New Paths 9: The Priest (PFRPG) PDF

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Your Faith Shall Be Your Weapon.

Like a cleric, a priest is called to serve divine powers. But unlike a cleric, a priest enters the field of battle armed only with the divine might of her god. A priest’s connection to her deity forms the very core of her being—and through this unwavering reverence, she gains her power and her strength.

New Paths 9: The Priest brings a non-battle, caster-only servant of the divine to the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game! Designed by Marc Radle, this class includes:

  • New class features including Divine Gift, Orisons, and Sacred Bond
  • Two new feats, Extra Divine Gift and Powerful Channel
  • A new archetype: Chosen of Nature, who protects and preserves the natural world

Let clerics have their hierarchies and temples: a priest ultimately answers only to her god. It is both a freedom and a heavy burden—but with it comes great power!

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Mechanically too strong, but so much flavor!

3/5

Note: this is a review of the original priest version, which I got as a copy from Marc Radle. Depending on if there has been an update in the meantime, some of my points might have become obsolete. Just so you know.

So I've been sitting on a review of the priest class for... way too long. Marc Radle, bless him, out of the goodness of his heart provided me with a PDF ages ago and is probably still waiting for something in return. Problem is, I really really want to say it's a 5-star installment and give it a rave review, but I can't, and that makes me sad.

Since both Endzeitgeist and Ssalarn already delivered comprehensive and solid reviews on this class, I won't go into all the mechanical details because there's nothing left to say on that. The Priest is a Wisdom-based divine full caster, d6 Hit Dice and a number of abilities, most of which are aimed at supporting a 'healer/buffer' theme.

My problem with the priest is that it's simply too good. Like, way too good. In a standard party (if there's such a thing) featuring Core Rulebook characters, a priest will stand head and shoulders above a cleric in terms of divine casting, and even if other base/hybrid classes and advanced races are allowed, I believe the priest still stands strong, Sure, he loses martial capabilities and is less of an allrounder compared to a cleric, but he is SAD (single-ability dependent) and gains a lot of flexibility with three domains and the divine gift class feature in particular. Having an answer to all kinds of situations is cool, but if you can almost constantly pull off the absolute best solution of the entire party, something's wrong.

I've played a priest character in a small Pathfinder game running from 3rd to 6th level, featuring a group of four characters (we had a fifth player for a while but she dropped out). I saw this game as an opportunity to playtest the priest a bit since our GM thankfully was open to 3rd party material. Our party consisted of a human spell-less ranger (another spectacular class created by Marc Radle, and one I've used several times in my own games) who did double duty as archer and melee combatant, a dwarf elemental wizard (earth) focusing on conjuration, a sylph unchained rogue doing the standard sneaky stuff and my samsaran priest (I didn't use the Mystic Past Life alternate trait, so no extra spell shenanigans) who was the dedicated healer of the group. Every player was experienced with Pathfinder, some for many years. I'm only mentioning the party setup since I guess it informed my opinion of the priest class quite a bit, and someone else, in another situation, might come to different conclusions.

With three domains (Healing (Restoration), Luck, and Travel (Exploration)), I had access to a variety of special abilities and all sorts of useful domains spells. Sure, a priest casts less spells per day than a cleric, but I felt the spontaneous casting of my prepared spells more than made up for the loss. Also, with a decent Wisdom score and a perl of power or two it's not even really an issue.

What became an issue though was the divine gift ability. Since you can select any gift when you use the ability, you can cherry-pick the entire list every single time according to your current needs. And with things like Ascetic's Blessing (apply any metamagic feat for free), Anointed Spell (add half your Wisdom modifier to CL and spell DC) or Supplant Spell (exchange one of your prepared spells for another one of the same level), there are super powerful options available. It introduces a nova capability (the ability to unleash limited daily resources in a single burst for great effect) to a character class that frankly doesn't need one. Compared to a wizard, and especially the elemental wizard in our group (even though he was pretty optimized and used the updated spell lists from Planes of Power since the APG's list is so badly dated), I constantly felt that I had more and better options available without even trying to push the game's limits.

In the end I toned things down considerably on my end. I enjoyed being good at my 'job', don't get me wrong, but as someone who's played a number of clerics over the years, this felt crazy powerful to me. I had fun, lots of it, but I also keenly felt the untapped power of the class souring the game for me.

