Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Inner Sea Intrigue (PFRPG)

4.30/5 (based on 4 ratings)
Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Inner Sea Intrigue (PFRPG)
Show Description For:
Non-Mint

Add Print Edition $22.99 $11.49

Add PDF $15.99

Non-Mint Unavailable

Facebook Twitter Email

A World of Secrets

From the infamous thieves' guilds of Absalom to the rebel networks of Galt, the poisoners of Daggermark to the secret courts of Taldor, cloakand-dagger plots manipulate fates across the Inner Sea region. With Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Inner Sea Intrigue, you'll learn the truth hidden beneath the surface and discover ways to make it work for your benefit. New insights on social combat, misleading magic, and secret academies allow the techniques introduced in Pathfinder RPG Ultimate Intrigue to shine. Sneaky new equipment, magic items, and spells also present a spectrum of options for deceptive heroes and unlock the powers of the new vigilante class for heroes and villains alike. Learn the hidden arts of the Inner Sea region and unleash the powers of stealth and subtlety in your Pathfinder RPG game!

Among the secrets revealed within are:

  • New Golarion-specific archetypes for a variety of classes, including the Anaphexia thought-killer, Keleshite prophet, and Nexian spellspy.
  • The Lion Blade and enchanting courtesan prestige classes.
  • New talents for investigators, rogues, and vigilantes, as well as devious intrigue inspired inquisitions.
  • Feats to get the most out of masked personas—alternate identities any class can adopt—and stylized spells!

Inner Sea Intrigue is intended for use with the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game and the Pathfinder campaign setting, but can easily be used in any fantasy game.

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-837-3

Other Resources: This product is also available on the following platforms:

Hero Lab Online
Archives of Nethys

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Lost Omens Subscription.

Product Availability

Print Edition:

Available now

Ships from our warehouse in 11 to 20 business days.

PDF:

Fulfilled immediately.

Non-Mint:

Unavailable

This product is non-mint. Refunds are not available for non-mint products. The standard version of this product can be found here.

Are there errors or omissions in this product information? Got corrections? Let us know at store@paizo.com.

PZO9292


See Also:

Average product rating:

4.30/5 (based on 4 ratings)

Sign in to create or edit a product review.

Excellent Addition to Many Campaigns

5/5

Inner Sea Intrigue is a 64-page, full-colour sourcebook that helps to situate the themes from the setting-neutral Ultimate Intrigue into Golarion. It has a mixture of material for GMs (like new content for rules sub-systems) and for players (such as several new archetypes). More detail is below. To preview my conclusion, I think this is an extremely useful book and a good addition to anyone's Pathfinder collection.

Chapter 1, "Intrigue of the Inner Sea" (6 pages) starts the book off with paragraph-long descriptions of how intrigue stories could be located in various regions of Golarion. There's an impressive amount of setting lore on display, though I might personally nitpick that Varisia (and some of its notable cities, like Korvosa and Riddleport) isn't included. The rest of the chapter is an usual little overview of something like three dozen "schemers of the Inner Sea"--each NPC receives a headshot, alignment and class level, and brief description. The NPCs come from a variety of places--Pathfinder Society, previous campaign setting books and adventures, and even the novels. I'm not 100% sure how useful this is, but it's an interesting assortment, to be sure.

Chapter 2, "Avenues of Intrigue" (10 pages) adds some additional content to some of the themes and rules sub-systems introduced in Ultimate Intrigue. It gives stats for four specific archives usable with the library research rules (I appreciated the info on the Jeggare Museum for my Curse of the Crimson Throne campaign), adds some new feats for characters with masked personas, expands on the idea of stylized spells (a great way to stun the know-it-alls at the table!), and adds a few more ways to use the verbal duels rules such as inciting riots or winning courtroom trials. A new sub-system is included--spreading and countering rumors. The chapter makes very good use of referencing other intrigue-based sub-systems from a wide variety of books, so, if nothing else, it can point readers in a good direction.

Chapter 3 is "Nefarious Schools" (10 pages) and sets up a whole rules sub-system for "nefarious" institutions in the same vein that Inner Sea Magic had for magical academies and Inner Sea Combat had for fighting schools. Everything from finding the group to entrance exams & fees to getting expelled is covered. In addition, each of the specific schools detailed has particular tasks and awards associated with them. In a way, they work a bit like factions in Pathfinder Society or Starfinder Society, where things like Fame and Prestige within the group are tracked and can be spent for special benefits. Some of the benefits are pretty cool and offer boosts to class abilities that could be unique in the game. However, I find it hard to picture how some of these "schools" work in light of the fact that many campaigns may only span several months of in-game time. It's a sub-system that could be an interesting way to track "success" (beyond just wealth and experience points), however, if the GM and players all bought into it. The chapter has specific descriptions for three criminal enterprises (the Freebooters' Academy, the Guild of Liars, and the Guild of Wonders), three rebel groups (the Bright Lions, Irgal's Axe, and the Woodsedge Dissidents), three secret schools (the Honored of Osibu, the Kusari-Gama, and the Sword Pit), and finally three spy academies (the Conservatory, the Kitharodian Academy, and the Twilight Talons. All of these locations are geographically notated on the book's inside front cover. The system is designed to work alongside a similar system in the Faction Guide as well.

