Pathfinder Core Rulebook

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Pathfinder Core Rulebook

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This comprehensive 640-page guide to the Pathfinder roleplaying game provides everything you need to set out into a world of limitless fantasy adventure! Choose from ancestries like elf, human, and goblin and classes like alchemist, fighter, and sorcerer to create a hero of your own design, destined to become a legend! The new Pathfinder rules are easier to learn and faster to play, and they offer deeper customization than ever before!

This indispensable volume contains the core rules for players and Game Masters, and is your first step on a heroic new journey!

The Pathfinder Core Rulebook includes:

  • More than 600 pages of game rules, advice, character options, treasure, and more for players and Game Masters!
  • Six heroic player character ancestries, including elf, dwarf, gnome, goblin, halfling, and human, with variant heritages for half-elf and half-orc!
  • More than 30 backgrounds like bartender, soldier, or apprentice to further immerse yourself in your hero's backstory!
  • Twelve character classes, including the alchemist, barbarian, bard, champion, cleric, druid, fighter, monk, ranger, rogue, sorcerer, and wizard!
  • Hundreds and hundreds of spells, class feats, and other exciting abilities to help you customize your character to become the hero YOU envision her to be!
  • Streamlined and revised rules to help ease new players into the game while providing the depth of character options and tactical interest that have defined Pathfinder from the beginning!

ISBN: 978-1-64078-168-9

Online Resources: Rules and mechanics from this book can be accessed for free on Paizo's official online resource: Archives of Nethys. Click here!

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Rulebook Subscription.

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Fantastic Game

5/5

It's been a long while since I've played Roleplaying games due to some tumultuous times in my life. However, I started trying to pick up 5th edition here recently and truthfully I wasn't a huge fan. Then I saw that Pathfinder 2e was coming out. I absolutely fell in love with this system. The book is fantastic! Very fun to develop characters and I'm excited to see how the game continues to evolve.


A great re-boot of a gaming system.

5/5

Pathfinder 2.0 is a reboot of a venerable franchise based upon a prior iteration of D&D. Looking at it next to the current 5th edition of D&D you can call them two different branches of the same tree. This review assumes that the reader is unfamiliar with Pathfinder or s/he has only a passing knowledge of it, I'll leave it to grognards in other reviews to shake out the minutae of what changed from the previous iteration of the game ;-)

Pathfinder is a fantasy cooperative role-playing game that is rules-heavy. If you prefer less complicated games - you might want to try D&D 5ed instead. But if you find yourself liking a crunchier game with more options - PF 2ed might be just right your alley. It hits a nice middle ground between complexity and simplicity. You can play an Elven warrior or a Dwarven wizard and customize your character with a wide array of options.

The gameplay itself is tactical, fast-paced and exciting. I've ran two games of it so far and found it right up my alley.

Production values of the book itself are top notch. Artwork is fantastic with evocative images and gorgeous landscapes spilling out of the book left and right. An overview of a fantasy setting - Paizo's renowned Golarion world - is provided. Trust me, Paizo's world building is outstanding and sets the bar very high.

Sprinkled throughout the books are examples, diagrams, tables and explanations which make this daunting 640 pg tome easier to consume. Additionally, and maybe to poke a stick into some reviewers below, I've found the "revolutionary" references to the game being a social experience that requires some sensitivity refreshing.

If you're looking for a mainstream fantasy RPG with some crunchy bits but with gameplay smooth enough to make recreating the Matt Mercer and Co. experience possible, check this out. You won't be disappointed, and with Paizo's legendary record of high quality game setting books and published adventures/campaigns, you're into fun for years to come.


Back to Pathfinder

5/5

I jumped into the hobby at 4e and transitioned over to Pathfinder after Essentials came out. Then, I jumped from Pathfinder 1e into 5e; the flaws Pathfinder inherited from its predecessor (3e) could only be concealed by a shiny, new veneer for so long.

But I never got over 4e. I loved how it was crunchy yet intuitive, jam-packed with options but never overwhelming, single-minded in its framework but still flexible enough to facilitate many different playstyles. And as I've gotten older, I've found myself pining for dedicated prewritten content support, something neither 4e or 5e combined have enough of.

