Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Aquatic Adventures (PFRPG)

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Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Aquatic Adventures (PFRPG)
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Dive into Adventure!

There's plenty of adventure hidden beneath the gentle tidal cycles and crashing waves of Golarion. Discover the rich ecologies and complex societies hidden in the briny depths of the oceans and seas. In this book you can learn more about merfolk nations, the dangerous sahuagin, peaceful aquatic humanoids, and the aquatic terrors that wage war against them. Dare deadly environments, explore strange underwater cities, and find lost treasures within these pages.

This book also provides a wealth of rules for underwater combat and ways for terrestrial adventurers to adapt to aquatic environs, including new archetypes, feats, and magic items. Dive in to underwater adventure!

Inside this book you'll find:

  • A thorough gazetteer of Golarion's five oceans that explores the various points of interest and conflicts between those who make these bodies of water their home.
  • A look at Golarion's seas and their inhabitants, as well as strange treasures that can be found within their depths.
  • An expansion of rules for underwater combat that clarifies those presented in the Pathfinder RPG Core Rulebook and introduces new challenges to consider.
  • Dozens of new archetypes, class features, feats, spells, and items both magical and mundane that players can use to prepare their characters for adventures beneath the waves.

Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Aquatic Adventures is intended for use with the Pathfinder campaign setting, but can be easily adapted to any fantasy world.

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-944-8

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Lost Omens Subscription.

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Worth the price for the Aquatic Rules chapter alone

4/5

First things first: this is Campaign Setting, so if you bought it to power up your PC and found out that many options are so narrow that they work best for NPCs ... well, you get what you deserve for not reading my review.

Second thing is that there are some very nice things for PCs here. I kind of wish that some of the stuff here was included in Blood of the Seas, but that ship has sailed. AHAHAHAHAHAHAHA. You got the joke, right? Right?

Anyway, apart from rules material, this book has two things going for it. One are the chapters on Golarion's oceans and seas which, while evocative and well written, are somewhat brief. They're more primers than full descriptions, so as usual with Paizo, there's a lot for a GM to fill out with her or his imagination.

Now the big kahuna is the Aquatic Rules chapter which gathers, updates and expands the rules for aquatic movement and actions. Why is this such a great deal? Well it's because these rules are horribly spread across the core rulebook thanks to the CRB inheriting less-than-stellar layout of the 3.5 PHB. Here you have everything in one place - movement, buoyancy, combat, spellcasting, drowning AND the creme de la creme, some guidance as to how do spells work underwater. My snarky tongue-in-cheek argument about lightning bolts underwater suddenly holds far less water than it used to. AHAHAHAHAHAH! Also a joke! C'mon, you did get this one, too? Let me know in comments below.


Okay, but not amazing

2/5

The book does what it says on the tin, but nearly all of the new rules elements are unusable in all but the most heavily water focused games. An example of this is the Drowned Channeler Spiritualist, who has to be within 25 feet of a major body of water to gain /any/ benefit from Shared Consciousness. Not any water, not even a lake or major river - it has to be something on the scale of an ocean or sea.

If this was an exception and not the rule, I could give this three stars - but this book is sadly not so. Nearly every rules element has no effect outside of water, some actively penalize you for being on land; unless you regularly play entirely-aquatic games, skip this book and save yourself $16+


Life Is Better Down Where It's Wetter

4/5

A good solid book about Golarion's oceans and seas and it also has some nice additional/expanded under water rules. While I do like some of the additional class options, spells, etc. I would have preferred less crunch for more world building.


Excellent, although too many rules for my liking

4/5

I find this book very hard to rank in the usual one to five star way.

I enjoyed the first forty pages immensely. They give a really good survey of the oceans and seas of Golarion including plenty of adventure hooks, details of who lives where and everything you'd want from an introductory 'gazetteer' of such large areas.

My main complaint is that each section is too short and further that there's no discussion of the bodies of water to be found in the Darklands. Given the importance of underworld regions to a fantasy world, the latter in particular feels like a glaring omission.

