Pathfinder Lost Omens World Guide

3.70/5 (based on 17 ratings)
Pathfinder Lost Omens World Guide

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This indispensable 136-page guidebook to the world of Pathfinder presents everything you need to know for a lifetime of adventure in the uncertain Age of Lost Omens. The god of humanity is dead and prophecy is broken, leaving adventuring heroes like you to carve their own destinies out of an uncertain future!

This gazetteer features 10 diverse regions packed with thrilling and deadly possibilities and is accompanied by a giant two-sided poster map depicting the heart of the Pathfinder setting.

ISBN: 978-1-64078-172-6

Online Resources: Rules and mechanics from this book can be accessed for free on Paizo's official online resource: Archives of Nethys. Click here!

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Lost Omens Subscription.

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Just buy the inner sea world guide

2/5

I picked this up because some people were telling me there would be a full map of Garund available, and with the Lizardfolk/Iruxi in the nearby release of Lost Omens Character Guide I really hoped there would finally be some information on Droon. I got neither of those things. the rest of the book is pretty meh as well. The Inner Sea World Guide is cheaper and provides much more information.


Love it

5/5

Great stuff.


Snappy, if brief, setting outline

5/5

Lost Omen World Guide is something of an extended primer to the campaign setting. It describes the Pathfinder world, paints some broad strokes and hopefully gets you excited about it. It does that job very well, between excellent art and brief but concise writing, it sets the tone of the place and hooks you up. There's nowhere as much detail in this book as in 300+ pg campaign setting tomes, but this book's job isn't to be a comprehensive reference. It's more of a pitch, and a very good one at that.

For existing players, LOWG presents a quick update of the setting, incorporating 10 years of storytelling to push the Golarion world a bit forward, figuratively and literally. There's a new nation here, a smoldering ruin in place of a vibrant city there and there's a new person in charge over there. But these changes are minor to moderate, as the writers have purposefully avoided the "realm-shattering event changes everything" paradigm of some other fantasy RPG settings.

There's some rules content, but sparse. One very welcome element of it are numerous backgrounds. The PF2e core rulebook is rather sparse with those, so any expansion is more than welcome.

Did I mention that the art is gorgeous? Because it is. The book is easily worth its price as an art book alone.

Overall, a great purchase IF you don't expect it to be a super-detailed campaign setting almanach. Manage your expectations and you'll be as happy with this purchase as I am.


Not a Good Value Unless You're New to Pathfinder

1/5

Against my better judgment, I've been excitedly looking forward to the Lost Omens World Guide.

I should have known better.

Before delving into the issues here, let's focus on a few of the positives:

- The art is gorgeous and very high-quality (for the most part)
- The layout and appearance of the book is excellent, with helpful tabs and indexing
- The section on Absalom is especially well-written - flavorful, evocative, and inspiring
- For those who have been following the changes that have taken place to Golarion since the Inner Sea World Guide was released, it's nice to have everything condensed in one place

Ready? On to the myriad issues:

- There is a startlingly low amount of new information in this book for existing players of PF who are porting over to 2E. As a comparison, the section on Varisia in the ISWG from 1E was 4 pages. In LOWG? Try 1.5. If you've been following Pathfinder, you may not read a single thing in this book that you didn't already know.

- The Paizo team decided to break the world down into "zones", where ostensibly things are similar and you can explore certain adventure themes. So Varisia is now part of a zone called "The Saga Lands" for some reason. The book focuses on each of these zones while paying short thrift to countries or city-states within them. The one exception is Absalom. Other "zones" include: Broken Land, Eye of Dread, Golden Road, High Seas, Impossible Lands, Mwangi Expanse, Old Cheliax, and Shining Kingdoms.

- The book bills itself as a "World Guide" and is 135 pages long. Compare this to Pathfinder first edition's "Inner Sea World Guide", which focused on the Inner Sea, a portion of Golarion's "world" at 318 pages and you'll begin to see the lack of detail in this book. Bear in mind, D&D 5E's Sword Coast Adventurer's Guide is 159 pages. That's 24 more pages for a small area of the Forgotten Realms. Yikes. So, one wonders why Paizo chose such a small page count. Would Paizo fans have not purchased a 300 - 400 page World Guide? Of course they would have. They just purchased a 620 pound doorstop of a Core Rulebook. A cynic might say that Paizo was looking out for their bottom line and wanted to hold a lot in reserve to sell again to their fanbase.

