Microsized Adventures (PFRPG) PDF

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Cut your players down to size with Microsized Adventures, by Everyman Gaming, LLC. Designed for the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, Microsized Adventures gives GMs and players alike the tools they need to create adventures and campaigns from an ant’s point of view, whether the PCs want to mount an ant, scale a dog, or boldly flee from a lumbering toddler.

Microsized Adventures includes:

  • Rules for altering ordinary-sized creatures in size, transforming them into miniscule Microsized Characters or massive Macrosized Characters.
  • Rules for adjusting ordinary-sized pests and creatures into mighty threats.
  • Rules for adjusting combat to accommodate extremely small or extremely large creatures, such as by altering the amount of space conveyed by a square on the combat grid or determining how tiny creatures can make attacks of opportunity, flank, and more.
  • Two new combat maneuvers that anyone can use, the crush maneuver, which allows large creatures to stomp smaller foes flat, and the scale maneuver, which allows tiny creatures to climb up larger enemies in order to find the perfect vantage point from which to strike.
  • New archetypes and class options that utilize the new rules found in Microsized Adventures.
  • New artifacts, cursed items, and intelligent items that can act as the catalyst to a microsized adventure.
  • And much, much more!
With Everyman Gaming, innovation is never more than a page away!

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***** (based on 3 ratings)

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An excellent buy, despite a few art hiccups

*****

After reading Endzeitgeist's review, I decided to give this a try. I am pleased to say I got my money's worth! The rules for under-and-oversized characters are simple and easy to use, and even campaigns that will never shrink the PCs an inch can make great use of the new maneuvers to pull off some awesome Shadow of the Colossus fight scenes. The formatting is very good as well, being very professional and clear.

My only gripe (more of a nitpick really) is that the art is a little on the rough side, at some points looking more like DeviantArt drawings than professional art. But that's really just a personal issue, and I've seen worse art in much more expensive books.

All in all, a 5/5. My issues with the art are just nitpicks, and the actual content delivered is just fantastic. I would highly recommend that any GM should purchase this PDF, if only to make your giants feel more giant-y.


An Endzeitgeist.com review

*****

This supplement clocks in at 30 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page SRD, leaving us with 27 pages of content, so let's dive in!

Microsized characters have been a staple in the movies of my childhood, when I learned that perspective is a crucial factor in determining what is creepy or dangerous and what isn't. And indeed, in earlier editions of the game, there have been quite a few modules that utilized this concept to some gain - one of which would be Ravenloft's "The Created" - a great module in the hands of a capable GM and utterly disturbing.

Now if you endeavor to run such a scenario in your own game, you'll quickly run into a brick wall, as you realize that the interconnected rules frameworks of 3.X and its follow-ups like Pathfinder do not lend themselves well to the very concept - of course, one could go the easy way out and hand-wave scaling, but in the end, that does not work well - as anyone who's tried it can attest. So, we necessarily begin with the very basics that need addressing.

5-foot steps are replaced with shifting steps - the range of these steps depends on the size of the creature attempting them and the size of the square used on the grid - essentially, the relation of the two - if that sounds complicated, well, it's not - one glance at the table and you're good to go. The second issue immediately crops up regarding attacks of opportunity and relative size: In an imho more feasible rule, creatures using this book can threaten any creature in its space as long as the creature is no more than four size categories larger or smaller than the threatening creature. Creatures with a reach of 0 feet can provide flanking within a creature's space and 2 or more such creatures can flank if they enter a creature's space. This generally means that tiny and smaller opponents become an increased threat against regularly-sized PCs.

A total and utter cluster-F*** in PFRPG, perhaps one of the worst rules-components of it, in my opinion would be weapon-size rules for over/under-sized weaponry - convoluted and utterly messy. In a supplement that deals with radical changes of sizes and huge discrepancies between them, this could break the neck of the supplement - so how does microsized adventures tackle this? Simple: By making damage increase and decrease based on the size of the opponent in relation to your own. I am aware that this changes radically the dynamics of combat against bigger foes, but that's a significant appeal, at least to me - why? Because I was always bothered by the scenes where adventurers poke giants to death- it just makes more sense to me. This is btw. handled with a simple array of additional hit points that is equal to the special size modifier times the number of creatures sizes smaller than the creature. This math is easy, quick and, supported by the tables, can be done on the fly if your multiplication skills aren't rusty.