The reason for that is no doubt the perceived need to include the mechanics in the latter part of the book. I suspect that these rules elements are well done and probably even necessary (I don't buy the campaign books for rules, so I haven't done more than flick through the later parts of the book) - nonetheless, I wish they'd been provided in some other way. It feels to me that this isn't really a campaign setting book, but rather two thirds of a campaign book plus some rules stuff.

Given all of that, I still consider this good value and it's a welcome entry in the line. I'd just personally prefer that the flavor proportion of these books be given greater weight.


Very Solid

4/5

The majority of this book details a lot of the oceans and seas throughout Golarion, along with sunken treasures and the occasional NPC. It has a ton of flavor text and pretty good art.

It also goes into the nitty gritty details on movement and combat underwater, even changing a rule in the core rulebook about "cover from the water's surface".

If you plan on doing anything underwater, pick this book up. If not, you probably can do without it.

Overall, good book. 4 stars.


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Pathfinder Companion, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
nighttree wrote:
What's the Deep Shaman like ?

Deep Shaman:
Okay, this one's a bit complex, but.

You have to pick waves for your spirit, you have to pick an aquatic spirit animal, which gets amphibious instead of breathing water because it can already do that. Also you get Swim.

You get some extra benefits when you use beckoning chill on creatures in the water, as well as some benefits with crashing waves.

You can also gain some extra hexes in place of mist's shroud and/or watersight, one of which lets you change a creature's buoyancy and keep your own neutral, the other of which lets you breathe underwater, get a swim speed, and deal with pressure better.

You gain a bunch of benefits for being underwater, and instead of turning into a water elemental with elemental form, you can turn into a brine dragon instead, though flying makes you expend your daily uses faster and spending time underwater lets it last longer.

Scarab Sages

Kajehase wrote:
Any rules for turning a longship into a submarine?

Well, there's the Dive! Dive! Dive! imposition from Skull & Shackles. It's temporary, but nice while it lasts.


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I really like the section on the valashmai sea especially the part about Shbloon and possibly a second kaiju living in that sea as well.


KarlBob wrote:
Kajehase wrote:
Any rules for turning a longship into a submarine?
Well, there's the Dive! Dive! Dive! imposition from Skull & Shackles. It's temporary, but nice while it lasts.

Or, staying in the RPG line, there's a spell from that AP.

Scarab Sages

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So the line in the book that allows water-based creatures to attack normally still doesn't include the dolphin.

It only lists creatures that have the aquatic or water subtypes. Dolphins do not have the aquatic subtype.

Dark Archive

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Rysky wrote:
They're psychically sensitive spontaneous Casters (still Divine though) and get a Holy Hippocampus.

If they're psychic, surely a holy amygdala would make more sense.

Paizo Employee Managing Developer

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Tallow wrote:

So the line in the book that allows water-based creatures to attack normally still doesn't include the dolphin.

It only lists creatures that have the aquatic or water subtypes. Dolphins do not have the aquatic subtype.

Well, you tell those dolphins I said it was okay!

Also... ooops, and damnit!

Paizo Employee Designer

4 people marked this as a favorite.

Yeah, it looks like the problem is that sea-dwelling mammals like dolphins and whales lack the aquatic subtype since they technically just hold their breath a long time (except a few that erroneously do have it). They are fundamentally aquatic (in the English term rather than the subtype) creatures, and like Adam says, should be fine with it as well. The point is that terrestrial creatures like an elephant or a catfolk wouldn't benefit.


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Maybe something to the effect that if a creature only has a swim speed and no other valid movement forms it takes no underwater attack penalties?


JDLPF wrote:
Maybe something to the effect that if a creature only has a swim speed and no other valid movement forms it takes no underwater attack penalties?

That would still leave out the pinnipeds.


They all have bite attacks, so no problems there.

Crocodiles though, they have troubles with their tail slap.