- Why is Tanya Depass involved with this book? You would be forgiven for not knowing who that is. As far as I can tell, her only qualification is that she's a self-proclaimed "diversity consultant" to the gaming industry. What exactly does that mean, you ask? Tanya is a Queer Woman of Color (TM), checking three virtue-signalling diversity boxes for Paizo, and she wants to see more people like herself in gaming. You might be asking whether this is self-serving or perhaps racist and sexist, as Tanya herself would likely conclude if a straight white male was fighting to see more like himself in gaming. Well, no, of course it isn't! Why? Shhh...don't think too hard... (-1 star)

- No map for Absalom? Very unfortunate considering the neighborhood by neighborhood breakdown for the city. It would be nice for readers to know where in the City a 'hood is located. Visuals people, visuals.

- Apparently, all countries are exemplars of racial and gender equity. Yes, even city-states that just banned slavery. Yes, even devil-bound nations: "We may be evil, but we aren't /monsters/!" (-1 star)

- All of this detracts from the verisimilitude of the world, making Golarion feel less like a real, living, breathing place and more like a fantasy simulacrum of utopia for the current American ultra-left, where everyone who is not pure evil gets along, with no animus or bias towards anyone as a result of their race or sexuality. Unfortunately, real people have biases, and differences of opinion, and interpretations of goodness, and yes, some are even racist or sexist. But not in Golarion! Oh no. If you cross that line in Golarion, you're a moustache-twirling villain who also happens to eat babies and gut puppies and cast away rainbows from the sky and steal iced-cream from children.

- It's one thing to hold extreme political views, on either side. It's quite another to infest a fantasy role-playing game with said leanings. For me, fantasy should be just that, a chance to exit the everyday, and explore a world different from our own, not one that seems like its run by Jezebel, the #METOO movement, or MSNBC.

- Now, all of this would be well and good if there were some in-world rationale for all of this perfect gender and racial parity and equity (though curiously, Paizo is still fine with wealth and class disparity). But there's not. As a matter of fact, in Pathfinder's early days, the world contained much more racial animus and tension, more traditional gender differences, and all manner of bias. Yet, all of that has mysteriously vanished over the last few years as the real world political winds have shifted. This leaves Golarion feeling less like a fully realized fantasy world and more like a shadowy reflection of real world American left-wing politics, fickle and changing as real world politics change. Suddenly, in the last few years, Golarion's races, some of whom have millenia of racial hatred between them, are all either besties or on the verge of reconciliation, and from all indications, Golarion is well on its way to having every major city and nation ruled by a woman. Not because anything shifted in-world - there weren't Golarion-wide "Me Too" or "Goblin Lives Matter" movements for example -, but because the foul winds of real world political-correctness have blown. Pathfinder developers live in fear that if they portray races of Golarion evincing racial hatred or animus that someone in the real world will take that as a cue that Paizo thinks its ok for real-world racial hatred to exist. That's the warped mindset here.

- This strange mindset is also reflected in the fact that Paizo plans on having slavery completely expunged from the Inner Sea. Why? This is due to the creative director's fear that not doing so would potentially cause someone in the real world to believe that Paizo approves of slavery. So, as a public service, Paizo really, REALLY wants you to know that slavery is bad and they don't approve of it, OK???


5/5


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Paizo Employee Creative Director

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Zaister wrote:
One more thing: Kingmaker is probably excluded from the list of APs that are canonically supposed to have happened in the new Lost Omens baseline, right?

Nope. All of the Adventure Paths are canonically supposed to have happened in the current timeline for the setting. Kingmaker included.


Paizo Charter Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

OK, but if the Stolen Lands have already been settled by someone, the new Kingmaker Annoiversary Edition doesn't really fit into that new setting baseline, does it?

Paizo Employee Creative Director

6 people marked this as a favorite.
Zaister wrote:
OK, but if the Stolen Lands have already been settled by someone, the new Kingmaker Annoiversary Edition doesn't really fit into that new setting baseline, does it?

No, and it was never intended to. Just as the Runelords compilation assumes that it takes place before the rest of the world really re-learns about Thassilon and the Crimson Throne hardcover takes place before the death of King Eodred, we aren't going to move forward the assumed starting time of the Kingmaker hardcover.

The hardcover will be for 2nd edition, but it still takes place in 4709 or thereabouts. Ten years before the "current year" in 2nd edition.


