Pathfinder Player Companion: Heroes of the High Court (PFRPG)

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Pathfinder Player Companion: Heroes of the High Court (PFRPG)
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Discover Your Noble Side!

Adventure is not limited to forbidding dungeons and grimy back alleys; sometimes the greatest risks and rewards are found in the gleaming halls of queens and emperors. Pathfinder Player Companion: Heroes of the High Court presents everything you need to take your escapades into the royal courts and noble houses of Golarion. Learn how to dress and act in high society, gain access to the echelons of political power, and take advantage of the privileges afforded to those who have mastered the arts of courtly intrigue!

Inside this book, you'll find:

  • Archetypes for a variety of classes, such as the court fool bard to the butterfly blade slayer, who performs a noble's dirty work in the shadows.
  • Equipment and magical courtly regalia suitable for any ruler, including thrones that grant great power to whoever earns the right to sit upon them!
  • New traits, feats, and spells for characters who wish to mingle with nobility, as well as new tactics that let a participant of a verbal duel cut her opponent down to size.

This Pathfinder Player Companion is intended for use with the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game and the Pathfinder campaign setting, but can easily be incorporated into any fantasy world.

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-920-2

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Player Companion Subscription.

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Surprisingly Heroic

4/5

This is not a well-titled book. When you think of a book with this title, you think of a middling to mediocre heavily flavor-focused book with at best some fluff archetypes that are kind of forgettable after a week or two. What you don’t expect is a whole host of really cool archetypes, flavorful items and abilities that hold up mechanically, and even new options for verbal duels of all things. Not everything’s a slam dunk of course, there’s a few less interesting or questionable archetypes scattered throughout the book (like the Paladin that trades out a bunch of stuff to basically become a Swashbuckler) but there’s also a bunch of really good archetypes included, like the Fighter archetype that gets Strength-based Combat Reflexes, and the Silksworn Occultist, a great archetype for the class that only gets better as it wears increasing amounts of bling.

Definitely worth a look, especially for someone who wants a character that's regal and wants to show it in style.


Serviceable but Uninspired

3/5

I decided to pick up Heroes of the High Court because a PC I'd been running for a while is a noblewoman and I thought I might find some good material for her in a book designed for PCs involved with royalty and noble intrigue. Alas, my character died this past weekend (aboleths!), but I'll still review this book anyway. As with all entries in the Pathfinder Player Companion line, this is a 32-page full colour book. The inside back cover is a reproduction of the cover, while the inside front cover is a depiction of six different signet rings and possible interpretations they could hold. It's a weird feature, but not necessarily a bad one (at least for people, like me, with zero in the way of artistic ability). The interior is literally divided into about fifteen different two-page long sections, which makes summary a bit of a chore. But if you stick with me, I'll try to move fast.

1. "Introduction/Rules Index": There's a couple of exceedingly-obvious paragraphs of introduction, followed by very short (one paragraph each) descriptions of some of the more prominent noble courts in the official campaign setting of Golarion: the Black Dome (Sothis), Castle Overwatch (Lastwall), the Imperial Palace of Egorian (Cheliax), the Imperial Palace of Oppara (Taldor), the Palace of Fallen Stars (Numeria), Queen Edasseril's Court (Kyonin), and the Umbral Court (Nidal). Each court receives a background trait; most are Social traits, but a couple are Magic or even Combat. Most don't actually have much to do with nobility in particular, and relate more to the culture of the region than anything.

2. "Playing a Noble": This section introduces five new feats (three of which are Story Feats), each of which is themed around being a different type of noble: Aspiring Noble, Enlightened Noble, Noble Impostor, Noble Stipend, and Self-Exiled Noble. Next, there's over a dozen new benefits that can be taken with the Noble Scion feat (from the Inner Sea World Guide book) relating to different regions of Golarion. Most of the benefits are fairly minor.

3. "Court Entertainers": Two new archetypes, one for Bards ("Court Fool") and one for Skalds ("Court Poet"), as well as three new Bardic masterpieces. I really like the Court Fool archetype and it seems like a natural role for a Bard, but the Skald archetype is a bit strange as it involves improving allies' "aesthetic sensibilities" (non-physical attributes).