I picked up Pathfinder 2e upon its release, mostly because of the comparisons made to 4e. Not only was I happy to return to Paizo's quality adventure paths, but I found that the system had finally moved past the things that made it sour for me originally. It's like Paizo said "we beat them at their own game for 3e, let's do the next one up." It's everything my nostalgia goggles said 4e was, and more. This is my new dedicated system for sure.


An Endzeitgeist.com review

5/5

The core rules for the second edition of Pathfinder clock in at 642 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page inside of front cover, 2 pages ToC, ¾ of a page SRD, 2 pages advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 634 ¼ pages of content, so let’s take a look!

So, Pathfinder Second Edition. I believe I should first specify where I’m coming from: I’m a huge fan of the first edition. Heck, I’ve reviewed literally thousands of PF1-books. I’ve also spent a lot of time with Pathfinder Playtest, and had complaints regarding that book that rendered me rather conflicted about the second edition.

Opening the second edition’s covers, we notice something good from the get-go: The book explains, in a concise and easy to grasp manner, with bolding of key components, the basics of the game. This is very much welcome, and in contrast to PF Playtest, which beat you over the head with complex concepts without explaining key-terms – so we’re off to a promising start. Indeed, the most crucial improvement on a formal level over PF Playtest is easily organization, something I loudly complained about back then – for example, we get tables that list ancestries and classes and their key ability scores, flaws, secondary ability scores, etc. This makes grasping the game easier for newbies. This extends to a step-by-step guide to make characters that is simpler and easier to grasp – the presentation if more concise, and we do get a spread-sheet summary of basics of races and classes, a quick reference, and step-by-step go through the filling out of the character sheet.

This being a review of the core game, I believe it is not helpful to go into the details of every bit of rules-relevant component; instead, I’ll attempt to convey what Pathfinder’s second edition is, and what it isn’t.

To make this abundantly clear from the get-go: Pathfinder’s second edition does not have much in common with the first edition, and it does not attempt to ape D&D 5th edition either. It is a game of its own. Both are mindsets I initially admittedly had – I expected either a further development of the first edition’s rules, or a 5.75 of sorts, similar to what Pathfinder’s first edition did with D&D 3.5 back in the day. If you expect either of these things, you may be somewhat flabbergasted by this game – this is not what Pathfinder second edition is all about.

There are similarities, sure – there still are feats, races are now called ancestries, and the ability score modifiers apply to the same extent as before – Strength 16 means you have a +3 modifier, for example. There are still feats that can only be taken by certain species, and indeed, these are more important now – ancestry feats are an important thing, and in Pathfinder second edition, matter more than for many races in PF1. Indeed, the ancestries have core benefits, the heritages, which actually have a significant impact on the playing experience. So that’s a plus.

While I have commented on the improved organization of the book, there is one aspect where it fails hard from a didactic point of view: It explains its combat actions etc. LONG after the ancestries, backgrounds and classes, which means that many of the rules featured in them will make no sense to you, unless you’ve read that section as well. Why not explain encounter mechanics first, and THEN let the players make informed choices? This is an unnecessary complication, one I believe was made to maintain the ABC of ancestries, background, classes in the beginning, which ultimately is a gimmick, but nothing more. In this way, the book mirrors the organizational shortcomings that annoyed me to bits in 5e.

First, you explain the game. THEN you let folks make characters. Not that hard per se, right?

While we’re on the subject matter of things that I don’t like: The new default speed, unless you’re playing an elf or dwarf, is 25 feet. This may not be an issue for people using and thinking in the imperial system, but I was born and raised with the metric system, which also makes mathematically more sense to me. That being said, I never had issues grasping the basic size relations in RPGs - 30 feet equals 9 meters. 20 feet equals 6 meters. Elegant. Simple.

