Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Distant Shores (PFRPG)

4.80/5 (based on 8 ratings)
Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Distant Shores (PFRPG)
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Beyond the Inner Sea!

It's time to leave familiar climes and tour the wider world! While most Pathfinder characters hail from the Inner Sea region, there are many other continents and societies out there just waiting to be explored. Within this book, you'll find detailed discussions of six major trade cities found on the distant corners of Golarion, complete with full-page maps and information on the resident cultures and traditions, adventure sites, new gods, magic and fighting styles, and more, plus rules to help you add local flavor and abilities to your characters. Face your destiny with a cyclopean myth-speaking, study the mysteries of the Iridian Fold, or hone your magic at the House of Green Mothers—there's a whole world at your fingertips!

Cities detailed in this book include:

  • Aelyosos, City of Tides and westernmost port in the archipelago of Iblydos, whose half-flooded streets are guarded by cyclops prophets and mighty hero-gods.
  • Anuli, City of New Beginnings and ancient gateway between the Inner Sea and southern Garund, where divine matriarchs rule with the mandate of Heaven.
  • Dhucharg, City of Conquest, whose militant hobgoblin generals won't be satisfied until their armies overrun all Tian Xia.
  • Radripal, City of Arches in the Impossible Kingdoms of Vudra, where priests travel the holy Matra River and rakshasas rule through fear and silver.
  • Segada, the fabled City of Keys in isolated Arcadia, whose mountaintop walls keep foreign colonists on the Grinding Coast from expanding into the continent's mysterious interior.
  • Ular Kel, Caravan City and Jewel of the Steppe, where Water Lords and nomadic horse tribes rule over massive trade routes that cut through the Grass Sea of central Casmaron.

Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Distant Shores is intended for use with the Pathfinder campaign setting, but can be easily adapted to any fantasy world.

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-787-1

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Lost Omens Subscription.

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4.80/5 (based on 8 ratings)

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Only problem is that there isn't more!

5/5

This material is super difficult to use.

Weird way to start a five star review, but there you have it. The reason why I say so is because this book has six great, wonderful, inspiring cities that I desperately want to adventure in, but nothing about their surroundings. So there are a few ways you can use this material: A DM that loves to worldbuild and has the time to do so, can flesh out the nation around the city, thus allowing a campaign to take place there. You could teleport-travel to the cities from afar, from areas better detailed, and then teleport back. You could run the campaign entirely inside the city -- perhaps something like transplanting Hell's Rebels to a revolution in the hobgoblin city of Dhucharg. You could have characters conventionally travel to these cities from nearby areas, but handwave/vague/skim the actual journeys. These are some ideas for how you could use these cities. But it is really important to be aware of this when considering buying this book: they are wonderfully fleshed out cities in the middle of a lot of blank white map. Personally, I don't take off a star because of that, but you might, so that's why I want to be really clear about that aspect of the product.

Having gotten that out of the way, let's move on to the content itself. Now, this is six cities, ten pages each. Each has a one-page top-down map for layout, and each has an amazingly evocative two-page wide panoramic shot for atmosphere. Additional graphics include 2-3 full-body NPC shots per city to show important personages or typical inhabitants. Each city has a settlement block (of course), and some new crunch/mechanics. The pseudo-Greek city (Aelyosos) has three new weapons, three new mythic path abilities and two new deities. The pseudo-African city (Anuli) has a new player race (Ganzi, which is to Chaotic as Aasimar is to Good or Tiefling is to Evil), seven new traits and one deity. And so on. The rest of the page count is rounded out by gazetteers of important locations, NPCs, customs and other such flavor material.

The six cities detailed are: Aelyosos (pseudo-Greek, with Mythic Adventures flavor), Anuli (pseudo-African, matriarchal), Dhucharg (pseudo-Japanese, hobgoblin-dominated military-flavored), Radripal (pseudo-Indian, with rakshasa intrigue), Segada (pseudo-Amerind, trade hub and entrance into Arcadia) and Ular Kel (pseudo-Mongol steppe city).

