Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Ultimate Intrigue (PFRPG)

3.40/5 (based on 19 ratings)
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Ultimate Intrigue (PFRPG)
Show Description For:
Non-Mint

Add Print Edition $44.99

Add PDF $9.99

Non-Mint Unavailable

Facebook Twitter Email

Words Cut Deep

In the right setting, a single scathing word can prove deadlier than a poisoned dagger. Behind the scenes of heroic battles and magical realms lies a seething underbelly of danger and deception. This world of intrigue holds endless possibilities for adventure, as heroes duel with words instead of steel, plot daring heists, and engage in battles of wills against relentless nemeses. A high-stakes game of shadows and secrets is yours to master—if you have the wits!

Whether the heroes are taming the blood-soaked back alleys of their favorite metropolis or jockeying for the queen's favor alongside highborn nobles, Pathfinder RPG Ultimate Intrigue is an invaluable companion to the Pathfinder RPG Core Rulebook. This imaginative tabletop game builds upon more than 10 years of system development and an Open Playtest featuring more than 50,000 gamers to create a cutting-edge RPG experience that brings the all-time best-selling set of fantasy rules into a new era.

Pathfinder RPG Ultimate Intrigue includes:

  • The vigilante, a new character class that lives two lives—that of an unassuming member of the community, and a cloaked crusader with his own agenda!
  • New archetypes for alchemists, bards, druids, hunters, inquisitors, investigators, mesmerists, rangers, rogues, slayers, spiritualists, and more!
  • New feats and magic items for characters of all sorts, granting mastery of street-smart combat, impenetrable disguises, and misdirection.
  • Dozens of spells to manipulate tense social settings, whether to reveal adversaries' secrets or hide the truth.
  • A complete system of influence, providing new goals and rewards to challenge players and link their fortunes to nonplayer characters and organizations.
  • Systems and advice to help Game Masters introduce a variety of new encounters into their games­—daring heists, extended pursuits, and tense searches for buried secrets.
  • Rules for social combat and verbal duels, allowing characters to use words as weapons to sway hearts and humiliate foes.
  • ... and much, much more!

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-826-7

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Rulebook Subscription.

Product Availability

Print Edition:

Available now

Ships from our warehouse in 11 to 20 business days.

PDF:

Fulfilled immediately.

Non-Mint:

Unavailable

This product is non-mint. Refunds are not available for non-mint products. The standard version of this product can be found here.

Are there errors or omissions in this product information? Got corrections? Let us know at store@paizo.com.

PZO1134


See Also:

1 to 5 of 19 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | next > last >>

Average product rating:

3.40/5 (based on 19 ratings)

Sign in to create or edit a product review.

A Must-Have for Heavy RP Games

5/5

Okay, let's get into Ultimate Intrigue! As the title implies, the purpose of this book is to help flesh out more subtle elements of the game: things like spreading rumors, rallying a crowd, stealing secrets, and other classic cloak-and-dagger stuff. I've used bits and pieces of it in previous campaigns, but read through it carefully (and incorporated a fair bit of it) for my current Curse of the Crimson Throne campaign, as that adventure path is designed around urban political strife. Boiled down to brass tacks, the book is a 256 page hardcover comprised of six chapters. The full-colour artwork is very strong throughout, and the cover is great (though Merisiel's legs are like three times longer than her torso!). There's a very short two-page introduction that summarises each chapter--which is what I'm going to do anyway.

Chapter 1 is "Classes" (60 pages). The big deal here is a new base case, the Vigilante. The concept is that the character has both a normal (social) identity and a masked identity, with certain class options only working while in the associated guise. There are also several safeguards to help keep anyone from figuring out that Bruce Wayne is really Batman. I have a Vigilante character in Pathfinder Society, and one of my players runs one in Curse of the Crimson Throne. I think the class is perfect for an urban campaign mostly set in a single city (especially with lots room for intrigue), but it doesn't work as well with the more traditional "travelling adventuring party" campaign. It's a bit too obvious when five newcomers arrive in town, only for one of them to "disappear" and a new costumed avenger show up. I know there are also some gamers who dislike what can seem like the awkward introduction of comic book super heroes into their fantasy role-playing. For me, I think the concept works well--though as I said, only in particular types of campaigns.