Even if you think in meters, that’s something you can learn to understand pretty quickly. 25 feet…equals 7.5 meters. Utterly opaque. I am willing to bet that, no matter how much I play the game, I will NEVER have a firm mental grasp of how much 7.5 meters are. Slightly less than 9 meters. By approximately half of a small person, and less than half of an opaque average value for human sizes- …yeah, that doesn’t help me at all. I can have a rough idea, but I’ll never be able to precisely see the distance in my mind’s eye. Why am I harping on this? While I often use battle maps, I can narrate complex tactical situations in mind’s eye theater, and with this…I won’t be able to do that. It might seem petty to you, but it’s a big strike for me as a person. That being said, I will not have this influence the final verdict, because it’s not an issue for people accustomed to the imperial system, and I can’t assume that my problem here is shared with all people accustomed to the metric system. As an aside: The change of default speed also provides a basic form of incompatibility with previously released content – one that can really trip up the GM, so please be aware of that. And yes, I get why. It’s got something to do with the changed 3-action economy and the size of the average flip mat. It still is something that proved to be problematic for me.

Anyhow, some more notes on ancestries, and namely, how they work: There are feats, and heritages. Heritages require that you choose one, and in a way, I don’t get why they’re the way they are. Let’s take the death warden dwarf. That heritage makes successes on saving throws versus necromancy critical successes instead. Umbral gnomes or cavern elves get darkvision as their heritage benefit. Notice something? You do choose, but the choices per se seem like there will be a ton of redundancy in the future. How many races will have a heritage that nets darkvision? How many will have a heritage that transforms a success into a critical success? The answer is, to spoil that for you: A TON. And I’m already bored by seeing them, because, you know, you get ONE heritage. Contrast those with e.g. the Whisper elf, who gets a 60-foot cone instead of a 30-foot cone when using Seek. That is…kinda more interesting. But, again, it is something we’re bound to see from other ancestries. In a way, heritages feel a bit like arbitrarily-restricted ancestry feats. In a way, these heritages don’t feel too tied to the species. Humans, in case you were wondering, still are very potent – their heritages include becoming trained in a skill, or get a bonus general feat. Oh, and a level 1 human feat can net you a 1st level class feat, which is a HUGE advantage for any character. So yeah, humans are very potent.

But I’m getting lost in the details, so let’s once more return to the big picture, shall we? Pathfinder’s second edition

Pathfinder’s second edition is a game that has a very tightly-wound math. This may not be evident at first glance, but upon delving deeper, it becomes readily apparent. This is at once one of the greatest strengths of the system, and one of its greatest weakness – which of the two apply to you and yours ultimately is contingent on personal preference. Let me elaborate: From the very core of the game, we have critical successes and failures contingent on beating or failing to beat a DC by +10 or -10, respectively. This degrees of success or failure paradigm is something I very much enjoy, However, it also makes a few things clear: There is a bounded accuracy paradigm at play here – and this is very prominently by the proficiency system: Untrained characters get +0, trained characters +2, expert +4, master +6, and legendary +8. Additionally, the character’s level is added to all but the untrained proficiency in respective checks. These proficiency ranks feature as a deeply ingrained component of the game in pretty much everything. It should become apparent that, at +8, the proficiency bonus alone can’t elevate a success to a decisive success. That being said, my math tests resulted in a general notion that legendary will make you only fail on 1s on relevant skills. Oh, take 10 is gone, so a degree of reliability is gone – which, I assume, will in the long run help in the regard of making proficiency rank matter more.

This brings me to a core design component I enjoyed in a way, but also somewhat bemoaned: In Pathfinder’s first edition, starting at mid levels, the specialization chasm began, at the very latest, to loom very widely. The rogue would have ridiculous amounts of Stealth, while the other characters wouldn’t; you’d be either excellent at something, or suck to the point where rolling the check was a waste of time. Pathfinder’s second edition gets rid of this issue by emphasizing two things: With a smaller range for the math to work in, ability score modifiers become more important. So does the level. If you’re a level 10 character, the difference between being trained and an expert in something becomes much less important. +2 difference vs. +10 gained by levels. Even a legendary proficiency would offer less of a boost than the full character level. Being trained, however, is very important, because it unlocks the level boost – in the example above, being untrained vs. trained means a difference of a whopping +12. This system allows for the creation of more streamlined adventure writing and means that high-level characters will be more universally useful, instead of being specialists. I don’t yet have enough playing experience to discern whether I prefer this take, or the first edition’s hyper-specialization. That being said, there are more ways to become better than in the Playtest, so there is a bit more difference between being sucky and being good. Still, one can’t expect the same range of different skillsets in Pathfinder 2nd edition.

