Pathfinder Player Companion: Psychic Anthology (PFRPG)

3.80/5 (based on 8 ratings)
Pathfinder Player Companion: Psychic Anthology (PFRPG)
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A Mind-Expanding Read

For curious readers who wish to hone their psychic skills, a plethora of occult tomes, lost scrolls, and even stranger items lie hidden throughout Golarion. From the kaleidoscopic Recursion Tablets to the never-ending Infinity Scroll, Pathfinder Player Companion: Psychic Anthology presents a diverse archive of texts elucidating esoteric ideas and techniques that can benefit any psychic spellcasting class, as well as other spellcasters. Alongside feats, magic items, and spells, this volume unlocks the hidden powers of the mind!

Inside this book, you'll find:

  • New archetypes for nearly every occult class, including the phantom blade spiritualist and the autohypnotist mesmerist.
  • Panoplies­—collections of occultist implements that harness the power resonating between the items—and numerous kineticist wild talents for all the elements.
  • A new corruption arising from raw psychic energy that, if left unchecked, could mutate one's form into an all-consuming horror of writhing flesh.

This Pathfinder Player Companion is intended for use with the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game and the Pathfinder campaign setting, but can easily be incorporated into any fantasy world.

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-928-8

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Player Companion Subscription.

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5/5

I'm not going to talk about the psychic or mesmerist much here. The psychic gets to be the magic and magic item section, and it's a mixed bag. Mesmerist just isn't a class I much care to play (outside of one archetype), so I haven't spent much time looking at it.

Spiritualists get a nice chunk of stuff, a fun new emotional focus (and rules for using it with older archetypes). Two new archetypes, one bringing in some black blade magus fun, and a phantom animal one. I have intentions of using the phantom blade, the totemist I might if an appropriate campaign comes up. My only real problem with either is they lose emotional focus (something I enjoy about the flavor of the class).

Medium gets a fun new archetype. It doesn't really address any issues with the class, might even make some of them worse (forcing taboo). It get's fun abilities and has cool flavor though. Look for a thematic campaign to use it in.

Kineticist gets a lot of expanded selections. The invocations are a cool idea, and possibly a good tool for the future, but the feat look for most characters is disappointing. More talents, especially for wood and void is nice. Wood's new simple blast is disappointing, and makes for a (mostly) true pacifist if taken as your first. Not practical but interesting choice. More blade abilities make the melee fan happy. Speaking of which the Kinetic Knight is everything I ever wanted for the Kineticist, not just supporting but encouraging a strength based build, nice defensive features. I've already started playing one and it's one of m favorite builds. The lack of form infusions can be limiting somewhat though.

Occultist is another nice package here. The panopolies are great. Between giving you a way to go deeper into your spell list with out giving up too much versatility and some nice new focus powers. the archetype to support them is a nice addition too.

Overall a great book that supported the four psychic classes I care about in fun ways, and inspiring at least 4 new characters I want to play.


A Fantastic Expansion of Occult Options (for the most part)

5/5

This is a fantastic companion book for those interested in playing one of the classes in Occult Adventures. And for the most part, it gives these classes a lot of love. In order of how much (and the quality of) the love they receive:

1. (A+): The Spiritualist was originally my least favorite class in Occult Adventures. A class with cool flavor but weak mechanics. This book changes that. It introduces not one, but two archetypes that turn the Spiritualist into a viable and interesting option. The first is essentially a psychic version of the Blackblade Magus, and the second gives you a phantom animal companion (or two!) that's a viable option in combat. And it introduces a new Kindness emotional focus that the Id Rager can take(!). This went from a class I couldn't imagine getting myself to play, to a class I have at least two character ideas for. Fantastic stuff.

2. (A+): The Mesmerist, on the other hand, was one of my favorite classes in Occult Adventures. It's a lot like the alchemist -- a 6th level caster with lots of skill points and a bag of abilities that, though neat, don't obviously fit together (in the case of the alchemist: bombs, mutagens, self-buffing extracts, poison-using abilities and alchemy/potion-oriented abilities, in the case of the mesmerist: stares, tricks, touch treatments and a bevy of mind-affecting spells). In the case of the Alchemist, this was fixed by a bunch of great archetypes and options that allow you to really focus on one of the themes of the Alchemist (e.g., bomb focused alchemists, mutagen + self-buffing alchemists, poison-focused alchemists, etc). But until now the Mesmerist didn't really have the options to do the same.