Since a single, low-level game hardly qualifies for an absolute verdict on the priest class, I don't think I can (or want) to end this review with a 'buy this' or 'avoid this' comment. The priest is a really good take on a non-martial cleric, a divine caster who doesn't run around in plate armor, swinging morningstars. I like the theme. And all the problems I mentioned, maybe you don't feel them the same way in your game. If I were to run a game and a player wanted to play a priest, I'd allow it - after dropping the third domain and doing something do divine gift, maybe making it a move action or something like that.

In the end I'd say: give this one a cautious try. Be wary, and keep a close eye on the group dynamics, but it might just be the divine class you've been looking for.


Review from DriveThruRPG

5/5

Review posted over on DriveThru RPG by Tyler E. [Verified Purchaser]

Coming in at about 8 pages of content, the Priest is a divine dynamo of scholastic theme and design, with class abilities that evoke the vibe and style of not just the scholastic priest but the raw might of the gods issued from humble hands. For the cost of your armor proficiencies, weapon proficiencies, and a Wizards BAB players gain access to more domains, a whole new system of casting, and miracles. Now the first two are pretty self explanatory, with the extra domain, extra domain spell slot at each spell level, and the new spont prep casting fusion lending a new and unique style to the Priest class in terms of play but the real star here is the miracles. A new mechanic reminiscent of smite in terms of power and progression, miracles are the divine favor of the Priest's god acted out large, allowing the priest to summon up powerful boons upon his companions and himself in order to carry the them to victory. These miracles run the gamut from anointing a spell with holy power to boost the save DC and calling down holy auras of protection upon the priest allies to literal divine interventions that allow players to re-roll saves, become invisible to their enemies, or even grow wings for short periods of time. The whole thing reads like a dream and feels amazing to play out on the table, with your priest channeling their gods powers to defeat enemies one minute and then shouting out prayers of safety that literally wrap their allies in protective wards or bend fate to turn mortal wounds into near misses. The whole thing makes you feel like an utter bad ass and honestly makes you wonder how the hell no one thought of this sooner.

The Priest has become one of my favorite new classes going forward and sets a high mark for whatever Paizo or other 3rd party publishers attempt within the realm of both divine scholar and the cleric itself. From a focus on skill points, domains, and more divine agent like class abilities to the just sheer fun of throwing a miracle on a friend and watching the GM have to suddenly pivot as that miss becomes a critical hit or that NPC dying of the black plague suddenly gets a second chance at that last save stave off his affliction or throwing fireballs imbued with holy energy at a pile of fiends, the Priest class as a whole feels like a marked improvement over both the divine scholar concept in specific and the vanilla cleric as a whole.

Read the entire review:
http://www.drivethrurpg.com/product_reviews.php?products_id=193416&test _epoch=0


The Divine Caster You've Been Looking For?

3/5

If you're anything like me, you've always found the Cleric class to be a little weird. Where other than media that specifically springs from D&D do you see this divine, "godly" character who prays for spells and runs around in a breastplate eviscerating opponents with their deity's preferred weapon? Aren't most of the divine spellcaster type tropes out there of robe and cloister types, or at least your duster and tie types like John Constantine? Even the evil divine types are always portrayed in heavy black robes with deep hoods or something of the like, preferring darksome spells and magically enhanced minions to wearing metal armor and beating people with their own two hands. The cleric we have is kind of a weird design artifact, born from the wargaming roots of D&D and oddly unchanged since its conception.

The Priest attempts to address that gap between the more commonly seen trope of the berobed and scholarly divine petitioner and the mechanical need for a spellcaster who can provide magical healing and support while surviving the rigors of an adventuring life, so let's take a look at how it does, hmmm?

The Priest has a d6 hit die, 1/2 BAB, Will as its only Good save, and 4+Int skill points off a skill list fairly similar to the cleric's. The priest is proficient with all simple weapons, but not any armors or shields.

The priest, as one might expect given the class chassis, is a full 9 level Wisdom-based divine caster drawing from the cleric spell list, with a spellcasting mechanic somewhat similar to the arcanist's, which is actually the first point that I'm not entirely sure how to feel about. To elaborate - the priest gains the same number of spell slots per day as a wizard, and prepares the same number of spells as a cleric (slightly more from 5th level on including domain spells), casting freely from it's prepared spells using its slots. So, for example, if the priest has chosen cure light wounds, bless, and divine favor as their prepared spells for the day at 2nd level, they can cast any combination of those three spells from their 3 slots for the day. Obviously, the priest's flexibility in how it spends its slots is a powerful factor, particularly considering that unlike virtually every other caster with spontaneous flexibility it gains new spell levels at the same rate as the wizard, and the priest automatically gains either cure or inflict spells as bonus prepared spells, giving him a de facto version of the cleric's spontaneous casting. This flexible casting may mean the priest has fewer spells per day than the cleric, but I think he's clearly the superior caster, even before we move into its other class features, which can further modify and enhance the priest's spellcasting power.

