Pathfinder Player Companion: People of the Stars (PFRPG)

4.30/5 (based on 4 ratings)
Pathfinder Player Companion: People of the Stars (PFRPG)

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Reach for the Stars!

Travel to other planets and harness the powers of the stars with Pathfinder Player Companion: People of the Stars! Whether you want to play a Golarion native daring the depths of outer space or an alien being exploring your own mysterious homeworld, you can unlock the secrets of the stars with the new rules, advice, and fantastic setting details in this volume.

People of the Stars presents a player-focused discussion of the Pathfinder campaign setting’s solar system and the diverse creatures, dangers, and rewards just waiting to be discovered. Inside this book, you’ll find:

  • Rules for how to play four of the Pathfinder campaign setting’s most iconic alien races: nanite-infused androids, four-armed kasathas, telepathic lashunta, and seasonally morphic Triaxians—including complementary new archetypes and feats.
  • Details on each of the most important celestial bodies in the Pathfinder campaign setting, complete with tips and rules options for amateur and experienced star-travelers alike.
  • New magic items and adventuring equipment that make your journey across the void of space just as exciting as the destination.
  • New traits to help develop backgrounds for characters of all races who hail from or are touched by the planets and stars beyond Golarion.
  • New astronomical feats, space-inspired spells, suggestions for playing adherents of the Dark Tapestry, and much, much more to turn your space-faring adventurer into an interstellar star.

This Pathfinder Player Companion is intended for use with the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game and the Pathfinder campaign setting, but can easily be incorporated into any fantasy setting.

Written by Andrew Romine, David N. Ross, Ethan Day-Jones, James L. Sutter, Jim Groves, Jonathan Keith.

Each monthly 32-page Pathfinder Player Companion contains several player-focused articles exploring the volume’s theme as well as short articles with innovative new rules for all types of characters, as well as traits to better anchor the player to the campaign.

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-674-4

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Player Companion Subscription.

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4.30/5 (based on 4 ratings)

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Add a Touch of Starfinder to your Pathfinder

4/5

Like a lot of people, I can't wait for Starfinder. And like a lot of Pathfinder fans, I took part in the recent Humble Bundle promotion to get a lot of great stuff for a very small amount of money. One of the exciting products was People of the Stars, a book in the Player Companion line that is all about . . . other planets! I've done a lot of SF role-playing in other systems, but I've never mixed it in with traditional fantasy. Nor have I read the Pathfinder Campaign Setting book Distant Worlds, which was a very successful predecessor to People of the Stars. Putting all of that aside, I really enjoyed this book and would be intrigued to incorporate some of its material into campaign someday.

After an awesome cover that definitely sends the message "you aren't on Golarion anymore", the inside front- and back- covers sport constellations of the northern and southern hemispheres, respectively. The 32 pages inside are arranged differently than most of the (older) Player's Companions I've read: instead of of just a few sections for the whole book, every two pages has a different entry on the table of contents. I'm still going to group the material together in larger chunks for ease of reviewing. I should note that about every other page of the book contains a sidebar on one of the planets in the solar system around Golarion, and that, for each planet, a new trait is introduced. Last, I'll note that the interior artwork is good, but not Paizo's best.

The first four pages, "For Your Character" and "The Stars Are Right", are essentially introductory material. They wisely emphasize that players need to talk to their GMs before trying to bring alien races or themes into a campaign, as the topic can be quite divisive. I did find that most of the "For Your Character" page amounted to essentially a second table of contents, and could have been safely omitted. The book's index of new options was useful, as was the few paragraphs on magic items, spells, and rules from other books that are pertinent in outer space adventures.

The next ten pages feature new races that hail from planets other than Golarion. Four races (Androids, Kasathas, Lashuntas, and Triaxians) each receive two-page write-ups that include racial ability modifiers and features, plus (varying from race to race) new feats, archetypes, equipment, or traits. Androids are rather self-explanatory, but they have some really cool, original abilities. Kasathas are four-armed nomads and seem far less tech-oriented than one might expect. Lashunta are harder to describe quickly, but they seem to value brainpower and receive bonus magical and mental abilities. Triaxians are an interesting race from a planet that changes seasons over a period of centuries, so very few Triaxians ever see a season different than the one they're born into; their abilities vary depending on whether they are "Summerborn" or "Winterborn" Triaxians. After the four races, there are two pages devoted to "Other People of the Stars": Formians (an insect race), Kalo (an aquatic race), Shobhads (a four-armed desert race), Vercites (humanoids with chameleon abilities), and Ysoki Rat-men (ratfolk). Quick ways to adjust known Pathfinder races to make equivalents for these alien races are provided. Overall, plenty of interesting options are presented and if anyone ever got bored of the races available on Golarion, something here should be of interest. I've never seen any of these races in an actual game, nor are they discussed much in the forums, so I can't offer any insight on how balanced they are mechanically for gameplay.