I'm biased because I'm a huge, huge, massive fan of all settings and environments that break away from the traditional Western European fantasy fare, so this product is tailor made for me. It's like getting to travel the world for twenty bucks. This is easily within my top five Pathfinder supplements, and if you're similarly interested in "off the beaten path" cultures and settings, I couldn't recommend Distant Shores more.

Having said that, if your campaign doesn't travel a lot, you're not likely to see a lot of use for this book. Some of the crunch can be brought abroad (like the ganzi player race, for instance) and maybe you want to make a character that has backstory in one of these cities. But this book is very situational. You'll want to think about whether you will have a use for it.

My rating is based on taking the book for what it is, and having a use for the niche it fills. As long as you have a campaign where travel is welcome, this book is a five star product.


A tantalizing glimpse of a wider world

5/5

Read my full review on Of Dice and Pen.

I always love seeing far-off lands of campaign settings described in greater detail. Not only does it give other real-world peoples some much-needed representation, it provides a welcome change of pace from the standard European-based cultures that make up the bulk of so many fantasy worlds. Distant Shores provides a tantalising look at the vast diversity that exists in Golarion. While I know that time and resources make it difficult to fully describe everywhere in the world, I hope that Distant Shores is only the first of several books that will one day explore numerous other regions of Golarion.


Takes you There!

5/5

A lot of the points have already been hit in previous reviews of this product, so this will be somewhat brief and hopefully to the point.

Each one of these locations feels a little bit 'clunky' at first read, but when reading for content, and weighing the possibilities of each one of these cities as a 'starting point' for a campaign or world setting, the true genius of each of their designs becomes readily apparent.

They work right now really well for home campaigns, even.

I can't wait to see a further expansion of Holomog and the nations around it, or Ducharg and how the hobgoblins keep from completely falling apart beyond the capital, or Arcadia and how this unknown continent has been both years ahead and behind of Avistan.

With the introduction of Iblydos Vudra, and Casmaron as viable settings as well, suddenly the world of Golarion feels both a slight bit smaller and a *lot* larger.

There are a few limitations to such an offering, but they do not detract from the value of this volume, and I would recommend it to anyone seeking to branch out from Tian Xia or the Inner Sea Region!


A nice taste of new lands

4/5

I really enjoyed this book providing information on never before explored corners of Golarion. It provides enough info to build a campaign arc in each location, and each is unique and interesting in its own way. Highly recommended for GMs wanting to spread out to something new for a bit.


A great sampler platter beyond the Inner Sea

5/5

Distant Shores whets the appetite for more, but gives 6 locations on 6 continents a write up, each chock full of adventure ideas and built in conflict. I particularly liked the evil Hobgoblin capitol city in Tian Xia, and Segada the gateway city to Arcadia. The first because it provides a worthy for for the already somewhat detailed Dragon Empires continent, and the later because it literally acts as a gate blocking the interior of the continent, making it a natural site for colonists and explorers looking to go where none have before (from the Inner Sea at least).

Radripal and Ular Kel build upon the scattered lore already seeded in the campaign setting for Vudra and Casmaron, while Aylyosos provides a setting in need of new mythic heroes as their home grown source of them hasn't proven up to the challenge lately.

I was intrigued by Anuli, the most Northern city of Southern Garund, but wasn't as grabbed by how to use a primarily stable city run by empyreal worshiping good and honest folk, especially when their primary foil is the necromantic nation of Geb, but Geb already has Nex set up as their primary allies. I can see adding Anuli to the conflict as a strategic ally for Nex, or safe haven retreating from Nex, but I had been hoping for something more exotic for Southern Garund, after the years of hints that the further south you travel, the weirder things get.

Overall though, this is a great supplement which stretches beyond the more detailed borders of the primary campaign setting.