Chapter 4 is the longest chapter, "Masters of Intrigue" (20 pages). It starts with a handy page describing how many intrigue-themed archetypes from other books could be situated in Golarion. Several pages are then devoted to new class options (talents, primarily) for Inquisitors, Rogues, and Vigilantes. Next are two new prestige classes, each receiving a full two-page spread. The prestige classes include the Enchanting Courtesan (an interesting mix of concealed spellcasting, poison use, and information gathering abilities) and the Lion Blade (secret bardic spies from Taldor--the prestige class is a bit scatter-shot in what it offers). The remainder of the chapter is devoted to several (17!) new archetypes. Although many of the archetypes are for classes one would expect (rogues, investigators, etc.), there's also some for counter-intuitive classes like druids, summoners, and witches. There's far too many archetypes for me to go into detail, so suffice it to say my notes on the various archetypes use the words "ok" and "too weak" frequently, but with a few inclusions of "cool". Something I have no qualms about, however, is the artwork--the piece on page 39 is just stunning.

Chapter 5 is the "Intrigue Toolbox" (16 pages), and contains dozens of new poisons, magic items, spells, and a very useful little section on special building materials (dead-magic walls, lead-lined walls, and secrecy runes). There's a lot of little things I like in this section, such as a poison (Blackfingers' Silence) that renders the victim unable to speak or cast spells--my Daggermark Poisoner PFS character once put that to good use. There's a lot of really clever, sneaky spells that help the GM in crafting intrigue and mystery stories that aren't so easily foiled by common skills and spells in a PC's toolbox. For example, there's substitute trail (making it seem like someone else left the trail that you've left). Overall, it's a solid chapter that pretty much every player and GM can make use of to some degree or another.

I found Inner Sea Intrigue extremely useful in planning my run of Curse of the Crimson Throne, and I'm sure most GMs can find something worthwhile inside it as well. It also has a wealth of options for players in terms of new archetypes, spells, equipment, etc. There's a consistent, high-standard of quality from the book, which might stem from the fact that it's one of the few Paizo books written by a single author instead of a collection of several each doing little bits. I love the cover art, but there's some great interior art as well. Anyway, this is a really useful book for anyone interested in the more subtle types of gameplay that Pathfinder can offer.


Intrigue, intrigues intriguingly.

5/5

Paizo's recent splurge on the Intrigue line of books is something that I have been missing since I started playing Pathfinder. Ultimate intrigue, and this successor Inner Sea Intrigue, have given me the tools I need to convince my players that it's well worth their time to stop slaying monsters for a minute and talk. A particular favorite this book is the Enchanting Courtesan PRC. It is absolutely everything I could want to have in a social character, and no intrigue focused campaign should be without one (or a secret society of such.)


4/5

I liked the background information on Golarion intrigue, and found much of the mechanics stuff useful as well.

My favorites:

Masked personas give any character a way to have a secret identity, if not as well as a Vigilante.

The Investigator and Rogue talents had some good abilities.

The Enchanting Courtesan is fun and well designed. You can make an amazing NPC with it.

Several good archetypes.

The magical items section is unusually strong.

The spell selection is pretty good.

The big surprise is how thin the Vigilante options are. I don't particularly care about that class, but if you're primarily interested in expanding those options you should be cautious and hope for more in Spymaster's Handbook.


3/5

While the fluff content of this book is great, and several of the new rules from Ultimate Intrigue get some attention, if you want good archetypes of Vigilante talents then you might be very disappointed. The handful of talents in here are lackluster, and the only feat that looked any good gave you the Renown talent, which is basically a talent-tax now moved to a feat.
It has nice options and suggestions for running masked characters of other classes, but for the class that I and probably a few others thought this book was aimed at, it's severely underwhelming.


251 to 281 of 281 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | next > last >>
The Exchange

So I was wondering if anyone actually has a decent (non skill monkey) Lion Blade build or ideal the bard/rogue/Lion Blade seems like a really terrible build with the mass penalties to the bab and no spell casting progression. I think the inspire competence requirement is probably the biggest downside to the PRC.


Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

You can also snag inspire competence with the Storyteller archetype for the Medium, the Sensei and Wanderer archetypes for Monk, and, of course, as already mentioned, the Deadly Courtesan archetype for the Rogue.

The Exchange

so here is the thing inspire competence is a level tax which is applied on top of a very steep 3 feat tax (I mean improved int is ok I guess) which is applied to a very high attribute tax (dex rogue, con because you don't like dying, cha for bard stuff, int is now used to determine dc for skills with the class) which is applied to a 16 skill tax.

The worst part is Inspire competence is overshadowed by the private one your giving yourself (oh and it requires the subject to hear you). Also from what I can see you may still have to spend a standard action to activate your performances.

On top of this you are taking a penalty to your BAB which the prestige class expects you to be in combat and perfect strike requires a charge on a flat footed for or spring attack (another 3 feats). Also you end any hopes of spell progression.

The Deadly Courtesan may be a good build up for the class but requires a boon for PFS.

Liberty's Edge

Any of the previously listed options for Inspire Competence, plus a one level dip into any class that gets sneak attack at 1st, plus the Accomplished Sneak Attacker feat.


Generic Villain wrote:
They get a unique poison named after them and a spell that lets you convert one poison into another on the fly. There's also some fluff on the Daggermark guilds in the River Kingdoms section.

A whole section on the River Kingdoms? May we get some hints at least as to what else can be found there?

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber

In the spell description for implant urge it says the saving throw is "Will partial" but there is no lesser effect that would make it "partial." It only has the one effect. Was it meant to have an effect that was non-negateable or was the spell supposed to be "will negates?"


For those of you who have had an opportunity to analyze the new spells in this book ..... do any of you have any insights as to which ones are the most intriguing in regards to added utility, combat performance, etc.?


Is it just me, or am I noticing more Alchemist extracts meant to use on enemies being added to their formula list?

Exactly what purpose does the spell Dream Reality have as an Alchemist extract? Alchemist extracts only work and affect the Alchemist (unless he has that discovery to grant it to others, but what enemy would drink this without being forced somehow?)

So what good are extracts that are meant as offensive to enemies?


VERY good question, Barachiel. Is Dream Reality in this book? I'm not familiar with it.


Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Barachiel Shina wrote:

Is it just me, or am I noticing more Alchemist extracts meant to use on enemies being added to their formula list?

Exactly what purpose does the spell Dream Reality have as an Alchemist extract? Alchemist extracts only work and affect the Alchemist (unless he has that discovery to grant it to others, but what enemy would drink this without being forced somehow?)

So what good are extracts that are meant as offensive to enemies?

I presume in this case you're meant to only be able to use it with the Infusion discovery and would try to trick someone into drinking it.


Dream Reality could be used by a spy to forget instructions he gave an agent ("take these plans to the Dagoba system") and avoid interrogation. Presumably only higher level effects than Modify Memory could recover it, and it blacks out more stuff and doesn't leave a permanent aura. Since Alchemists don't have limited extracts known and this is an intrigue book it makes sense.


4 people marked this as a favorite.
Miss Disaster wrote:
For those of you who have had an opportunity to analyze the new spells in this book ..... do any of you have any insights as to which ones are the most intriguing in regards to added utility, combat performance, etc.?

These were the ones I liked or thought might be broadly useful.

Brightest Light: An upgraded Daylight (level 4 and hr/level duration) that is a hard counter to Deeper Darkness (automatically dispels 3rd and below darkness spells that enter its area of effect).

Calistria's Guardian Wasps: Sets a day/level wasp swarm trap. Level 3 and no expensive material component, so you can build up several interlocking applications so that enemies can trigger several at once. (It's a 10x10 area, but triggered if you come within 20' without saying the password.)

Commune with Texts: Definitely gives you a max roll when you do research checks to deplete knowledge points in a library. Also gives you a the ability to get books to tell you about their past users similarly to Stone Tell. There's also some less clear fluff about instantly finding what you want in a library, but that sort of conflicts with the research checks stuff.

Dream Reality: For minute/round the target acts normally, but when the spell expires they forget all details of what happened during that time, like it was a dream. Not subject to the same easy recovery or permanent spell aura of Modify Memory. Great when you have to leave a witness alive but don't want him to come after you or testify. But it's pretty high level, 5/6.

Inveigle Person/Monster: Like charm person, but it makes it friendly to everyone. Seems intended to stop combat, since the whole party is now a friend, not just the caster. Can also be used to create a party friend/helper so that a low Cha caster can hand off wrangling duties to the face.

