Southlands Bestiary (PFRPG)

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Desert Spirits, Grasslands Hunters, Jungle Horrors!

The Southlands Bestiary brings 90+ new monsters of the hotter climes to Pathfinder Roleplaying Game. Want to run a campaign in the deserts, jungles or savannas? This tome of monsters will make sure your players will have hair-raising encounters like none they’ve experienced before.

In this 122-page, full-color book of monsters you get:

  • Swamp adders, sphinxes, scorpion swarms, and skinbats!
  • Demon lords and their followers, arch-devils and their cohorts! 
  • Dinosaurs and flame dragons suitable for any volcanic lair!
  • Possessed pillars and prismatic beetles!
  • Genies, gremlins and golems!
  • Killer cactids and clockwork tomb guardians!

…and so much more, plus an introduction by Jeff Grubb, designer of the classic Al-Qadim setting. Use these strange and deadly foes in the Midgard Campaign Setting, or in any campaign of high adventure beneath the pitiless sun.

Draw your scimitar, ready your spear, and call upon whatever gods you choose, mortals: the monsters of the Southlands are here!

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An Endzeitgeist.com review

5/5

This massive bestiary for use with the Southlands campaign setting (but not limited to it) clocks in at 122 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages of backer-lists, 1 page ToC, 1 page SRD, 2 3/4 pages of advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 112 1/4 pages of content, so let's take a look!

I was a backer of the Southlands kickstarter, but am otherwise not involved with this book. My review is primarily based on the softcover print version of this book, though I consulted the electronic version to verify e.g. presence of bookmarks and similar components.

This book is pretty much a sans frills experience - the brief version of this review would be as follows: After an introduction by Jeff Grubb, we dive into a ton of monsters; in the end, there is a table of monsters by CR; they span the breadth from humble CR 1/2 to massive CR 26.

...

Yeah, I know, not very fulfilling now, is it? Let's try to do this more justice: We have, at this point, seen more than one book (or chapter) on creatures of the deserts - there usually are a couple of undead, some ambush predators, a killer scarab, the like. We know the tropes and this book very much is aware of this - instead of simply resorting to trying to re-invent the wheel, it pretty much says: "So yeah, you do - but guess what? You haven't seen THIS done!" What do I mean by this? Well, for one, the massive book has something unique going on for every creature - there is no boring rehash of old tricks in this book. That tentacley ambush-predator cactus you've seen done before? Well, it can generate a lethal aura of spikes by shooting them all at once in a pinch. That undead, doomed to wander the desert? Let's just say that it can be used in Ravenloft sans modification, since it requires brains to defeat it.

The second component that sets this apart is that, much like the Southlands-book, it borrows heavily on real world mythology and adds a unique spin to it - Mechuitl and Camazotz, for example, are statted as full-blown demon lords - including e.g. information on Camazotz in the underworld... Similarly, monster tropes are combined with great panache with Midgard flavor - Clockwork Shabti and Ushabti, for example tie in perfectly with the gearforged concept, while the types of tosculi and their master, dread Arbeyach, prince of swarms also get their due.

Speaking of resonance with real world myth - if you're familiar with Prester John's myth, you'll be like me and grin from ear to ear upon seeing the Blemmyes statted. The lightning-infused swarm "Bolt of Ekwanes" similarly resounds with a deep pulse of the familiar and yet unique. Fans of ancient mythologies will also cheer at the rendition of noble Buraqs, while drought swallows threaten the land and well-being of those foolish enough to attract their attention. Salt-devils scour the lands and demonic idolic deities await to be unearthed, while owl-headed harpies prey on the travelers.

Intelligent ambush predator spiders called J'ba Fobi or the smoke-lions mngwas, carnivorousnandi bears or an ooze camouflaging as whole oasis - the breadth and depth of adversaries and creatures covered herein is wide indeed. Perhaps you want a pygmy trumpeteer elephant companion? Heck, even the tired old desert worm gets a new twist, with Sathaq worms sporting a pain-inducing aura and a hunting style based on dragging foes beneath the sands. Even the classic hybrids that in earlier days sometimes ended up being less than interesting have great representations herein - the lethal serpopard (serpent-leopard-hybrid) is a brutal foe, while an orangutan-choker hybrid should, by all accounts, end up on a ridiculous monster-list...but it does work! Insectoid Xhkarsh can afflict their victims with oracle curses and creatures mentioned in the great setting book, from the twisted vine lords to the arcane wasting-bearing intelligent white apes resound with themes of our collective cultural consciousness.

