Everyman Unchained: Skills and Options (PFRPG) PDF

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Tinker with the rules of the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game like never before with Everyman Unchained: Skills and Options! In Everyman Unchained: Skills and Options, you'll find:

  • An all-new skill system designed to increase the number of skill ranks available to characters without sacrificing versatility.
  • A reimagining of the Favored Class system that helps gives great bonuses to all characters, regardless of race.
  • Favored Class Options for a variety of races, including classics like humans and elves as well as more exotic characters such as aasimars, kitsune, and androids.
  • Three new variant multiclass options from three Third-Party companies: the Dragon Paragon, the Mystic (Amora Game), the Occultist (Radiance House), and the Technician (Radiance House).
  • And more!

With Everyman Gaming, innovation is only a purchase away!

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4.70/5 (based on 3 ratings)

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4/5

When Pathfinder Unchained came out I was ecstatic. The talk of the town was the new unchained classes but i was all about the series of house rules to adjust the game. Unfortunately some of the patches for difficult parts of the game were a little too conservative which resulted in them being fantastic ideas in their own right but not really enough or very functional for the space allotted. Even the best ideas required a bit of adjustment before going into a game. But that's the nature of house rules so I was really eager to see how third party publishers polished off some of these great ideas, and so we get to Everyman Games, now a part of Rogue Genius Games, with Everyman Unchained: Skills and Options.

For the first bit we get a new skill system, a hybrid of grouped skills from Unchained and normal skills. To make things short, you get your normal ranks and skills as normal but additionally you choose skill groups as defined by the table inside at first level(You have to start with the Background skill group.), second level and every 4 levels after that. You get bonus skill ranks that you have to spend on skills within a skill group you selected but only if you have more than half your level in ranks from a skill in that group. On paper and in use this system works very well and gives you a wider range of skills without just handing off a bunch of extra skills willy nilly. But your milage may vary because I personally don't think I'll ever use this purely because Its an added layer of complication which I don't like even though it still works without having to adjust anything else. When presenting it to players I've had to explain whats being said and there was a lot of back tracking for players. To be fair half of my usual group isn't very adaptive to any level of complication so you may take that criticism with a huge grain of salt. Also for the other half it seems fairly simple enough. In the end I just feel like it's the background skills system that threw an added complication by adding your background ranks into something that you have to keep backchecking a chart for instead of simply adding them to a set list.

The next section is on favored class bonuses. There are things that I do like and things that I don't like. I like the favored class bonus options that are class specific (but not specific to race/class combinations). Its a cool way to really give a little more variety within a class. There are even a few third party classes in the mix. Same goes for the racially specific bonuses, particularly that they aren't class specific racial bonuses as well, something that I've always criticized because it means each new race is burdened to account for classes that don't yet through updates. At the same time the class specific ones have the same problem that makes me like the racial ones in that there's no way for it to account for third party classes. to a lesser extent the same can go for the racial ones because races not represented here get basically nothing. But this doesn't exactly mean that non-represented classes and races get no action. One set of bonuses are specific to classes with an animal companion, which works with classes or even archetypes that could come out next year and still functions. Then there are the universal options, favored class bonuses that don't require a specific race or class, which is basically the holy grail for me in this section. Particularly I like that you can pay favored class bonuses towards a feat that uses your race as a prerequisite. This little rule make racial feats a kind of mini paragon path which ups their value and flavor. Besides that it completely bypasses all the problems I have with favored class bonuses not being able to account for classes and races that don't exist yet or are third party while still keeping it racially relevant. Its one of those things where I wished the game was like that from the beginning. There are new feats that interact with the new favored class bonuses. They are nice but the real noteworthy thing is that humans make out like bandits with a new racial feat that gives them oodles of HP, skill ranks or both.

Lastly we have Alternate Multi-Classing options for the Dragon Paragon, Mystic, Occultist(third party), and Technician.