Nex's Secret Workshop: A mass Nondetection effect. Hide all objects and people within close range.

Recorporeal Incarnation: Wear someone's corpse as a long term disguise, not subject to most magical means of discovery and gives you a lot of abilities of the corpse (immunities, weaknesses, weapon proficiencies, spell resistance) so that you won't get found out too easily. I think this is a reprint of what the party uses to imitate drow in a certain AP.

Rotting Alliance: Level 8 so you won't really see it much, but curses a group so that if they are ever within 100' feat of another member of the group in a given day they have to save against 1d6 Con and Cha damage. You can't heal the damage if you stay together, you can't remove the curse unless you're near another afflicted. The ultimate magical restraining order.

Sealed Sending: Like Sending, but you send a scroll with a longer message to any location you have seen, so you can arrange for someone you don't personally know to pick up the message from a dead drop.

True Skill: True Sight for skills! Sort of. Lasts min/level, you pick a skill when you cast it and the next time you make a check with that skill you receive an insight bonus of half caster level.

Violent Accident: Level 2, curses the target from long range (no save) so that sometime over the next day an event will happen (falling roof tiles, runaway wagon, slip and fall, whatever) that inflicts 1d8 per level (max 5d8, reflex half) damage to the target. An interesting way to torment PCs or have NPCs assassinate low level victims that you have to investigate.

Silver Crusade Contributor

Slithery D wrote:
Recorporeal Incarnation... I think this is a reprint of what the party uses to imitate drow in a certain AP.

This is correct. ^_^


Thank you, Slithery D! I just ordered this book - so I'll especially zero-in on those spells you mentioned.


Could a Wiz get some info on the Perfect Scholar?


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Maps, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Secret Wizard wrote:
Could a Wiz get some info on the Perfect Scholar?

It is a Monk archetype that modifies class skills and Perfect Self, loses Still Mind, Slow Fall, and Tongue of the Sun and the Moon, gains Lore (as a Bard), Learn from Failure, and Eye of the Sun and the Moon. An Unchained Monk loses his 4th level ki power instead of Slow Fall. This archetype focuses more on reading than a standard Monk does.


David knott 242 wrote:
Secret Wizard wrote:
Could a Wiz get some info on the Perfect Scholar?

It is a Monk archetype that modifies class skills and Perfect Self, loses Still Mind, Slow Fall, and Tongue of the Sun and the Moon, gains Lore (as a Bard), Learn from Failure, and Eye of the Sun and the Moon. An Unchained Monk loses his 4th level ki power instead of Slow Fall. This archetype focuses more on reading than a standard Monk does.

Sounds pretty interesting - what does Learn from Failure do, more or less?


Secret Wizard wrote:
David knott 242 wrote:
Secret Wizard wrote:
Could a Wiz get some info on the Perfect Scholar?

It is a Monk archetype that modifies class skills and Perfect Self, loses Still Mind, Slow Fall, and Tongue of the Sun and the Moon, gains Lore (as a Bard), Learn from Failure, and Eye of the Sun and the Moon. An Unchained Monk loses his 4th level ki power instead of Slow Fall. This archetype focuses more on reading than a standard Monk does.

Sounds pretty interesting - what does Learn from Failure do, more or less?

When you miss on an attack or fail a research check, you get an insight bonus (+1 at 4th and another +1 for every additional two levels) when you retry against the same target. Only works once per day for each target.


Eric Hinkle wrote:
Slithery D wrote:

Most of those deities I get, but Cayden? It's because he's the god of booze, right?

"You sure look a lot hotter now that I've had those ten ales!"

I am also guessing that this particular inquisition is really best reserved for the less action-heavy campaigns. It'd be a bit hard to use most of those in your average dungeon crawl.

Still and all, it sounds good.

Some PCs aren't very picky. When your 10 levels below the earth, ya gotta take what is offered.

Unless one's hand can be considered a willing partner.

"Hold on fellas! *huff huff* I'm almost there!"


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Gisher wrote:
Secret Wizard wrote:
David knott 242 wrote:
Secret Wizard wrote:
Could a Wiz get some info on the Perfect Scholar?

It is a Monk archetype that modifies class skills and Perfect Self, loses Still Mind, Slow Fall, and Tongue of the Sun and the Moon, gains Lore (as a Bard), Learn from Failure, and Eye of the Sun and the Moon. An Unchained Monk loses his 4th level ki power instead of Slow Fall. This archetype focuses more on reading than a standard Monk does.

Sounds pretty interesting - what does Learn from Failure do, more or less?
When you miss on an attack or fail a research check, you get an insight bonus (+1 at 4th and another +1 for every additional two levels) when you retry against the same target. Only works once per day for each target.