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Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook Subscriber
technarken wrote:
Surprised nobody's mentioned the "Totes can make a Paladin of Asmodeus" trait yet.

Wow I totally missed that on my first read through...

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
technarken wrote:
Surprised nobody's mentioned the "Totes can make a Paladin of Asmodeus" trait yet.

I was hoping that it would be PFS légal before they caught it ; -)


Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber
technarken wrote:
Surprised nobody's mentioned the "Totes can make a Paladin of Asmodeus" trait yet.

!? Now I'm curious...


Pathfinder Card Game, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

This looks fantastic!

Liberty's Edge

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Companion Subscriber
QuidEst wrote:
technarken wrote:
Surprised nobody's mentioned the "Totes can make a Paladin of Asmodeus" trait yet.
!? Now I'm curious...

There's a trait that allows you to treat Asmodeus as Lawful Neutral for mechanical purposes because of the history he has with the city.


Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber
Samy wrote:
QuidEst wrote:
technarken wrote:
Surprised nobody's mentioned the "Totes can make a Paladin of Asmodeus" trait yet.
!? Now I'm curious...
There's a trait that allows you to treat Asmodeus as Lawful Neutral for mechanical purposes because of the history he has with the city.

"It says here you're a Paladin of... Asmodeus's, Lord of Darkness and Prince of Hell?"

"Yeah, he's a real stand-up guy."

Liberty's Edge Assistant Developer

16 people marked this as a favorite.
QuidEst wrote:
Samy wrote:
QuidEst wrote:
technarken wrote:
Surprised nobody's mentioned the "Totes can make a Paladin of Asmodeus" trait yet.
!? Now I'm curious...
There's a trait that allows you to treat Asmodeus as Lawful Neutral for mechanical purposes because of the history he has with the city.

"It says here you're a Paladin of... Asmodeus's, Lord of Darkness and Prince of Hell?"

"Yeah, he's a real stand-up guy."

90% of your job involves apologizing

Silver Crusade

1 person marked this as a favorite.

So much <3 for that trait


Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Samy wrote:
QuidEst wrote:
technarken wrote:
Surprised nobody's mentioned the "Totes can make a Paladin of Asmodeus" trait yet.
!? Now I'm curious...
There's a trait that allows you to treat Asmodeus as Lawful Neutral for mechanical purposes because of the history he has with the city.

Which city is that for? Dhucharg or Radripal?

Either way, I assume that this trait is NOT open to Chelish characters, right?

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

Anuli. It's listed under a heading called Holomog traits though, so I'm not sure if it's open to other residents of Holomog outside Anuli.


Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

That is an interesting surprise. Still -- whether or not other natives of Holomog can take that trait, it would seem that people of other nations are definitely excluded. I am really looking forward to reading the details behind this trait in a couple of weeks.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
page 49 wrote:
Segada purchased these metal machines from the city-state of Three Craters in the Land of Northern Lakes far to the east—a mostly-barren landscape pitted with crater lakes, strange geological formations, and specks of monster-infested forests where the residents dig into the earth to mine precious metals, highly pure iron, and skymetals.

I called it! :D


Crystal Frasier wrote:
QuidEst wrote:
Samy wrote:
QuidEst wrote:
technarken wrote:
Surprised nobody's mentioned the "Totes can make a Paladin of Asmodeus" trait yet.
!? Now I'm curious...
There's a trait that allows you to treat Asmodeus as Lawful Neutral for mechanical purposes because of the history he has with the city.

"It says here you're a Paladin of... Asmodeus's, Lord of Darkness and Prince of Hell?"

"Yeah, he's a real stand-up guy."
90% of your job involves apologizing

...But you seriously CAN become a paladin of Asmodeus?


As far as I can tell, he still has no Paladin code.