On can definitely see Alexander Augunas' teaching experience at work in the way in which the pdf is organized in that it concisely presents the respective steps in an easy to grasp manner. We begin size category alteration and go, step by step, through skills from Fly to Intimidate and Stealth onwards to Strength etc. - all supported by tables that present the necessary information at the blink of an eye. Step 2 would thereafter be the recalculation of special size modifiers that thankfully not only mentions minimum damage, but also the interaction with spells, supernatural and spell-like abilities. The carrying capacity and its modification are also addressed, including an object's respective new weight, including when objects do not alter size - inappropriately sized gear and shields, weapons and shields - all covered via concise AC and weight-multipliers. Oh, and for convenience's sake and didactic reasons, we receive analogues for sample weights to better picture the result and ground it in reality.

Now this would not cover everything, obviously - want to simply make an ordinarily-sized creature a different size? Go for it, step by step - including CR-step-by-step adjustments and advice on handling massive CR-escalation due to size changes. How do swarms work? Well, you will be happy to know that rules for both regular-sized swarms versus diminished characters and diminished swarms are covered - oh and, if you require stats for regular pets, quick and dirty substitution suggestions will spare you the effort of looking them up.

Now as for the scale of the grid in which movement happens, that essentially remains the same - only the scale changes, which is pretty elegant - and the same can be said about the range-calculations for ranged weapons of varying sizes, spells and area effects. Now if you're like me, the first monster subtype you'll run through this would be the kaiju (obviously) due to its non-standard size-rules...and because kaiju are AWESOME. Suffice to say, this book covers even this fringe creature type.

Okay, so far, so good. Want to know where true awesomeness begins? With rules that have been in place in my home-game for ages, once again, seemingly plucked from my mind - with two new combat maneuvers: Crush and Scale. Crush is obviously used to flatten those tiny insects, whereas scale is a requirement in my games to deal damage to anything huge+? Why? Because, as mentioned before, I loathe the idea of PCs poking giants to death by ramming teeny-tiny weapons into their feet. And yes, the latter actually has a downright ingenious rules-interaction with the Climb-skill - once again, one I've been using in my games for this type of maneuver as well. If you're even halfway into good, thoughtful video-games: Yes, these are your basic tools to play Shadow of the Colossus-type boss fights.

If you've played that game, you're probably buying this right now. For the rest of you, my dear readers: Yes, the mobile suit golems and mechas recently pioneered by Rite Publishing and Rogue Genius Games (Kaiju Codex and Construct Companion, if you didn't know) make actually more sense - because puny medium creatures may end up being too small to damage a kaiju or elder dragon... Yes, finally a reason to crank out those siege engines, Berserk-like huge swords and similar fun tricks.

Now if you think this book is a dry read, you'd be sorely mistaken - interspersed throughout the book are the (mis-)adventures of Alexander Augunas' signature Kitsune Kyr'shin - oh, and GMs can actually look forward to a concise advice section that helps planning a microsized adventure properly - from the catalyst to questions of terrain and exploration up to sample hooks that run the gamut from traditional to far-out. I mentioned terrain - yes, even a table on wind effects and their severity and rules for minuscule siege weapons can be found within these pages - oh, and two sample artifacts for the GM or the player's perusal to easily move into the microsized worlds are provided.

Beyond that, the pdf does not leave players in the dark either - with new rage powers that let barbarians feel a bit like berserk ants (or crush foes) and an archetype that make break improvised weapons for additional potency, a gunslinger archetype that is a thrown weapons expert (since gunslingers can't well get the materials for their expensive weaponry in dust mote size...) to investigators that use their eidetic memory to foil monsters and finally, rogues that are scaling specialists or born scrappers, the crunch here is just as solid. But that's not all - with two new combat maneuvers, it should come as no surprise that this book also features a plethora of feats that deal with them - and these go beyond the simple standard-improved-greater-chain and extends to even teamwork feats. The second focus here would be on the necessity of properly using improvised weapons, so yeah - awesome as well.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good - apart from minor glitches like a typo "if" that should read "of" and the like, I have found no glaring ones, and none that would compromise the reading experience unduly. Layout adheres to Everyman Gaming's beautiful 2-column full-color standard and the pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience as well as with several pieces of neat original full-color art by Jacob Blackmon.