This book starts to change that. It introduces a trick-focused archetype and a bunch of feats that make the Mesmerist's tricks cool and effective enough to really build a character around. Likewise, there are some great Stare feats that make stares effective enough to build a character around. Add in a cool Possession-focused archetype and a "mind-over-matter"-style archetype which moves away from *just* mind-affecting spells, and there are now a number of interesting and distinct options on the table to focus your Mesmerist around. More great stuff.

3. (A+): The Occultist was originally in the middle of the pack for me -- lots of flavor, and reasonably effective mechanically, but with a couple awkward features that make it hard to develop all of the versions of the class one might like to try (such as the dramatic difference in the power of different schools -- from the virtually obligatory Transmutation to the painfully bad Necromancy and Evocation -- and the strong disincentive to choose a school more than once, essentially locking you into a single spell per school). This book (combined with the incredible Silksworn archetype from the Heroes of the High Court) do a fair bit to change that. By adding panoply options (and the corresponding panoply-focused archetype) you now have a cool and flavorful way of getting multiple spells from a given school, and of spreading out your spell picks a bit more. There's still a few awkward features of the class left over (it's still hard to imagine building an Occultist without Transmutation, or with Necromancy and Evocation), but the class is definitely more fun to play with than before.

4. (A): The Kineticist was a class I liked a lot, and it also gets a lot of love, in the form of the first good Kineticist archetype (a melee-focused armor-wearing kineticist tank) and a big batch of new wild talents which open up the variety of builds to pursue, especially if you want a Wood or Void-focused Kineticist. Granted, a lot of them are high-level abilities which only the DM is likely to get to play with, and it's hard to not to wish there were even more utility Wild Talents and Kinetic Invocation options. (More! More! More!) But this still opens up a lot of interesting options, making this book pretty much a "must-have" for anyone building a Kineticist.

5. (B): The Medium was one of my least favorite classes in Occult Adventures. It had great flavor, making it a class I very much wanted to play. But mechanically, the only really viable option seems to be building your character around the Champion spirit and making them a kind of psychic-flavored fighter, which didn't fit very well with most of the Medium-style character ideas I wanted to play with.

This book adds some more neat flavor options to the Medium (you can tie yourself to a kind of outsider), with an accompanying archetype, which someone building a Medium might consider. But none of these options make the class feel like it would play very differently, or open up the possibility of making a Medium which isn't basically a psychic fighter. Of course, these demerits of the Medium class aren't this book's fault, and it's a little unfair to expect it to resolve all of the problems facing the Medium. Still, given how much I like the idea behind this class, it would be great to someday see some options for making a viable character focused around one of the non-Champion spirits.

6. (B-): The Psychic was originally another class from Occult Adventures in the middle of the pack for me. The disciplines have lots of flavor, but, much like the sorcerer's bloodlines, most of them don't have enough mechanical "meat" to make them feel like they'd play that differently. The amplifications are kind of neat-ish, but most don't do interesting enough things to be memorable. And the overwhelming focus on mind-affecting spells makes the Psychic feel a bit fragile, usefulness-wise, for a 9th level caster.

This book does a bit to round out the Psychic's spell casting possibilities, and adds in some psychic analogs of arcane spell-related magic items. But the class feels much the same as before (in both good ways and bad) in light of these options, and there's little that seems specific to the Psychic that's on offer. Okay stuff.

All told, if you're mostly interested in the Medium or the Psychic, then while there are some new options in this book, there isn't anything that you really need in this book. But if you're interesting in playing around with Spiritualists, Mesmerists, Occultists or Kineticists, then this is definitely a book you'll want to have.


Lots of great stuff and a little bit of really, really bad

3/5

I would strongly recommend you buy this book, but I can't give it more than three stars because it has some really poorly conceived and edited options in here that should be mildly embarrassing to Paizo.