Paizo Charter Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

Ah, thanks. I hope this doesn't confuse new players too much, then. :)

Dark Archive

Basically it means if new 2e players play kingmaker, they take step back to the past so by time of 4719 they know what kind of kingdom grew there in almost 10 years?(I think canonical start date for kinmaker was 4710 because that was its release date)

Makes sense to me, I mean, default location of 2e stolen lands is gonna be "And there is kingdom there, but we can't say what kind of kingdom", so by not moving kingmaker's startdate you can both answer what kind of kingdom is there and 2e players won't get spoiled of what happens in the ap :D


We are finally getting glimpses of this book in the following weeks, an I'm obviously excited about it, but I can't deny I'm also looking forward to the next book in the World Guide line.

Should we expect news about what's to come following the release of the main books in August 1st to be revealed at PaizoCon?


1 person marked this as a favorite.

How come this book is almost a third of the size of the ISWG? Is it just the realities of modern publishing where significantly smaller books for slightly less money are much more financially viable? Are PF2e fans expected to buy the ISWG to get the same info?


Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

People who already have the Inner Sea World Guide would be happier with less duplication of information. I assume that the focus will be on what has changed since the earlier book was published and that anything that hasn't changed since then will be merely summarized (for the benefit of the many people who have the newer book but not the older one).


This looks like it will be an interesting book. I hope that it will give some guidance on non human realms.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

6 people marked this as a favorite.
John Lynch 106 wrote:
How come this book is almost a third of the size of the ISWG? Is it just the realities of modern publishing where significantly smaller books for slightly less money are much more financially viable? Are PF2e fans expected to buy the ISWG to get the same info?

A couple of reasons come to mind:

1) We wanted the introduction to the setting for new players to be less intimidating, and one way to do that is to make the book smaller and thus less expensive than a larger book would have been.

2) The laws of time and space forbade us from doing a much larger book, since getting well over a thousand pages of Core Rulebook, Bestiary, Adventure Path, and Intro Adventure (among other things) pushed our capacities to the limit.

3) The majority of the world lore we've presented for Golarion over the last decade plus is still accurate, in any event, so newcomers to the setting who want to learn more have a LOT of options to dive deep if they want, while for established players, we don't "force" them to spend extra money on content they already know.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

8 people marked this as a favorite.
CorvusMask wrote:

Basically it means if new 2e players play kingmaker, they take step back to the past so by time of 4719 they know what kind of kingdom grew there in almost 10 years?(I think canonical start date for kinmaker was 4710 because that was its release date)

Makes sense to me, I mean, default location of 2e stolen lands is gonna be "And there is kingdom there, but we can't say what kind of kingdom", so by not moving kingmaker's startdate you can both answer what kind of kingdom is there and 2e players won't get spoiled of what happens in the ap :D

If we can enjoy movies and novels and videogames and more set in our own real-world past, why can't we enjoy adventures set in Golarion's past? Not every adventure folks play has to take place in the in-world present day. The longer we publish Golarion content, the wider the window gets for players and GMs to do "historical" adventures without the need to rebuild the entire campaign setting (which is what would be required if, say, we were to publish an entire Adventure Path set before Earthfall, since the baseline of what classes and ancestries and deities and nationalities and all the rest that is even available is different).

The Exchange

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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
James Jacobs wrote:
If we can enjoy movies and novels and videogames and more set in our own real-world past, why can't we enjoy adventures set in Golarion's past?

I guess part of the problem is that players want to feel like their characters are the movers and shakers of the world they are playing in. Now playing an "historical AP" in a setting where the outcome of that AP has already been defined by new setting books makes you feel like you can't move and shake as much as you want to (when you want to stay true to the canon, that is). So we're touching on the topic of railroading here which is something most rpg fans hate with a vengeance. And that is mostly not a problem in other media because there, everyone accepts from the get-go that they are not the ones who create the story.

It's hard to describe but while I have no problems at all with the fact, that the new setting book might describe the outcome of an AP in a different way than it happened in my own game, I'm not sure if I'd want to touch on an AP I haven't run so far if it would be too difficult to adapt it to the new status quo of the setting. Not sure if this is an issue as of right now as I can easily pretend that the Worldwound is still open, or New Thassilon hasn't come into existence. But in case you decide to publish a new AP that takes those developments as already established facts and I decide to run this AP, I don't think that I would be very much interested in running the Runelords trilogy or WotR after that, just set in the past, because I'm not interested in opening alternative timelines in my own game and I'm also not interested in limiting players' agency by railroading them towards an already defined outcome.