Axial wrote:
Crystal Frasier wrote:
QuidEst wrote:
Samy wrote:
QuidEst wrote:
technarken wrote:
Surprised nobody's mentioned the "Totes can make a Paladin of Asmodeus" trait yet.
!? Now I'm curious...
There's a trait that allows you to treat Asmodeus as Lawful Neutral for mechanical purposes because of the history he has with the city.

"It says here you're a Paladin of... Asmodeus's, Lord of Darkness and Prince of Hell?"

"Yeah, he's a real stand-up guy."
90% of your job involves apologizing
...But you seriously CAN become a paladin of Asmodeus?


Pathfinder Rulebook Subscriber
Cthulhusquatch wrote:
As far as I can tell, he still has no Paladin code.

Neither do LG demigods.

Dark Archive

QuidEst wrote:
Cthulhusquatch wrote:
As far as I can tell, he still has no Paladin code.
Neither do LG demigods.

Or any other LG god they haven't got around to making a specific code for, such as the Dragon Empires gods Tsukiyo and Shizuru.

On the one hand, it might be technically possible (and Asmodeus, god of contracts, *thrives* on those sorts of technicalities, literally being the devil in the details), and would fit the theme of Asmodeus (if not the theme of Paladins!) perfectly.

On the other hand, James Jacobs is the 'god' of this setting and wasn't a big fan of the idea the first time it appeared, so probably not.


Pathfinder Companion, Pawns, Starfinder Accessories, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Just noticed, but what are the starting/other languages of the Ganzi? I don't see it anywhere listed. <o>


Even if you do make a Paladin of Asmodeus, it would probably really hard to stay as one, either because of falling or because of the god revoking his favor.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

I dunno, it seems to me like having paladins would be the sort of thing that would give Asmodeus access to all *sorts* of technicalities, so he might be willing to give them a *lot* of leeway. Since he isn't the sort of guy to brute force himself into things, but to come up with twists, paladins might be a sweet ace in the hole.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber

With the creative director saying No they don't exist, and only certain LN gods actually being said as having paladins, i'm just going to say that i expect that to NOT be the case.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook Subscriber

In the case of Holomog, it might be that paladins are drawing power from the Pact itself, not Asmodeus. In which case there code wouldn't necessitate following the edicts of Asmodeus and his clergy.

Granted I still have no idea how the afterlife of said paladin would work out...

Liberty's Edge

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
MMCJawa wrote:
Granted I still have no idea how the afterlife of said paladin would work out...

I am sure they will be fine. They all have a quite proper contract saying this, kind of :-P

Paizo Employee Developer

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Justin Franklin wrote:

Aelyosos things I liked:

** spoiler omitted **

Still compiling so I will have a complete list of questions later. :)

More thoughts behind Aelyosos and Dhuraxilis:

A lot of the ideas for Iblydos arose from contemplating how an archipelago with a cyclopean connection would handle the death of Aroden and prophecy--especially troubling when considering how most cyclopses worldwide have become less prophetic and civilized over time since the fall of Ghol-Gan. I especially wanted to tap into some of the Greek and Roman vibe of heroic deeds while avoiding direct appropriation. Using the mythic rules while also establishing that mythic power is something of a dying "art" helps present an in-world connection with that rules set without requiring that every campaign in Iblydos embrace that optional system.

I'm glad you appreciate my take on it.

Dhuraxilis was my other proposal for the Iblydan city in Distant Shores, though we decided to go with the option that is more representative of Iblydos (totally the right choice). As you might guess, I have a head start on whatever gazetteer we might write for it in the future. Just as Aelyosos began with the concept of a coastal city suffering massive tidal fluctuation, Dhuraxilis began with the idea of a holiday a bit like Carnival but with a bunch of "classical" monsters invited to the party. It then spun into even more possibilities, including a really cool mystery cult that Wes and I cooked up.


Argh, why isn't the PDF available for purchase yet?!?!


Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Only a week to go....

Executive Editor

Samy wrote:


** spoiler omitted **...

I... can't believe that didn't occur to me. I got so focused on the relationship that I totally forgot about feats based on the symbol. :-O

Oh well—clearly more design space to be explored in future products!