It is my firm conviction that you have to play this book to truly by able to judge it. When I got this, I though "Looks all nice and shiny, but so did your idea of size-changing scenarios..." -so I went and playtested this book's material. Size-changes affect a lot of variables and color me surprised when I noted how well this book manages to transport the respective mechanics. In fact, analysis made me appreciate that even more, because the math behind this system is surprisingly beautiful - I know, I know - but believe me when I say that I can definitely appreciate that.

So, the system works - but how well? That is a task I struggled with to properly convey - see, Alexander Augunas is not by accident a regular face among my Top Ten-lists. In the hands of a lesser designer, this system would be a mess of numbers, tiring to read and hard to comprehend. The excessive use of examples, the concise step-by-step guidelines and didactically sound presentation conspire to make a complex rules-operation feel simple. Best of all, if you're a GM not afraid of diving into the grit of numbers, you can easily modify all or even only parts of the system. Why? Because it is surprisingly modular. Crush and Scale can enrich any game; Particularly epic games with a focus on cinematic combat may want to further increase the hit point buffer against smaller weapons and attacks - or even move the spaces around where attacks become ineffective.

An internally closed system, whether mathematically or rhetoric, is an impressive and powerful beast to behold - if you require proof of that, just try to argue against some prevailing psychological theories without hard science to back you up. A system that is modular, that can be modified, scavenged and mutated to fit one's individual needs, though, that is the one that ultimately will receive the broadest traction, the system that has the highest potential for growth. Microsized adventure can act as a closed system and as a modular system - you *can* appreciate and run this as presented, yes - it'll work perfectly. But we're gamers and we have very strong opinions of how things should be, right? We all have pet-peeves and particular likes and dislikes. The genius of this system is its robust framework, which allows for *skilled* GMs to modify it according to their preferences.

A book as beginner-friendly as possible that has a maximum of user-friendly expert-customization options - that's hard to find. Harder and rarer even is the book that blends this with a sincere, total sense of jamais-vu - I have literally never seen a d20-based book that tackles this concept, much less one that actually does it with such a deceptive ease and panache. This book is, for size-change/discrepancy-style stories what Cerulean Seas was for underwater adventuring, what Companions of the Firmament is for flying - whether against impossibly large adversaries, shrunken battles versus house cats or anything in between and beyond, this book is an inspired gem that belongs into the library of any GM, a book that needs sequels and or a print-on-demand-version...or a 300+ page AP + hardcover...

If the above was not ample clue for you - this is the type of book I review for. If I can get even one person out there to give this a shot, I'm happy. It's that good. This book is an apex-level, innovative, awesome supplement and receives 5 stars + seal of approval, unsurprising status as a candidate for my Top Ten of 2015 and the EZG Essential-tag. Why the latter? Because in my games, the really big monsters should scare the living hell out of players and because, ultimately, I love the huge cosmos of options this unlocks. Perfect score and synergy with other publications to boot - I couldn't complain about this wonderful pdf for the life of me. Have I mentioned the low 5-buck-price-tag? This is a steal if there ever was one! Do yourself a favor and get this NOW!

Endzeitgeist out.


Time to get tiny!

*****

One oddly overlooked bit of fantasy in Pathfinder is the story or adventure where the heroes get small. Really, really small. It happens many times, including one of the classics of the genre (Fritz Leiber's <i>Swords of Lankhmar</i>) but it tends to be rare in games, mostly due to the need to rework everyone's stats. What was needed was a quick and relatively simple way of doing this.

In Microsized Adventures, that's what we get -- along with ideas for adventures and even campaigns, new feats, combat rules, magic items, and even some archetypes that can work very well in non-microsized adventures.

The PDF proper is thirty pages long, with one for the cover, one for credits, the OGL, and a preface and contents. First section covers diminishing the characters and gives us a size bonus or penalty on attack rolls, AC, combat maneuvers, CMD, Fly and Intimidate and Stealth skill checks, and more which all come from basic Pathfinder. It's still useful to have this information here, though.