There's certainly stuff you can do in the setting's past without changing the present's status quo, and that I would be cool with. Playing in a scenario whose outcome has already been defined by official publications is generally not my thing (unless I already decided that I plan to ignore the official canon as thoroughly as possible as I did with certain developments in the Realms^^).


6 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Card Game, Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Charter Superscriber
WormysQueue wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
If we can enjoy movies and novels and videogames and more set in our own real-world past, why can't we enjoy adventures set in Golarion’s past?

... I'm not interested in opening alternative timelines in my own game and I'm also not interested in limiting players' agency by railroading them towards an already defined outcome ...

You are going overboard Wormy. Your quote here, if taken in the sense that you were responding to James, would imply that you should not use a pre-made world like Golarion. Basically, from what you described you would need to make your own world. Because every time you play an adventure or an adventure path you are in effect changing the world as it is assumed to be at print. Not to mention all of the things your players will do during the course of their adventures. Any time you are dealing with something pre-made you have to adjudicate multiple timelines, always.

The Exchange

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Elorebaen wrote:
Because every time you play an adventure or an adventure path you are in effect changing the world as it is assumed to be at print. Not to mention all of the things your players will do during the course of their adventures. Any time you are dealing with something pre-made you have to adjudicate multiple timelines, always.

Hm, I didn't try to come across as antagonistic towards James at all, so apologies if I caused that impression. I was just trying to explain what - for me at least - is the difference between Tabletop RPG and basically every other medium out there. Obviously I didn't come across as clear as I thought I would, so let's try again.

First, in my mind TTRPGs are completely different from novels, movies and videogames, because it's the only of those media that is based upon being creative instead of just passively consuming other peoples' work. It's the only medium in which players can have their own agenda and that makes for a huge difference.

Second, you're right that I change the setting every time I play/run an adventure or AP. I'm not only comfortable with that, I also think that it's an important part of making the setting offered to my/our own setting. But that's not what I was talking about in the part of the post that you quoted. I was talking about changing things retroactively that I have already accepted as having happened in my version of the setting. To further clarify, I'll give you two examples:

1)Based on the first campaign setting book, I run the first Runelords AP. In my version of Golarion that AP ends with Karzoug's victory which constitutes a new status quo of the setting. Now the Inner Sea World Guide comes out that assumes Karzoug has been defeated instead. Perfectly fine by me, I don't feel like my game experience has been invalidated like at all. Also, I feel free to ignore all the things in the new setting book that would contradict the developments in my Golarion. This solution is perfectly acceptable to me and I knew that this would happen when I decided to make the setting my own.

2) Pathfinder 2E comes out, the new campaign setting book comes out and I decide to accept every update made on the setting. Including the defeat of Karzoug. That also means that I cannot go back in time and play RotRL in the setting's past because that could mean that I have to limit my players' influence on the outcome of said AP (because Karzoug has to stay dead no matter what, because I already decided about that), and that I'm just not willing to do. Because either I have to railroad them so that they are not able to contradict an outcome of the AP that is already defined by the setting version we are using, or I have to reatroactively have to change facts that had already been established, thereby creating what I was calling another alternative timeline.

So I'm not accusing Paizo of doing anything wrong and I'm also not saying that you can't do what James proposed in his posts. It's just me musing about why I won't do it and why I think that playing adventures in an historic episode of a setting has never seemed to hold great appeal to a lot of players.

And just as an aside: I would love to see that pre-Earthfall Hardcover bringing life to Golarion's past. But I would only run adventures or APs in that time that would not even touch on Earthfall, because, again, that event has already happened in my version of Golarion.


6 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Maps, Pathfinder Accessories, Starfinder Accessories, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I cannot wait for this book. In my opinion, Campaign flavor is Paizo's greatest strength (amongst a bunch of strengths).

I'm looking forward to a fresh take on the setting. I think it's a good idea to group the regions of the inner sea a little more than by nation, so I'm also looking forward to regional expansions down the line.

I'm sure this will be the very first 2E book I read.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Card Game, Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Charter Superscriber
WormysQueue wrote:
Elorebaen wrote:
Because every time you play an adventure or an adventure path you are in effect changing the world as it is assumed to be at print. Not to mention all of the things your players will do during the course of their adventures. Any time you are dealing with something pre-made you have to adjudicate multiple timelines, always.

Hm, I didn't try to come across as antagonistic towards James at all, so apologies if I caused that impression. I was just trying to explain what - for me at least - is the difference between Tabletop RPG and basically every other medium out there. Obviously I didn't come across as clear as I thought I would, so let's try again.