On the plus-side, this mechanic extends to basically everything, replacing BAB, saves, etc. – which makes explaining the game quicker and provides a sense of unification of previously disparate concepts.  E.g. the highest two proficiency ranks are restricted to the higher levels, while you can potentially start with up to third rank. This means that levels and ability scores are more important than the proficiency, but I do like that you can now be bad at something.

Now, backgrounds deserve some applause, in that they very much matter in contrast to the traits of PF1, and they provide very tangible benefits – but on the other hand, I fail to see the difference between many heritages and backgrounds. It may just be me being somewhat anal-retentive – I think that heritages should reflect biological components, and the other stuff should be ancestry feats and/or backgrounds, but that may be me. That being said, there are MANY more backgrounds than in the playtest, which is a GOOD thing.

Speaking of good things: Beyond feats, there are some serious decisions at first level; this is a huge advantage over 5th edition, where the choices , for many classes, start mattering at 3rd level. So yeah, good thing. Speaking of things that this does well: In contrast to Pathfinder Playtest, each of them comes with a sidebar that lists suitable choices for you – want to play chirurgeon alchemist? Check the sidebar. Want to play an animal rager barbarian? Check the sidebar. This is an excellent way for new players to prevent choice-paralysis. That being said, layout is not 100% as efficient as I’d expect it here – each of the classes has its cool icon, and there is necessarily some overlap between the classes and their presentation; if a class feat exists for two classes, it’ll be there multiple times. That being said, I once again understand the choice, and for a core book, this is smart: Each class chapter contains all the rules for each class, which means you can print out everything for one class, be done.

On the downside, you will be rereading the same paragraph over and over. If I have to read “In addition to the abilities provided by your class at 1st level, you have the benefits of your selected ancestry and background, as described in Chapter 2.” One more time…These feel like filler. On the other hand, the class tables are condensed to a point where they lose any ability to parse them efficiently. They have a whopping 2 (!!) columns: One for the level, and the rest is a frickin’ wall of text. WHY? My eyes glaze over whenever I try reading one of them. How hard would it have been to have a column for ancestry feat, one for skill feats, one for class feats, one for ability boosts and one for class features? Not hard. And it’d allow for swift and simple parsing of information.

On the plus-side: Each class offers a TON of choice, including e.g. monks and wizards. Wizards of different arcane theses (a super-important 1st level choice) will feel radically different from each other. Monks and fighters, on the other hand, do not get such a choice and instead relegate the customization to a combination of fixed class features and class feats – there is a lot of diversity here, but unlike most of the classes, these two do not have the same subclasses. The fighter is pretty novel, in that it clearly has had some fans of a certain OotS-fighter among the design team – the class now clearly rewards playing smart and knowing when to use what class feat. It is no longer a grab bag and a “hit it”-class – meaningful choices abound. This is good.

Not so good: Let’s talk about the druid – it has been nerfed, but the primal list now includes spells such as lightning bolt…and the class has a choice between orders: Shapechanger, blaster, leshy familiar + healing, or animal companion – you must choose one. You can get the stuff later, but you’ll have to spend class feats on those if you don’t get the order. Oh, and the class feat shows up at 2nd level, not at first. So you can quickly, potentially, have more than one order’s abilities, but it’ll cost you. I like the druid class per se, but compared to the ranger, the companion option is much better when taking the entire package into account. Still, less overpowered than in Pathfinder’s 1st edition. The cleric wasn’t changed too much, but THANKFULLY, we can now decide between being an old-school cleric, or being essentially a white mage. This is another decision I very much applaud. While we’re on the subject of divine classes: Paladins are now a subset of the champion class, which is essentially the defensive tank martial. So yeah, we have a functional defense class. As an aside on defense: Shields now actually NEGATE hits. Shields matter. Big time.