I may have lobbed some criticism but all in all this is a decent product. If you liked the background skills system from Pathfinder Unchained then the skill system is a better alternative. (I did not so I wasn't too keen on this system.) If you aren't finicky about getting new races and classes in on the favored class bonuses then you at least have an option to give them something. The thing I'm mostly taking from this book is the universal favored class bonuses and the associated feats but i can seriously see anyone else taking away more. So right now I'm on the fence of what to rate this because of a fight between what I feel like I'd use and what I feel others would use. I think 4 out of 5 stars is fair. Its a rating that doesn't scare people who would like it from the product but expresses that I really only consider two pages of the product useful to me.


An Endzeitgeist.com review

5/5

This installment of Everyman Gaming's support-series for Pathfinder Unchained clocks in at 17 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, leaving us with 14 pages of content, so let's take a look!

So, if you've been experimenting with skill-systems from Pathfinder Unchained and your group is like mine, you'll have had an experience that mirrors that of author Alexander Augunas - backlash. In practice, none of the skill systems worked for my game. I'm not judging you if the suggested systems work for you and yours - just stating it does not work for everyone. Still, several design-ideas provided in the skill systems doe have some merit - and as such, I considered it a pity to let them fall by the wayside. The author seems to agree with me and has hammered out a system of skills that (hopefully) utilizes the best of the classic and unchained systems- so how does it work?

At each level, a character gets skill ranks equal to the class's baseline, with a cap of ranks being equal to your HD. Each class has favored skills, class skills - if you have one rank in them, you gain a +3 bonus to them and multiple such bonuses do not stack from multiple classes - so far, so good. The number of skill points gained per level depends on the skill category of your class - poor, average, good or excellent, with Int-mod added. A handy table does provide these, and, as before the ranks per level range from 2 (poor) to 8 (excellent). At 1st level, 2nd level and every 4 levels thereafter, you determine a skill group, as listed on another handy table - Tinkering, e.g., includes Craft, Disable Device, Spellcraft and Use Magic Device. 1st level nets the background skill group.

In order to select any skill group other that the background skill group, a character needs to possess skill ranks in any one of the skill group's skills greater than 1/2 the character's level. Each level, a character gains 4 ranks to spend among the group skills exclusively. However, there is a further restriction imposed on group skills - you can only invest group skill ranks into a given skill equal to the number of skill groups you have that include the skill. It should also be noted that the fighter now receives more skills per level, with poor skills being now primarily the providenc of spellcasters (and paladin + magus), thus maintaining the notion that they use their magic for flexibility as opposed to utilizing skills for various means.

Favored Class Bonuses, when used with this system, remain at +1 hp/skill rank or alternate benefits.

The pdf then goes on to provide a variety of new favored class options for ALL classes - a total of 5 are covered for all Paizo-classes, also including Alexander#s Dragon Paragon (from the Dragon Companion Handbook), the Mystic (from Amora Game's Liber Influxus Communis) and his superb Occultist (Pact Magic) and Technician-classes (from Age of Electrotech). The diversified favored class options provided here add rather complex choices to the mix: Alchemists, for example may choose between +1 formula, +1/2 bomb damage, +10 minutes mutagen-duration, 1/6 discovery or 2 alchemist class skills, which both gain +1/2. The options generally are more than solid and add a welcome tactical dimension to leveling up - though, the nitpicky bastard in me can't help but comment on minor hiccups like the samurai class's FCO referring once to the cavalier class - nothing grievous mind you - the content herein is not impeded in functionality. Companion-based options are also in here, with 5 choices for customization. Beyond these, the pdf does provide a huge array of racial options that further expand the favored class options available, with two per level provided for even the most exotic of races. If you've been counting - that amounts to 10 (!!!) choices available for every character per level as opposed to the base system's usual 3. But that's not where it stops - the system also provides further universal options: +1/3 of a save, max +2; +1/6 bonus feat from a limited list, decrease a weapon's non-proficiency penalty by 1, +1/3 on crit confirmation rolls with a chosen weapon, +1/3 racial trait, +1/4 SP use per day gained from a racial trait or feat or +1 energy resistance for an energy the character is resistant against via a racial trait. This totals at potentially 17 (!!!) options to choose from.