JDLPF wrote:

They all have bite attacks, so no problems there.

Crocodiles though, they have troubles with their tail slap.

Ok, I get it. Not having the book yet I wasn't sure whether it introduced new difficulties, but it sounds like it's just the old Slashing/Bludgeoning issues.

Scarab Sages

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Mark Seifter wrote:
Yeah, it looks like the problem is that sea-dwelling mammals like dolphins and whales lack the aquatic subtype since they technically just hold their breath a long time (except a few that erroneously do have it). They are fundamentally aquatic (in the English term rather than the subtype) creatures, and like Adam says, should be fine with it as well. The point is that terrestrial creatures like an elephant or a catfolk wouldn't benefit.

Hopefully we can get this clarification in the Campaign Clarifications for PFS, so GM's don't have to fight with players over whether a dolphin gets a penalty underwater or not.


I also like that the antarkos ocean as a colony of kalo living there.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber
Tallow wrote:
Mark Seifter wrote:
Yeah, it looks like the problem is that sea-dwelling mammals like dolphins and whales lack the aquatic subtype since they technically just hold their breath a long time (except a few that erroneously do have it). They are fundamentally aquatic (in the English term rather than the subtype) creatures, and like Adam says, should be fine with it as well. The point is that terrestrial creatures like an elephant or a catfolk wouldn't benefit.
Hopefully we can get this clarification in the Campaign Clarifications for PFS, so GM's don't have to fight with players over whether a dolphin gets a penalty underwater or not.

Maybe this could be a revision of the Hold Breath special quality. I am not certain, but suspect all of the aquatic animals that do not have the aquatic subtype have this special quality. Perhaps creatures like boggards and lizardfolk are edge cases, but I cannot think of any monsters off hand with the SQ that absolutely shouldn't be skilled under water. EDIT: Actually, looking through it looks like the cockroaches have the Hold Breath SQ. I honestly don't know how well they are supposed to be underwater.

Sovereign Court

Does a druid wildshaping into a squid or even a water elemental take underwater combat penalties? Because the shape changing magic doesn't technically change the druid's type, just changes him into exactly the same form as something with a happy type.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

While I really liked this book, one issue that annoys me is the continued misconception that sahuagin are amphibious. They aren't. Thus, despite what's written under the "Sahuagin Empire," it would be unrealistic for the shark people to raid coastal towns. It would be extremely tough for them to even climb aboard a ship and raid it, which is something they are also supposed to do. Good luck pulling off either feat while holding your breath the entire time.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber

Um I think that might have been a minor mistake on paizo's part. If not there is another explanation. Magic. People cast air bubble and water-breathing all the time to prepare for underwater excursions. What is to say the sahagins don't have a similar carefully coordinated system for raiding dry land. Also you have to factor in how mutants fit into sahagins society. A mutant that can breath air and wateris going to be very good at what it does. Besides, even if you assume that most sahagins are as presented, you assume they are not preparing for these raids. If a player made no preperations to fight underwater, holding his breath, and using his just his normal kit for the surface weapons, he would die in a few minutes or rounds.

Preperations are always made. Sahagins that are stupid and don't prepare die droves. If they are an empire, the implications include an advanced intelligence, a strong military power, and the ability to call on other resources besides simply just what they come prepackaged with.

A monsters stats are a small slice of what they are. If you just took humans by basic stats, they don't win against over half the bestiary. And yet they have made empires and civilisations that have lasted many, many years. Sahagins can likewise form civilisations. They can develop class levels, amass power and knowledge. There have already been proofs of this.

The Exchange

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Pathfinder Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

they do have a breath air spell. Paizo srd link, scroll down


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
ErisAcolyte-Chaos jester wrote:


A monsters stats are a small slice of what they are. If you just took humans by basic stats, they don't win against over half the bestiary. And yet they have made empires and civilisations that have lasted many, many years. Sahagins can likewise form civilisations. They can develop class levels, amass power and knowledge. There have already been proofs of this.