A large chunk of the chapter is devoted to new archetypes for other classes. More specifically, alchemists, bards, cavaliers, druids, inquisitors, investigators, mesmerists, rangers, rogues, skalds, spiritualists, swashbucklers, and vigilantes get some love. Frankly, a lot of the archetypes are fairly forgettable, but there are exceptions--for example, a Daring General Cavalier would be great in military campaigns, the Dandy Ranger could be really useful in an urban campaign, and a couple of the vigilante archetypes are perfect if you want to play the Hulk or Spider-Man. Although the rogue archetypes aren't very good, there are several excellent rogue talents that focus on making the character harder to track through divination, etc. It's worth nothing that this book came out during the period when the hardcover line was still setting-neutral, so there won't be any Golarion-specific flavour with the archetypes (for better or worse depending on your preferences).

Chapter 2 is "Feats" (24 pages). There's something like 110 new feats in the chapter, and probably something for everyone. Given the book's theme, many of the feats are related to sneaking around, hiding and disguising spells, stealing stuff, making plans, figuring out when you're being to lied to, etc. A few that I particularly like include Brilliant Planner (giving you the chance to have just what you need just when you need it), Call Truce (giving a slim chance to actually end combat peacefully when its underway), and Drunkard's Recovery (silly but fun). A couple of important feats are Conceal Spell (which hides the pesky manifestations that spells create in Pathfinder) and Fencing Grace (adding Dex to damage with rapiers, a favourite of swashbucklers everywhere). Overall, I thought the options presented were well-written and plausible in terms of desirability.

Chapter 3 is "Mastering Intrigue" (68 pages). This is probably the most important chapter in the book for GMs. It offers tons of useful advice, as well as clarification on some tricky game mechanics, to help run intrigue-based games. The pages about how common magic spells can be handled while still preserving mysteries, secrets, and misdirection is pure gold. The chapter also introduces seven new rules sub-systems, any or all of which can be incorporated into a campaign to flesh out certain aspects of gameplay. "Influence" is a sub-system that deepens the process of persuading a person or organisation to support you. Instead of a simple single Dipomacy check, PCs need to make certain skill checks to learn a person's interests and weaknesses, and then other skill checks to take advantage of what they've learned. The process operates through multiple phases of tracked successes and failures, and can be tied to mechanical favours and benefits. It's become a very popular facet of many Pathfinder Society scenarios, and I think it's a pretty clever way to handle things--though it can be a bit clunky at first. "Heists" is a sub-system that contains some excellent advice to GMs on how to structure things so players don't obsess over unimportant trivia and are willing to violate that old canard of "don't split the party." "Infiltration" contains some quick advice, but that's about it. "Leadership" deepens the feat of the same name, adding lots of rules for interacting with other sub-systems both in this book and in Ultimate Campaign. I'm personally still not persuaded that the Leadership feat chain is a good inclusion to the game. "Nemeses" is all about adding a recurring villain; I think it's trying to systematise something that could be handled just fine without it. Though there are some fun suggestions on evil plots to foil. "Pursuit" is a little like the Chase sub-system from the GameMastery Guide but stretched out over hours and days cross-country instead of in minutes through alleyways. I could imagine using it. "Research" is probably my favourite of the sub-systems, and one I've used in multiple campaigns. In essence, it gives the PCs a reason to use things like libraries and archives by giving them bonuses to their Knowledge checks, but then makes gaining different thresholds of information the result of multiple successful checks. Overall, a great chapter--I wish the Influence and Research sub-systems had been in the Core Rulebook, because they really add a lot to the non-combat aspects of the game.

Chapter 4 is "Social Combat" (25 pages). The idea here is to present GMs with options on how to handle social conflicts--things like debates, trials, cutting repartee, etc. There's also a "verbal duels" sub-system. I'm just not sure about it--it's something I'd have to see in practice. However, a really useful part of the chapter is advice to the GM on how to handle the various social skills in the game--Bluff, Diplomacy, Intimidate, and Sense Motive--as well as the intrigue skills like Disguise, Perception, and Stealth. The advice here is excellent, and I just stopped in the middle of this review to reread it.

Chapter 5 is "Spells" (40 pages). You can judge from the length of the chapter that there's a ton of new spells, and every spellcasting class will find something. One of the fun things the chapter introduces is a new "ruse" descriptor for spells, which means the spell is easily mistaken for another even by observers trained in Spellcraft or Knowledge (arcana). It's a good way to mislead folks who have played way too much Pathfinder. There are some really clever spells in this section, with a couple of my favourites including false resurrection (instead of bringing back a soul, you stuff a demon into the body!) and the hilarious shamefully overdressed.