4. "Royal Defenders": Three new archetypes, one for Fighters ("High Guardian"), one for Gunslingers of all things ("Thronewarden"), and one for Witches ("Witch-Watcher"). Witches also get two new hexes and a new patron choice, Protection. The Gunslinger archetype seems okay to me, the Witch archetype really needs much more flavour (it's very bland conceptually), and the Fighter archetype seems like a really bad choice, as the character loses several bonus combat feats in exchange for getting very specific feats with restrictions on them.

5. "Arcane Retainers": Four new spells, three new Alchemist discoveries, and a new Alchemist archetype ("Royal Alchemist"). The artwork accompanying this archetype is pretty cool, but the archetype itself seems like a very, very complicated way to essentially give allies some modest bonuses against disease and poison. I've noticed a trend in Pathfinder game design of giving various class features "pools" of points that do various different things depending on the number of points spent, and I'm not sure if it's a good one for gameplay.

6. "Orders of Chivalry": One new archetype for Cavaliers ("Gallant"), one for Paladins ("Virtuous Bravo"), and the introduction of a new category of magic items called Favors. The Gallant really doesn't do much, but the Virtuous Bravo basically adds Swashbuckler class abilities to a Paladin chassis and definitely provides a different feel for a character with them. Favors are one-use only minor magic items given to a character as a reward or token of admiration for services rendered; I like the concept, though most are pretty expensive considering their minor mechanical effects.

7. "Courtly Races": All of the Core Rulebook races get short (two to three paragraph) entries on what their royal courts are like, along with an alternate racial trait. My favourite of the bunch is "Conservative Diplomacy" for dwarves, which says that they treat any roll of 5 or less on a Diplomacy check as a 5, but any roll of 15 or better as a 15. The mechanical effect ties in really well with the flavour explanation and it makes perfect sense.

8. "Courts of the East": This section contains description of noble life in Jalmeray and Katheer (two areas of the campaign setting that don't receive as much coverage as others), which is more useful than the fairly generic description in the previous section. There's also two new feats, a new Oracle archetype ("Inerrant Voice"), and a new Psychic discipline ("Pageantry"). I have to confess to not knowing much about Psychics (apart from a terribly inept attempt to create one), but the Pageantry discipline looks pretty powerful; I will note, however, that the abilities it grants do not seem particularly well-tied to a "pageantry" theme. Function should follow form here, and it doesn't.

9. "Courts of the Dragon Empires": Brief overviews of four Tian royal courts are provided: Minkai, Po Li, Tianjing, and Xa Hoi. There's also four new feats and a new Occultist ritual. Again, I appreciate seeing some options themed around areas of Golarion outside the Inner Sea, even if the options aren't always as well-tied to the flavour as they should be.

10. "Ecclesiastical Courts": This section includes very brief (one paragraph each) introductions to the royal courts of Cheliax, Mendev, Druma, Razmiran, and Nidal, along with five new feats loosely themed to each. I really like the feats in this section: creative and useful. Two new clerical subdomains are also added, "Chivalry" and "Sovereignty."

11. "Invested with Divinity": This entire section is about a major new Monk archetype, the "Invested Regent." Again, the archetype grants a pool of points which which the character can do special things (and this pool is separate than the Monk's Ki pool). There's three new feats, each of which requires the archetype as a prerequisite. The powers granted to a character with the archetype just don't seem to have much to do with the flavour of the concept, and appeared to be a bit randomly chosen to me.

12. "Enemies of Rule": An archetype each for the Slayer ("Butterfly Blade") and Vigilante ("Dragonscale Loyalist") and three new spells for infiltrating and detecting impostors. The archetypes in this section were much better than in the previous section, and it's good to see Vigilantes getting some attention in a book that would seem to be a natural place for them to shine.

13. "Conduct and Decorum": This section introduces some new ways to use existing skills, such as using a Knowledge (nobility) check instead of Sense Motive to determine if someone is feigning noble blood. I like the concept overall, though some of the options seem more complicated than necessary in order to accomplish a relatively rare task. The verbal duel rules from Ultimate Intrigue receive support with four new tactics; I'm a big believer that new rules sub-systems should be supported beyond the book they're introduced in, so I was happy to see this.