The mesmerist, spiritualist, and occultist options are generally great, a couple of bad archetypes and unclear rules ("holding" panoply occultist implements) aside. As far as I can tell the medium and kineticist stuff is of similar quality, but I don't care about those as much. If you want more options for these classes absolutely buy this book and you won't regret it.

Where the book falls down is the Psychic items and spells section. I can agree that this was arguably more necessary to grow the class than an archetype or more disciplines would have been, but the implementation is pretty poor. Most of the magic items are uninspired psychic retreads of (bad) arcane options that in some cases already worked fine for psychic casters. The spells have some decent options, and a couple of weak options, but the real problem is that there are two absurdly strong options. One allows you to daze lock a creature even on a successful save (at 3rd level!), the other is basically a Moment of Prescience god mode that applies to almost every roll you do for 1 full minute. I think you can easily solo higher threat CR creatures in melee with this spell and a few standard buffs. It's that ugly.

Publishing either of these spells would have been irresponsible, publishing both makes me doubt Paizo takes this line seriously anymore with respect to maintaining the integrity and balance of their game. PFS will ban the hell out of them, but having this sort of awful munchkiness out there as an idea that someone at Paizo thought was ok to publish is troublesome.

My final complaint is that there are a few more than the usual (already disappointing) level of poor editing and rules mistakes that we've come to expect in the Player Companion line. You have an unprecedented casting time of "1 full round action" on some spells (a big problem on Psychic classes that need their move action to add metamagic or center and avoid concentration penalties and not an innovation that should be dropped in without explanation), missing explanations of partial saving throws, and a couple of other minor signs that this needed a better development pass from a responsible adult.

That aside, you should reward Paizo for the good things with your money and put the good options to use responsibly. I just hope the bad things get more attention in future products and don't become a trend.


Good fluff, but wouldn't recommend...

2/5

The fluff and items range from good to alright, but everything else is sorta meh. The new spirits for the Medium are pretty cool, as well as some of the Stare feats/tricks for the Mesmerist, but other than that...

I'll be honest. I wanted more kineticist talents when I bought this book, and I was nothing but disappointed. Oh gee, more ways to melee as a kineticist - as though there weren't a half-dozen archetypes that did pretty much the same thing. Oh look, *more* blasts that expand the use of your kinetic blade! Oh look, *feats*! Like there aren't *enough* feats, and these simply add a few spells as kineticist talents.

It was alright overall, but frankly, I would've saved the 10 bucks.


uninspired

2/5

I pride myself on long detailed reviews, but there is very little to say about this. Uninspired, tending to overly dramatic and "uncontrolled!" type wackiness. Lack of content covered by larger than normal bad magic items section.


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Isabelle Lee wrote:
Gordrenn Higgler wrote:
Would someone be kind enough to give an example of using Kinetic Crafting with a Void/Aether kineticist and how converting talents for prerequisites for making magic items.

It's probably going to require a fair amount of GM fiat, to be honest. Off the top of my head, I'd consider associating wood and aether with the wood and void element wizard schools, and tying void to negative energy and necromancy magic. At the very least, aether should work with any force or telekinesis effect.

I'll try to give it some thought. ^_^

Out of curiosity, other than the archetype's title being "kinetic KNIGHT", was there any other thought as to why their new defense ability only works with heavy armor considering they get medium armor proficiency as well? It kind of bothers me that every single high end kinetic knight is gonna have mithril full plate and look exactly the same.

Also, since the kinetic knight doesn't possess the samurai's challenge class feature, does that mean that their pool of resolve can't be regained except by rest?


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The aesthetic was the main thing - it's all about that shining armor. ^_^

A note: since mithril full plate is medium armor, it won't work for the kinetic knight's defense; reliance on heavy armor pushes the kinetic knight towards Strength over Dexterity, which is fine by me. (And speaking of all kinetic knights looking the same: the thing I wrote for kineticists and dragonhide armor got cut, or you'd be seeing a lot of that.)