Chapter 6 is "Gear and Magic Items" (22 pages). There are some new mundane pieces of equipment (weapons like the cool wrist dart launcher, alchemical items, etc.) but most of the chapter is new magic items with an intrigue theme. The one that really stuck out at me was the launcher of distraction, which is perfect for assassination attempts because it makes it seem like the attack is coming from somewhere else.

Overall, I think Ultimate Intrigue is an excellent book. It's pretty much a must-have in my opinion for any campaign that's going to involve a lot of role-playing or that moves beyond traditional dungeon crawling and wilderness encounters. Even readers not involved in "intrigue campaigns" per se are sure to find plenty of material they can use.


1/5

Don't get me wrong I love Paizo books, I love their work, and I'm proud to own almost all of their publications.

However, Ultimate Intrigue is the one book I regret buying. It's even more than that, it's the one book i regret they ever published.

We need rules and systems, ok. We need a magic system because magic isn't a real thing. We need a combat system otherwise playing with your grilfriend become home abuse. But we don't need a social system because it's a ROLEPLAYING game. Either you want intrigue heavy campaign and you roleplay them, or you want to dungeon crawl or investigate (that's fine too) and you don't play intrigues. You can even do both and it's great.

Aside from that massive problem, the book suffers from "a turn normal actions into feats/class ability" syndrome. I can't count the number of time where players made me fighters to wizards or rogues with a dual identity. We didn't need the Vigilante, and still don't. And I loved when wizard use to get clever and ask for linguistics/bluff roll to blend a spell into a phrase. Now you need a feat for it. Thanks, Ultimate Intrigue. If that was not enough, some of these nonsense feat are built in feat tax chains.

But the one thing I hate the most about this book is the stupid FAQ it bestowed upon us to promote itself (https://paizo.com/paizo/faq/v5748nruor1fm#v5748eaic9tza). That makes a whole school of magic (illusion) utterly useless, and destroys a lot of others (enchantment).

Now I know I can just refuse to use it. But i use to love pathfinder for the clarity and perfect sense with out need to houserule much.

Now it's gone.


I'm tired of paizo trying to stuff this book down our face

1/5

If I was playing a home campaign this book might be more fitting,

For society play this verbal debate and other ideas for this book really bog down the game play. I like social aspect of games and role playing but as I said society play it slows the game way down to try and get people up to snuff on the mechanics


An amazing new class in a hit and miss supplement

4/5

So, Ultimate Intrigue took a long time for me to come to a complete opinion on.

The Vigilante class introduced in this book is, in my opinion, easily the best non-spellcasting class Paizo has ever created. It breaks up its social options and combat options in such a way that you have a great character able to participate in all areas of the game without having to choose whether you want to be competent in combat or in the myriad other facets of the game like exploration, social encounters, etc. It has deep and well-designed talents that allow you to pick any of a variety of different ways to participate in combat, with or without weapons, and numerous tools for allowing players to influence the story with safe houses, contacts, and more.

At PAX Prime 2016 I had the opportunity to visit Paizo's Pathfinder demo area and play their pregenerated vigilante character. I honestly didn't expect it to go terribly well; after all, the vigilante is a class built around balancing two identities and moving between different social strata, so you'd think that this would require a more controlled environment where you know the other players in advance and have time to plan out how your character fits into the game world with your GM ahead of time, right? Turns out, I was wrong. The vigilante class is well-crafted enough that even while playing a 1st level pregen I was able to easily deal with situations in and out of combat, and it took me about 60 seconds of conversation to establish with the group that I had a secret identity they were privy to and might need them to cover for my character from time to time if he needed to swap identities. It didn't hurt matters that the only downside to anyone learning a vigilante's secret identity is that, well, they know his or her secret identity. You can go all Tony Stark if you want, announce that you are Iron Man, and carry on as normal. Very few of the vigilante's abilities actually require you to maintain truly secret identities, and the only real hit you take is that you're a bit easier to find by magical means (though even this can be addressed with clever use of the Safe House Social Talent).

The book also elaborates on the intent behind numerous spells that often prove problematic for GMs in games where they want to have a focus on gritty investigation of mystery, such as the various detect spells, speak with dead, etc.