Okay. I'll rephrase: the vast, overwhelming majority of sahuagins cannot breathe air. The vast, overwhelming majority of humans cannot breathe water. That's why humans don't raid sahuagin camps, and why sahuagins shouldn't raid human towns.

GeneticDrift wrote:
they do have a breath air spell. Paizo srd link, scroll down

It's a 3rd-level spell. Each casting can give a few sahuagin the ability to breathe air for an hour. Depending on the size of the raiding party, you would need a dozen or more castings (or even more expensive alternatives like wands, scrolls, or potions). In all, a very inefficient way to raid. As written, sahuagin would be much better off sticking to raiding fellow aquatic creatures. They have very little reason to waste so many resources for what is going to roughly be the same reward.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Companion Subscriber
Generic Villain wrote:
It's a 3rd-level spell. Each casting can give a few sahuagin the ability to breathe air for an hour.

A level 5 caster gets to divide 10 hours (600 minutes) of duration. That could give 100 sahuagin 6 minutes of air activity. Easily enough to overwhelm a merchant vessel for example. And that's just with one spell slot. Could memorize multiple castings.

Edit: Remembered the rule about "touch only 6 people per casting" limitation. Maybe there are ways to stretch that limitation? Any feats or magic items that allow more touching?


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Samy wrote:
A level 5 caster gets to divide 10 hours (600 minutes) of duration. That could give 100 sahuagin 6 minutes of air activity. Easily enough to overwhelm a merchant vessel for example. And that's just with one spell slot. Could memorize multiple castings.

Personally I think the water/air breathing spell should have a 1 hour minimum per creature, but that's just me. Taken as written, yes, air breathing could allow a large sahuagin band time on the surface. No matter how dumb the thought of a single caster touching 100 creatures with a single standard action is, or the fact that very few sahuagin would be able to cast the spell (to date, most sahuagin with class levels favor martial classes, not spellcasting ones). But that's my main annoyance with sahuagins: the idea of them being land-raiders is dumb. They should have just been given the amphibious quality. They already have a base land speed and legs, which certainly implies surface capabilities, and have repeatedly functioned as terrestrial threats in past Pathfinder works, yet... can't actually breathe air? Dumb.

Liberty's Edge

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Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

I don't think there's anything dumb about the idea of them being land-raiders. If we were talking merfolk I'd agree with them flopping around on their fish tails, but with the legs and all, I don't see anything comical about sahuagin attacking land-dwellers. We've seen them emerging from the water as far back as the 1978 original Monster Manual illustration. It's always been an ingrained aspect of them that they keep coming out of the water.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Samy wrote:
I don't think there's anything dumb about the idea of them being land-raiders. If we were talking merfolk I'd agree with them flopping around on their fish tails, but with the legs and all, I don't see anything comical about sahuagin attacking land-dwellers. We've seen them emerging from the water as far back as the 1978 original Monster Manual illustration. It's always been an ingrained aspect of them that they keep coming out of the water.

So glad you brought that up! In 2nd-edition D&D, sahuagins were amphibious. In 3rd-edition, they had a specific ability called water dependent that allowed them to survive outside water for 1 hour per 2 Constitution before they started drowning. In Pathfinder, this crucial and iconic ability was removed - seemingly arbitrarily - and yet sahuagins are continued to be treated as if they possessed it. Still called land raiders, still encountered on the surface in past adventures. This? This is dumb.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

Sure, removing the amphibious ability might be questionable (I'm not sure I'd go as far as calling it 'dumb' -- that's IMO needlessly offensive and doesn't make anyone want to look for a solution for you), but using them as land raiders most certainly isn't -- it's in keeping with how they've always been.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Samy wrote:
Sure, removing the amphibious ability might be questionable (I'm not sure I'd go as far as calling it 'dumb' -- that's IMO needlessly offensive and doesn't make anyone want to look for a solution for you), but using them as land raiders most certainly isn't -- it's in keeping with how they've always been.