As for regaining resolve, for the most part, it'll be rest-only. A samurai/kinetic knight would be able to recharge, though; you could probably do something very thematic with the Order of the Flame.


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Isabelle Lee wrote:
A note: since mithril full plate is medium armor, it won't work for the kinetic knight's defense;

You sure? I mean, if that's the intent, OK, but in general I thought mithral full plate still was heavy armor. It's still got enough room for a mount with the Hosteling enhancement, it still requires heavy armor proficiency to use, etc. The Bulette Charge Style from Armor Master's Handbook even treats mithral heavy armor as still being heavy armor, by giving it a penalty.


Yeah, based on the FAQ i thought that mithral heavy armor is a heavy armor with the movement penalty of medium and allows you to use any class abilities that check off heavy or medium, though for any hard checks (such as an enchantment that can only apply to one category) it is in its original category. Here is the FAQ text i am referencing, "It does not change the armor’s actual category, which means that you can still store a creature one size category larger in a hosteling mithral fullplate, and you can’t enhance a mithral breastplate with special abilities that require it to be light armor, like brawling (though you could enhance it with special abilities that require it to be medium armor), and so on."

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
shaventalz wrote:
Isabelle Lee wrote:
A note: since mithril full plate is medium armor, it won't work for the kinetic knight's defense;
You sure? I mean, if that's the intent, OK, but in general I thought mithral full plate still was heavy armor. It's still got enough room for a mount with the Hosteling enhancement, it still requires heavy armor proficiency to use, etc. The Bulette Charge Style from Armor Master's Handbook even treats mithral heavy armor as still being heavy armor, by giving it a penalty.

Actually Bulette style gives you a penalty if you have armor made of a lighter material. The actual armor style requirement is

Armor Style wrote:
Armor style feats can be used only while wearing armor whose type matches the feat’s armor proficiency prerequisite, disregarding any changes resulting from the armor’s material.

Which backs up Kali's statement. Bulette Style doesn't require heavy armor, it requires armor that is used with heavy armor proficiency, which could be normal heavy armor or mithril heavy armor.


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Since the kinetic knight's requirement is a class feature, I'd consider it in the context of the other class features listed in the FAQ:

FAQ wrote:
For example, a bard can cast spells in mithral breastplate without arcane spell failure, a barbarian can use her fast movement in mithral fullplate, a ranger can use his combat style in mithral fullplate, brawlers, swashbucklers, and gunslingers can keep their nimble bonus in mithral breastplate, rogues keep evasion in mithral breastplate, a brawler can flurry in mithral breastplate, characters without Endurance can sleep in mithral breastplate without becoming fatigued, and so on.

That sounds like it's lighter than its original category to me. The FAQ tells us that the armor is considered heavy for some things and medium for others; this falls into the category for which it's medium.

That said, as always: ask your GM. If you can get a more favorable ruling, don't let me get in your way. ^_^


Man... i am actually amused when clarifying FAQs seem to contradict themselves :P Go go Table Variance!


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Isabelle Lee wrote:

The aesthetic was the main thing - it's all about that shining armor. ^_^

A note: since mithril full plate is medium armor, it won't work for the kinetic knight's defense; reliance on heavy armor pushes the kinetic knight towards Strength over Dexterity, which is fine by me. (And speaking of all kinetic knights looking the same: the thing I wrote for kineticists and dragonhide armor got cut, or you'd be seeing a lot of that.)

As for regaining resolve, for the most part, it'll be rest-only. A samurai/kinetic knight would be able to recharge, though; you could probably do something very thematic with the Order of the Flame.

Okay, see, now you NEED to tell us how dragonhide armor interacts with kinetic knight. :v


Just asking, but does the Kinetic Knight archetype basically allow you to play 'Iron Man' (in the sense of being an armored energy-bolt hurler)?


Could kinetic invocations be used to refill a staff?


Pathfinder Rulebook, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Eric Hinkle wrote:
Just asking, but does the Kinetic Knight archetype basically allow you to play 'Iron Man' (in the sense of being an armored energy-bolt hurler)?

Sadly, no. It's pretty strictly Melee.


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Gordrenn Higgler wrote:
Could kinetic invocations be used to refill a staff?