Sorcerers have drastically different feeling as well, with the bloodline influencing the magic tradition from which you draw your spells – divine, primal or occult sorcerers? Very much possible. In case you’re new to the tradition concept: Spell-access is now by tradition – arcane, divine, occult, primal. Smart future-proofing. As an aside: if you were like me and hated the Playtest sorcerer, it has grown tremendously – for the first time, they feel like a class of their own, with flexibility being tantamount. No longer late spells gained, and in fact, they get more castings per day and spells. Oh, and the barbarian? We are no longer locked into totems. That’s a very good thing – instead, we choose instincts for the barbarian – a good piece of advice here: Please do read the entire class here. This class, ironically, rewards planning more than others, as there is much building on instincts. Love it to bits.

Part II of my review may be found here!


Absolutely love this system!

5/5

I began tabletop RPG's with 4th Ed D&D. I really enjoyed myself because I didn't know any better. Then one of my buddies introduced me to 1st Ed Pathfinder and I saw all the flaws of 4th Ed, and there were many. I played Pathfinder 1e for a year or so when 5e came out and swept up my group and we never looked back...until 2e launched. I love this system! I really missed the pathfinder world, and I really missed the crunch of pathfinder. 2e does an excellent job of easy play (especially for the dm) without sacrificing the crunch and complexity of that Pathfinder is famous for. I really love this system, and now my group and I are running our first adventure on roll20 and it is awesome. Love this system, love Paizo. 5 stars


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Dark Archive

5 people marked this as a favorite.

I don't like the red dragon design, but the rest looks good.

So paladin is now called "champion"?

I won't pre-order this, because of the Playtest, but i'll be taking a hard look at it day one (and probably buy it to understand the stats).


9 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Will this order include the PDF version or is that only if you get it through the PF Subscription?

Paizo Employee Chief Creative Officer, Publisher

26 people marked this as a favorite.

Paladin is the lawful good version of the champion. There are two others (NG, CG) included in the Core Rulebook, and one presumes we might do still others in the future.

Paizo Employee Chief Creative Officer, Publisher

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Caledonia wrote:
Will this order include the PDF version or is that only if you get it through the PF Subscription?

You do not get a PDF with the print edition preorder. They must be purchased separately.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Erik Mona wrote:
Caledonia wrote:
Will this order include the PDF version or is that only if you get it through the PF Subscription?

You do not get a PDF with the print edition preorder. They must be purchased separately.

Thanks for the quick reply. Now to wait for the Tax Return :)


Pathfinder Pathfinder Accessories, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Just to make sure. It looks like my current Pathfinder 1E subscription will automatically migrate to 2E and I don't have to separately preorder this or wait until other subscriptions become available?

Edit: Seems this is all answered in the FAQ, and it seems the answer is yes!

Silver Crusade

Quite a number of pages more than the PF1 rulebook, I am very much looking forward to this one ^^


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I'm sorry, I've not preordered anything before on Paizo. Does it mean if you preorder, those orders are shipped out to customers on the 8th? Or is that just when you have inventory? Reason why I ask is the August 1st date.

Grand Lodge

3 people marked this as a favorite.

All aboard the hype train. Even though I wasn't in love with the playtest, I trust Paizo will do a good job with the final version.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber
Erik Mona wrote:
Caledonia wrote:
Will this order include the PDF version or is that only if you get it through the PF Subscription?

You do not get a PDF with the print edition preorder. They must be purchased separately.

But do you if you subscribe to the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Subscription?

Also, wondering how do I subscribe and get both the Core and the Bestiary... says start with one or the other.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Yoshua wrote:
Also, wondering how do I subscribe and get both the Core and the Bestiary... says start with one or the other.

The FAQ says if you start with the core rulebook you'll get both.


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Erik Mona wrote:

Paladin is the lawful good version of the champion. There are two others (NG, CG) included in the Core Rulebook, and one presumes we might do still others in the future.