We also get the new Special Size Modifier to be applied to a shrunk character's Strength, Dexterity, Constitution, and natural armor. It's one simple number quickly applied. I.e. if a Medium character gets reduced to ant size (Fine) she takes a Special Size Modifier of -10 for all affected stats and natural armor bonuses. It also applies to all damage by weapons and from spells, spell-like abilities, and supernatural powers. It lists numbers for up to eight reductions in size in you're shrinking ancient dragons and giants, or if you want to REALLY reduce your PCs.

The same number above is also given as a bonus to whatever creatures you face that are now bigger than you on their AC, CMD, combat maneuver checks, attacks, and damage rolls. This can make even minor threats into real menaces fast, which is one of the big elements in microsized stories in the first place -- remember the Incredible Shrinking Man and that spider? So if your currently-Fine sized PCs meet a normal badger, it gets a +10 to all the rolls listed above! It also gets bonuses to its saves and Save DCs as well as bonus hit points due to its relative newfound toughness. There are guidelines on how to reckon the new CRs of these tiny terrors as well as how to rework swarms -- and hey, if you thought they were *bad* for normal-sized PCs!...

There are rules on how to adjust the combat grid, movement, and weapon ranges for smaller characters, as well as two new maneuvers that would work very well in the current Giantkiller AP, Crush (step on the little pests!) and Scale (climb the big bully and show him who's boss!). Both are detailed and kept at the same level of complexity as maneuvers in the basic game.

There's also a damage-by-size table for weapons ranging from up to 8 sizes smaller/bigger than normal. Some people might consider buying the PDF for that alone. Let's just say that you don't want to confront a Medium dagger when you're Fine in size... There are also quick rules for making makeshift armor and shields.

In the campaigns section we get several ideas on just who would do this to your poor PCs and why, as well as how such an adventure could be run and finished. There are also hints on how to handle the terrain and denizens. And the effect of high winds on shrunk characters and ranged weapons.

There are also some suggestions for potential artifacts that can be used to shrink characters. Sure, they're kind of unpredictable and may not work the way you want them to, but that's all part of the fun, right?

There are archetypes for the barbarian (the never-unarmed frothing pugilist), gunslinger (crack-shot slinger, using thrown weapons rather than guns), investigator (monster eidetic, a thinking man's monster hunter), and two for the rogue (the scaling striker who fearlessly clambers up monsters to strike down the mightiest foes, and the scrapper who can always find a weapon). They work great for microsized adventures and in more mundane campaigns too, especially when facing Large and bigger opponents.

It rounds out with some new feats, many revolving around the new maneuvers (Improved and Greater Crush and Scale). You can get better with improvised armor and shields, or you can climb an enemy sneakily, help a friend to stomp on the little annoyances (I have this mental image of a gang of giants loudly stamping on meddlesome PCs), and even pinning someone under your mighty heel.

This is simply a great piece of work. It shows how to do shrunken characters and their opponents in an adventure in a way that captures the feel of the danger they should be in, while at the same time never overwhelming them. The rules are simple and straightforward and the tables included are easily used.

If you want to shrink your PCs and teach them some sympathy for the 'little guy', or if you want to make your giants and other massive monsters even meaner, then you will want to buy this PDF.

Five stars and my fond hope that you give Microsized Adventures a try!


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Now available!

Contributor

Thanks, Liz!

If anyone has any questions about Microsized Adventures, ask away!

Its a very strange, little product. There isn't much on the market that alters the way that you and your players view a campaign setting quite like Microsized Adventures does.

And to answer this question as it crops up, yes. It'll work with any one of the plethora of adventures that have been printed out over the years that involve a dramatic reduction in size. The system is flexible enough that you can make your PCs as little as one size category smaller or as much as eight size categories smaller with the potential for more. Instead of adjusting ability scores, Microsized Adventures introduces a system where you gain a series of scaling bonuses and penalties based upon your size, which is called a Special Size Modifier. Your SSM modifies your damage rolls against creatures that are bigger than you, while un-shrunk opponents get their own SSM that boosts their hp, attack rolls, damage rolls, and more when they battle diminished foes. So as you get smaller, your enemies get stronger.