In addition to its spellcasting class feature, the priest gains a selection of bonus languages, domains, a new class feature called divine gift, channel energy, a sacred bond, 3 bonus feats, and a capstone ability called hallowed vessel. I'll talk a bit about of each these, including what the provide and how they fit into the overall class.

The priest's selection of bonus languages (Abyssal, Celestial, and Infernal) is a nice little fluffy mechanic whose actual value will depend on starting race. Since this merely modifies the starting options without actually providing any additional languages, it will be essentially a dead class feature without any real benefit to races with open bonus language lists, like humans, and multiclass characters, but ensures that your priest has at least the option of conferring with whatever divine powers they worship in their preferred tongue. This might have been better implemented as an option that specifically granted the priest a bonus language based on their alignment, so it isn't a wasted ability for many of the characters who might take the class.

The domain class feature works, essentially, exactly like the cleric domain class feature, but the priest gains three domains to the cleric's two. This actually is a huge boon with more impact than one might expect, because not only does it grant an additional set of domain abilities for the priest to utilize, but it's also where the priest's potential spell list gains a big leg up compared to the cleric's; that extra domain is potentially a whole set of thematic spells levels 1-9 that the priest has access to over the cleric. This advantage is bolstered a bit by the fact that starting at 5th level and every odd numbered level thereafter, the priest gains an additional domain spell option in its prepared spells shoring up the power of its flexible casting.

The priest's divine gift class feature can be used 1/day at 1st level, scaling up to 7/day at 19th level. Divine gifts are typically activated as a swift action, and the priest can select any of the divine gifts available each time he uses the ability. The gifts themselves include direct offensive abilities like Smiting Burst, which deals 2d8 + 1d8/ 2 levels to enemies within a 20-foot burst or 1d8/class level to a single enemy and causes them to be shaken on a failed Will save, support options like Divine Intervention which the priest can use as an immediate action to allow an ally to reroll one d20 roll adding 1/2 the priest's class level to the result, or more technical options like Ascetic's Blessing and Supplant Spell. Ascetic's Blessing and Supplant Spell actually need to be called out as being fairly exceptional abilities and things a GM should really be aware of. Ascetic Blessing has a minor verbage issue ( It states: "The priest is treated as having any one metamagic feat of her choosing when casting her next divine spell. This does not alter the casting time of the spell.[...]" The intent here seems to pretty obviously be that the priest can apply any metamagic feat of her choosing to a spell without increasing its casting time, but the actual rules language doesn't actually cover applying the feat to the spell. Aside from the hiccup in the rules structure, this is a "holy-s%*@-are-you-kidding-me-this-is-mythic-level-crazy" ability. Any metamagic feat? Not "any metamagic feat the priest knows"? Add to that the other ability I mentioned, Supplant Spell, which allows the priest to swap out any one of her prepared spells with another spell on her list of the same level, and the Priest's spellcasting is officially vaulted to "substantially better than the cleric's". Divine gifts are powerful modifiers of the priest's abilities, even with their limited uses per day, ensuring that even priest's who've made some poor choices in their feat and/or spell selection will always have the potential to pluck out a winning play.

The priest's sacred bond ability is similar to the wizard's arcane bond in that loss or destruction of the item (typically a holy symbol) imposes some steep penalties on the priest's ability to execute their spells. Unlike the arcane bond, the sacred bond doesn't affect spell recall (already well covered by the priest's semi-spontaneous casting and divine gifts), but instead allows the priest to cast any cure or inflict spell with a range of touch that they've prepared at close range instead. I'm... actualy not a huge fan of this ability. While being able to cast cure/inflict spells at range is a nice boon, it presupposes that the priest is actually going to be spending his in combat actions on cure/inflict spells. For priests who may no longer rely (or never relied at all) on the cure/inflict line to cover their in-combat healing, this is actually a huge and worthless liability. I would have loved to see this option expanded with some additional choices, whether that be a divine companion option (angelic or undead familiars/companions would be awesome), a sacred/favored weapon option, or even just some variants on the benefits available to the sacred bond. As it is, I find that a mandatory class feature with the potential to all but completely shut the priest down, whose only benefit applies to a tiny subset of the spells available which the priest may not (and in many builds arguably should not) even utilize in a situation where the benefit is actually a benefit, is a strict mark against the class as a whole.