14. "Courtly Regalia": Seven new mundane and magical articles of clothing or accessories to make every noble look (and act) their best. My favourite by far is "Phantom Entourage", which does exactly as the name implies--it creates illusory assorted sycophants and hangers-on to make it clear to everyone just how important the (actually unimportant) wearer is. There's also a new Occultist archetype called the "Silksworn." The concept has been quite popular in the Paizo forums, though again I'll cop to not knowing enough about the class to offer an opinion.

15. "Implements of Rule": Several new magic items, including crowns and scepters, as well as a new type of magic items, thrones. Thrones are interesting because they provide benefits to the monarch sitting on them as well as anyone who makes an obeisance (like kneeling or other gesture of allegiance) before it. I could imagine thrones as an excellent way to add some interesting effects to "boss fights" without risking PCs getting their hands on something so powerful that it will upend campaign balance.

So you can see from the summary above that the book is chock-full of new options. Contrary to what one might expect, there's no particular focus on the classes that seem more naturally aligned to courtly settings (like Bards, Paladins, Vigilantes in their social guises, etc.). Instead, this book has a "satisfy everyone with something for everyone" approach. My feelings after reading it are of mild disappointment. There's no heart or style to the book; the writing in each section is functional but pedestrian, and it's never inspiring or passionate about a rarely-touched area of Pathfinder gameplay that deserves better. I know most buyers of these books want as much "crunch" as can possibly be fitted between two covers, but the book suffers for it in terms of cohesiveness and enduring contribution to the game.


Intriguing new archetypes and items

5/5

I ordered this right as I saw it available. My current character is a noble, so thought it would be useful for her for some different flavor. I wasn't wrong, but was also pleasantly surprised by the various archetypes, items, and spells available.

The archetypes, as with others in the same vein, don't completely replace a class'so abilities, but rather give them noble (or anti-noble) flare. Some even change classes a fair bit (dex paladin??), but that's par the course for archetypes.

Additional excitement came to be when I read into the info for verbal duels; so much can be done with that, adding a new dynamic to game play.

The items are interesting without being overpowered or too situational- not everything needs to be a Legendary Sword of Legend. In particular, I love the item that gives a character it's own illusory hangers-on... could donly both useful and hilarious things with that!

All in all I like it, and am looking forward to using some of these items and rules in game soon.


A few noble gems among the common riff raff

3/5

Do you want a lot of rules and options to help run a campaign set in royal courts and other elite social environments? Buy Ultimate Intrigue!

But this book is ok, too. You'll find many archetypes and feats that are of the usual quality (forgettable but not offensively bad) and a few well polished diamonds.

My favorites:

1. A bardic masterpiece that replicates the Commune spell
2. The Protective Luck hex makes enemies roll twice and take the worst when attacking an ally
3. A paladin archetype that gives lots of swashbuckler abilities at reasonable cost
4. A strong level 4 occult ritual that can serve as a daily party buff
5. A monk archetype that lets you swap feats for SLAs or advanced feats (w/o preqs) fueled by a new (Cha based) pool of energy separate from your ki, it's also well supported by feats, a case can be made for treating this as a standard archetype you need to justify not taking
6. The Perceive Betrayal spell, which is great for bodyguard or intrigue situations
7. New skill options for existing social skills, much better than the UI "here's a feat to do something you were obviously capable of by default before we published this" approach
8. The Silksworn Occultist. Easily the best 6th level caster when it comes to actual spell casting and SLAs, 9th level casters would be jealous if they weren't, you know, 9th level casters. But for breath and effectiveness in using the abilities and spell levels it does have it's really, really good.
9. The Chastising Baton, a magical rod. Adds +1 DC to all compulsion spells, and sickens the target for 1 round if they make their save. Only 5,000 gp and a new must have for serious Mesmerists, Psychics, and Enchanters.

My biggest disappointment is the Pageantry Discipline for Psychics. It has promise, but makes a big, easily avoided mistake in the spell list that overlooks a well known OA errata, and the first discipline ability by possible intent is basically useless, but as actually written is too powerful. Better editing would have made this a good addition, but I don't see how it can be saved without a comprehensive FAQ that a Player's Companion won't get. Maybe PFS clarifications can at least fix the bonus spell list error.