4 feats are provided to work with this system:

Multiple Companion Training allows you to extend FCOs for a companion chosen to all companions. Eclectic is potentially problematic - the text is "Choose an additional favored class and gain +1 in any favored class option that you qualify for whenever you take a level in that class. If you choose a class in which you already have levels, the benefits of this feat are retroactive" However, favored class options do not necessarily net you +1, but fractions thereof - I get what this feat tries to do, but its wording is problematic. I do enjoy that humans may take it multiple times, though. Fast Learner has been streamlined for use with the system and finally, the story feat Nemesis is part of the deal.

The multiclassing system presented in Pathfinder Unchained, essentially a kind of gestalting lite, may not fit every campaign - I know that the balance ramifications of some combos most definitely do not gel with most campaigns I run. At the same time, for quite a few campaigns, this may actually end up being exactly what you've been looking for - so yeah. I'm personally weary of it and consider it too roughshod for my own tastes. This does not keep me from enjoying the inclusion of new such options herein, though - Alex's classes, from Dragon Paragon to Occultist, Technician and Mystic, receive their information for use with exactly this system in here as well, unlocking them for campaigns utilizing this design paradigm. So far, I only have two sessions of experience with this multiclass-system, so the finer points of balance ramifications may be slightly lost on me, but from what I can glean, the direct comparison between the options provided herein and those used in the base book yields a power-level that does not exceed that presumed by the options presented in Pathfinder Unchained.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I noticed no significant glitches. Layout adheres to Everyman Gaming's two-column full-color standard with beautiful, original artworks by Jacob Blackmon -for once, btw., no kitsune! OO EDIT: Mea Culpa: That's a kitsune on the cover; I thought it was a canid/dog/wolf-folk. I stand rectified! The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.

Alexander Augunas skill system has polarized my group and indeed, I myself oscillate between its benefits and slight drawbacks. But first, let me reiterate and emphasize that the system, as presented herein, simply is superior to everyone of the takes presented in Pathfinder Unchained, benefiting imho from the strengths of the individual systems and refining them. Now, whether this system is a god-send for you or not very much depends on the preferences of your players - do they like planning character-progression, tinkering with the nuts and bolts, getting synergies out of material etc.? Then they will probably love this system. The skill groups and skill-group exclusive ranks allow for satisfying planning of skill-progression in a way that actually can enhance roleplaying - if a character needs the occult-skillgroup to make the most of his next level, in-game studying the material can lead into pretty much awesome, organic character-developments. The skill-system provided here can work as a catalyst for roleplaying and I adore this system for it. The downside is evident - you need to plan, carefully, your progression - players that do not want to tinker much, that just want to play, tend to dislike the additional complication this brings to the game - and, obviously, when there are choices, there are ways to choose badly. While you won't cripple a character with bad choices, you can end up unable to spend group skill ranks gained, which may prove to be a source of frustration. This is a system-inherent issue, though - one generated from the additional skills and the structure.

The favored class options with their vast array of options for each class at every level, including racial ones, is absolutely awesome in my book - while I consider some options slightly stronger than others, ultimately that holds true for regular favored class options provided for vanilla pathfinder. The massive customization options definitely enhance level-ups in intriguing manners and have no significant drawback - apart from the fact, that I would have loved some guidance on how to use already existing FCOs within the context of this system.

The big question, then, would be how to rate this - and I'm somewhat at a loss. Usually, when I can't decide, my group helps me shape my opinion - but my players are evenly divided. And I pretty much, as a reviewer, am likewise divided. Make no mistake - as a private person, I love tinkering options like this, where some complexity and choices reward smart planning. At the same time, I can understand disdain for what some might consider a needless complication. Ultimately, I decided to rate this according to its intention: How does it hold up as an alternative for the skill system for people looking for something different? After all, it makes no sense to rate a system down due to concerns of people who do not see a need for it in the first place and who're content with the status quo - after all, why then get this pdf?

Well, this holds up better than the base-line provided by Pathfinder Unchained. And a similar conclusion can be drawn for the favored class options provided herein. And what more could I ask conceivably of such a small pdf? My final verdict will hence clock in at 5 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.