The priest also gains Channel Energy at a reduced rate from the cleric, starting at 1d6 at 2nd level and capping at 7d6 at 20th level... Which begs the question "Why?" Channel Energy is a mediocre class feature that requires investment just to be usable in combat, and the reduced progression makes that investment somewhat questionable. Now, the plus sides to this ability lie in its variations from the version the cleric gets; first, it gets free action economy upgrades, bumping up to move action activation at 7th level and swift action activation at 14th level. The verbage leads me to believe that similarly to bardic performance, these action economy changes are inclusive and the priest can still use the larger action expenditure if they wish, meaning that their Channel Energy uses need not conflict with other swift action options like their Divine Gift or Quickened spells. The other big perk here is that the priest doesn't end up with increased MADness due to this ability; the priest's Channel Energy is Wisdom-based, just like its spellcasting, rather than Charisma-based like the cleric's. Ultimately, I believe that the beneficial variations of this ability outweigh the negative effects of the ability's slower scaling, but I can't help feeling that both Channel Energy and Sacred Bond are somewhat lazy class features. That's not to deride the author; it's possible that word counts or deadlines or both impacted his ability to implement more robust options, but Sacred Bond is mediocre at best, and Channel Energy is a class feature that demands investment to be of real use. Now granted, the 3 bonus feats the priest gets are all intended to help alleviate the required investment since they're all channel-focused feats, including the essential Selective Channeling feat, but the first bonus feat doesn't kick in until 6th level and the feature lacks the verbage found in classes that intend you to have some easy feat swapping, like the vigilante, to swap in another feat you qualified for at the level you gained it. Given that retraining is both an optional rule and time-consuming, this imposes an awkward burden on the class, and renders the benefit of being able to gain Selective Channeling as a bonus feat essentially moot.

The priest's capstone ability, Hallowed Vessel, renders the priest immune to death attacks and negative levels, ensures that ability damage and drain cannot reduce the priest below 1 in any ability score, and makes it so that the priest does not die until its negative hit point total is in excess of twice its Constitution score, all handy benefits for a squishy caster with a poor Fort save and a d6 hit die.

In addition to the base class, The Priest includes two new feats and an archetype.

The feats include the almost mandatory and entirely expected Extra Divine Gift for extra uses of the priest's Divine Gift ability, and Powerful Channel, which allows you to boost your channel dice to d10s by channeling as a full round action that provokes an AoO and becoming fatigued for a number of rounds equal to the number of dice in your channel (so, if your channel is 5d6, you can bump to 5d10 in exchange for 5 rounds of fatigue). I don't really like either of these feats. Extra Divine Gift (which refers to itself as "Extra Divine Boon" in its text), is ridiculously good, specifically because Divine Gift is so ridiculously good. I'm not going to take any metamagic feat other than Quicken Spell when I can spend a swift action to pluck whatever metamagic feat I need out of the air, and many other potential bonuses or situations are covered by the wider umbrella of the many other Divine Gift options. Paizo recognized that the vigilante didn't need an "Extra Vigilante Talent" because they had created talents that were actually better than a feat, and I feel like some of that same reasoning applies here. There are very few feats that I would choose over getting additional uses of Divine Gift. Powerful Channel suffers from kind of the opposite problem. While yes, I called out the slower scaling of the priest's channel energy as a negative, it's not a negative I'm going to pay a full round action and up to 7 rounds of fatigue (and the accompanying risk of exhaustion if another source that would fatigue me hits) for. As an example: a 5th level priest would go from 2d6 channeled energy (average 7 points of damage/healing) to 2d10 (average 10 points of damage/healing). In exchange for that extra 3 points, you're foregoing the option to move, potentially provoking an AoO, and for the next 2 rounds you take a -1 penalty to AC, Reflex saves, melee and ranged attack rolls, CMB, and a -2 penalty to CMD (meaning that things are extra scary if an opponent decides the right move is to grapple the caster). The cleric spell list, even with the addition of three domains, simply doesn't have the flexibility that the wizard spell list does, so the danger these penalties impose is much more immediate than it might be for an arcane caster who would take the same penalties without blinking. More than that, 5th level is one of the last points where there might be any reason to use this feat at all. Come 7th level, you can use a Divine Gift, cast a spell, and channel energy normally for the same action economy without taking any penalty, which leads one to ask "Why risk an AoO and take all those penalties for a nominal 'benefit' that doesn't approximate what I could do anyways? Why spend a feat to do so in the first place?" I could potentially see this feat as being okay for channeling done out of combat, but only if I had no other feats I qualified for or even kind of wanted at that point.