The most dramatic size reduction that I play tested involved making the PCs roughly 1/32 of an inch, which is the size of an unfed tick. In that scenario, I put the PCs up against a normally CR 1 toddler. It was pretty terrifying to watch the toddler literally crush them all with the new crush combat maneuver, which is what that maneuver is designed to do: allow larger creatures to "beat" the size bonus to AC that smaller creatures get by attacking their CMD instead with a well-placed stomp. I think it was determined that the CR 1/2 toddler was effectively CR 14 or 15 with the modifications (which is reflected in the rules). It didn't help that everyone in the party was trying to deal nonlethal damage to the toddler at first. >: )


Well to ask questions I have to paint a scene...

For a while I'd been planning a long adventure Where the players delve a dungeon looking for a secret treasure that they have a map to. when they get to the bottom of the dungeon they are suddenly shrunken by the room to find a key to an item at the top of the dungeon which contains the treasure, so they have to travel through the dungeon backwards while being very tiny.

Along the way they find that some of the magic items in the dungeon has had catastrophic effects on the occupants of the dungeon. Mice made sentient by a shattered headband of intelligence thrive for control of the dungeon. Spiders mutated by magic items run amok. Bands of tiny gnomes worship an outsider summoned by an amulet. Also a band of goblins have made the dungeon their home with one particular goblin with ears large enough to hear the microverse who's going insane trying to prove that it exists.

I had a number of obstacles in this. Because of the magic item treadmill I wound up making the microverse synonymous with the faewild so that there were settlements capable of crafting items were involved. I wanted to use magically mutated talking animals for the locals (Secret of NIHM-ish) but could not get a consistent size going for them so replaced most of them with fairies and precurser gnomes. I had to convert gold,silver and copper pieces to Garnet, Sapphire and Crystal pieces to make money 'different' without disrupting the gp, sp and cp sections of wealth on character sheets.

I also decided to use 'giant' animals for adversaries but the scale is off. Giant fleas are larger than giant ants. And it's hardly easy to generate a cat encounter when the players are an inch tall. I also had trouble figuring out how they'd interact with goblins while small.

In the end I shelfed the project promising to fix it later when I was up to doing the work.

So my question is; How will this product help me create the adventure that I wanted or fix the problems I stated?

Contributor

Malwing wrote:

Well to ask questions I have to paint a scene...

For a while I'd been planning a long adventure Where the players delve a dungeon looking for a secret treasure that they have a map to. when they get to the bottom of the dungeon they are suddenly shrunken by the room to find a key to an item at the top of the dungeon which contains the treasure, so they have to travel through the dungeon backwards while being very tiny.

Along the way they find that some of the magic items in the dungeon has had catastrophic effects on the occupants of the dungeon. Mice made sentient by a shattered headband of intelligence thrive for control of the dungeon. Spiders mutated by magic items run amok. Bands of tiny gnomes worship an outsider summoned by an amulet. Also a band of goblins have made the dungeon their home with one particular goblin with ears large enough to hear the microverse who's going insane trying to prove that it exists.

I had a number of obstacles in this. Because of the magic item treadmill I wound up making the microverse synonymous with the faewild so that there were settlements capable of crafting items were involved. I wanted to use magically mutated talking animals for the locals (Secret of NIHM-ish) but could not get a consistent size going for them so replaced most of them with fairies and precurser gnomes. I had to convert gold,silver and copper pieces to Garnet, Sapphire and Crystal pieces to make money 'different' without disrupting the gp, sp and cp sections of wealth on character sheets.

I also decided to use 'giant' animals for adversaries but the scale is off. Giant fleas are larger than giant ants. And it's hardly easy to generate a cat encounter when the players are an inch tall. I also had trouble figuring out how they'd interact with goblins while small.

In the end I shelfed the project promising to fix it later when I was up to doing the work.

So my question is; How will this product help me create the adventure that I wanted or fix the problems I stated?

The biggest way that Microsized Adventure will help you is that it gives you an easy way to "adjust" a creature's size without needing to adjust its stats. There is a special type of bonus called "Special Size Modifier" that applies to any creature that is "ordinary-sized," meaning that it hasn't had its size altered. So in the example of your goblins, if you wanted to run an encounter where your big-eared goblin tried to capture the PCs to prove to his tribe that they're real, the fight could be rather dangerous depending on how small you made the PCs. SSM modifies the PC's damage rolls (typically reducing them) as well as most of the ordinarily-sized foe's combat statistics (to Hit, to damage, hp, saving throws, everything). The rules allow you to apply a special size modifier up to about 10 size categories smaller than you actually are; this makes Medium-sized creatures roughly the same size as an unfed tick. It also provides its calculations so you can make them even smaller if you want to.