Was hoping to try the LE version of the Champion on launch but I guess I'll go Ranger then.

Paizo Employee Chief Creative Officer, Publisher

5 people marked this as a favorite.

You can play a LE ranger easily! :)

RPG Superstar 2013 Top 4

Any chance of a pocket edition in the not too distant future? The quality of life improvement was amazing for carrying around conventions. Thank you!

Paizo Employee Chief Creative Officer, Publisher

6 people marked this as a favorite.

It'll happen eventually, but probably not for the first year at least.


Just to clarify, will this be a hardcover? I'd assume so, since that seems to be standard operating procedure for flagship books, but the Deluxe Edition explicitly says hardcover and this one does not.

Grand Lodge

Both are hardcovers.

The Concordance

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

So for people planning on being at GenCon, will we be able to pre-order and pick up our books at the convention?

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Caledonia wrote:
Erik Mona wrote:
Caledonia wrote:
Will this order include the PDF version or is that only if you get it through the PF Subscription?

You do not get a PDF with the print edition preorder. They must be purchased separately.

Thanks for the quick reply. Now to wait for the Tax Return :)

Side note, if we have the subscription, will we get the pdf with the book through that? (and I'm sorry if someone's already asked this and it's been answered.)


3 people marked this as a favorite.

Seoni and Valeros were kicked off the cover? I think they need to speak to their agents to get better billing. A bit surprised Fumbus isn't there to show off the new kid. But Merisiel sneaking in is expected. I do like the art, but I expected to. It's a Wayne Reynolds piece after all. Has definite callbacks to the PF1 cover, but also shows that it's new.

640 pages. That's a beefy book. 65 more than PF1 and 206 more than the playtest. So clearly there will be more options than the playtest had.

I'm not the biggest fan of the playtest, but I've got my fingers crossed for this. Eagerly waiting for details.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Companion, Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
robert Goode wrote:
So for people planning on being at GenCon, will we be able to pre-order and pick up our books at the convention?
Sara Marie wrote:
NielsenE wrote:
If I have subscriptions to basically everything, and am buying a copy of the deluxe version outside the subscription, are any of these slated for GenCon pickup?
Very likely yes, but we haven't made any announcements about Gen Con pick up yet.
Joseph Davis wrote:
Side note, if we have the subscription, will we get the pdf with the book through that? (and I'm sorry if someone's already asked this and it's been answered.)
Erik Mona wrote:
Rycaut wrote:

So what is the answer re PDFs (I assume the remain a part of subscriptions?)

also if you are a subscriber currently (and plan to rollover) will there be an option to get the limited edition versions?

We are still finalizing details on subscription benefits for all these lines, so for the time being we don't have an answer to this questions. Please stay tuned. We'll definitely make sure the benefits are clear well before August.

There is a thread just for subscription questions, though so far the only answers for those particular questions is Reply Hazy Try Again Later.


Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Erik Mona wrote:

You can play a LE ranger easily! :)

Thats the plan now

Grand Lodge

When pdf's will become available ? and what will be the prices ? asking for the folk who genarly uses digital content and not have money to buy everything in hard cover ^^'

Dark Archive

Erik Mona wrote:
It'll happen eventually, but probably not for the first year at least.

That's great to hear, Erik!

I got all pocket editions, some in multiple numbers, as they greatly reduce weight & space at the tables.
-Will the Pocket Editions line of PF 1 continue after may 2019?
-Will there be a Starfinder CRB pocket edition eventually?

Sorry for being off topic, i don't know where else to ask.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Doktor Weasel wrote:

Seoni and Valeros were kicked off the cover? I think they need to speak to their agents to get better billing. A bit surprised Fumbus isn't there to show off the new kid. But Merisiel sneaking in is expected. I do like the art, but I expected to. It's a Wayne Reynolds piece after all. Has definite callbacks to the PF1 cover, but also shows that it's new.

640 pages. That's a beefy book. 65 more than PF1 and 206 more than the playtest. So clearly there will be more options than the playtest had.

I'm not the biggest fan of the playtest, but I've got my fingers crossed for this. Eagerly waiting for details.