The archetype included herein is the "Chosen of Nature", and the name pretty much spells this one out. You get some nature-themed modifications to your skill list, cast from the druid spell list instead of the cleric spell list, and you gain scaling beast shape / plant shape SLAs in exchange for all your Channel Energy increases from 6th level on. I, personally, consider this a bad archetype. Firstly, Channel Energy goes from a mediocre class feature with some interesting class-specific tweaks to a dead feature. Why not just replace it entirely and bring the SLAs online earlier? We're essentially talking about a weaker version of the druid's wildshape, so it would just make more sense to have a smooth flow of progression along your abilities than to have you be a channeler for 3 levels and then a shapeshifter for the rest of your career. Second, this archetype all but dumps channel energy and yet the bonus feats you get at 6, 12, and 18 are all still dedicated to improving Channel Energy, meaning that these bonus feats are basically as dead as the class feature they modify. Finally, this is a class that gets three domains. If I want to play a nature priest, I can grab the Animal and Plant domains and not give up my Channel Energy, while still getting access to some of the beast shape spells. So, I could take this archetype and essentially murder two of my class features in exchange for some SLAs that don't mesh with the rest of my class (you can't use Natural Spell to complete verbal and somatic spell components without actually having the wildshape class feature), or I could keep all of my class features and play a nature caster by grabbing appropriate domains.

So, how to sum up...? While it may seem like I had quite a number of negative things to say about the priest, the majority of these boiled down to things I wanted it to do better, or things that I wanted it to do more of. All the key components of a great class are here, but they feel unpolished, or maybe unfinished, to me. I feel like this class is undeniably better constructed and fits more tropes from outside the immediate D&D/PF franchise than the cleric, but it just doesn't quite fulfill the promise and potential that it hints at.


An Endzeitgeist.com review

5/5

This installment of the New Paths-series clocks in at 12 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page advertisement, 2/3 of a page SRD, leaving us with 8 1/3 pages of content, so let's take a look!

The priest class receives d6 HD, 4 + Int skills per level and gets 1/2 BAB-progression, good Will-saves and proficiency in only simple weapons. The class begins play with an aura as per the cleric's default and bonus languages include the respective languages of the alignment-related outer planes. Similarly, the restrictions we know regarding opposed alignment spells still apply. A priest draws her spells from the cleric spell list and must prepare them in advance; however, they are not expended upon being cast, instead consuming a spell slot available. The governing spellcasting attribute for the priest would be Wisdom and the priest begins with 1 + 1 spells of first level prepared, +4 orisons. Obviously, as a full caster, she progresses to learn up to 9th level spells and the maximum spells per day per spell level clock in at unmodified 4, with prepared spells capping at 4 + 2 per spell level.

The pluses in the list refer obviously to the domain spells; a priest selects 3 domains from her deity and she gains all domain powers of the chosen domains. The priest's spellcasting is also tied to her holy symbol, with which she shares a sacred bond - much like an arcane bond, casting without it becomes problematic, but here's the kicker: The priest may use the holy (or unholy) symbol to cast cure or inflict spells as though they had a range of close instead of touch - which is a huge boon. Back in 3.X literally EVERY cleric in my games had the feat to do just that.

Also at first level, the priest receives a so-called divine gift that can be used 1/day as a swift action. 10 such gifts are provided and all are available - you don't have to choose. The priest may use the ability, as mentioned, 1/day, but may use it +1/day for every 3 levels beyond first. If a gift enhances a spell, it may only enhance cleric spells and only one gift may enhance each spell. The gifts include CL and DC-increases of the next spell cast, invisibility (that scales up to greater invisibility at 7th level), metamagic enhancements, immediate action rerolls, wings at 5th level, Ac and save bonuses with DR and SR or bursts of raw, divine power...or, well, spell-swapping.

The priest also receives access to channel energy at 2nd level, though it is governed by Wisdom for the class and 7th level decreases activation action to move, 14th to swift. Personally, I think the ability should have a catch here to prevent the priest from executing multiple channel energy uses per round - in spite of the limitations in daily uses, three channels in one round can be pretty devastating. 6th level and every 6 levels thereafter net a bonus feat from a nice selection and, as a capstone, the class becomes immune to death attacks and negative levels and may never reduced below 1 in any ability score. Additionally, she remains alive until 2 x negative Constitution score.