Microsized Adventures also gives you plenty of tips and advice for using existing stat blocks to represent mundane threats. For instance, if you decide that the PCs should be two size categories bigger than an ant, the book tells you to take a giant ant and simply apply three size categories' worth of special size modifier to the ant, then adjust its size reach and space accordingly. Presto! You've got an ant.

Microsized Adventures also shows you how to adjust shrunken creature's movement speed to account for their reduced stature. As a general rule, the number of squares that a creature can move doesn't change, but the distance each of its squares shrinks to equal its space. For instance, a Fine creature has a space of six inches, so a human with a movement speed of 30 feet can only move six six-inch squares, or about 36 inches (or three feet). This will help you scale the size and scope of your environment to fit the Microsized Adventure. It also includes things like adjusting carrying capacity, or "what to do if you shrink but your equipment doesn't?" It even has a small number of artifacts that you can use in your game as well as some general storyline tips and suggestions.

In short, you'll be able to use the book to make any creature as big or as small as you want and adjust their statistics to reflect that without needing to build an entirely new creature.


This sounds like it could help me try something I heard about long ago (though done for the old 'Bunnies & Burrows' system), where the player characters got shrunk down to the size of mice in a very creepy old house, and end up having to deal with these hyperintelligent mutant rats who have been messing around with this one book from the library, Necronomicon something or other...

Basically, they ended up in the house from 'Rats in the Walls', but Brown Jenkin was around, too.

Contributor

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Eric Hinkle wrote:

This sounds like it could help me try something I heard about long ago (though done for the old 'Bunnies & Burrows' system), where the player characters got shrunk down to the size of mice in a very creepy old house, and end up having to deal with these hyperintelligent mutant rats who have been messing around with this one book from the library, Necronomicon something or other...

Basically, they ended up in the house from 'Rats in the Walls', but Brown Jenkin was around, too.

Microsized Adventures would excel in an adventure like that.


Just posted a review that I hope will get some buys for this one. It really does fill a long-ignored niche in fantasy, and it'd work great with the Giantslayer AP right now too.

Contributor

Eric Hinkle wrote:
Just posted a review that I hope will get some buys for this one. It really does fill a long-ignored niche in fantasy, and it'd work great with the Giantslayer AP right now too.

Thank you for the wonderful review! Veery in-depth and thorough. :)


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Reviewed first on endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted on Lou Agresta's RPGaggression and here, OBS and d20pfsrd.com's shop.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

That's a very good review Thilo! And sounds like a very good product...

Contributor

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Endzeitgeist wrote:
Reviewed first on endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted on Lou Agresta's RPGaggression and here, OBS and d20pfsrd.com's shop.

Thanks for the review, Endzeitgeist! I'm glad that you ended up liking Microsized Adventures as much as you did. :D

Contributor

Oceanshieldwolf wrote:
That's a very good review Thilo! And sounds like a very good product...

Its the best (and only) product of its kind if you're looking to run a microsized adventure! But as Thilo points out, I designed many of the different rules systems to be perfectly playable outside of a Microsized Adventures game. For instance, the "shifting step" rule basically amounts to "bigger creatures = bigger '5-foot steps'," and you can easily pull the "weapon damage is based on the size of the thing you're attacking" rule for any game too.

The overall idea was to make PCs feel small when fighting things that are bigger then them, and I made sure that the rules that evoke this feeling are available to the GM regardless of his player's size. Most of the time, the "shrinking math" isn't something that the PCs even taken into account, aside from the weapon damage dice and the special size damage modifiers rules. Other than those, everything is on the GM's end.


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Once again End shows the rest of us reviewers how it's done. He knows how to make people want to get the good products!


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Eric, your review for Microsized Adventures is one of your best and I always look forward to reading your reviews! Also: Thank you very much for the kind words! :D


I just downloaded the updated version of this and it's great. I really love the new art (more kitsune, yay) and the new macrosized adventures looks amazing. Enlarge that PC and let him punch Cthulhu in the face!