2/5


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

I'm toying with the idea of making an Occultist who is a psychic investigator, focusing on abilities like object reading and aura sight, and taking divination as one of their implements. Does the Silksworn archetype seem like a good fit for such a character?

(I.e., does it trade out object reading and aura sight (bad for this concept)? Does it get access to a wider array of divination spells (good for this concept)? Or to "talky" abilities to use when investigating (good for this concept)?)


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Porridge wrote:
I'm toying with the idea of making an Occultist who is a psychic investigator, focusing on abilities like object reading and aura sight, and taking divination as one of their implements. Does the Silksworn archetype seem like a good fit for such a character?

Well... perhaps. If you're not too attached to the "psychic" part. Still, let's see what we can do for you. ^_^

The silksworn:
Porridge wrote:
(I.e., does it trade out object reading and aura sight (bad for this concept)?

Still there.

Porridge wrote:
Does it get access to a wider array of divination spells (good for this concept)?

Not anything the occultist couldn't already learn. But you'll get more of what you could already access.

Porridge wrote:
Or to "talky" abilities to use when investigating (good for this concept)?)

It definitely gets a bit of that.

Any further questions?


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Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber

To add on to that, if "psychic" is a big deal, the Psychic Sensitivity feat is great for getting that flavor back.


QuidEst wrote:
To add on to that, if "psychic" is a big deal, the Psychic Sensitivity feat is great for getting that flavor back.

I thought this three times, and still somehow forgot to include it in my post. ^_^


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

Hot dog! Awesome!

(Especially since the Occultist divination spells lend themselves very well to the idea of a psychic detective. So having access to more of them than 1/lvl would be great.)

Definitely got to pick up a copy of this!


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Luthorne wrote:
steelhead wrote:
Luthorne wrote:

Alright, had some time to read through this, here's my thoughts on it.

** spoiler omitted **...

Hey Luthorne, could you enter this post as a review? It provides a lot of detail and the only reviewer just posted a star rating rather than giving your level of thought to the review. People will be more likely to read your exposition if it is a review, and it will help prospective buyers. Thanks!
I think I would have to pare it down considerably if it was going to be a proper review...since it's, well, rather rambly...

You say that Luthorne but your review and list of things has convinced me that this is an immediate buy for me.


How soon before this will be in Brick and Mortar shops?

Silver Crusade

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Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Tomorrow!


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Isabelle Lee wrote:
QuidEst wrote:
To add on to that, if "psychic" is a big deal, the Psychic Sensitivity feat is great for getting that flavor back.
I thought this three times, and still somehow forgot to include it in my post. ^_^

You didn't accidentally summon Beetlejuice, did you?


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Cthulhudrew wrote:
Isabelle Lee wrote:
QuidEst wrote:
To add on to that, if "psychic" is a big deal, the Psychic Sensitivity feat is great for getting that flavor back.
I thought this three times, and still somehow forgot to include it in my post. ^_^
You didn't accidentally summon Beetlejuice, did you?

Not this time...


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Too sleepy for a detailed analysis, but my initial impression is that the Silksworn Occultist is very cool. I want to see what it looks like with some levels in Dragon Disciple. ;)


The Pageantry Psychic discipline is cool, but has some issues. Most are minor.

1. The one that is NOT minor is the 4th level bonus spell: Overwhelming Presence. This is a 9th level spell that was errata'd out of the OA Psychic spell list assigning it to the (way) wrong level. So this discipline doesn't have a legal 4th level bonus spell.

2. Ritual Unity: This is the only discipline ability that refreshes phrenic pool and doesn't provide a per day limit on attempts/successes. Usually it's either the pool ability modifier or 3+ the pool ability modifier, but as written this is a way to refresh your phrenic pool an infinite number of times per day. Since skill Aid Another checks are pretty much possible to spam infinitely, this is a problem.

3. The fact that all of the other discipline abilities require expending a phrenic point is an issue if a limit on refreshing your pool gets implementedl. Except for Power from Pageantry (which has the very significant 1 round casting limitation already built in) none of these are obviously powerful enough to justify spending pool on them, an approach only otherwise taken on the (stronger) discipline abilities form Occult Origins. Power from Pageantry aside, a per Cha modifier limit per day would have been better and more consistent with most Psychic disciplines.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Plausible Pseudonym wrote:

The Pageantry Psychic discipline is cool, but has some issues. Most are minor.