Kyra, Merisiel, and Harsk? That combo makes sense; NG, CN, and LN. They could perhaps have subbed Sajan for Harsk, but using a dwarf makes more sense than another human.

I like the expanded book length. Every bit of playtest errata was an improvement, and I am very curious to see the final product.

Dark Archive

2 people marked this as a favorite.

I think of the cover as the continuation of the combat encounter of the cover of Pathfinder 1. Same dragon, same ruins, different characters, as if they were in another part of the encounter


4 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Hmm I want to subscribe but I buy the books primarily to collect and use the PDFs because I primarily game through virtual table top. The pdfs are the only thing that currently makes Subscribing worth it. Im curious why they would change that. I want to support Paizo and I want to sub but without a PDF the value simply isnt there with the shipping costs. Lets hope they keep it the way it is.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I do like the cover.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook Subscriber
Vexies wrote:
Hmm I want to subscribe but I buy the books primarily to collect and use the PDFs because I primarily game through virtual table top. The pdfs are the only thing that currently makes Subscribing worth it. Im curious why they would change that. I want to support Paizo and I want to sub but without a PDF the value simply isnt there with the shipping costs. Lets hope they keep it the way it is.

Are you referring to not getting a pdf with the pre-order? I think that has always been the case. Getting this via a pre-order vs getting this via the pathfinder subscription are not the same thing.

Presumably the appropriate subscriptions will still include the free pdf

Paizo folks, correct me if I am wrong.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
MMCJawa wrote:
Vexies wrote:
Hmm I want to subscribe but I buy the books primarily to collect and use the PDFs because I primarily game through virtual table top. The pdfs are the only thing that currently makes Subscribing worth it. Im curious why they would change that. I want to support Paizo and I want to sub but without a PDF the value simply isnt there with the shipping costs. Lets hope they keep it the way it is.

Are you referring to not getting a pdf with the pre-order? I think that has always been the case. Getting this via a pre-order vs getting this via the pathfinder subscription are not the same thing.

Presumably the appropriate subscriptions will still include the free pdf

Paizo folks, correct me if I am wrong.

Yeah Im aware for pre-orders and thats completely understood. I was speaking to the Subscriber benefits themselves. They are apparently still being hammered out so I was simply voicing my concern and support for the free pdf remaining as a benefit to subscribing. I will probably order a few separate copies and was planing on subbing as well will wait to see what the benefits end up being.

Scarab Sages

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Question, it says pre-order expected July so is that when the pre-order ends or is that when we can expect delivery?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens Subscriber

Will the price tag for the PDF of the rulebook line stay at $9.99?


Paizo Charter Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

It also says

Quote:
*** Please disregard the availability information below. This item will be available August 1, 2019.***


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens Subscriber
MMCJawa wrote:

Presumably the appropriate subscriptions will still include the free pdf

Paizo folks, correct me if I am wrong.

It looks like no change there.

The RPG Rulebook Subscription page states that a free PDF is included, AND it also says that both the PF2e Core Rulebook and Bestiary will be part of the subscription.

Consequently: The PDF will be included with a subscription to the rulebook line.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I'm curious if the font size for the new CRB is the same as the 1st edition? In other words, what's the total word count?

I'm trying to compare the amount of content between the two books. More so out of curiosity than anything...


Strachan Fireblade wrote:
I'm curious if the font size for the new CRB is the same as the 1st edition?

Oh please god no. I need reading glasses for normal size print... :)


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In the cover art — what is going on with Merisiel?

It's like she has an extra arm and her head is twisted backwards.

... also I think all of the characters are facing away from the dragon attacking them? (I noticed this because I'm hoping Merisiel's right leg is in front, rather than her left leg, as otherwise her waist is rather unpleasantly contorted — hard to tell with the position of the book title.)

I guess that kind of makes sense in terms of sheltering from dragon breath, though perhaps not the most heroic pose.

My negative last comment is that the pile of treasure is rather tiny.