I think my biggest disappointments with the book, and the reason I can't give it 5 stars, lie in the feats and archetypes. I'll start with the feats, and a bit about why I see most of them as representative of missed opportunities.

To start with, Pathfinder's skill system is heavily dated. When Paizo brought it over from 3.5, they combined a few extraneous skills, but otherwise did little to update things, meaning the core area of the rules covering everything in the game that isn't casting spells or hitting things is now well over a decade old and out of date. Several skills don't even actually work, or work well, as written, have interactions you're just supposed to kind of assume or make up (Ride and Handle Animal are a mess, Stealth requires one to check out FAQs and blog posts online to use as intended, Bluff and Diplomacy have more than a few vague areas and inconsistencies, etc.), so what better book to address, update, and expand these core components of the game than a book about playing skill and intrigue heavy campaigns? Unfortunately, Paizo chose not to go that route, instead relying on feats to stretch skills over their gaps and issues, leading to many of the feats in the this book providing skill uses that I've seen GMs at hundreds of tables houserule as basic functions of those skills to begin with. Instead of formalizing intuitive uses of existing skills into their basic function, they added a feat tax to allow characters to do things many people already thought they could do. While there is a section in the book going over several of the vague areas in a few key skills, these are primarily common sense clarifications instead of the full address the skills could have used.

The archetypes, like many Paizo hardcovers, are all over the place. Some of them are interesting and dynamic, like the Masked Performer bard archetype, some show an attempt at embodying a cool and modern concept but fail to achieve that concept in the actual execution, like the Magical Child vigilante archetype, and some are just plain bad, so obviously terribly designed that you almost wonder if the person who wrote them has ever actually played Pathfinder, like the Brute vigilante archetype.

Now, don't let the above wall of negativity mislead you; there is a lot of great stuff in this book, including perhaps the most inspired and well-crafted class Paizo has ever produced, a class that introduces really interesting design concepts, plays with components of the class chassis we haven't seen classes treat as quite so malleable before, and is a genuinely fun and interesting class to play in and of itself. Despite many of the feats ranging from useless to frustrating, there are still quite a few that are interesting and viable, and while the archetypes are very hit or miss, that's generally true of Paizo books in general and probably shouldn't be held against this one in particular.

My final verdict on Ultimate Intrigue is 4 stars, and a strong recommendation to pick it up, if for no other reason than to add the Vigilante class to your game (though there definitely are other reasons to add this book to your collection).


Pathfinder presents Batman!

4/5

No seriously. The vigilante class is freaking batman. Look at the art for chapter one and for the character. HE'S BATMAN. Of course they also have archetypes if you want to make Hulk, Sailor Moon, even He-Man. With the archetypes from other books the list goes on.
My favorite part, and I cannot wait to test this properly in a game, is the social combat. It works a lot like playing craps or roulette. You get a pool of Determination points which you use to place a bet then you roll off with your social skills check! Seriously it sounds like lots of fun!


1 to 5 of 19 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | next > last >>
351 to 400 of 1,471 << first < prev | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | next > last >>

*will just wait for Monday to come*


Pathfinder Adventure, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber
Malwing wrote:
Aww come on, nobody else in for Kamen Rider?

I am esp Kamen Rider Black.


Jem'Nai wrote:
Malwing wrote:
Aww come on, nobody else in for Kamen Rider?
I am esp Kamen Rider Black.

That one was sick. Easily the most watchable out of the showa bunch. Although I'm hoping for an archetype or something where you get more than two identities so I can pull off a Kamen Rider Decade or Den-o.


QuidEst wrote:
Witch list has Charm Person, Adjustable Disguise, and Geas, so Cabalist might end up as a decent backup option. It'd probably need a patron to round out the useful illusions, though.

Mechanically it might be an option, but the "Dark Pacts" theme isn't particularly appealing to me at the moment. But I may be pleasantly surprised when I get more details.


I'll admit to a certain level of disappointment that my Burning Blaster Warlock will have to be reworked. On the other hand, she gets a legit magical girl sequence, a pet and becomes a buffer instead, so I'll live.

Paizo Employee Designer

1 person marked this as a favorite.
FedoraFerret wrote:
I'll admit to a certain level of disappointment that my Burning Blaster Warlock will have to be reworked. On the other hand, she gets a legit magical girl sequence, a pet and becomes a buffer instead, so I'll live.

You can still go burning blaster and play a warlock if you like!


Malwing wrote:
Aww come on, nobody else in for Kamen Rider?