First, in my mind TTRPGs are completely different from novels, movies and videogames, because it's the only of those media that is based upon being creative instead of just passively consuming other peoples' work. It's the only medium in which players can have their own agenda and that makes for a huge difference.

Second, you're right that I change the setting every time I play/run an adventure or AP. I'm not only comfortable with that, I also think that it's an important part of making the setting offered to my/our own setting. But that's not what I was talking about in the part of the post that you quoted. I was talking about changing things retroactively that I have already accepted as having happened in my version of the setting. To further clarify, I'll give you two examples:

1)Based on the first campaign setting book, I run the first Runelords AP. In my version of Golarion that AP ends with Karzoug's victory which constitutes a new status quo of the setting. Now the Inner Sea World Guide comes out that assumes Karzoug has been defeated instead. Perfectly fine by me, I don't feel like my game experience has been invalidated like at all. Also, I feel free to ignore all the things in the new setting book that would contradict the developments in my Golarion. This solution is perfectly acceptable to me and I knew that this...

Wormy, to be clear, I didn't think you were accusing anyone :) I also thought you were clear in your first post, as you are in this post. What you are pointing out is just simply how it is, and how it has always been if one is going to use a pre-defined world. Either you are changing the world or you are not, and it looks like changing the world according to player actions is important to you (which is great!). Anyway, I think the dead horse has been beaten sufficiently :) However things turn out, I wish you good gaming!

Dark Archive

1 person marked this as a favorite.

From the Paizocon reveal:

Lost Omens Worldguide - 2e overview of Golarion in the new 2e era. Set in 4719, updating all the events of the last 10 years.

They are going to re-present the campaign setting. This book canonizes the changes of what has happened over the last 10 years. They have broken down Golarion into 10 metaregions, Absalom will still be the main locale, but this book breaks down the world in a new way.

Absalom & Starstone Isle: cool maps and backstory, lots of cool new info.
Each of the 10 regions will have some pages into background, themes, Pathfinder Agent archetype.

Other metaregions:
Golden Road
Mwangi Expanse
Old Cheliax
Shining Kingdoms
Impossible Lands
Eye of Dread
Broken Lands
Saga Lands
High Seas

Gah...didn’t get them all...but damn it’s cool.

Lost Omens Character Guide - 2nd hardcover - Character with new heritages and ancestry, feats and stuff. New Ancestries: hobgoblin, leshy, & lizard folk.

Book includes 5 factions and whatnot.

New Thassalonians exists as a playable race.?!

Tieflings and ratfolk: things to come, according to Erik.

* * *
3rd book: Lost Omens Gods & Magic - January 2020
Lots of new feats, spells, weapons, & domains.

Thanks to Painlord!


Marco Massoudi wrote:

From the Paizocon reveal:

Lost Omens Worldguide - 2e overview of Golarion in the new 2e era. Set in 4719, updating all the events of the last 10 years.

They are going to re-present the campaign setting. This book canonizes the changes of what has happened over the last 10 years. They have broken down Golarion into 10 metaregions, Absalom will still be the main locale, but this book breaks down the world in a new way.

Absalom & Starstone Isle: cool maps and backstory, lots of cool new info.
Each of the 10 regions will have some pages into background, themes, Pathfinder Agent archetype.

Other metaregions:
Golden Road
Mwangi Expanse
Old Cheliax
Shining Kingdoms
Impossible Lands
Eye of Dread
Broken Lands
Saga Lands
High Seas

Gah...didn’t get them all...but damn it’s cool.

Lost Omens Character Guide - 2nd hardcover - Character with new heritages and ancestry, feats and stuff. New Ancestries: hobgoblin, leshy, & lizard folk.

Book includes 5 factions and whatnot.

New Thassalonians exists as a playable race.?!

Tieflings and ratfolk: things to come, according to Erik.

* * *
3rd book: Lost Omens Gods & Magic - January 2020
Lots of new feats, spells, weapons, & domains.

Thanks to Painlord!

I'm not sure if it was an accurate information, but the preview also noted that Gods & Magic will provide rules for hundreds of gods in the form of tables/index. Maybe something close to the tables from Inner Sea Gods.

Dark Archive

Wouldn't be hard to have hundreds of gods in table form if book includes all deities from inner sea gods, faiths of golarion, books of the damned, chronicles of righteous, concordance of rivals, some other books with gods and tables I forgot about...