The mythic Southlands titans do sport notes on words of power (and an optional, non WoP-array of SPs) while the wakane, a feathered pterosaur, is particularly feared for sinking boats - have I mentioned the huge, burrowing pitcher plants masquerading as an oasis, commanding whole swarms of its rootlets to defeat resilient prey? There is a lot of downright inspired material to be found herein and not one of the creatures in this book felt lazy or bland.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch - while e.g. MR is not capitalized in a statblock and while I noticed some small hiccups, overall, the book is solid. The statblocks I checked sported no glaring glitches. Layout adheres to a gorgeous two-column full-color standard and the pdf is fully bookmarked. The book has a huge selling point: The artwork is absolutely fantastic. original and truly evocative, full-color artworks for all creatures are provided and they are downright baffling, eclipsing even most 1st party bestiaries. Some of the artworks are so beautiful, they make you immediately want to use the creature they represent - and this holds true for just about all of them. Look at the cover: This is the level of awesomeness you get throughout the whole book.

Here's the awesome thing, though: As a long-time supporter of Kobold Press, I have, time and again, bemoaned the fact that some of the truly astounding full color pdfs were translated "only" into b/w-print copies. Not so here: The Southlands Bestiary's print version is a truly gorgeous full color softcover that features thick, glossy paper and thus is a joy to simply flip open - if you can, get the print edition.

Okay, so here is the list of designers:

Kristian Ahonen, Eric Anderson, Anonymous, Joshua Banks, Wolfgang Baur, dpb, Clinton Boomer, Marina de Santiago Buey, Angelica Burns, Jarrod Camiré, Aaron Cheung, Jim Davis, Lee DeBoer, Dan Dillon, John Doh, Chris Doyle, Harold Farmer, John Foster, Erik Freund, Leonard Grand, Amanda Hamon Kunz, Andrew Harshman, Jacob Haywood, Steven T. Helt, Jeffrey Hersh, Andrew Hind, Richard Iversen, Alex Kanous, Henry S. Kurtz, Richard Lawson, Jeff Lee, Chris Lockey, Ari Marmell, Ben McFarland, Jesse McGatha, Brett A. McLean, Brian Wiborg Mønster, Matt Morrissette, Robert H. Nichols, Stacy Nichols, Kalervo Oikarinen, Gunnar Ólafsson, Richard Rossi, Stephen Rowe, Adam Roy, Wendall Roy, Matt Rupprecht, Allen F. Schell, Brian Suskind, Troy Taylor, James Thomas, John Tolios, James Whittaker, Clarence Wisdom, Henry Wong - in spite of the established names among these ladies and gentlemen, one would expect quality to fluctuate. At least as far as I could tell (or where it would become jarring or problematic for the GM), I could not observe any tendency like that - Ben McFarland, Justin Riddler, Alistair Rigg, Brian Suskind, Jason Nelson and Amanda Hamon Kunz have done a glorious job reviewing, editing and developing these creatures - and the effort show. This is a superb bestiary, perhaps one of the most compelling ones I've read all year.

Even if you're not interested in Midgard or Southlands, I very much recommend you get this gorgeous tome - this is a glorious bestiary and well worth 5 stars + seal of approval as well as nomination as a candidate for my Top Ten of 2015.

Endzeitgeist out.


If you like bestiaries, then you'll love the Southlands Bestiary!

5/5

Ever since the long lost days of first edition, my favorite RPG books have been the Monster Manuals. With the rise of the Pathfinder RPG, the Bestiary series has kept the grand flame of the Monster Manual alive with an ever increasing cast of critters and creatures to confound your players!

Kobold Press has produced high quality, well balanced supplements for Pathfinder for years. The Southlands Bestiary works best as a supplement for desert or planar adventures, but with its wide range of CRs, there are plenty of monster options for any campaign regardless of setting.

From the lowly CR 1/2 lemurfolk to the mighty CR 26 Mechuiti Demon Lord, you get a full range of threats to throw at your PCs for an entire campaign. If you're running campaigns through the planes or in Golarion's desert regions, this is a must buy. Players love to read through bestiaries and books they're supposed to avoid, but with this solid third party supplement, you can shock and surprise them before beating them into submission!

If you need another bestiary, buy the Southlands Bestiary today!