Everyman's new skills option

5/5

Everyman Games has already done several PDFs covering the new information and options given in Pathfinder Unchained. This time around they cover a new skills system based on the work done in Unchained. The PDF itself consists of 17 pages, with one for the credits, the cover, the title page, and the author's preface and table of contents. This leaves room for thirteen pages of material, and it's definitely not an unlucky number here!

The first section covers a new way of handling skills. It combines the old number of skills per class level (except that in this system fighters get 4 points per level), but includes skill groups. You get one at first level, the Background Skill Group. You then get a new Skill Group at level 2, and one more every four levels after that. You get four more skill points every level that can be spent on skills in your Skill Groups, with the limitation that you can only spend as many points on such skills as you have groups they're included in. You can also only pick a Skill Group if you have skill ranks in any one of the included group skills greater than half your character level.

Intelligence doesn't affect how many Group Skill Points you can get. And favored skills still get the +3 bonus they do in normal Pathfinder.

The list of Skill Groups seems fairly exhaustive with enough crossover that you can get any skill by at least three ways. If you like skilled characters who aren't rogues, you will like this idea. Of course, if you're getting all those new skill points, what do you do with the old '+1 skill point per level' advance?

The next section consists of new Favored Class bonuses for every class published up to the point of Occult Adventures, along with four 3rd party classes -- the Dragon Paragon from the Dragon Companion Handbook, the Mystic from the Liber Influxus Communis, Pact Magic Unbound's Occultist, and the Age Of Electrotech's Technician. These lists of options are much more expansive than the older ones -- practically everything that scales by character level in the game can be increased. You can advance and individualize your character in a multitude of ways.

It also offers companion options if you want to enhance your animal companion, eidolon, or familiar. More hit points, more skill points, better natural armor, more feats, and even DR/magic can all be gained.

We get racial options too, allowing you to improve various racial traits or to increase certain ability scores which vary by race at a rate of 1/6. As I said before, you get a LOT of options here for how to customize your character over time. The racial options include every race from the Advanced Race Guide, some creatures from the Monster Codex, and three 3rd party races, the Dragon Companion Handbook's dragons and the Mutamorphs and Nashi from Age of Electrotech.

Next comes universal options with new choices like bonuses on saves, bonus feats, removing the nonproficiency penalty for weapons, improved racial traits and more uses of racial spell-like abilities, and improved energy resistances for characters that already possess them.

Some altered feats are included as well -- Multiple Companion Training gives multiple companions, eidolons, or familiars your favored class bonuses; Eclectic for more than one favored class; Fast Learner provides extra favored class bonuses for human characters; and the Nemesis story feat provides an extra favored class benefit per level, while also granting your enemy a +2 on to hit and damage rolls made against you.

Finally comes new variant multiclassing using the Pathfinder Unchained rules for the 3rd party classes of the Dragoon Paragon, the Mystic, the Occultist, and the Technician.

Really for the asking price you get a tremendous amount of material here. I saw few or no typos and the organization is simple and straightforward. If you want more skilled characters as well as more options for character advancement you could easily do far worse and really no better than to buy this PDF. I'm going with five stars.


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Gotta say, I love the concept for the revamped Favored Class bonuses. Not sure it's all as balanced...if nothing else, gaining +3 to Intelligence or Constitution is straight out better than getting +1 skill point or hit point per level, but on the other hand you have to wait six to twelve levels (depending on even or odd) to get the benefit, so there is that. But splitting them up between race and class like that? Genius. Really helps break up the 'play this race solely because awesome favored class bonus makes it crushingly superior' elements that have been annoying me for awhile.

However. I hate to nitpick. But it's triaxian. Not traxian.

(Super-picky nitpick, for tiefling, you have, "of a alternate racial trait", instead of 'an alternate'.)

Edit: Haven't given the skill system an in-depth read yet, though, looks like it'll take a bit of digesting.

Contributor

Luthorne wrote:
However. I hate to nitpick. But it's triaxian. Not traxian.

That's intentional. Since triaxians are named for their planet, I wasn't sure if their name was OGL or not. So I went the safe route and altered their racial name slightly.

