it halfway. I presume that he either would have to turn back or try a different strategy.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

In which case this seems like an odd example to explain skill DCs to a beginner, readers should not have to "presume" anything. Why start with an ambivalent case where the reader doesn't know what happens halfway through?

Starting a rulebook with a rule example that already sparks a forum discussion (guilty as charged here) sets an unfortunate precedence. Besides that the example itself is odd with the critical success being necessary to complete the deed. Does this mean that beating the DC is not enough for skill checks anymore, but crits are needed for instant completition now?

This touches FAQ/errata territory, which it really should not being the very first beginner example of a rule.

But to be clear: No real negativity meant here, I am happy to see the 2nd edition out and eager to read through the book. Thanks to all parties involved for the hard work!


I agree that it is a confusing example. I'm just guessing what it means, myself..

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Charter Superscriber

The example seems to have incomplete data: table 4-4 on page 242 lists distances you achieve with one climb/swim action.
The example on page 10 doesn't include any distances, so it seems the river is wider than the character (we don't know it's speed either) can swim with a success, but narrower than the character can swim with a critical success.


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Paizo Charter Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

The part about the drowning begins with "Had your result been less than 16," – I see no problem there.


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Playing devil's advocate here: The problem is that the most important part of the example - simple DC success - is the one that leaves you literally hanging in the water without resolve. How is this is a good first beginner example on page 10 of a rulebook?

And even a more seasoned player (myself) wondered why the critical success was needed?! Seemingly something that is explained 232 pages later and an odd case that various players likely never encountered before. Personally I never had to make that role in years of playing PF1.

The authors have my deepest respect, but they could sport a more "educational" writing style that results in more answers than questions. I had hopes that PF2 would be more precise in writing. And maybe it is, I only just began to read. But the first rule example proved to be a stumbling block already and that does everyone an unnecessary disservice.


The Druid Spellcasting description says you start with 5 cantrips, but the spells per day chart says 4. Is that i typo?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber

Rule Error?

Fighter Dedication requirements list Strength 14, Dexterity 14 with a COMMA. Shouldn't this be an OR depending on which primary stat would have been chosen? The other Dedications are based on the primary stat and this feels like a high cost to buy in when a Fighter doesnt HAVE to have 14 or higher in both stats at creation. It's a choice to shouldn't that comma be an OR?

Silver Crusade

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Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Yoshua wrote:

Rule Error?

Fighter Dedication requirements list Strength 14, Dexterity 14 with a COMMA. Shouldn't this be an OR depending on which primary stat would have been chosen? The other Dedications are based on the primary stat and this feels like a high cost to buy in when a Fighter doesnt HAVE to have 14 or higher in both stats at creation. It's a choice to shouldn't that comma be an OR?

Not an error, Barbarian, Champion, and Monk also have dual stat requirements.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber
Rysky wrote:
Yoshua wrote:

Rule Error?

Fighter Dedication requirements list Strength 14, Dexterity 14 with a COMMA. Shouldn't this be an OR depending on which primary stat would have been chosen? The other Dedications are based on the primary stat and this feels like a high cost to buy in when a Fighter doesnt HAVE to have 14 or higher in both stats at creation. It's a choice to shouldn't that comma be an OR?

Not an error, Barbarian, Champion, and Monk also have dual stat requirements.

I see this and am asking if it is an error across the board.

Seems like a high cost to buy into a dedication.

In the beta I believe it was 16 Str or Dex

Also, it was a question for a developer, not sure you would have knowledge of what was or was not intended when it comes to errors and because of our previous encounter I wouldn't want to take what you say, or you to take what I say in any way other than the way it was intended. This was intended for someone who wrote the rules, unless you are one of those peeps and are missing the tag? Or have a link to where a dev clarified?

Thanks.


Pathfinder Card Game, Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Charter Superscriber

Loving all of the extra lines of flavor description in the items, hazards, and really in most everything. Much appreciated!

Paizo Employee Chief Technical Officer

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Please post rules questions in the Rules Questions forum.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Still on the fence about picking this up. Loving the idea that +10 or -10 also results in crit result (fun and intuitive!), not loving that there is a separate list of results for every possible action (stopping game to consult a table!).

Also, you kinda' needed three spreadsheets open to run Pathfinder combat past level 10. How unplayable does PF2 get at higher levels?

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

You don’t need to consult a table, the degrees of success are on each ability it’s applicable to, so you’re doing no more referencing than in 1e.

From what I’ve glimpsed combat is running a lot smoother. The rules and monster stats are up on Archives of Nethys, the official PRD if you wanna check them out :3


What does the Barbarian Animal Instinct "Deer" do? The 'CHARGE' weapon trait is not defined anywhere in Core Rulebook or Bestiary.

$80 for my deluxe CRB and it's already obsolete needing errata? :-(

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