I'm in for Kamen Rider.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

*is in for archetypes*


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Just a couple more days.


Just a couple more days and then sitting by your machine hitting refresh over and over till it ships... which hopefully won't be the end of Spring break.... Hate to have Daredevil and UI competing for my attention !
Lol


When I think of the mounted furies, I definitely am thinking He-Man.
Am I alone in that? :p


*prefer to keep mounted furies in Hell because they generally don't like to ride alone*


The vigilante ends up working well with a demigod I made some time ago. Cadmus-Nibiru CG demigoddess of Darkness, Endurance, & Retribution.


So you're making a viligante zealot of Cadmus-Nibiru then?


Thomas Seitz wrote:
So you're making a viligante zealot of Cadmus-Nibiru then?

Not in the immediate future, but it is a viable option. Maybe I will put one in to be a rival of one of the PCs in the Hell's Rebels game I am going to be running.


Just one more day to go.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Companion Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I await information with trepidation, and an eagerness of the heart.


The second thing I'm going to do once I get the PDF is convert Meri into BatElf and Kyra into The Question.


*is now thinking he needs to make the viligant assassin*


Hopefully shipping will start today and I will find out something cool after I get home from work tonight.


Pathfinder Starfinder Society Subscriber
Malwing wrote:
Jem'Nai wrote:
Malwing wrote:
Aww come on, nobody else in for Kamen Rider?
I am esp Kamen Rider Black.
That one was sick. Easily the most watchable out of the showa bunch. Although I'm hoping for an archetype or something where you get more than two identities so I can pull off a Kamen Rider Decade or Den-o.

There's a talent for that

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Companion Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

So what kind skills is the vigilante fielding into the fray of battle? Does the class feel like it works out well?
I MUST KNOW THESE THINGS BUT I HAVE LITTLE MONEY FOR SUBSCRIPTIONS.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

Soon we subscribers shall have the power to drop vague yet menacing hints as to content.


technarken wrote:
Soon we subscribers shall have the power to drop vague yet menacing hints as to content.

Waiting eagerly for the first dropped pearl of vague wisdom....

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Companion, Maps Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

Fingers crossed that my own ranger-casting, invisibility-using zealot converts cleanly... but I'm also interested in seeing how the various influence, renown, etc. mechanics turn out...


I am very much looking forward to this!

Contributor

11 people marked this as a favorite.

Spoiler:

TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION 4

CHAPTER 1: CLASSES 6
Base Class: Vigilante 9
Alchemist
Archetypes 18
Bard
Archetypes 20
Cavalier
Archetypes 24
Druid
Archetypes 26
Inquisitor
Inquisitions 28
Archetypes 28
Investigator
Archetypes 32
Mesmerist
Archetypes 36
Ranger
Combat Styles 40
Archetypes 40
Rogue
Talents 44
Archetypes 44
Skald
Archetypes 48
Spiritualist
Archetypes 50
Swashbuckler
Archetypes 52
Vigilante
Archetypes 54
Other Class Archetypes 64

CHAPTER 2: FEATS 72
Types of Feats 74
Feat Descriptions 74
Feat Table 76

CHAPTER 3: MASTERING INTRIGUE 96
Influence 102
Heists 118
Leadership 130
Nemeses 136
Pursuit 142
Research 148
Spells of Intrigue 154

CHAPTER 4: SOCIAL COMBAT 164
Social Conflicts 166
Verbal Duels 176
Skills in Conflict 182
Bluff 182
Diplomacy 184
Disguise 186
Intimidate 186
Perception and Stealth 187
Sense Motive 188
Replacing Opposed Rolls 189

CHAPTER 5: SPELLS 190
Spell Lists 192
Spells 203

CHAPTER 6: GEAR AND MAGIC ITEMS 230
Weapons 232
Adventuring Gear 232
Alchemical Tools 234
Magic Items 237

INDEX 252

*disappears in a cloud of intriguing smoke*


Pathfinder Companion, Rulebook, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Very intriguing. While I wait for my own copy, don't suppose you'd be willing to divulge a list of archetype names and what class they're archetypes of?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook Subscriber

The wait...it hhuuuurrrts....

Grand Lodge

Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Ah, now contributors are getting in on the spoiler action. ;)

-Skeld

Silver Crusade

5 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

20. Pages. Of feats.


spoiler:
Tell me about Nemeses, and the Tyrant archetype
.