I'm not looking for help or solutions. I'm pointing out an error.

The Exchange

Pathfinder Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

They can hold their breath while fighting for 14+ rounds, I don't see a problem. kill a number of humans and run off to come back later, where are the air breathers going to hide in the middle of the ocean...

Kinda works for coastal settlements too. Otherwise yeah, seems like an odd thing to do.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Companion Subscriber
Generic Villain wrote:
I'm not looking for help or solutions. I'm pointing out an error.

Well then you're failing. There is no error.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
GeneticDrift wrote:

They can hold their breath while fighting for 14+ rounds, I don't see a problem. kill a number of humans and run off to come back later, where are the air breathers going to hide in the middle of the ocean...

Kinda works for coastal settlements too. Otherwise yeah, seems like an odd thing to do.

For a brief ship raid, sure. But for a coastal town of like 200+ people? They'd have to trudge from the beach up to the town itself. They would have ~1 minute and 40 seconds to bust in doors, battle resistance, pillage goods, slaughter innocents, then head back to the ocean. If the town had even a basic wooden wall, they'd be even more screwed. I'm fine that Paizo decided to make them an entirely aquatic threat (except for small groups with spellcaster backup) by removing their pseudo-amphibiousness, but they don't seem to stick to that. Anyway, as said it's an error. Errors happen and this one has a simple solution. Nothing more to say.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Companion Subscriber
Generic Villain wrote:
For a brief ship raid, sure. But for a coastal town of like 200+ people? They'd have to trudge from the beach up to the town itself. They would have ~1 minute and 40 seconds to bust in doors, battle resistance, pillage goods, slaughter innocents, then head back to the ocean. If the town had even a basic wooden wall, they'd be even more screwed.

Presumably in Pathfinder they don't attack towns that have a basic wooden wall or an extensive travel time from shore to people. There's plenty of villages that have piers and wharfs right on the water where sahuagin can reach humans within 2-3 rounds of emerging from the water. In Pathfinder, these are likely the places targeted by sahuagin.


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Generic Villain wrote:
In 2nd-edition D&D, sahuagins were amphibious. In 3rd-edition, they had a specific ability called water dependent that allowed them to survive outside water for 1 hour per 2 Constitution before they started drowning. In Pathfinder, this crucial and iconic ability was removed - seemingly arbitrarily - and yet sahuagins are continued to be treated as if they possessed it. Still called land raiders, still encountered on the surface in past adventures. This? This is dumb.

I'm lost. If sahuagin don't have the amphibious ability, but are treated as if they did in virtually every Pathfinder product in existence, why doesn't one just slap the ability on there themselves, make the fact known to any players they have that need things to be absolutely by the letter of the law, and be done with it?

Why is this something we need to be arguing about for over a dozen posts now and counting? I'm also sorry to be adding to it, but I had to ask!


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Samy wrote:
(I'm not sure I'd go as far as calling it 'dumb' -- that's IMO needlessly offensive and doesn't make anyone want to look for a solution for you)

Upon reflection, you are correct. Too late to edit the post though. Apologies.


I'm just glad to get the second of quartet of major artifacts in a book.

Lack of artifacts have been kind of annoying to me IE not showing up in Campaign Setting books.


It's weird that Paizo chose this book to establish that forcing people into slavery in a particularly cruel way isn't evil.

Page 9 wrote:
In the last few months, the pirate captain Amity Halfheart (CN female human swashbuckler 6) has made a name for herself capturing slaves to sell in illegal markets on the southern coast. Halfheart makes a point of taking only half the ship’s crew, leaving the rest to make their way to safer waters. She splits up pairs whenever she can, taking one of two spouses, one of two siblings, a parent or a child, and so on, devastating even those she ultimately leaves behind.