Did anyone get the screenshot from the Absalom chapter opening spread? It seemed to be filled with interesting informations we could use to fathom the content of the other regions opening pages as well.


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Pathfinder Companion, Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
The Gold Sovereign wrote:
Did anyone get the screenshot from the Absalom chapter opening spread? It seemed to be filled with interesting informations we could use to fathom the content of the other regions opening pages as well.

There's a pretty clean screenshot here. (Scroll down.)

Looks like Nations, Peoples, Languages, Factions, Religions, and Resources.


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

can I start my subscription with this product?


Pathfinder Companion, Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Biztak wrote:
can I start my subscription with this product?

Not yet. You have to wait until street date for Druma: Profit and Prophecy, at which point that will be the "current" product and Lost Omens World Guide will be next one. Around June 10th.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber
James Jacobs wrote:
If we can enjoy movies and novels and videogames and more set in our own real-world past, why can't we enjoy adventures set in Golarion's past? Not every adventure folks play has to take place in the in-world present day. The longer we publish Golarion content, the wider the window gets for players and GMs to do "historical" adventures without the need to rebuild the entire campaign setting (which is what would be required if, say, we were to publish an entire Adventure Path set before Earthfall, since the baseline of what classes and ancestries and deities and nationalities and all the rest that is even available is different).

For me its simply using Rule 1. I as the GM will find it more fun for me and my group to just call that kingdom the savage lands and pull it into the current time line of PF2e. Thats what a GM is for after all. For the most part I don't believe my players are going to look at the world around them too closely to tell me that NPC A can't be here because in Scenario A Created Scenario B that Places NPC B in that current role. But, thats for me and my table to deal with. And of course, It would work perfectly fine to play a historical game. After all my group never tried rise of the runelords until after the Hardcover ReRelease for it came out.


Alenvire wrote:

{. . .}

For me its simply using Rule 1. I as the GM will find it more fun for me and my group to just call that kingdom the savage lands and pull it into the current time line of PF2e. {. . .}

If you want to make it really spooky, you could have frequent references to the tragically failed attempt by a previous group of adventurers that tried to do the Kingmaker thing in AR 4710 . . . .

Dark Archive

Joana wrote:
Biztak wrote:
can I start my subscription with this product?
Not yet. You have to wait until street date for Druma: Profit and Prophecy, at which point that will be the "current" product and Lost Omens World Guide will be next one. Around June 10th.

Street date for the "Druma" book is june 26th.

June 10th is when subscriber shipping will start. :-)


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber
UnArcaneElection wrote:
Alenvire wrote:

{. . .}

For me its simply using Rule 1. I as the GM will find it more fun for me and my group to just call that kingdom the savage lands and pull it into the current time line of PF2e. {. . .}

If you want to make it really spooky, you could have frequent references to the tragically failed attempt by a previous group of adventurers that tried to do the Kingmaker thing in AR 4710 . . . .

Ohhh I like that. I will have to use that. Since my current players have not played the AP except one I would not have to even change anything really to do all that as long as the original adventurers were killed off before upgrading the kingdom any. Just remove the bandit lord from the original party and let them die to mysterious means that nobody ever quite figured out what happend to them. Could even throw in their bodies with a couple pieces of useful gear that my players may be needing.

Dark Archive

So what results ye people hope for canon 2e?

I hope Kevoth-Kul survived Iron Gods and was cured from his drug addiction :D

Grand Lodge

Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I'm too lazy to look: what's the expected ratio of campaign setting info to 2e rules content?

That will be driving reason behind by decision to purchase or not.

-Skeld


Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Maps, Pathfinder Accessories, Starfinder Accessories, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Skeld wrote:

I'm too lazy to look: what's the expected ratio of campaign setting info to 2e rules content?

That will be driving reason behind by decision to purchase or not.

-Skeld

I don't have a definitive answer, but from what I've been able to piece together via discussions with various Paizo people it's likely to have a little more flavor material than the old campaign sourcebooks did and a little more mechanical options than the old player guides did but also a little more page count than one of each did.

As I understand it, each of these is basically a campaign sourcebook plus a player companion plus a few pages. So you'll get more of both but won't have the option to pick and choose so much between flavor/mechanics as "the old way".

Also, the impression I got was that that the flavor/mechanics breakdown is going to vary from book to book and that this one would be more flavorful but that the next one (full of class options/ancestry stuff and so forth) would be heavier on the crunch.

I'm afraid I don't have a quote to point to though - it's more from chatting to various people (often via their respective twitch channels).


Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Maps, Pathfinder Accessories, Starfinder Accessories, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I guess that doesn't really answer the question. So, with the caveat that this is little more than an impressionistic guess, I'm going to go with roughly 96 pages of flavor and roughly 40 pages of mechanics.

Paizo Employee Developer

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World Guides will vary in their setting and rules material as is appropriate and necessary for their respective subject matters. Lost Omens World Guide (WG1) will have a bit over 20 pages worth of rules content, with the rest being setting information. This is due to the fact that WG1 is mostly about presenting Golarion and the Lost Omens campaign setting for new and returning players and GMs. Adding more rules content would cut into some of this valuable world flavor and lore and considering the Core Rulebook would have just released, we figure it was okay to be "lighter" on the rules content, as you just received 640 pages of rules!

Lost Omens Character Guide (WG2) features over double that amount of rules content. As that book looks to expand on existing ancestries, provide new ancestries, and also provide rules content to support a number of organizations, it is only fitting that more space is dedicated to rules. Mind you, some of this content, like the NPCs and templates, is more aimed towards GMs, but it's no less important important for the book.

These values are not set in stone, mind you. If we have a "setting heavy" World Guide, it doesn't always mean 85% setting material and a "rules heavy" WG doesn't always mean 50% rules. WG3 sure doesn't adhere to the same amounts that WG1 and WG2 do. The new product line allows us to play around with how much space we dedicate to either setting or rules material. I don't feel that we are beholden to always present the same amounts of material, because not every book fits that mold. It's exciting to give the book the amount material we think is right and frankly, trying to stick with the same formula with every book would lead to lower quality books and get boring pretty quick. Hopefully, people like what we have coming down the pipeline. We would love to get feedback on what does or doesn't work on a particular book as that will help us strike a better balance on setting/rules content going forward.


Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Steve -- That looks like one of the first questions that should be answered when the subscription copies start shipping, if they follow the usual schedule -- but I thought I read somewhere that even subscribers won't be getting PDFs before August 1st, regardless of shipping date.

Does anyone remember seeing a definitive statement on that point?


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Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Maps, Pathfinder Accessories, Starfinder Accessories, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Luis Loza wrote:

World Guides will vary in their setting and rules material as is appropriate and necessary for their respective subject matters. Lost Omens World Guide (WG1) will have a bit over 20 pages worth of rules content, with the rest being setting information. This is due to the fact that WG1 is mostly about presenting Golarion and the Lost Omens campaign setting for new and returning players and GMs. Adding more rules content would cut into some of this valuable world flavor and lore and considering the Core Rulebook would have just released, we figure it was okay to be "lighter" on the rules content, as you just received 640 pages of rules!

Lost Omens Character Guide (WG2) features over double that amount of rules content. As that book looks to expand on existing ancestries, provide new ancestries, and also provide rules content to support a number of organizations, it is only fitting that more space is dedicated to rules. Mind you, some of this content, like the NPCs and templates, is more aimed towards GMs, but it's no less important important for the book.

These values are not set in stone, mind you. If we have a "setting heavy" World Guide, it doesn't always mean 85% setting material and a "rules heavy" WG doesn't always mean 50% rules. WG3 sure doesn't adhere to the same amounts that WG1 and WG2 do. The new product line allows us to play around with how much space we dedicate to either setting or rules material. I don't feel that we are beholden to always present the same amounts of material, because not every book fits that mold. It's exciting to give the book the amount material we think is right and frankly, trying to stick with the same formula with every book would lead to lower quality books and get boring pretty quick. Hopefully, people like what we have coming down the pipeline. We would love to get feedback on what does or doesn't work on a particular book as that will help us strike a better balance on setting/rules content going forward.

Thanks, Luis. Now I do have a definitive quote.

Glad to hear I overestimated the amount of crunch. My feedback is always going to be more flavor and less not-flavor. :)

Grand Lodge

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Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Luis Loza wrote:
World Guides will vary in their setting and rules material...

Ok, thanks. Sounds like another sub I need to cancel.

-Skeld


Pathfinder Card Game, Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Charter Superscriber
Luis Loza wrote:
These values are not set in stone, mind you. If we have a "setting heavy" World Guide, it doesn't always mean 85% setting material and a "rules heavy" WG doesn't always mean 50% rules. WG3 sure doesn't adhere to the same amounts that WG1 and WG2 do. The new product line allows us to play around with how much space we dedicate to either setting or rules material. I don't feel that we are beholden to always present the same amounts of material, because not every book fits that mold. It's exciting to give the book the amount material we think is right and frankly, trying to stick with the same formula with every book would lead to lower quality books and get boring pretty quick. Hopefully, people like what we have coming down the pipeline. We would love to get feedback on what does or doesn't work on a particular book as that will help us strike a better balance on setting/rules content going forward.