Quote:
Edit: Haven't given the skill system an in-depth read yet, though, looks like it'll take a bit of digesting.

At its core, the basic idea is, "+4 skill ranks for all classes." This is based on some thoughts that I generated on Guidance a few months back.

That said, I don't think that adding a flat bonus to a character's number of skill ranks is interesting. It doesn't encourage diversification in a character's skills, as a character is just as likely to dump all of his additional ranks into more skills. So to that end, I took the idea of skill groups from the skill group system in Pathfinder Unchained and tweaked it. The current implementation is reminiscent of backgrounds, from 4th and 5th Edition, except its more based on who you choose to become rather than who you were.


I've been saying that third party publishers should be capitalizing on the ideas presented in Unchained that didn't quite get the polish everyone wanted or go as far as it could. I am glad that you guys are handling it but it seems like you are almost the only ones to do it. Great job.

Anyways, this goes immediately on my wishlist for later use.

Contributor

Malwing wrote:

I've been saying that third party publishers should be capitalizing on the ideas presented in Unchained that didn't quite get the polish everyone wanted or go as far as it could. I am glad that you guys are handling it but it seems like you are almost the only ones to do it. Great job.

Anyways, this goes immediately on my wishlist for later use.

I know Rogue Genius Games is doing something with Unchained material that'll be worth looking into in the near future, but aside from that I haven't see much. I have my theories about why we don't see many 3PP doing stuff with Unchained. On one hand, it is a LOT to digest, especially if we're talking alternate systems. Supporting a system that the 1PP won't support is a bit of a gamble; you can either carve a niche for yourself or ultimately make a product that is unpopular. Ultimately, we don't know how much support the Unchained rules are going to get, so I'm willing to bet that plenty of writers are choosing to spent their energy elsewhere.

I'm not completely done with Pathfinder Unchained yet. I still have Unchained Cunning coming out, which is focused on the Unchained Rogue and its alternate and hybrid classes. I'm also planning on playing with the alternate disease and poison rules that are in Pathfinder Unchained at some point.


Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

There is a minor error in the product descriptions. One line begins "Three new variant multiclass options from three Third-Party companies:", but that part is followed by an enumeration of FOUR classes from three companies. Let's not sell this product short here!

Also: Are there any plans to come up with VMC options for the official classes that Paizo skipped? Or perhaps to give VMC in general the same sort of boost given in this product for skills and favored class bonuses?

Contributor

David knott 242 wrote:

There is a minor error in the product descriptions. One line begins "Three new variant multiclass options from three Third-Party companies:", but that part is followed by an enumeration of FOUR classes from three companies. Let's not sell this product short here!

Also: Are there any plans to come up with VMC options for the official classes that Paizo skipped? Or perhaps to give VMC in general the same sort of boost given in this product for skills and favored class bonuses?

There are plans, but they're not mine. :D


I am a skills nut, loved your work with Psychological Combat, but am curious how extensive a re-write your proposed skills system is.

Can you give an outline? Or at least clues as to what it's not?

Specific questions: Do you still use ranks? Did you condense or expand classifications? Is this compatible with Unchained Background Skills? Did you bake Unchained Skill Unlocks right into the system (sans feats; or in addition to feats)? Is this compatible with your PC work? Etc...


Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Interesting -- I will have to keep my eye out for that, wherever it turns up, then.

By the way, was there any good reason for including background skills in the other groups? Doing so merely creates confusion when using your skill system -- in fact, it creates the risk that an inattentive player might accidentally select the Artistic group at 2nd level and gain no additional skill access at all.

Contributor

rainzax wrote:

I am curious how extensive a re-write your proposed skills system is.

Can you give an outline? Or at least clues as to what it's not?

Specific questions: Do you still use ranks? Did you condense or expand classifications? Is this compatible with Unchained Background Skills? Did you bake Unchained Skill Unlocks right into the system (sans feats; or in addition to feats)? Is this compatible with your PC work? Etc...

Sure!