Pathfinder Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Is it me are all the cities all very lawful...

Shadow Lodge

Cities tend to lean that way, unless there's something big to push them toward chaos.

Most chaotic folk don't tend to lump in with large groups, they tend to strike out on their own more.

Editor-in-Chief

10 people marked this as a favorite.
technarken wrote:
Surprised nobody's mentioned the "Totes can make a Paladin of Asmodeus" trait yet.

I'm a little surprised how often the paladins of Asmodeus question comes up, considering the concept is addressed in Inner Sea Gods on page 24.

Inner Sea Gods, page 24 says wrote:
Many soldiers and martially minded types welcome Asmodeus’s dogma of force and dominance. While his church has few organized groups of soldiers, monastic orders or mercenary companies aligned with Hell are not that unusual. Among such militaristic servants of Asmodeus are those who extol him as a paragon of law and enforcer of order. With the encouragement of the church, many go so far as to call themselves “paladins,” relying on the reputations of virtuous crusaders to gain acceptance among commoners and those of modest faith. Although such armed propagandists lack the holy powers of true paladins, many supplement their strength of arms with magic items that allow them to perform miraculous feats. Most go out of their way to perform heroic deeds for communities in need—or to manufacture then thwart tribulations for those not in imminent need. Thus Asmodeus’s servants hope to undermine the common knowledge of their god’s evil, opening the minds and hearts of everyday people to the belief that Asmodeus has been judged too harshly, and that perhaps peace is worth harsh laws and rigid order. Once even a few entertain the previously unthinkable possibility of living alongside worshipers of the Prince of Darkness, the insidious seed of Asmodeus’s faith has taken root.

That's pretty much the end-all, be-all word on paladins of Asmodeus in Pathfinder canon.

Now, if you in your personal game want to play with that concept, go for it–certainly no one here's interested in interrupting your fun—just make sure you and your GM are on the same page first. :)

As for the pact servant trait, that's largely meant to be a flavor thing for Holomog. By the strictest readings of the Core Rules, there are not a lot of stipulations on who your paladin's divine backer has to be. For the Pathfinder world, though, the vast, vast, vast majority of the time we cleave to the Paizo house-rule that paladins have to worship lawful good deities. If you want to play faster and looser with that in your game and your GM buys off on it, go for it, but for us, that's our rule and how we play it in our printed products.

For my piece—and you'll find few more pro-Asmodeus backers—I doubt that even the Archfiend can honestly trick someone of true paladin stock into worshiping him, one of the most unabashedly evil beings in the multiverse. Even if he could, he probably can't grant them a true paladin's abilities. Asmodeus IS all about confounding folks, though. (So, if you find yourself confounded by any of this: good.) :P

In any case, we're certainly not going to be presenting paladins who worship Asmodeus in official Pathfinder products.

The pact servant trait dances in a gray idea that's unique to the situation in Holomog. If you want to play in that space with your divine spell casters, enjoy—the background there affords you that rare opportunity. If that unsettles you and you want to say the divine power from that ability in fact comes from some mysterious empyreal lord patron who's backing some ancient bargain tied into the pact, that's a neat idea too and could make for even more interesting stories.

Ultimately, play with it however you like, but don't view this as some new change in stance on our view of paladins of Asmodeus as anything but shysters.


Pathfinder Companion, Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
John Compton wrote:
Justin Franklin wrote:

Aelyosos things I liked:

** spoiler omitted **

Still compiling so I will have a complete list of questions later. :)

** spoiler omitted **

Spoiler:
The article mentions the "thanatotic magma of

Mount Ebaios", is that thanatotic because it is magma, or is there something special about it? Or does this have something to do with the titans?I had an idea for a Tyrant that was a Thanatotic Titan, as ruler of one of the city-states.

Now if I can just find a way to pick your brain for what your plans are.