I am LOVING this new paradigm for this line. Thanks for the head's up, Luis!


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Steve Geddes wrote:
Luis Loza wrote:

World Guides will vary in their setting and rules material as is appropriate and necessary for their respective subject matters. Lost Omens World Guide (WG1) will have a bit over 20 pages worth of rules content, with the rest being setting information. This is due to the fact that WG1 is mostly about presenting Golarion and the Lost Omens campaign setting for new and returning players and GMs. Adding more rules content would cut into some of this valuable world flavor and lore and considering the Core Rulebook would have just released, we figure it was okay to be "lighter" on the rules content, as you just received 640 pages of rules!

Lost Omens Character Guide (WG2) features over double that amount of rules content. As that book looks to expand on existing ancestries, provide new ancestries, and also provide rules content to support a number of organizations, it is only fitting that more space is dedicated to rules. Mind you, some of this content, like the NPCs and templates, is more aimed towards GMs, but it's no less important important for the book.

These values are not set in stone, mind you. If we have a "setting heavy" World Guide, it doesn't always mean 85% setting material and a "rules heavy" WG doesn't always mean 50% rules. WG3 sure doesn't adhere to the same amounts that WG1 and WG2 do. The new product line allows us to play around with how much space we dedicate to either setting or rules material. I don't feel that we are beholden to always present the same amounts of material, because not every book fits that mold. It's exciting to give the book the amount material we think is right and frankly, trying to stick with the same formula with every book would lead to lower quality books and get boring pretty quick. Hopefully, people like what we have coming down the pipeline. We would love to get feedback on what does or doesn't work on a particular book as that will help us strike a better balance on setting/rules content going forward.

Thanks, Luis. Now I...

*radiates Aura of Wholehearted Agreement*


in this book, he have the red crimson assassin archetype ?


i want to said the red mantis assassin. This book have this archetype ?

Dark Archive

So I'm really happy the pdfs for 2e launch books will be available 1 of august :D It would have been really painful to be out of conversation for month while all subscribers have the books


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Pathfinder Companion, Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Maris_Thistledown wrote:

Can I assume that this book is not full of 2nd edition game mechanics?

I will freely admit I am not going to drink the 2nd Ed. Kool-Aid, HOWEVER I want to continue to get resource books that I can use with any edition of the game.

Addressed a few posts above yours:

Luis Loza wrote:
World Guides will vary in their setting and rules material as is appropriate and necessary for their respective subject matters. Lost Omens World Guide (WG1) will have a bit over 20 pages worth of rules content, with the rest being setting information. This is due to the fact that WG1 is mostly about presenting Golarion and the Lost Omens campaign setting for new and returning players and GMs. Adding more rules content would cut into some of this valuable world flavor and lore and considering the Core Rulebook would have just released, we figure it was okay to be "lighter" on the rules content, as you just received 640 pages of rules!


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Yeah, I was already buying this, now I'm stoked to. Since I'm not switching to PF2E, having a solid basis from where to either write my own stuff or retroengineer new PF2E AP's is excellent.


kaid wrote:
One thing I guess I am not super clear on is there any time jump in the in game universe between pathfinder 1 and pathfinder 2?

Sounds like they'll be updating the world to reflect some of the outcomes of the adventure paths. For example, the Worldwound is now the Sarkoris Scar. In the River Kingdoms, an unknown nation state (i.e. Kingmaker) has toppled Pitax, etc.


Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Very pleased with the direction this line is going. Was not too pleased with the playtest but optimistic for PF2E. Roll on August!!


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Pathfinder Accessories, Pawns Subscriber

If I preorder LOWG, do I also get the PDF?

Silver Crusade

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Pathfinder Pathfinder Accessories, Pawns, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Only if you subscribe.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Pathfinder Accessories, Pawns Subscriber

Thank you Cori Marie

Contributor

Cori Marie wrote:
Only if you subscribe.

Was it confirmed somewhere they'll keep using that subscription model going forward? I know folks've been curious, but I thought Paizo hadn't given details yet.

Silver Crusade

4 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Pathfinder Accessories, Pawns, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Lisa confirmed that any subscription that currently contains a free PDF will continue to do so.

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