1. The one that is NOT minor is the 4th level bonus spell: Overwhelming Presence. This is a 9th level spell that was errata'd out of the OA Psychic spell list assigning it to the (way) wrong level. So this discipline doesn't have a legal 4th level bonus spell.

2. Ritual Unity: This is the only discipline ability that refreshes phrenic pool and doesn't provide a per day limit on attempts/successes. Usually it's either the pool ability modifier or 3+ the pool ability modifier, but as written this is a way to refresh your phrenic pool an infinite number of times per day. Since skill Aid Another checks are pretty much possible to spam infinitely, this is a problem.

3. The fact that all of the other discipline abilities require expending a phrenic point is an issue if a limit on refreshing your pool gets implementedl. Except for Power from Pageantry (which has the very significant 1 round casting limitation already built in) none of these are obviously powerful enough to justify spending pool on them, an approach only otherwise taken on the (stronger) discipline abilities form Occult Origins. Power from Pageantry aside, a per Cha modifier limit per day would have been better and more consistent with most Psychic disciplines.

In regards to Ritual Unity, it could have definitely been worded better, but I believe the intent was for it to only apply on aid another skill checks that are part of a Ritual, not on all aid another skill checks.


Rysky wrote:
In regards to Ritual Unity, it could have definitely been worded better, but I believe the intent was for it to only apply on aid another skill checks that are part of a Ritual, not on all aid another skill checks.

I considered and rejected that because that would make this LOL bad. Vanishingly rare opportunities to attempt it, and how often do you want to do an Aid Another on someone else rather than doing the skill checks yourself? You're an Int based character with class skills in all Knowledge skills, it's not very often that a party member will be a better option even if you could boost them via Aid Another (at a relative -2 penalty because you'd be forgoing your own +2 bonus from doing it yourself). Which you can't.

Occult Rituals rules wrote:
These checks cannot benefit from the aid another action

Secondary casters (with a flat +1 per four participants) are the only way to boost a ritual.

Ritual Unity for all skill Aid Another attempts is actually fine and well balanced (given the Phrenic pool suck on all other abilities), it just needs a use/success per day limitation. Compare to the Self Perfection discipline, which also has an (even easier) instant win trigger condition to refresh pool by jumping around.


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Ok, Silksworn Occultists are awesome! And they do synergize really well with Dragon Disciple. Now I want to play one who gradually becomes more dragony while wearing his hoard in the form of gold-threaded and gem-encrusted garments.


Slowly working through this, but I have to say that as much as I love the panoplies in Psychic Anthology I have to admit that Silksworn is probably going to make me ignore them. This is unquestionably the best 6th level caster in the game when it comes to actual spellcasting. If you wanted to play a Wizard but can live without high level spells (or your GM bans full casters) this is an easy and very cool and powerful choice that can potentially outshine it in several areas with the right build, especially after 16th level and the +2 DC boosters come online.


I do wonder flavor-wise why the Silksworn is arcane. Getting psychic power from resonances in items makes a sort of sense, getting arcane power from a love of bling does not.

Mechanically I assume it was done to avoid wearing déclassé armor over your finery, but it's hard to justify in universe.


Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber
Plausible Pseudonym wrote:

I do wonder flavor-wise why the Silksworn is arcane. Getting psychic power from resonances in items makes a sort of sense, getting arcane power from a love of bling does not.

Mechanically I assume it was done to avoid wearing déclassé armor over your finery, but it's hard to justify in universe.

It's the mechanical reason.

If you want a fluff reason, though, my choice would be that it's a Prophecies of Kalistrade thing. Money is power, and you are getting the universe to sit down and acknowledge that.


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The silksworn originally had flavor tying it more firmly to Vudrani lore and to the courts of Nex. It got left by the wayside at some point, alas; wordcount is a cruel, cruel mistress, and Mavaro's art always takes up a lot of room. (It does make a really good Prophet of Kalistrade, though, especially since the PrC establishes them as arcane spellcasters.)

As for the original inspiration, it went along the following lines:
-"They're supposed to wear fancy clothing, which suggests no armor."
-"Who doesn't wear armor in this game? Sorcerers, wizards, and monks."
-"We already have a divine occultist, so why not an arcane one?"