Liberty's Edge Assistant Developer

11 people marked this as a favorite.

Re: Paladins of Asmodeus - That was never the intention of the trait, which was more intended to open up Asmodeus worship to neutral and even good-leaning Clerics and Inquisitors in Holomog (and only in Holomog). Being a paladin is a whole different thing above and beyond alignment in Golarion, and while it's a fun concept for a home game it is not something that can happen officially in the game world. The Wily Linguist aspect is an advocate, negotiator, archivist, and lawyer, not a warrior.

Asmodeus wouldn't be behind anyone going around fighting evil on his behalf, and certainly would be giving them stuff expressly to be used for that purpose.

Please, feel free to explore this kind of idea in your home game, but there's ultimately nothing stopping you from doing that in home games already. Don't be disappointed if this trait is not available in organized play.

Paizo Employee Developer

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Justin Franklin wrote:
John Compton wrote:
Justin Franklin wrote:

Aelyosos things I liked:

** spoiler omitted **

Still compiling so I will have a complete list of questions later. :)

** spoiler omitted **
** spoiler omitted **

Spoiler:
*Shifty eyes*

I will simply say that I had a lot of fun seeding adventure ideas into this gazetteer for all levels of play. Some of these are ones I'd love to expand upon in future publications one day. For others I don't have any extent plans, yet every mystery is another opportunity for enterprising GMs to spin their own explanations and adventures.

And the great thing about the messageboards is that our fans sometimes suggest possibilities that are even better than the original ideas!


Pathfinder Companion, Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
John Compton wrote:
Justin Franklin wrote:
John Compton wrote:
Justin Franklin wrote:

Aelyosos things I liked:

** spoiler omitted **

Still compiling so I will have a complete list of questions later. :)

** spoiler omitted **
** spoiler omitted **
** spoiler omitted **

Sounds like it is time to restart a Iblydos thread in the campaign setting thread.

Sovereign Court

Orthos wrote:

Cities tend to lean that way, unless there's something big to push them toward chaos.

IRL and before 19th century organised planning, I would say exactly the opposite.If you compare city plans from before and after, the difference is striking.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

You're referring to the physical layout of the city. I believe that Orthos was referring to the general moral/ethical alignment of the city, and not to if the streets were properly aligned. :)

Sovereign Court

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion Subscriber

Finally read my copy. I'll have to digest it for a while before I have any specific commentary on it, but I loved every second of it.

Huge fan of the new Mythic content! I especially liked how it was set into the world - a good contrast to my experience with Wrath of the Righteous.

I do hope to be able to play an LG worshiper of Asmodeus in Society, although I'd stay closer to (what I believe is) the intended purpose - a Diplomacy-heavy librarian/negotiator type. (Might be a good time to use my aasimar boon, in fact.)

Silver Crusade

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

*wubs kitty's full tummy*

Shadow Lodge

Bellona wrote:
You're referring to the physical layout of the city. I believe that Orthos was referring to the general moral/ethical alignment of the city, and not to if the streets were properly aligned. :)

This is correct. People gathered in large groups tend to be people who think in similar ways, behave in similar ways, and go with the flow. IE, Lawful people.

Chaotic people - more prone to forging their own path, doing things their own way, not following the crowd - are generally not as much drawn to large concentrations of people, where they will be expected to "play by the rules" and "go along to get along", and thus would be less likely to congregate in a single location in large numbers.

As a result, cities by their very nature tend toward being more Lawful-aligned, while smaller communities and more nomadic cultures lean toward Chaos more frequently.

(There are, of course, exceptions. I'm an extremely Lawful person but I can't stand cities, I can't take being that close to other humans and not having some elbow room.)

Sovereign Court

I am not entirely convinced. I would say cities appeared also out of economics / demographics and convenience alliances against raiders, but I see your point has merit.