SQUEAL

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Pathfinder Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber
CBDunkerson wrote:
It is very similar to the original, but with 'more'. More requirements for entry, more class skills, more abilities, more usefulness added in to the abilities it had. Their hands down best ability is the new 'Crowd Strike'. Allows them to treat any crowd square as an ally for flanking and to use Stealth sniping to remain hidden on MELEE attacks when attacking from a square with at least one other creature within one size category of themselves.

Still trying to figure out the melee stealth snipe. You can't end your movement in an occupied square (barring extreme size differences) so how is the Lion Blade making melee attacks from an already occupied square to crowd strike?

Liberty's Edge

NightTrace wrote:
Still trying to figure out the melee stealth snipe. You can't end your movement in an occupied square (barring extreme size differences) so how is the Lion Blade making melee attacks from an already occupied square to crowd strike?

"Crowds: Urban streets are often full of people going about their daily lives. In most cases, it isn't necessary to put every 1st-level commoner on the map when a fight breaks out on the city's main thoroughfare. Instead, just indicate which squares on the map contain crowds. If crowds see something obviously dangerous, they'll move away at 30 feet per round at initiative count 0. It takes 2 squares of movement to enter a square with crowds. The crowds provide cover for anyone who does so, enabling a Stealth check and providing a bonus to Armor Class and on Reflex saves."

Basically, crowd squares are an abstraction. They represent areas that people are constantly moving through rather than the location of a single individual. They aren't really 'occupied'. Thus, my understanding is that it IS possible to end your movement in a crowd square. Otherwise, the bonus to AC and Reflex saves wouldn't make sense.

That said, RAW a group of Tiny Lion Blades could be brutally effective by all 'hiding' behind each other in the same square while making stealth melee attacks. :]

Shadow Lodge

Luthorne wrote:
doc the grey wrote:
Luthorne wrote:
psychie wrote:

In addition to the previously requested rogue talents and enchanting courtesan prerequisites, I would also appreciate info on the rogue archetypes and the vigilante talents.

Thanks!
** spoiler omitted **...
You actually can take harsh judgement as any vigilante, the Zealot already has there own version of this just with the full suite of options for judgement rather than the smaller list this gives.
While I'm not going to quote anything, given it's a week until the pdf comes out, you might want to reread the last sentence of Harsh Judgment.

Crapspackle, you are correct. That makes that ability far less appealing than it was before. Wanted to see a Brute of a demon lord with the ability to throw down judgements when he's all hulked out. Hate having to house rule around s~#@ like this...


Nexian Spellspy - which makes this archetype?


PhD. Okkam wrote:
Nexian Spellspy - which makes this archetype?

Exactly. It's a WITCH, not which.


but what kind of archetype abilities?


Whadda mean what kind of abilities? It's witch archetypes. :p


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Stop torturing him. :)

Nexian Spellspy

Familiar is altered so it no longer delivers touch spells, instead it can be the point of origin for divination spells.

4th level hex replaced with ability to store divination results and provide those results when you are the target of divination.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Just noticed this, dream reality is listed as an illusion (compulsion) [mind-affecting] spell, but compulsion is an enchantment subschool, and the spell certainly seems like it could be an enchantment spell, so...is it supposed to be one? Asking mostly since I was looking around at occultist spells, for whom school matters more than most classes...


That's come up before. I think it's meant to be illusion (phantasm) [mind-affecting]. I base this on (1) the description where everything seems like a dream matches up with similar dream effects that are phantasms and (2) there are already plenty of enchantment effects that alter memories, so this gives some diversity and a reason to exist.

Paizo Employee Franchise Manager

5 people marked this as a favorite.
FedoraFerret wrote:
Fair. Different question. Anaphexia Thought-Killer: what the hell? We're apparently giving up a social talent on an even level and a vigilante talent on an odd level. Can we get some clarification on this typo please, it's kind of an extremely important distinction.

We have gotten a few emails about this recently (actually, the same email, multiple times, from different email addresses ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ ) so I thought it best to address it here for future reference.

All abilities replacing either a social or vigilante talent should be learned one level earlier than indicated in order to replace the correct type of talent at the right level. Thus, it gains monastic communication at 1st level, silent to magic at 5th level, thought-scent at 6th level, and false reading at 14th level. All other level-dependent aspects of each ability (such as silent to magic applying to both identities at 10th level) remain unchanged.

251 to 281 of 281 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | next > last >>
Community / Forums / Paizo / Product Discussion / Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Inner Sea Intrigue (PFRPG) All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.