...now I just need to find a way to make an alchemical occultist, and we'll have the set. ^_^


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Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber
Isabelle Lee wrote:

The silksworn originally had flavor tying it more firmly to Vudrani lore and to the courts of Nex. It got left by the wayside at some point, alas; wordcount is a cruel, cruel mistress, and Mavaro's art always takes up a lot of room. (It does make a really good Prophet of Kalistrade, though, especially since the PrC establishes them as arcane spellcasters.)

As for the original inspiration, it went along the following lines:
-"They're supposed to wear fancy clothing, which suggests no armor."
-"Who doesn't wear armor in this game? Sorcerers, wizards, and monks."
-"We already have a divine occultist, so why not an arcane one?"

...now I just need to find a way to make an alchemical occultist, and we'll have the set. ^_^

The Blood Alchemist is kind of one coming from the other direction. Gets various circle abilities, at least.


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Isabelle Lee wrote:


...now I just need to find a way to make an alchemical occultist, and we'll have the set. ^_^

My body is ready.


My compliments to the author of the occult ritual tea ceremony, this is a nice buff that I could see being part of the daily ritual for a party if you've got someone willing to accept the primary caster backlash.

Legalistic Reading feat's ability to cast a scroll spell two consecutive rounds is almost a great ability, but by the time you can make the CL check you'll have better options than scrolls.


A silksworn occultist VMCed with an Oracle could be pretty neat if you choose the Covetous curse.


Has anyone praised the Invested Regent monk archetype? I think it's brilliant from a design perspective, maximum flexibility allowing limited use prequisite skipping feats or SLAs to be chosen in place of regular or bonus feats. Because of the way it's written it should stack with any archetype that doesn't trade out the 1st level bonus feat. It's hard to see why this wouldn't be a reasonable pick for everyone else.


Pathfinder Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Society Subscriber
Isabelle Lee wrote:

...now I just need to find a way to make an alchemical occultist, and we'll have the set. ^_^

Well, have you ever seen the movie "Zapped"?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Plausible Pseudonym wrote:
Has anyone praised the Invested Regent monk archetype? I think it's brilliant from a design perspective, maximum flexibility allowing limited use prequisite skipping feats or SLAs to be chosen in place of regular or bonus feats. Because of the way it's written it should stack with any archetype that doesn't trade out the 1st level bonus feat. It's hard to see why this wouldn't be a reasonable pick for everyone else.

Well it *is* Cha based, which is usually the one stat that a Monk can afford to dump, but yeah, all in all, pretty nice.


You can get plenty out of it without boosting Cha, the level 1 ability is an ok 1 point boost to a save when you have an immediate action to spare, and you just buy a self buff you don't need that often with a later feat. You'd have to do a really big Cha investment to make a big difference, so play it slow.


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Or combine it with the Scaled Fist archetype and say that your right to rule comes from your association with Imperial Dragons.


thecursor wrote:
Isabelle Lee wrote:

...now I just need to find a way to make an alchemical occultist, and we'll have the set. ^_^

Well, have you ever seen the movie "Zapped"?

It's not finding out how to flavor it - that's a breeze. ^_^

It's more "I need to be assigned to write an occultist archetype, in a book where adding such an archetype makes sense." And that can be way harder than you'd think, for various reasons. For example, the silksworn would look much different if it had been in Psychic Anthology instead.


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Isabelle Lee wrote:

The silksworn originally had flavor tying it more firmly to Vudrani lore and to the courts of Nex. It got left by the wayside at some point, alas; wordcount is a cruel, cruel mistress, and Mavaro's art always takes up a lot of room. (It does make a really good Prophet of Kalistrade, though, especially since the PrC establishes them as arcane spellcasters.)

As for the original inspiration, it went along the following lines:
-"They're supposed to wear fancy clothing, which suggests no armor."
-"Who doesn't wear armor in this game? Sorcerers, wizards, and monks."
-"We already have a divine occultist, so why not an arcane one?"

...now I just need to find a way to make an alchemical occultist, and we'll have the set. ^_^

Heh, heh! My plan is working. :)


Whoa, the Chastising Baton! Only 5,000 gp to add a permanent +1 DC to all compulsion spells, and the targets is sickened for 1 round and takes 1d6 nonlethal even if they save! An early must have for Psychics, Mesmerists, and Enchanters.