The pdf provides two feats: +1/day divine gift use and the option to channel energy as a full-round action, but instead roll d10s, but at the cost of being fatigues for a number of rounds equal to the channel dice rolled. I LOVE the visuals of this feat!

We also receive a brief archetype, the chosen of nature: These guys get an expanded class skills list(but oddly lose none) and draw their spells from the druid list instead of the cleric's. The archetype replaces the channel energy progression beyond 6th level with progressively better beast shape and plant shape SPs. Decent, but honestly, not that cool - the archetype feels a bit like an afterthought.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no glitches. Layout adheres to a beautiful 2-column full-color standard and the pdf features gorgeous full-color artworks. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.

Marc Radle's priest addresses a very crucial need I always felt: The need for a divine adherent that feels like a caster. I mean, when you think about agents of the divine in the context of our world, you probably won't think of mace-wielding, armor-clad quasi-crusaders. You'll think about men and women of the cloth. The priest fills this niche rather well. Divine gift also represents a cool mechanic, though frankly, I would have loved to see the whole thing go one step further; divine spells never really felt that "divine" to me and while the priest does a great job of emphasizing this component, I think the engine could carry more.

But I am rambling. Frankly, I feel that this should be the base class, with the more martially inclined cleric being something of a specialist. In my games, most clerics tend to not be too martially inclined (except when adventuring or when the background/deity fits), so the priest is guaranteed to see a lot of use. The divine gifts and at range cure/inflict casting also make for great balancing tools to offset the loss of the decent 2nd-line fighting options of the cleric. In short: I really, really like the class. Deceptively simple, fun and elegant. Similarly, the feat provided is nice and while I think channel spamming should be prevented with a cap, that operation's pretty simple to perform. The one thing that left me somewhat disinterested herein would be the archetype, perhaps the space would have been better served with FCOs. Oh well, this is certainly a cool class for the fair asking price - my final verdict will clock in at 5 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.


Wonderful New Class

5/5

A lot of players find the cleric boring and it is a bit bland. Having had a chance to review the Priest, this is the class I want to play if I am not playing a cleric. Using a souped up version of the arcanist spell casting engine. I highly recommend this class to anyone who want to play a full caster instead of playing a cleric or warpriest.


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Community Manager

Now available!

Liberty's Edge

Thanks Liz!

Super excited to see this out in the world :)

If you are looking for that 'no armor, robed holy man with lots of divine power' this is the class for you! Please check it out! :)


OMG....this sounds like exactly like something I've been looking for for my games.


Sadly, I won't be able to pick it up until the end of the month when I get my check. But I'll surely be grabbing it.

Liberty's Edge

Very much looking forward to reading it
:-)


Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Quick summary: This class is an unarmored cleric (think Eccesiastic Theurge) who casts Arcanist style.

Liberty's Edge

David knott 242 wrote:

Quick summary: This class is an unarmored cleric (think Eccesiastic Theurge) who casts Arcanist style.

Ha! Was that a statement or a question :)

The Priest is definitely an unarmored cleric-type of class that uses a variant of the standard Arcanist casting mechanic.

A few other highlights:

  • Access to more domains and the ability to cast more than one domain spell per day
  • Divine Gift class ability which allows the priest to perform various divine acts/miracles at a moments notice
  • Improved Channeling
  • Sacred Bond
  • New feats (including Powerful Channel)
  • A new archetype: Chosen of Nature
  • ... and plenty more

I'm really happy with this class and I hope folks dig it!

The Exchange Kobold Press

I know I'm doing going this route with some NPCs. Seems very appropriate for the non-combat, advisor types as well as prophetic figures and hermits.


Check your downloads Cal. I can't check it till I get out of work, but hopefully you get a chance to now.


Thank you!

Liberty's Edge

3 people marked this as a favorite.

Wow, that's very cool Wraithguard!
Hopefully that means we have 2 reviews to look forward to :)


I was actually thinking about writing up a new class like this using Spheres of Power as the base for it and going from there. I figure this will either give me an awesome class to make some archetypes off of, or at worst give me inspiration.

I had an idea from the Ur-Priest (prestige class?) to make a class that had access to a few domains, but only accessed one strongly and two fairly weakly. The weakly bound domains could be swapped on a daily basis. In Spheres of Power this basically means you have floating Magical Talents to rearrange everyday. Powerful, but not game breaking if you deny access to the Advanced Talents. Thoughts?


I'm not familiar with Spheres of Power at all, so I can't comment, though the product looks interesting.


Paizo Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, LO Special Edition, Pathfinder Accessories, PF Special Edition Subscriber; Starfinder Superscriber

I think I'm going to like this.