The Everyman Skills system was conceived after I had my players in one of my home campaigns switch from the standard skill system (the one in the Core Rulebook) to the Skill Groups system, from Pathfinder Unchained. I liked the Skill Groups system because it was very clear to me that it gave great skill potential to nearly ALL characters, rather than just a small subset of characters.

However, all of my players (except my min-maxer brother) hated it. They reported that the system was designed in a way that it favored giving PCs expositive tools (i.e. lumping all Knowledges into one group) while penalizing them for favoring investigative tools (i.e. putting Perception and Sense Motive by themselves). Armed with this feedback, I designed the Everyman Skills system to be a hybrid of the standard system and the skill groups system. Here's a rundown of how it works:

1) All characters get skill ranks exactly as detailed in the Core Rulebook with one exception: in Everyman Skills, the fighter is bumped up to 4 + Int skill ranks per level.

2) In addition, all characters gain four bonus skill ranks at every character level. These are known as group skill ranks and the number of group skill ranks that you possess isn't modified by your Intelligence. You can only spend group skill ranks on skills that are included in one of your skill groups (see below), and at every level you have to spent at least 1 group skill ranks in a background skill (also see below).

3) At 1st level, 2nd level, and every 4 levels after 2nd, you get to pick a skill group. Skill groups are thematic lists of roughly five skills that cover common skill sets. At 1st level, every character gains the background skill group, which consists of the entire list of background skills from the background skills alternate rule in Pathfinder Unchained. (As a result, the background skills group is the largest group; the only one that ignores the 5 skills per group rule.) For all skill groups aside from the background group, you need to meet a skill rank requirement in order to select the group. Specifically, you need to have a minimum number of skill ranks in one of that group's skills that is greater than half your character level, so 2 ranks at 2nd level, 4+ ranks at 6th level, 6+ ranks at 10th level, and so on.

Additionally, you can spend a maximum number of group skill ranks in a given skill at each level equal to the number of your skill groups that said skill is included in. Say, for example, you want to be able to put two of your three group skill ranks in Stealth. In order to do so, you need to have access to at least two skill groups that include Stealth among their list of included skills.

So basically, here's a quick summary:
A) The system adds more ranks to all characters, but restricts how you spend them.
B) The system keeps the flexibility of the skill system while encouraging (or possibly forcing) the PC to dip his skill ranks into skills he might not normally take.
C) The system rewards PCs who choose to diversify or stack their list of included skills equally.

Hope that helps!


So, taking your Fighter example, we'll say INT 10, he gains 8 skill points per level, half of which must be used to purchase grouped skills only, the other half of which may be spent freely.

Does spending a skill point on a group skill grant ranks in all skills under that group (like an umbrella), or just a single rank to a skill within that group (1-for-1)?

Did you use the groupings from the Unchained Skill Groups variant, or did you create new groups?

It also seems that you are incentivizing a sort of "organic progression" (as opposed to "overnight mastery") by instituting rank requirements for picking new groups. Is this intentional?

Cheers.

Contributor

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rainzax wrote:
So, taking your Fighter example, we'll say INT 10, he gains 8 skill points per level, half of which must be used to purchase grouped skills only, the other half of which may be spent freely.

Close. Four of those skill points are spent freely. Three of them can be spent in any skill that is included in one or more of your skill grounds. One must be spent on a skill that belongs to the background skill group.

Quote:
Does spending a skill point on a group skill grant ranks in all skills under that group (like an umbrella), or just a single rank to a skill within that group (1-for-1)?

One for one.

Quote:
Did you use the groupings from the Unchained Skill Groups variant, or did you create new groups?

Entirely new groups. All of my groups (sans background and Athletic) have exactly four skills (with Knowledge skills counting individually), and those skills relate back to a common theme. For example, if you choose the Conning skill group, your group skills are Bluff, Disguise, Sense Motive, and Sleight of Hand.

The groups are NOT created to be perfectly even with one another in terms of usefulness. (The bardic skill group, for instance, is Knowledge (history), Knowledge (local), Knowledge (nobility), and Perform). They're designed to relate back to common themes and archetypes that players will find useful.

Quote:
It also seems that you are incentivizing a sort of "organic progression" (as opposed to "overnight mastery") by instituting rank requirements for picking new groups. Is this intentional?