An RPG Resource Review

5/5

Early explorers of distant and far-off lands often define them by the creatures to be found there, so here is a collection of diverse and fascinating beasts to populate the Southlands and terrorise incautious visitors. These creatures are at home, the party are the interlopers, having to deal with the rigors of the setting as well as the actual monsters themselves. A new land with new monsters provides a challenge to players as well as to their characters as both are venturing someplace new. It's also a way to get over the obstacle of a character knowing more about his surroundings (including the monsters) than his player does!

There's a wealth of opportunity for the GM as well. Treat the monsters not as mere cannon-fodder but as a living, breathing part of the world that they inhabit. The ultimate challenge for the characters may well be to engage in combat with the monsters, but what of learning about them first? Observations can be made, legends learned, and so on, enabling the characters to know something about these new creatures before having to fight them... or such observations can be made after the first stunning shock of a combat encounter as the characters regroup, figure out what attacked them and how they can detect and deal with it in the future.

Even if you don't want to use the Southlands in your game, or the plot does not call for the party to go there right now, the odd creature might have strayed elsewhere. You may have a suitable ecological niche for it where your game is currently set, or it may have strayed - perhaps as an exhibit in a menagerie - far from its natural habitat. There's always scope for new monsters....

The Introduction touches on these concepts and then we're off with an array of monsters presented in alphabetic order. Each comes with all the details we have come to expect: a description, complete stat block, notes on lifestyle, habitat and behaviour and a glorious full-colour illustration. Most entries fill a single page, else they fill two, so users of the PDF will be able to print out the pages that they need without extraneous material. There's almost an hundred of them to feast your eyes upon and build adventures around; and there's a table listing them by CR at the back to help you in setting up encounters appropriate to your characters.

Many of the monsters are uniquely suited to the Southlands, both ecologically and in terms of the overall style of the campaign setting. Perhaps a gentle stroll across the desert will be interrupted as two speckled, wickedly pointed legs erupt from the sand, plunging forward with murderous speed, followed by a spider the size of a rhino... the evocative description provided for the sand spider. Another beast, the subek, is a humanoid crocodile which retains many of the fighting techniques of the animal that is its inspiration such as the 'death roll' of a crocodile dragging its prey underwater to drown, adapting the technique to a land-based grappling manoeuvere.

The giant white apes reflect legends about super-intelligent gorillas found in the depths of Congo rain forests, twisted to suit the Southlands setting yet evoking the same awe and curiousity. The monsters range from pure animal to sentient, from desert dwellers to jungle inhabitants - whatever your needs there is likely something that will suit. Beautifully presented and well-considered, if you are using the Southlands Campaign Setting or have another area occupying the ecological niche of Africa in your world, these creatures will help to bring it to life.


A worthwhile addition to a bestiary collection

5/5

I like the flavor and theme of most of these critters. They really seem to belong in the setting and are not just a hodge podge of random monsters. Looking forward to seeing my players try to figure out what is whooping them as they explore the southlands.


Great resource!

5/5

Very nice collection of flavorful desert- and African-themed creatures. Written for Kobold Press' Midgard setting, but most are easily portable to Golarion or whatever your world you're playing in.


Community Manager

Now available!


I got this book yesterday. Here are some fun facts about it!

*There are a grand total of six different monsters in this book that use dehydration as a weapon or are capable of inducing thirst in their victims. In a mostly desert-themed campaign setting, that's a big deal. I can see why they did it, but the sheer number of monsters with dehydration powers is almost funny.

*Three different creatures are specifically focused on camping out near an oasis waiting to eff people up, and several more are implied to. Again, desert campaign!

*There's a bear that eats brains.

*Lemurfolk PC race!

*Two new devils, one new demon.

*There are three new "deities". An arch-devil named Arbeyach who looks like an old man filled with vermin, a demon lord named Camazotz what looks like a giant humanoid bat, and another demon lord named Mechuiti that is a giant mandril. For reasons I still have not begun to comprehend, they don't have domains and favored weapons.


Axial wrote:
There are three new "deities". An arch-devil named Arbeyach who looks like an old man filled with vermin, a demon lord named Camazotz what looks like a giant humanoid bat, and another demon lord named Mechuiti that is a giant mandril. For reasons I still have not begun to comprehend, they don't have domains and favored weapons.

I believe that information is in the actual Southlands book. If you're using Southlands, then you're all set. Otherwise, then they can be whatever you need them to be.