Silver Crusade

4 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Companion, Maps Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

The vigilante class is 10 pages... and its archetypes are elsewhere, and take up a separate 10 pages!

20-ish pages of feats...

16 pages of influence has me quite interested.

A page or so of Perception and Stealth? Extra stuff on Diplomacy? Oh boy! I hope this is good clarifications and not a mess of incompatibility, but I'm optimistic.

I'm also looking forward to using this on my Kingmaker players...

Kingmaker spoilers:
they're just about to meet Grigori.


Most important question. Kind of. It kept getting brought up in the playtest, but it's relevant to the fact that I'm going on a road trip with a new player, and may want to talk then into Vigilante.

Is there a reason to want separate identities when the rest of the party doesn't have them?

Edit: Actually, I guess while I'm at it, another important one to my road trip at hand. A more constructive question even. Anybody willing to give us some magical child details?


Oh man oh man...come on let us know things.

Spells and feats, what're some good ones!?

Paizo Employee Designer

5 people marked this as a favorite.

Not too long to wait: this week's blog will have spells, feats, and magic items. It's going to be awesome!

Grand Lodge

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Skeld, you are normally pretty awesome with the spoilers.

Any chance you could fill me in on the Feyspeaker Druid and Dandy Ranger?


Can anyone comment on the hinted at guidance on how Mind Blank interacts with divination and self illusions? Is it in there?


No love for the fighter. Shame.

Anyone give information on the combat feats and the swashbuckler archetypes, please?


Human Fighter wrote:

No love for the fighter. Shame.

Anyone give information on the combat feats and the swashbuckler archetypes, please?

There's a section for "Other Archetypes", which could encompass Fighter. It's where the 6+Int skill mod Cleric seems to have been placed, after all.

Paizo Employee Designer

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Human Fighter wrote:

No love for the fighter. Shame.

Anyone give information on the combat feats and the swashbuckler archetypes, please?

Oh, there's some stuff in there that's only for the fighter. And it's mentioned in this week's blog because fighter stuff is cool!


Well unsurprisingly, the paladin got no love.

I am interested in the spiritualist archetype(s).

Silver Crusade

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Terminalmancer wrote:

I'm also looking forward to using this on my Kingmaker players...** spoiler omitted **

Kingmaker:
That's the random bard that turns up trying to destabilize the kingdom, yes? Our party has three bards, so one of them just engaged him in a bard-off and he left town in shame. Then my ranger tracked him. :P Seems the GM really didn't want us to know where he came from, though, since I wasn't permitted to chase him very far outside the borders before being not-so-randomly waylaid and forced to break off...
Thomas Seitz wrote:

Well unsurprisingly, the paladin got no love.

I am interested in the spiritualist archetype(s).

You're damn right it didn't. Just anti-paladin and some posers pretending to be paladins. :P


Thomas Seitz wrote:
Well unsurprisingly, the paladin got no love.

Gray Paladin was already mentioned. Just because something doesn't show up on the list doesn't mean it's not there- there's a whole section for other archetypes. Personally, I've got my fingers crossed for some Sorcerer love.


Thomas Seitz wrote:

Well unsurprisingly, the paladin got no love.

I am interested in the spiritualist archetype(s).

We've been told the Grey Paladin is in this book. It probably in "Other class archetypes" section.

Silver Crusade

1 person marked this as a favorite.
jedi8187 wrote:
Thomas Seitz wrote:

Well unsurprisingly, the paladin got no love.

I am interested in the spiritualist archetype(s).

We've been told the Grey Paladin is in this book. It probably in "Other class archetypes" section.

See: Posers pretending to be paladins.


In ANY CASE, I wanted to see spiritualist myself.


Spoiler:
What stuff is there for fighters?

What do the new rogue talents do? (I like the sound of 'Hidden Mind'--shoring up the bad Will save, maybe?)

What are the archetypes for clerics, druids, rangers, and spiritualists like?

Are there any archetypes not listed in the blog post?


Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Maps, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber

Which classes are covered in the "Other Class Archetypes" chapter?


Paizo Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories, PF Special Edition Subscriber; Starfinder Superscriber

"Waiting is. Waiting for fullness is." -- Valentine Michael Smith.

351 to 400 of 1,471 << first < prev | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | next > last >>
Community / Forums / Paizo / Product Discussion / Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Ultimate Intrigue (PFRPG) All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.