Sort of. The idea with skill groups is that these are things that you're good at by extension. For example, in order to take the Conning skill group, you need to meet a skill rank prerequisite with one of its five included skills before you can select it. The idea is that your skill at one of those skills (the one that you used to quality for the group), "spills over" into the other ones.

So yeah, its trying to harken to the same design space as the 3.5 skill synergy rules. Except the synergies are MUCH broarder here then they were in 3.5.


I see what you mean now by "essentially +4 skill ranks per level, but diversified."

Has the +3 class skill bonus gone the way of the dinosaur, remain essentially unchanged, or been reorganized (say, into class groups)?

And distributions aside, have you added any new skill functions? Or any new interactivity with Skill Unlocks? Or any new skills altogether?

Cheers again.

Contributor

rainzax wrote:

I see what you mean now by "essentially +4 skill ranks per level, but diversified."

Has the +3 class skill bonus gone the way of the dinosaur, remain essentially unchanged, or been reorganized (say, into class groups)?

Nope. With the exception of the addition of skill groups and group skill ranks, it functions exactly like the standard skill system as detailed in the Core Rulebook.

Quote:
And distributions aside, have you added any new skill functions? Or any new interactivity with Skill Unlocks? Or any new skills altogether?

No to all three. It is designed to be a modular solution for GMs who want their players to have the flexibility of the rank system, but with more skill ranks per level.


I got this one and I have to say, for fans of skill-heavy characters it is a godsend. The bits about those non-core classes (mystic, technician, and occultist; for the Dragon Paragon) make me very curious about them as well, which was probably not an accident on Mister Augunas' part. For $4 this is a good buy.

Contributor

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Eric Hinkle wrote:
I got this one and I have to say, for fans of skill-heavy characters it is a godsend. The bits about those non-core classes (mystic, technician, and occultist; for the Dragon Paragon) make me very curious about them as well, which was probably not an accident on Mister Augunas' part. For $4 this is a good buy.

Mystic was a class I designed for Amora Game. Its an elemental-bending monk that's basically a combination of benders from Avatar mixed with Jedi. Compared to the kineticist (because of course you're going to), you have much larger variety of stuff that you can do as a mystic, but you have a much tighter resource to work with. Another way of looking at the mystic is as "quingong monk, the base class."

Technician and Occultist are classes I designed for Radiance House. The technician is an alchemist-like class that specializes in a specific field of technology and builds a large number of fantastic objects and items. It has tinkers that function like alchemist extracts, save you use them like wands instead of potions, and it has gadgets that function like an occultist's implements. (I beat Paizo on that, though! ;-P)

The Radiance House occultist is an analog to the 3.5 binder, and not like the medium. Dario and I write stories and legends for a ridiculously huge stable of characters, each with six different special abilities. A good way to think of the class is if the medium had been comprised of nothing but the "legendary spirits" from Occult Origins. In terms of what makes the occultist and the medium different flavor-wise, the Pact Magic occultist does not cast spells and can seal pacts with multiple spirits at a time as she gets higher-leveled compared to the medium, who can only create a lasting pact with one spirit at a time, but has spellcasting ability to make up for it. Furthermore, the Pact Magic occultist is all about sealing pacts with spirits that have been removed from reality while the medium is mostly about dead people and the Astral Plane. If you're looking for more on the Pact Magic occultist, keep your eye out for the Grimoire of Lost Souls, which should be coming out relatively soon.


Thank you Mister Augunas. And for the Pact Magic occultist, I saw two books/PDFs on them already on the site. Would they work or is it best to wait for the Grimoire that you mentioned?


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Pathfinder Companion, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Eric Hinkle wrote:
Thank you Mister Augunas. And for the Pact Magic occultist, I saw two books/PDFs on them already on the site. Would they work or is it best to wait for the Grimoire that you mentioned?

It's probably better to wait, the Grimoire of Lost Souls is going to be a revamping of both those books plus quite a bit of new material to boot. Kind of like Ultimate Charisma with the Leadership Handbook and Psychological Combat...except a much bigger tome, and more reworking and improvements.