(Side Note: The desert region being modeled is roughly the size of the United States, so a variety of monsters with dehydration powers allows them to be regional.)

-Ben.

Liberty's Edge

Axial wrote:

I got this book yesterday. Here are some fun facts about it!

*There are a grand total of six different monsters in this book that use dehydration as a weapon or are capable of inducing thirst in their victims. In a mostly desert-themed campaign setting, that's a big deal. I can see why they did it, but the sheer number of monsters with dehydration powers is almost funny.

Of course, in a book containing more than 100 monsters, a mere 6 that cause dehydration or are capable of inducing thirst doesn't seem at all unreasonable :)


terraleon wrote:

I believe that information is in the actual Southlands book. If you're using Southlands, then you're all set. Otherwise, then they can be whatever you need them to be.

(Side Note: The desert region being modeled is roughly the size of the United States, so a variety of monsters with dehydration powers allows them to be regional.)

-Ben.

I have that book; I was one of the backers. All three of them are referenced in the book to varying degrees, but none of them are given domains.

On the topic of dehydration monsters, I am not opposed. Six monsters means the GM has choices.


Axial wrote:
All three of them are referenced in the book to varying degrees, but none of them are given domains.

Lookitthat. You're quite right. Mechuiti and Camazotz were both in Kobold Quarterly. (23 and 9, respectively) Mechuiti was also in Pirates of the Western Ocean.

Camazotz
Domains Chaos, Evil, Travel and I would add Death and the Speed domain from Southlands.
Favored Weapon maquahuitl (a heavy wooden club edged down two sides with razor-like obsidian blades)

Mechuiti
Domains Destruction, Fire, Hunger, and while they're not listed in there, I'd add Animal and Evil, possibly Strength.
Favored Weapon Pirates of the Western Ocean implies this is a heavy mace

Arbeyach was in KQ#3, and he's noted as having:
Domains Death, Law, and Swarm, and I would add the Deception domain and the Vermin domain from Southlands.
Favored Weapon KQ#3 does not offer one, nor does any of the other places Arbeyach has surfaced, I'd suggest a stiletto or a scorpion whip.

However, the cult section in the back of Southlands has some cult worship feats that grant spell-like abilities to followers, and those could be used to grant any number of different powers to regular cultists.

-Ben.

Liberty's Edge

Axial wrote:
On the topic of dehydration monsters, I am not opposed. Six monsters means the GM has choices.

All good! :)

There are PLENTY of cool choices for GMs in this book, that's for sure!


Marc Radle wrote:
Axial wrote:
On the topic of dehydration monsters, I am not opposed. Six monsters means the GM has choices.

All good! :)

There are PLENTY of cool choices for GMs in this book, that's for sure!

I can promise to you that I'll use at least one, maybe two creatures from here when the PCs are dumb enough to go to the desert. ;)

While you're here, may I ask what the reason was behind the design decision to not have domains for the three new deities?


Axial wrote:
While you're here, may I ask what the reason was behind the design decision to not have domains for the three new deities?

They're three archdevils and demon princes. I wouldn't really consider them "deities," per se. They're certainly not anything I would expect player characters to be using as patron gods. The deities are all in the Southlands book, and these might be better thought of as serious enemies who might mastermind large plots, perhaps in the service of one the various dark gods listed in the setting book. And if it's just the GM rolling their own bad guys, I would expect them to customize it as they need.

But the details may just not have fit, or might have been simply forgotten, because it wasn't at the forefront of the monster's purpose. Arbeyach appears as a visiting dignitary in Courts of the Shadow Fey. The idea of him as a god didn't really enter into our mind as designers.

-Ben.


No, but in Pathfinder every single demon lord or nascent demon lord is a minor deity capable of granting spells to their followers. Paizo, and even Kobold Press in every other case but this one makes it a point to write up which favored weapon a demon lord grants and which domains his/her followers have access to.

It's true that none of these guys would probably be a PC's patron, but what if I want a cleric of Arberyach as the big baddie of my campaign? Seeing as how important the weapons/domains are thematically to a deity, like Desna's starknife or Zon-Kuthon's spiked chain, I would prefer not to guess.


Perhaps in Golarion, they do. In Midgard, previously only Mammon is an arch-devil with domains and weapons in the setting. The others have been hit or miss in Midgard setting materials. Golarion doesn't necessarily equal Pathfinder, in terms of mechanics, but I see what you're saying. I can't say why these three in the bestiary didn't have the domains and weapons listed.