Pathfinder Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Society Subscriber
Isabelle Lee wrote:


It's not finding out how to flavor it - that's a breeze. ^_^

It's more "I need to be assigned to write an occultist archetype, in a book where adding such an archetype makes sense." And that can be way harder than you'd think, for various reasons. For example, the silksworn would look much different if it had been in Psychic Anthology instead.

I was half joking, please don't do an Alchemical Kineticist based on Zapped, that would be awful.

However...I just PMed you with a suggestion you could pitch...

Dark Archive

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QuidEst wrote:
If you want a fluff reason, though, my choice would be that it's a Prophecies of Kalistrade thing. Money is power, and you are getting the universe to sit down and acknowledge that.

Arcane power from gods (or archfiends, etc.) associated with wealth or greed, such as Abadar or Mammon, could also be a suitable Golarion flavor connection, although it does seem perfect for a Prophet of the Kalistrade.

Flavoring the fancy garb as implanted gemstones, a la Karzoug, could be a way to tie it to the Runelord of Greed, and his Thassilonian courtiers, as well.

Going in another direction, the 'silk' itself could be special, in some way, being produced by aranea or phase spiders or jorugumo. Perhaps not any old silk will have the arcane resonances for this sort of thing.

The Silksworn is just thematic and flavorful as heck. You could easily design an entire class, with a dozen different flavorful options, based on this one archetype, and it can thematically integrate with the setting (thanks to the Kalistocracy, Greed magic, Mammon, etc.) than some other archetypes (or even whole classes...).

Dark Archive

Plausible Pseudonym wrote:
Legalistic Reading feat's ability to cast a scroll spell two consecutive rounds is almost a great ability, but by the time you can make the CL check you'll have better options than scrolls.

Yeah, it's not something you'll be able to make even half the time with even a 1st level scroll before 16th level or so, which makes it a strange option for someone to be able to take at 3rd level (three levels before it will work even on a natural 20).

OTOH, it *might* synergize with the Cypermage ability of Focused Scroll.

Quote:
Focused Scroll (Su): As a swift action, a cyphermage can add a bonus equal to twice his Intelligence modifier on any caster level checks made with a scroll spell, including checks to overcome SR. He can use this ability a number of times per day equal to 1/3 his cyphermage level (minimum 1).

It would be neat if it somehow interacted with the Scrollmaster and / or Scroll Scholar Archetypes.

Compared to the Druid herbalist option in Healer's Handbook to create a bunch of free potions each day (potentially even of higher level druid spells!), it's nothing to write home about.


I see some people suggesting to stack the Invested Regent archetype with the Scaled Fist but... I'm not sure if you could actually do that by a hard reading of the rules. Scaled Fist changes up the bonus feat list and the Investitures replace bonus feats.

Since that isn't actually a conflict that could cause mechanical issues I think most GM's would ignore that issue but it might be a problem in PFS.


Pageantry Discipline-FIXED

Bonus Spells ...Complex Hallucination (UI) (8th)...

Ritual Unity (Su): You receive a +2 bonus on all skill checks attempted as part of an occult ritual. In addition, when you take the Aid Another action to assist an ally with a skill check and succeed at a DC 20 check, you impart a +4 bonus to your ally. When you successfully aid an ally in this way, you regain 1 point in your phrenic pool. The maximum number of points you can regain in this way per day is equal to your CHA modifier. (Note that if you fail the DC 20 check, but still succeed at a DC 10 check, then you still impart the standard +2 bonus but do not regain any points in your phrenic pool.)

Power from Pageantry (Su): When casting a spell with a casting time of 1 standard action or less, you can spend 2 points from your phrenic pool to extend the casting time to 1 full round as you create a showy display of psychic power. By doing so, the cost of any phrenic amplification you link to that spell is reduced by 1 (to a minimum of 0 phrenic points). You can use this ability a maximum number of times per day equal to 3 + your CHA modifier.


Bryan MANGUM wrote:

Pageantry Discipline-FIXED

Bonus Spells ...Complex Hallucination (UI) (8th)...