Shadow Lodge

I'm less meaning their purpose of origin and more the results of having that many people living closely together and cooperating on a daily basis. Eventually, under most circumstances, they'd all sort of congeal together into a unified pattern of behavior and thought, barring outliers.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook Subscriber

Anyone here familiar with the comic character Spawn? The super condensed explanation is that he's a super hero that works for the Devil. See, the Devil wants Spawn to fight and (in this case) kill bad guys because then their souls go to Hell and become soldiers in the Devils army.

That's the pitch I'm gonna go with if I try to play a paladin of Asmodeus in a home game anyway. :)


Pathfinder Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Orthos wrote:
Bellona wrote:
You're referring to the physical layout of the city. I believe that Orthos was referring to the general moral/ethical alignment of the city, and not to if the streets were properly aligned. :)

This is correct. People gathered in large groups tend to be people who think in similar ways, behave in similar ways, and go with the flow. IE, Lawful people.

Chaotic people - more prone to forging their own path, doing things their own way, not following the crowd - are generally not as much drawn to large concentrations of people, where they will be expected to "play by the rules" and "go along to get along", and thus would be less likely to congregate in a single location in large numbers.

As a result, cities by their very nature tend toward being more Lawful-aligned, while smaller communities and more nomadic cultures lean toward Chaos more frequently.

(There are, of course, exceptions. I'm an extremely Lawful person but I can't stand cities, I can't take being that close to other humans and not having some elbow room.)

I disagree. I think in cities you are more likely to be chaotic because the large number of people. In smaller communities people tend to more traditional. And tend to be more united if no other reason than survival(well in a fantasy setting with wondering monsters). Small communities tend to care more what your neighbors are doing. And you are less likely to run into people who share whatever makes you different.

In cities you tend to not have too be that way. Also if the city is a trade hub as most cities in this book you are constantly meeting outsiders and being exposed to new ideas.

I think you are not understanding the chaotic alignments very well.

Sovereign Court

Anonymous-ness (?) is a trait of cities. Especially modern ones.

Paizo Employee Developer

We probably could have done a better job covering a more diverse range of alignments in the book's cities. We certainly made a point of ensuring the good/evil axis was covered.

While I don't think cities necessarily need to be more lawful than chaotic, it is important to remember that the goal of this book was to present settlements that were somewhat indicative of their respective regions. If they were outliers, existing beyond the scope of most other settlements in their nations, they wouldn't really meet that design goal.

Rest assured, there are chaotic-leaning settlements in all of the presented countries (except maybe in Kaoling), we just haven't detailed them yet.

Dark Archive

F. Wesley Schneider wrote:
For the Pathfinder world, though, the vast, vast, vast majority of the time we cleave to the Paizo house-rule that paladins have to worship lawful good deities. If you want to play faster and looser with that in your game and your GM buys off on it, go for it, but for us, that's our rule and how we play it in our printed products.

Will paladins of lawful neutral and neutral good gods, like Abadar, Sarenrae and Shelyn remain an option?

Shadow Lodge

1 person marked this as a favorite.
John Kretzer wrote:
I think you are not understanding the chaotic alignments very well.
Orthos wrote:
I'm an extremely Lawful person

Paizo Employee Developer

Set wrote:
F. Wesley Schneider wrote:
For the Pathfinder world, though, the vast, vast, vast majority of the time we cleave to the Paizo house-rule that paladins have to worship lawful good deities. If you want to play faster and looser with that in your game and your GM buys off on it, go for it, but for us, that's our rule and how we play it in our printed products.

Will paladins of lawful neutral and neutral good gods, like Abadar, Sarenrae and Shelyn remain an option?

Paladins of NG-adjacent deities are pretty well established in canon. And while you can be a paladin of Shelyn or Abadar, you still need to be LG to be a paladin, regardless of your deity's alignment.


Only have to wait until 3AM EST now...


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Ambrosia Slaad wrote:
Only have to wait until 3AM EST now...

It's MINE!!! :D


HUZZAH!

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