But if you're the GM, just make it up. The Setting Police will not show up and shut down your table if you do something different for your game.

-Ben.


I get that, but I wish they would at least explain it. Maybe a "Demon Lords in Midgard" sidebar that explains why they don't actually grant spells to their followers. As it stands, this is like deciding to not list a class' weapon proficiencies.


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Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Adventure, Lost Omens Subscriber

So, how about 'em monsters.

Liberty's Edge

Agreed! :)

Did I mention there's more than 100 of 'em?

Oh, many thanks for the first review!!!


2 people marked this as a favorite.

I love the Midgard campaign setting !

This book looks like it's awesome !

Any chance for a D&D 5th version of this ?

Because that would make me go all "Squeeeee ! Take my money, please !".

In truth, if the entirety of the Midgard campaign setting was transcribed into D&D 5th edition, i think I would go (temporarily) bonkers with joy, and surely broke.

[*Putting a kobold's skull helmet askew on his rotund gnomish head and waving a miner's pick in a (self-harming) menacing way*]
"Come on, darned kobolds: make me bonkers and broke, I dare you !"

Liberty's Edge

Quiche Lisp wrote:

I love the Midgard campaign setting !

This book looks like it's awesome !

Any chance for a D&D 5th version of this ?

Because that would make me go all "Squeeeee ! Take my money, please !".

In truth, if the entirety of the Midgard campaign setting was transcribed into D&D 5th edition, i think I would go (temporarily) bonkers with joy, and surely broke.

[*Putting a kobold's skull helmet askew on his rotund gnomish head and waving a miner's pick in a (self-harming) menacing way*]
"Come on, darned kobolds: make me bonkers and broke, I dare you !"

Well, to get you started, there's this :) Southlands Heroes – 5th Edition Compatible

... which you can pick up ***RIGHT HERE! *** :)

Kobold Press will absolutely be producing 5E material ... but the lack of official 5E OGL right now makes doing so a bit dicey. The rumor mill says an official 5E OGL will be ready ... soonish. At that point, I think it's safe to say there will be plenty of cool 5E stuff from the Kobolds!

I will say ... if you attended the "What’s New for 5th Edition D&D from Kobold Press" GenCon seminar you heard a bit about the possibility of LOTS of new 5E monsters on the horizon from Kobold Press ... :)


Squeeee :-) !


Marc Radle wrote:

The rumor mill says an official 5E OGL will be ready ... soonish. At that point, I think it's safe to say there will be plenty of cool 5E stuff from the Kobolds!

I wouldn't hold my breath waiting on WotC.

Keep pressing on with Pathfinder under the OGL I say. Any more bestiaries planned? Something small but themed like Dark Fey?

Liberty's Edge

Hey - thanks for the new review! :)


Ok, so I just bought the Southlands Bestiary, and I must admit that i'm shockingly impressed by it!

The artwork is simply amazing and stunning and most of the creatures are awesome!

There is a great deal in this book and I really hope the makers of this book will Kick-start or otherwise create much more of these in the future (Native American HINT HINT ;-) ) as that would be awesome!

This are some of the better and disappointing critters of the book:

List of Monsters I love or dislike:

Arboreal Grappler: Ok this is a really awesome critter that reminds me of the North American Fearsome Critter named Argopelter, it has the same arms at least, and if it was called the Argopelter I wouldn't even mind, in fact that artwork is gonna suit my Argopelter, it sure as hell is much better than any of the original argopelter artworks I've found!

Asanbosam: Another artwork which really suits the creature, beatiful! I love the iron diet of the creatures which gives them their teeth, which makes perfect sense! Rusty for old ones is also very thought out! Perfect creature, one of my favorites in the book.

Blemmyes: WOW, Just WOW, this artwork is exactly what I searched for in Blemmyes, they remind me of the Serious Sam enemies and fit perfectly for the Blemmyes, its like someone drew the version from my mind. Their abilities are also very fitting.

Bouda: I never thought Gnolls had roots in mythology!? That artwork does most of the work but then come the awesome background and abilities of these torturers of the weak! Awesome, never cared for Gnolls too much, but this creature is going to end up in my project about mythology now.

Cactid: I really love cactus monsters and Pathfinder only has the humanoid cactus this far, so this awesome creature really comes from heaven for me. Awesome art.