Liberty's Edge

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Ed Reppert wrote:
I think I'm going to like this.

Excellent! Hope you do :)

Please consider posting a review once you get a chance to digest - reviews really do mean a lot!


My review will have to wait until tomorrow or tomorrow night. Migraine city here tonight. But I will say that I do have a few questions about things before I start. I'll post them tomorrow, unless the light in my head goes off and I understand the things on my own first. But I will also say this; I really like it.

Liberty's Edge

2 people marked this as a favorite.

Huzzah!!

Just saw that The Priest debuted at #6 on DriveThru.com's Hottest Pathfinder list!


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Possible typo, check the 20th level Priest Spells Prepared table. From 19th level to 20th level we somehow lose one domain spell of 8th level spells.


Good eye. I overlooked that one myself. I'm still putting together my review, but have been hampered by knee pain today.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Sorry to hear that Cal. I am just about done with my review, should be posted in the next few minutes.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

That was probably one of the longer reviews I have done. Hopefully that helps answer any questions people have about this class.

Liberty's Edge

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Wraithguard wrote:
Possible typo, check the 20th level Priest Spells Prepared table. From 19th level to 20th level we somehow lose one domain spell of 8th level spells.

No, no. You see, as a divine representative of the Gods within the mortal realm, the Priest must make certain sacrifices as he approaches the highest levels of ...

OK, yeah - that's a typo. It should absolutely be 4+2 instead of 4+1.

We'll get that fixed up post haste!

Dark Archive

Pathfinder Companion Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Charter Superscriber

So... it's basically a divine casting version of the Arcanist? Just at first read-through it feels a little bit underpowered. Maybe just bonus metamagic feats for the three dead levels (3rd, 9th, 15th).

Still definitely interesting, though.


Wraithguard wrote:
That was probably one of the longer reviews I have done. Hopefully that helps answer any questions people have about this class.

That's a good review. I'm gonna be hard pressed to add much to your views!


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I can't imagine bonus metamagic feats at the empty levels would really throw you off. Definitely a point to consider if you think it is a little weak.


Just purchased and scanned through it. Wow, as a spell caster definitely better than the cleric or arcanist. If I get to play a cleric like character in a home game again I will try to talk my GM into allowing it. I wish Kobold Press had written the cleric and arcanist for Paizo, the priest is just so much better.

Liberty's Edge

Thanks Cole Deschain and Wraithguard for the first reviews!!!


Before I get started on my review, I have a question about the following two paragraphs:

In addition to the normal spells a priest prepares
at each level, a good priest (or a neutral priest of a
good deity) is treated as having prepared the cure
spell of the appropriate level as a bonus spell. A
cure spell is one with “cure” in the name.

An evil priest (or a neutral priest who worships
an evil deity) is treated as having prepared the
inflict spell of the appropriate level (an inflict spell
is one with “inflict” in its name).

Does this mean the priest gets the cure or inflict spells as EXTRA spells on top of of the others prepared or is it the same as the swapping out of a prepared for spell for a cure or inflict spell that the cleric has?


Bump.

Liberty's Edge

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DungeonmasterCal wrote:

Before I get started on my review, I have a question about the following two paragraphs:

In addition to the normal spells a priest prepares
at each level, a good priest (or a neutral priest of a
good deity) is treated as having prepared the cure
spell of the appropriate level as a bonus spell
. A
cure spell is one with “cure” in the name.

An evil priest (or a neutral priest who worships
an evil deity) is treated as having prepared the
inflict spell of the appropriate level (an inflict spell
is one with “inflict” in its name)

Does this mean the priest gets the cure or inflict spells as EXTRA spells on top of of the others prepared or is it the same as the swapping out of a prepared for spell for a cure or inflict spell that the cleric has?

Hey there!

The Priest is considered to have prepared the appropriate cure or inflict spell in addition to the spells he prepares due to his level, very much like an Oracle (note the bold portion in the text you quoted above).

The cure or inflict spells aren't 'swapping out' like a cleric. Remember that the Priest's casting mechanic is similar to the Arcanist, although modified somewhat. The Priest prepares his spells each day, choosing from the full Cleric/Oracle spell list just like a Cleric. However, the Priest then can spontaneously cast any of those spells he has prepared, in any order and/or number of times, as long as he has spell slots available, just like an Oracle.

Allowing the Priest to have those cure or inflict spells prepared as bonus spells simply means he has them available to cast if/when needed.