I'll have to check some wording, but probably - it's just like casting a spell. (If it requires you to "expend a spell slot", then the answer is technically no. But I'd still allow it without batting an eye.)


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Isabelle Lee wrote:
Gordrenn Higgler wrote:
Could kinetic invocations be used to refill a staff?
I'll have to check some wording, but probably - it's just like casting a spell.

It appears the answer is indeed no, based on the text here.

As a houserule: when the kineticist recovers burn, I would allow her to immediately accept burn equal to the invocation's burn cost or 1 burn (whichever is higher) to restore one charge to the staff. For this purpose, all invocations associated with any element to which the kineticist has access are considered to be on her spell list, and she is considered to be "capable of casting" any invocation from those elements for which she meets the level requirement. End houserule.


Isabelle Lee wrote:
Isabelle Lee wrote:
Gordrenn Higgler wrote:
Could kinetic invocations be used to refill a staff?
I'll have to check some wording, but probably - it's just like casting a spell.

It appears the answer is indeed no, based on the text here.

As a houserule: when the kineticist recovers burn, I would allow her to immediately accept burn equal to the invocation's burn cost or 1 burn (whichever is higher) to restore one charge to the staff. For this purpose, all invocations associated with any element to which the kineticist has access are considered to be on her spell list, and she is considered to be "capable of casting" any invocation from those elements for which she meets the level requirement. End houserule.

Any chance you could tell us what the original interaction between dragonhide armor and kinetic knight was?


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Regarding dragonhide: it wasn't actually part of the kinetic knight (which is pretty much as I wrote it, except for some of the math). This was a separate mechanic.

I'm afraid I can't provide further information at this time, since (among other reasons) it's not totally impossible that it could appear in a future publication. Hopefully that, at least, provides some hope. ^_^


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Hoping it will include more than just the chromatic and metallic dragon types, looking forward to when it gets published, it's already on preorder :)


Down side to Phantom Blade....most of the usual Magus feat picks don't work...there is always some kind of conflict in the prerequisites they can't meet :(

Shadow Lodge

Phantom blade has the same problem as the ectoplasmatist: spell list. There are so few touch spells worth your time that it's usually better to just two-hand the weapon. I mean, I like stricken heart and all but it's no shocking grasp. In phantom blade's favor though, it can actually reliably hit stuff. My ectoplasmatist is about to hit level 10 and it feels like Core flurry of blows from time to time.

Now, don't get me wrong, mindshock, spirit-bound blade, Power Attack, etc all assure there'll be plenty pain IF he hits.


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I consider it a point in the archetype's favor that there isn't something like Shocking Grasp. It made Magus builds really homogeneous and kind of unpleasant to have in a game.


There are plenty of neat control touch spells that the Spiritualist gets. And of course, there's Harm.


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I've started playing a Kinetic Knight and I love it. I've wanted to play a kineticist, but don't care for dex based melee characters for whatever reason. I wish I kept some ranged options, even if it made me more mad, but don't mind losing them. The only "problem" is the limited infusions I can take, but that has more to do with not only chooising void as element but also expanding into void again (or maybe going purist) which is a lesser supported element to begin with. And my touch AC, but that's heavy armor for you. Love this, and has quickly risen to one of my favorite builds.


Glad to hear you're enjoying it! ^_^

Silver Crusade

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I hear about the kinetic knight and so when a friend of mine got a copy of Psychic Anthology, it was the first thing I took a look at. I must say, I like the archetype quite a bit, especially after sitting down to build a peri-blooded aasimar pyrokineticist 8/samurai (sovereign blade) 1 to test it out (based on the idea that the resolve features would stack). I chose void (negative blast and negative admixture) as his expanded element to represent his tapping into that inner darkness inherent in his celestial heritage. Also, I just loved coming up with the visual for his kinetic overflow (wreathed in fiery wings while surrounded by a cloud of black particulate), again a nod to his peri ancestry. It was fun being able to play him. I look forward to using him in future games.