Dau: Is this from Mythology? Can somebody LINK me to more information about these awesome Fairy-like creatures that spin solid illusions? I'm fasinated by them!

Kishi: Turning these into demons makes sense! Not really a huge fan of the picture but i'm happy this creature from mythology gets some love!

Dispa: It would have been better if this creature's bite turned creatures into oozes or into extremely thirsty victims that drink their own blood if no other liquid is nearby, but that artwork is really awesome!

Dire Spinosaurus: Wow, best Spinosaurus Artwork i've ever seen! Also an awesome beasty! Hope to see more dinosaurs in the future from you guys!

Drought Swallows: Here I was searching for artworks of Rock Swallows for my project as WDL mentioned some Anaye Demonic Swallow monsters from Native American myths called the Rock Swallows, this artwork comes pretty close and their abilities are also awesome.

Dune Mimic: At first I thought this can't be coincidence as this creature perfectly resembles another Anaye from Native American mythology, the living desert or Seitaad. Awesome creature with cool artwork and I always love more Mimics!

Gbahali: Thanks for this creature, it never came to my attention before, but that artwork startled my curiosity and now I use this mythological monster in my own project. I love this Chameleon Croc! One of my favorites in the book.

Azza: Another creature which resembles an other creature from myth, this cloud-rider artwork can come off as the Spanish Nuberu, which also ride clouds. I love Gremlins so they are all cool for me!

Mbielu: I'm very curious at the Mbielu-Mbielu-Mbielu! Beautiful artwork, best artwork for Mbielu i've seen on internet.

Ngoubou: These mixtures of Hippo and Styracosaurus is awesome and cute at the same time!

Serpopard: Too bad the neck is too short, as would it have been somewhat longer I would have found it perfect! The reptilian face really suits this creature and the colors are cool.

Titanobao: Awesome! Love this beast, and its one of my favorite prehistoric animals!

Wakane: Pretty much based on the Kongamato I guess, I love this artwork and creature, but I wonder why you guys didn't take a real mythological beast like the Ropen?

Xhkarsh: The mantis monster! This is a mantis monster! Love the artwork and the abilities and I was bummed this wasn't from mythology! As myths could use some Mantis!

Now for the creatures that I really didn't like that much, which are few indeed.

Emela Ntouka: The artwork seems kinda off, and I imagined a more fearsome beast for the Elephant Killer, less Rhinoceros and more prehistorical looking.

Nandi Bear: This is just another bear monster, would have changed this creature a bit or mix it with an hyena, or put alien tentacles inside its maw.

Mngwa: A tiger/Panther would have been much better, don't like the Lion version at all, but the abilities are kinda awesome!

Jaculus: I can't see the spear-like head? Doesn't look that spear-like at all.

All other creatures are nice! The African myth creatures i'm kinda missing are: Adze, Kasai Rex, Olitiau, Abatwa, Anansi, Petsuchos, Ya-Te-Veo, Cerastes, Eloko, Ga-Gorib, Intulo, Lunwaba, Jidra, Sak, Ropen, Ichneumon, Leontophone, MIgas, Rompo, Sandwalker and Zogbanu, but who knows they can be in another book?

I really hope to see more of these area-specific monster books full of mythology monsters from you guys!

Keep them coming!

Dark Archive

Was able to grab a copy of the Bestiary during the sale. The book looks amazing.

Liberty's Edge

Myth Lord wrote:

Ok, so I just bought the Southlands Bestiary, and I must admit that i'm shockingly impressed by it!

The artwork is simply amazing and stunning ....

Music to Kobold ears! :)

Liberty's Edge

I just received my copy of the Southlands Bestiary!

Wow! I knew the content was good, of course, and I knew what the book looked like on my screen but ...

WOW! I am thrilled with the quality of the printed book itself! The art looks vibrant and crisp and great and the quality of the nice, thick, coated paper stock is outstanding! It just feels great to page through.

Man, I could not be happier with how this book turned out!!! :)


terraleon wrote:


Camazotz
Domains Chaos, Evil, Travel and I would add Death and the Speed domain from Southlands.
Favored Weapon maquahuitl (a heavy wooden club edged down two sides with razor-like obsidian blades)

Macuahuitl = terbutje which is in the PRD.

Liberty's Edge

Just noticed some new reviews!

Much appreciated!!!


Reviewed first on endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted here, on OBS and d20pfsrd.com's shop. Also posted on amazon.com alongside a slew of classic KP-product-reviews.

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