Contributor

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Eric Hinkle wrote:
I just downloaded the updated version of this and it's great. I really love the new art (more kitsune, yay) and the new macrosized adventures looks amazing. Enlarge that PC and let him punch Cthulhu in the face!

Glad you like it!

Jacob and I talked a bit about how we wanted to do the art for an updated Microsized Adventures, and we came to two conclusions:

1) It would be pretty cool if the art in the book worked together to tell a Microsized Adventure.

2) Artistically, the average buyer will be less weirded out by the distinct lack of apparel that comes with the shrinking / growing territory on a kitsune character as they would, say, a human. Having Sal or Drake in a piece wearing as little as Kyr'shin does in some of those pictures gets dangerous close to Rated X content, whereas those flags don't get raised for a race of anthropomorphic fox people. (I mean, I guess they COULD get raised but its significantly less likely. Especially when an effort is made to be tasteful.)

Its sort of like the uncanny valley, but with nakedness.


Just left a review. You've done an excellent thing here, Alex!

Contributor

Shub-Niggurath's cousin Al wrote:
Just left a review. You've done an excellent thing here, Alex!

Thanks! I appreciate the review and I'm glad you like it.


Sorry for the threadomancy...

...I just have a tiny question about the scale combat maneuver.

In a battle with a Roc my PCs wanted to telport on top it and begin scaling the beast. AhaBut we soon came across the age old CMB/D problem in that the PCs couldn't get close to the CMD of the big birdie.

Was the intention that characters must be professional scalers to have a chance of climbing a monster? Aswe talked about it amongst ourselves we wondered if the size modifiers to CMB/D should be ignored.

Thanks for a great product.

Mark

Contributor

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Mark Norfolk wrote:

Sorry for the threadomancy...

...I just have a tiny question about the scale combat maneuver.

In a battle with a Roc my PCs wanted to telport on top it and begin scaling the beast. AhaBut we soon came across the age old CMB/D problem in that the PCs couldn't get close to the CMD of the big birdie.

Was the intention that characters must be professional scalers to have a chance of climbing a monster? Aswe talked about it amongst ourselves we wondered if the size modifiers to CMB/D should be ignored.

Thanks for a great product.

Mark

Unlike animating the dead, animating product threads is never evil because it gets an older product back to the top of the product listings page. So thanks!

I can't speak for anyone else, but I don't think that I could scale an elephant, let alone a roc. You need to be decent at it to do it, and it isn't easy. As written, it is SIGNIFICANTLY easier to scale an enemy using the Climb skill than a combat maneuver check, in any case.

However, if the monster isn't aware of your player and the player hasn't done anything to warrant aggression yet, I think giving them the +5 bonus described in the entry is fair enough. (It says maintain rather than start, but hey, you're the GM you do you. ;-P)


Thanks for that! :-)


I'm very intrigued by this, but am a bit unclear as to exactly what it is. Is this a PDF/book? A game/computer program? I would really appreciate someone explaining.

Also, what is the smallest size attainable in this? Can it get into the level of interacting with microorganisms, etc?

Thanks Everyone!


Almost perfect thread necromancy timing!

Going beyond microorganisms: Can you get down into the Quantum Realm?

Contributor

UnArcaneElection wrote:

Almost perfect thread necromancy timing!

Going beyond microorganisms: Can you get down into the Quantum Realm?

Short Answer: The rules let you shrink as far as your GM wants you to go. There's no upper or lower cap. That being said, the rules mostly dwell in the realm of, "Here's what happens if you fight something ordinary-sized while you're shrunk / blown up." If your GM wants to set a game in the Quantum Realm where you fight things from the Quantum Realm, there's really no need to use this book in my opinion.

But if you want to be quantum realm sized and fight off viruses or whatever, then these rules would be of immense help. :)


^I was thinking more in terms of a recently released movie that features this . . . .

Contributor

UnArcaneElection wrote:

^I was thinking more in terms of a recently released movie that features this . . . .

No spoilers! I haven't seen Ant Man and the Wasp yet! Too much going on with finally finishing my Master's program this week.... TvT


Congrats AA, you beat me to it. I had to put mine off for a year because of work requirements that trumped the immediacy of the remaining courses.

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