Muser wrote:

Phantom blade has the same problem as the ectoplasmatist: spell list. There are so few touch spells worth your time that it's usually better to just two-hand the weapon. I mean, I like stricken heart and all but it's no shocking grasp. In phantom blade's favor though, it can actually reliably hit stuff. My ectoplasmatist is about to hit level 10 and it feels like Core flurry of blows from time to time.

Now, don't get me wrong, mindshock, spirit-bound blade, Power Attack, etc all assure there'll be plenty pain IF he hits.

What I find amusing is that the Spiritualist Knacks that are touch spells are all beneficial to the touched: Guidance, Resistance, and Virtue. So instead of spamming Arcane Strike, they could spam Virtue - giving their opponent a temporary hit point in exchange for an extra attack that takes away many hit point. :)


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"STAND STILL!!! I'M TRYING TO HELP YOOOOOU!!!"


Ventnor wrote:
"STAND STILL!!! I'M TRYING TO HELP YOOOOOU!!!"

No pain, no gain.


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If folks like the book (or something from it), reviews are a good way to get more of what you liked!


QuidEst wrote:
If folks like the book (or something from it), reviews are a good way to get more of what you liked!

I'll get on that because the 4 classes I like out if all got great stuff that I enjoy


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Just got my copy today The kinetic knight is one of the most elegant archetypes I've seen. It does exactly what you think it would do but in a cool way that works for the class Good work designers! keep it coming!

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Charter Superscriber
Luis Loza wrote:

...

I didn't want to punish any phantom blades for having their weapon destroyed, but I also didn't want the safety of the weapon to become and afterthought. Thus, the idea of empowering the spiritualist's body with phantom energy while harboring the weapon. The phantom blade already had the intent of providing any possible weapon as a phantom weapon, so why not unarmed strikes? (Also, I'm a big fun of monks and unarmed attackers, so it was a good chance to slip that in!) Unarmed strikes take a lot of investment to get working effectively compared to a weapon though, so the phantom blade needed a little more punch. That's why she gets a slower progression of flurry of blows. I feel that it's enough to make unarmed strikes as appealing as other weapons, without stepping on any brawler or monk toes. All in all, I grew very proud and excited of those 130ish words and I hope other people out there are, too!
...

The Phantom blade gains unarmed strike damage dice as a Monk of same level -2. (IIRC)

How much damage does the phantom blade do at 1st and 2nd level?

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Franz Lunzer wrote:
Luis Loza wrote:

...

I didn't want to punish any phantom blades for having their weapon destroyed, but I also didn't want the safety of the weapon to become and afterthought. Thus, the idea of empowering the spiritualist's body with phantom energy while harboring the weapon. The phantom blade already had the intent of providing any possible weapon as a phantom weapon, so why not unarmed strikes? (Also, I'm a big fun of monks and unarmed attackers, so it was a good chance to slip that in!) Unarmed strikes take a lot of investment to get working effectively compared to a weapon though, so the phantom blade needed a little more punch. That's why she gets a slower progression of flurry of blows. I feel that it's enough to make unarmed strikes as appealing as other weapons, without stepping on any brawler or monk toes. All in all, I grew very proud and excited of those 130ish words and I hope other people out there are, too!
...

The Phantom blade gains unarmed strike damage dice as a Monk of same level -2. (IIRC)

How much damage does the phantom blade do at 1st and 2nd level?

The normal non-Monk damage for Unarmed Strikes, 1d3.

Paizo Employee Developer

Franz Lunzer wrote:
Luis Loza wrote:

...

I didn't want to punish any phantom blades for having their weapon destroyed, but I also didn't want the safety of the weapon to become and afterthought. Thus, the idea of empowering the spiritualist's body with phantom energy while harboring the weapon. The phantom blade already had the intent of providing any possible weapon as a phantom weapon, so why not unarmed strikes? (Also, I'm a big fun of monks and unarmed attackers, so it was a good chance to slip that in!) Unarmed strikes take a lot of investment to get working effectively compared to a weapon though, so the phantom blade needed a little more punch. That's why she gets a slower progression of flurry of blows. I feel that it's enough to make unarmed strikes as appealing as other weapons, without stepping on any brawler or monk toes. All in all, I grew very proud and excited of those 130ish words and I hope other people out there are, too!
...