Ritual Unity (Su): You receive a +2 bonus on all skill checks attempted as part of an occult ritual. In addition, when you take the Aid Another action to assist an ally with a skill check and succeed at a DC 20 check, you impart a +4 bonus to your ally. When you successfully aid an ally in this way, you regain 1 point in your phrenic pool. The maximum number of points you can regain in this way per day is equal to your CHA modifier. (Note that if you fail the DC 20 check, but still succeed at a DC 10 check, then you still impart the standard +2 bonus but do not regain any points in your phrenic pool.)

Power from Pageantry (Su): When casting a spell with a casting time of 1 standard action or less, you can spend 2 points from your phrenic pool to extend the casting time to 1 full round as you create a showy display of psychic power. By doing so, the cost of any phrenic amplification you link to that spell is reduced by 1 (to a minimum of 0 phrenic points). You can use this ability a maximum number of times per day equal to 3 + your CHA modifier.

1. I don't see what that spell has to do with Pageantry.

2. This is how it should work, agreed.

3. This didn't need a nerf, and your change actually makes this useless. You're paying 2 phrenic points and extending your casting time in order to...save 1 point, for a net loss of actions and and 1 phrenic point.

Grand Lodge

Verzen wrote:
Markov Spiked Chain wrote:
Another Skald Archetype that replaces Inspired Rage without any mention of using or replacing Rage Powers. :(
You can still use rage powers with their new song. My question is... can my allies who accept it cast spells?

There's nothing in the Song's description, or in the description of rage powers, that would let affect characters use Rage Powers, any more than they could under Song of Marching.

I don't see any reason your allies can't cast spells/concentrate. Presumably the whole point is to be a bard for caster DCs.


Would Scion of Highhelm be restricted to dwarves ?

Paizo Employee Developer

Technically, no. It's a lot harder to justify a non-dwarf as a Scion of Highhelm, but if you and your GM can work out a good reason for it, there's no reason it shouldn't work.


were you intending the hex "Protective Luck (Su)" to be unlimited uses on a target per day or did you forget to include the "a creature cannot be
the target of this hex again for 1 day" line on this? It seems incredibly strong if you can use it on your party whenever you want.


Samuel K 495 wrote:

were you intending the hex "Protective Luck (Su)" to be unlimited uses on a target per day or did you forget to include the "a creature cannot be

the target of this hex again for 1 day" line on this? It seems incredibly strong if you can use it on your party whenever you want.

SHHHHHHH! Keep that on the down low or they will take away such pretty things!

Honestly, sheesh. Don't ruin it for the rest of us!

:P


It's not a shock, but Silksworn didn't get approved for PFS, nor the Chastising Baton. I'd also hoped for a campaign clarification to make the Pageantry Psychic discipline actually work, but they banned it. Probably too many issues to deal with.


Sorry for the delayed response; I was out of country.

Samuel K 495 wrote:
were you intending the hex "Protective Luck (Su)" to be unlimited uses on a target per day or did you forget to include the "a creature cannot be the target of this hex again for 1 day" line on this? It seems incredibly strong if you can use it on your party whenever you want.

I can't speak for Paizo's official response, but my intent when I wrote it was for it to have unlimited uses per day on a target (a la the fortune hex, which it was modeled after).


Fortune Hex wrote:
The witch can grant a creature within 30 feet a bit of good luck for 1 round. The target can call upon this good luck once per round, allowing him to reroll any ability check, attack roll, saving throw, or skill check, taking the better result. He must decide to use this ability before the first roll is made. At 8th level and 16th level, the duration of this hex is extended by 1 round. Once a creature has benefited from the fortune hex, it cannot benefit from it again for 24 hours.


Rogue Eidolon wrote:
Fortune Hex wrote:
The witch can grant a creature within 30 feet a bit of good luck for 1 round. The target can call upon this good luck once per round, allowing him to reroll any ability check, attack roll, saving throw, or skill check, taking the better result. He must decide to use this ability before the first roll is made. At 8th level and 16th level, the duration of this hex is extended by 1 round. Once a creature has benefited from the fortune hex, it cannot benefit from it again for 24 hours.

Dur. And this is why you don't respond while still recovering from vacation. :)


Is the Invested Regent intended to be stackable with other archetypes? The wording comes across very similar to the Qinggong monk archetype, but I was hoping someone involved in making it could clarify the intention.

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