So, at each spell level, a Priest prepares the number of spells as indicated on the 'Priest Spells Prepared' table. He also prepares the appropriate cure or inflict spell as an additional bonus spell, and 1 or 2 bonus domain spells. He is still limited to the number of spells he can cast each day, as shown on the 'Spells per Day' table

Does that help?

Dark Archive

Will these new paths be collected and printed in a volume two?


Marc, that was a great explanation. Thanks!

The Exchange Kobold Press

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Mine all mine...don't touch wrote:
Will these new paths be collected and printed in a volume two?

Hmmmmm. Well, the New Paths series has certainly been popular, and some of the classes are now staples in a lot of campaigns. Others, like the shaman, have since been adopted or at least their names used for Paizo base classes.

So, maybe revisiting them is worth considering. Right now, we're just seeing how the sales go, what questions people have, and generally whether we have enough in the tank for a run big enough to qualify as "Volume 2." Even if not, I think Marc has done some great design here.


Caught what may be a typo. The feat "Extra Divine Gift's" special description calls it "Extra Divine Boon".

Liberty's Edge

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DungeonmasterCal wrote:
Caught what may be a typo. The feat "Extra Divine Gift's" special description calls it "Extra Divine Boon".

Great catch!

Liberty's Edge

And thanks to everyone for the latest round of reviews !!!!!
I even saw today that the Priest debuted on Paizo's Top Ten Downloads list this week at #6!!
That's awesome!!


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Well, when you put out great products these things happen!


Would "Powerful channel" be considered a "priest only" feat or could a cleric also choose it?

I am also wondering if adding "bonus feat" to the dead levels would be a good idea.


Some have suggested added metamagic feats to the dead levels. And I personally don't see why a Cleric (or Paladin or anti-Paladin, for that matter) couldn't take Powerful Channel. The devs may have a different opinion on that, though.

Liberty's Edge

As long as your DM is ok with it, a cleric could absolutely take Powerful Channel!

Liberty's Edge

DungeonmasterCal wrote:
Well, when you put out great products these things happen!

That's very kind of you!


Am I overlooking it, or did you leave out the Priest's starting gold?


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DungeonmasterCal wrote:
Am I overlooking it, or did you leave out the Priest's starting gold?

After service concludes, the priest draws a circle on the ground and throws the tithes in the air.

The money that stays in the air belongs to the deity; the money that lands on the ground is the Priest's starting gold.


scary harpy wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
Am I overlooking it, or did you leave out the Priest's starting gold?

After service concludes, the priest draws a circle on the ground and throws the tithes in the air.

The money that stays in the air belongs to the deity; the money that lands on the ground is the Priest's starting gold.

I like it LOL


Marc Radle wrote:

And thanks to everyone for the latest round of reviews !!!!!

I even saw today that the Priest debuted on Paizo's Top Ten Downloads list this week at #6!!
That's awesome!!

Congratulations!

Liberty's Edge

3 people marked this as a favorite.
scary harpy wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
Am I overlooking it, or did you leave out the Priest's starting gold?

After service concludes, the priest draws a circle on the ground and throws the tithes in the air.

The money that stays in the air belongs to the deity; the money that lands on the ground is the Priest's starting gold.

Ha! As it turns out, about 70 gp is what lands on the ground!

Starting Wealth: 2d6 × 10 gp (average 70 gp).

We'll be sure to get that added to the PDF asap :)

Liberty's Edge

Eric Hinkle wrote:
Marc Radle wrote:

And thanks to everyone for the latest round of reviews !!!!!

I even saw today that the Priest debuted on Paizo's Top Ten Downloads list this week at #6!!
That's awesome!!
Congratulations!

Many thanks!!

Liberty's Edge

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Just checked my e-mail and saw that New Paths 9: The Priest is #1 on Paizo's Top Ten Downloads list this week

What an awesome way to start the day!!

Liberty's Edge

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Hey everyone, I received a PM from someone who recently purchased The Priest. He was commenting on how much he liked the improvements to the Priest's Channel Energy ability compared to the Cleric's. He also said he was surprised that very few people have actually commented on the Priest's improved Channel Energy and wondered if most folks simply hadn't noticed the improvements.

I hadn't thought about it up until now, but he might be right. The improvements are subtle and probably easy to overlook when reading the ability, but they are pretty powerful in actual play. The really do make Channeling more worthwhile and worth actually doing at the table and even in the middle of combat, especially as the Priest gains levels.

Anyway, I just thought it was an interesting observation :)

Liberty's Edge

Big thanks to DougErvin for his review!!!

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