Other than this, I do like the art a lot — the dragon pulling its way through the arch in order to claw them, while breathing fire down on them is very dynamic. Kyra looks good, and Harsk suddenly has bright red hair, but otherwise looks good.

I really didn't mean this post to be negative — I'm really looking forward to 2nd Ed coming out. My eyes just aren't understanding Merisiel's pose/extra arm.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Ramanujan wrote:

In the cover art — what is going on with Merisiel?

It's like she has an extra arm and her head is twisted backwards.

It's Kyra's leg/foot.


Rysky wrote:
Ramanujan wrote:

In the cover art — what is going on with Merisiel?

It's like she has an extra arm and her head is twisted backwards.

It's Kyra's leg/foot.

I hope not. She’s standing behind that block with her other leg, if the mystery shape is a leg it’s bizarrely long and she’s about to fall backwards.

It might be a quiver on Merisiel’ back that is hanging towards the ground while the rest of her body twists.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Xenocrat wrote:
Rysky wrote:
Ramanujan wrote:

In the cover art — what is going on with Merisiel?

It's like she has an extra arm and her head is twisted backwards.

It's Kyra's leg/foot.
I hope not. She’s standing behind that block with her other leg,

She's bracing with her left leg, you can see all the weight on it.

Dark Archive

Pathfinder Card Game, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
Ramanujan wrote:

In the cover art — what is going on with Merisiel?

It's like she has an extra arm and her head is twisted backwards.

... also I think all of the characters are facing away from the dragon attacking them? (I noticed this because I'm hoping Merisiel's right leg is in front, rather than her left leg, as otherwise her waist is rather unpleasantly contorted — hard to tell with the position of the book title.)

I guess that kind of makes sense in terms of sheltering from dragon breath, though perhaps not the most heroic pose.

I think that they've been ambushed by the dragon, and are just turning to face it.


I hope that they have the shipping thing fixed from the Playtest fiasco.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Terevalis Unctio of House Mysti wrote:
I hope that they have the shipping thing fixed from the Playtest fiasco.

They'll most likely be shipping inhouse this time, so yes.


Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Pathfinder Accessories, Pawns, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Terevalis Unctio of House Mysti wrote:
I hope that they have the shipping thing fixed from the Playtest fiasco.

Looks like this will be shipped like all their other products. The Playtest was an attempt to make sure everyone got their playtest materials on the same date; it backfired.


I'll likely be getting one of these for review on my YouTube channel. It is frustrating that they aren't including the pdf with physical purchases though.


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Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber
The IoPC wrote:
I'll likely be getting one of these for review on my YouTube channel. It is frustrating that they aren't including the pdf with physical purchases though.

I don't think they EVER have, unless you're a subscriber. If it's that big of a deal, subscribe.


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Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Maps, Pathfinder Accessories, Starfinder Accessories, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
The IoPC wrote:
I'll likely be getting one of these for review on my YouTube channel. It is frustrating that they aren't including the pdf with physical purchases though.

You can subscribe. If you’re going to get it from them anyway there’s really no reason not to. You can cancel after it’s shipped if you don’t want anything else.

Note that they haven’t actually confirmed free PDFs as a continued perk for subscribing, but I think it’s highly likely.


I like the new Pathfinder logo!
It's less elaborate, but clearer, more legible. I like the sandy texture, the colour combination better and I like the subtle shine towards the middle, I think it conveys the idea of being a guiding light ("path finder").
Well done!


My only problem with the cover is the red dragon's appearance. This is not how they are supposed to look in Pathfinder. I miss the spikes that makes their wings do piercing damage, and they have no horn melee attacks, as they have no horns (playtest).


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The Gold Sovereign wrote:
My only problem with the cover is the red dragon's appearance. This is not how they are supposed to look in Pathfinder. I miss the spikes that makes their wings do piercing damage, and they have no horn melee attacks, as they have no horns (playtest).

My only problem is that is all wrong. All wing attacks do bludgeoning damage and always have, per the natural attacks universal monster rule (I can't find any dragon specific rule granting piercing on their wings), and the presence or absence of physical body parts is not perfectly correlated with usable natural attacks.

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