Luthorne wrote:
Eric Hinkle wrote:
Thank you Mister Augunas. And for the Pact Magic occultist, I saw two books/PDFs on them already on the site. Would they work or is it best to wait for the Grimoire that you mentioned?
It's probably better to wait, the Grimoire of Lost Souls is going to be a revamping of both those books plus quite a bit of new material to boot. Kind of like Ultimate Charisma with the Leadership Handbook and Psychological Combat...except a much bigger tome, and more reworking and improvements.

Thanks, I'll follow this advice. Is there any idea yet on what the book will cost?

Contributor

Eric Hinkle wrote:
Luthorne wrote:
Eric Hinkle wrote:
Thank you Mister Augunas. And for the Pact Magic occultist, I saw two books/PDFs on them already on the site. Would they work or is it best to wait for the Grimoire that you mentioned?
It's probably better to wait, the Grimoire of Lost Souls is going to be a revamping of both those books plus quite a bit of new material to boot. Kind of like Ultimate Charisma with the Leadership Handbook and Psychological Combat...except a much bigger tome, and more reworking and improvements.
Thanks, I'll follow this advice. Is there any idea yet on what the book will cost?

The book's a Radiance House product, so its Dario's call. Its big. REALLY big. Like, almost as big as Ultimate Psionics big.

I think its around $50, but I don't have the numbers in front of me at the moment.


Alexander Augunas wrote:
Eric Hinkle wrote:
Luthorne wrote:
Eric Hinkle wrote:
Thank you Mister Augunas. And for the Pact Magic occultist, I saw two books/PDFs on them already on the site. Would they work or is it best to wait for the Grimoire that you mentioned?
It's probably better to wait, the Grimoire of Lost Souls is going to be a revamping of both those books plus quite a bit of new material to boot. Kind of like Ultimate Charisma with the Leadership Handbook and Psychological Combat...except a much bigger tome, and more reworking and improvements.
Thanks, I'll follow this advice. Is there any idea yet on what the book will cost?

The book's a Radiance House product, so its Dario's call. Its big. REALLY big. Like, almost as big as Ultimate Psionics big.

I think its around $50, but I don't have the numbers in front of me at the moment.

Thanks for responding. And that price is a bit steep for me, but I'll have to think about it.


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Just did a review for this, I hope it's a good one. I really do like this PDF, it's got some great stuff in it.

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Eric Hinkle wrote:
Just did a review for this, I hope it's a good one. I really do like this PDF, it's got some great stuff in it.

Its a very informative review. Thanks!


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Nice review, Eric!


Endzeitgeist wrote:
Nice review, Eric!

Thanks, End!


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Reviewed first on endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted here, on OBS and d20pfsrd.com's shop.


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Just read EZ's review and it's amazing.


Thanks, Eric! :D This one was a LOT of work to get done; much more than I anticipated....

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Endzeitgeist wrote:
Thanks, Eric! :D This one was a LOT of work to get done; much more than I anticipated....

Just WAIT until you have to review Ultimate Charisma! *cackles madly*


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I am actually in the process of writing that one... :)


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Review is up. You can find it and more over on my blog

Contributor

Malwing wrote:
Review is up. You can find it and more over on my blog

Thanks!

The skills system definitely isn't one for every group. I actually tried to have my players use the consolidated skills systems from Pathfinder Unchained and they HATED them. Like, "Let's stop the game I don't even want to play my character of two years using this system," hated them.

The Everyman Skills system is sort of like a compromise between the standard skills system and the ideas from Pathfinder Unchained; the newer skill systems make characters MUCH more versatile, but because of the way that the groups are stacked, my players felt incentified towards similar skill groups and penalized for investing in others. (Perception was the big one.) They wanted the flexibility of the standard skill system (where you can drop a few ranks into class skills and be okay in them) while also getting some of the broader applications of the newer ideas.

I'm glad that you didn't give the product a poor review just because that skill system wasn't useful to you. Sometimes not everything will be, especially when you're dealing with alternate rules systems. Thanks for the review! :D

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