Silver Crusade

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Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

While they've had Neutral slave owners before for an actual Slaver-kidnapper-whatever the f##~ you would call her, and one with an even crueler MO like this, I would definitely peg as full on Evil.

I'm going with typo for this one, because seriously, you're stacking cruelty on top of an already malicious cruelty.


Well, why would she release half of the crew? If she really wanted to make money, she would enslave and sell everyone.


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shadowkras wrote:
Well, why would she release half of the crew? If she really wanted to make money, she would enslave and sell everyone.

Based on what I read, she releases them to ruin them. It's not about just the money for her, but the pain she can cause even those she sets free, which she only sets free to cause them pain, which is why she tears apart families and lovers every time.

Sorry, man. That's evil. Pure and simple.


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Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Maps, Pathfinder Accessories, Starfinder Accessories, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Definitely evil. That's just an error.


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Rysky wrote:

While they've had Neutral slave owners before for an actual Slaver-kidnapper-whatever the f$@* you would call her, and one with an even crueler MO like this, I would definitely peg as full on Evil.

I'm going with typo for this one, because seriously, you're stacking cruelty on top of an already malicious cruelty.

Yeah. Sometimes a character can be neutral because they balance out evil acts with good ones, but I can't imagine what would make the scales balance here.

Dark Archive

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Gisher wrote:
Rysky wrote:

While they've had Neutral slave owners before for an actual Slaver-kidnapper-whatever the f$@* you would call her, and one with an even crueler MO like this, I would definitely peg as full on Evil.

I'm going with typo for this one, because seriously, you're stacking cruelty on top of an already malicious cruelty.

Yeah. Sometimes a character can be neutral because they balance out evil acts with good ones, but I can't imagine what would make the scales balance here.

Maybe she read one of those threads about how you can cast like three infernal healings and turn evil, regardless of intent, and so spends half her slave-gold on wands of protection from evil to UMD (and therefore cast all sorts of [good] spells to trump her evil actions). Which, yes, absurd, but sauce for the goose and all that.

Seriously, though. She's evil, or headed there on a rocket sled from a formerly good alignment... Gotta be a typo.


She sounds evil to me and I did find it strange they had her as CN.


CN works for me as a completely unpredictable personality type....

Silver Crusade

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Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
nighttree wrote:
CN works for me as a completely unpredictable personality type....

Which this person isn't, since her reputation and writeup specifically spells out what she does each time, there is no unpredictably, you know what's going to happen.

Paizo Employee Managing Developer

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That alignment is a typo.

Silver Crusade

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Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Adam Daigle wrote:
That alignment is a typo.

Thank you for clearing that up, it is greatly appreciated.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I'm a little bummed we didn't get some more info on the gutaki/devilfish city of Achom (detailed in From Hells Heart). Seems like an absolutely killer place for an adventure of seven. I would have also liked to see one or two of the noted underwater communities get a formal stat writeup, but I understand that space was at a premium what with all the info, underwater rules, character options, and so forth.

Still though. Achom for the win baby.


Adam Daigle wrote:
That alignment is a typo.

seems like CE might fit - but confirmation would be good


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I picked up this book just in time to get to the water parts of Hell's Rebels. The brutal pugilist in the game is delighted that making things prone now has an effect underwater. :-)

Also, the bit about squeezing damage from constricting doing full damage underwater regardless of the type matches the house ruling I already made up, so thanks for that!

Paizo Employee Designer

Meraki wrote:

I picked up this book just in time to get to the water parts of Hell's Rebels. The brutal pugilist in the game is delighted that making things prone now has an effect underwater. :-)

Also, the bit about squeezing damage from constricting doing full damage underwater regardless of the type matches the house ruling I already made up, so thanks for that!

Yeah, our brawler in Skull and Shackles, Ti, is happy about the underwater trip too; a lot of these were things that came up in my own aquatic games. Ti will caution your brutal pugilist that it is still very difficult to disorient a naturally aquatic creature with a high Swim bonus, though, so use those new powers wisely!

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