The Phantom blade gains unarmed strike damage dice as a Monk of same level -2. (IIRC)

How much damage does the phantom blade do at 1st and 2nd level?

She would do base unarmed strike damage of 1d3. At 3rd level it jumps up to 1d6.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Charter Superscriber

Okay. Could have been Small Monk Progression.


I've never really given Spiritualist a hard look. Reading the Totem Spiritualist, it basically boils down to, "Me and my ghost dinosaur", right?

Paizo Employee Developer

Redblade8 wrote:
I've never really given Spiritualist a hard look. Reading the Totem Spiritualist, it basically boils down to, "Me and my ghost dinosaur", right?

Yup!


Pathfinder Rulebook, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

How does spell combat work in regards to the Phantom Blade? Can they still take a penalty on attack rolls to get a boost to concentration? As written it looks like they can, but the limit is still Int based.


Luis Loza wrote:
Redblade8 wrote:
I've never really given Spiritualist a hard look. Reading the Totem Spiritualist, it basically boils down to, "Me and my ghost dinosaur", right?
Yup!

Yussss! Thanks.


Am I missing something, or is the Phantom Blade just a better (if less flavourful) version of the Ectoplasmatist?


Mighty Squash wrote:
Am I missing something, or is the Phantom Blade just a better (if less flavourful) version of the Ectoplasmatist?

I dunno about it being less flavorful- intelligent weapons are a very good flavor. But yeah, more or less. Extoplasmist didn't work very well. If you like, you can think of it as an archetype for Ectoplasmist rather than for Spiritualist in general. The focusing headband does help Ectoplasmist out a lot, so now you've got two solid Magus-like options for the class, much like Magus and Bladebound Magus.


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Mighty Squash wrote:
Am I missing something, or is the Phantom Blade just a better (if less flavourful) version of the Ectoplasmatist?

Intelligent Ghost Sword is objectively more flavorful than goopy tentacles.

True fact.

Silver Crusade

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Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Ventnor wrote:
Mighty Squash wrote:
Am I missing something, or is the Phantom Blade just a better (if less flavourful) version of the Ectoplasmatist?

Intelligent Ghost Sword is objectively more flavorful than goopy tentacles.

True fact.

Depends on what flavor you make the tentacles.


So what would be a good module or AP to play Psychic characters in??

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

... any?

You're gonna have to be a bit more specific.


Well Strange Aeons can have good thematics for most of the occult classes (Kineticists being about the only one that is a heavy stretch), with the iconic Medium even being one of the "cannon" heroes of it.

But like Rysky said most any AP can fit them in. The Outside Channeler archetype in this book would be great in Wrath of The Righteous, Hell's Rebels, or Hell's Vengeance. And air or water (or both) would be thematically useful in Skull and Shackles. Occultist would have good reason to be interested in the set up for Mummy's Mask. Between generic flavor and the archetypes you can probably build a psychic character thematic for just about any story.


Cool!.

Um, not sure what specifics. I guess like you said with a little work they can be good for almost anything. I just thought that certain AP's would be best suited for occult classes cos of magical items and useful abilities and whatnot. I'm pretty keen on trying out the Phantom Blade Spiritualist.

Silver Crusade

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Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Oh okies, well since you start at level 1 with the ability to hack up ghosts Carrion Crown might be fun :3


Haha if only I knew this a while ago. Playing a cleric in Carrion Crown and he's not doing so bad. I don't actually enjoy playing clerics so he's more like a Paladin than a cleric. But he does okay.

Maybe I'll use this Phantom Blade Spiritualist for Strange Aeons then.


Can kinetic invocations be cast into a ring of spell storing?


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Haldelar Baxter wrote:
Can kinetic invocations be cast into a ring of spell storing?

Looking over the ring and the feat, I don't see any reason why not. ^_^


Isabelle Lee wrote:
Haldelar Baxter wrote:
Can kinetic invocations be cast into a ring of spell storing?
Looking over the ring and the feat, I don't see any reason why not. ^_^

Thanks

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