The middle of the book covers various topics. First, there's a two-page spread of the solar system. I only have the PDF, so I don't know if this was removable or not in the print book. It's serviceable, but frankly a bit bland. Next, there's two pages titled "Interstellar Adventures" which is a bit of a miscellany: different ways to reach other planets, the mechanical effects of different types of gravity, and spell-casting in a vacuum. If I were running an interplanetary campaign, I would want far more detail on these topics, and they should probably be in a campaign setting book with more space to develop them. There's also a handful of new pieces of equipment--they're not particularly exciting ones, but definitely important ones (compressed air, gravity boots, etc.). Last, there are two pages on other stars (beyond Golarion's solar system) and other cosmic features like black holes. Again, some intriguing tidbits are offered, but this material would have to be expanded elsewhere to make it really useful.

The last third of the book is also a grab-bag of material. Outer Gods and Great Old Ones are briefly covered over two pages for would-be worshippers of mysterious, distant powers, and there's two new clerical subdomains (Dark Tapestry and Stars) . "Star Touched Regions" (on Golarion) is the topic for two more pages, with a couple of paragraphs on Numeria, Osirion, Elves, and Outer Dragons each serving as the inspiration for a new trait. A two-page section on astronomy introduces two new pieces of equipment and two new feats for would-be stargazers. The idea of astronomer-adventurers is something I had never thought of before, and I have to say it's an original, intriguing idea. The last quartet of pages introduces five new spells (and reprints two important ones from Distant Worlds) as well as six new magic items. The spells presented here would be quite useful for an interstellar campaign, as would most of the magic items, such as a "Traveler's Translator" (basically, a universal translator from Star Trek) and a "Wayfinder of the Stars".

Six authors and eight interior artists are listed in the credits for this book, and sometimes it shows: two-page piecework assignments make it easy to use freelancers, but they don't always fit together into a cohesive whole. Still, I really like the "feel" of this book--the different colour palette, page borders, and simply subject matter set it apart from any other Player Companion. This book isn't the best it could be, but if I were travelling from Golarion into the stars, I wouldn't leave home without it.


Androids and aliens, oh my!

4/5

Read my full review on Of Dice and Pen.

People of the Stars is a great book for people who want to add a little bit of otherworldliness to their games. It's not a book for everyone—particularly for those who aren't fond of mixing fantasy and science fiction. But for those who do like that sort of thing, it will be invaluable, providing lots of new options to make the game truly alien.


Ring Side Report- RPG Review of People of the Stars

5/5

Originally posted on www.throatpunchgames.com, a new idea everyday!

Product- Pathfinder Player Companion-People of the Stars

System-Pathfinder

Producer-Paizo

Price-$13

TL;DR-It's that book with android stuff! 93%

Basics-I want to believe! People of the Stars is the player companion to Distant Worlds. This book follows the standard Pathfinder formula for player books by adding new races, feats, items, traits, archetypes, and spells for races from beyond Golarion in the solar system.

Mechanics or Crunch- This is crunch-tastic. The book is full of all kinds of great stuff to build otherworldly characters. What's here is pretty useful and well done if you want to have an intergalactic campaign. If you want to keep you game on Golarion, there isn't much for you here. 5/5

Theme of Fluff- There are some amazing stories here. Each world in the solar system gets about half a page and gives a nice, short summary that world. The races all have some nice build up and are varied enough to be good additions to the Pathfinder race line up. However, like I said above, the stuff presented here really won't be that much use to any campaign or player if you just stay on Golarion. 5/5

Execution-Paizo knows how to make a good book. This book is well written, laid out well, and entertaining. This isn't the best book put out by Paizo as there are some parts that drag on, and there are a few sections with "textbook problem". But, this is generally a good book. 4/5

Summary-Going to play in the solar system in Pathfinder? Then, get this book. Going to play the Iron God's campaign and want to play an android? Get this book, because this book has some android feat and traits you might want. Otherwise, this book might not help you much. It's a well done book, but this book will mostly hit a niche market. Even the Iron Gods adventure path doesn't use this book and advices the use of another book called People of the River. This is a good book, but only a few people will really need this book. 93%


A Good Book...from Ground or Sky

4/5

Paizo’s August 2014 Player’s Companion release is People of the Stars, which presents characters with options for playing characters from space, playing characters that will be traveling into space, and introducing the stars in general into your character concept.

Disclaimer: I have not read Distant Worlds and space is not really my jam. That said, I am reading my way through this, the Technology Guide, and The Fires of Creation and I’m really excited about what I’m seeing thus far. So, this comes more from a position of ability to appreciate and less of a position of authority on these topics. Also, I've tried to avoid mentioning anything that would break Paizo's community use policy and to respect their IP. If I've failed in any way, let me know and I will remove the offending content.

In general, People of the Stars does exactly what it promises to do: it gives PCs a basic idea on how to play a character from the stars or to prepare themselves to adventure amongst the stars. We get just about everything you could want, except for spaceships, which James Jacobs has indicated they aren’t planning on looking at until they explore portions of the universe that will require them to do so. Now that we know the adventure paths for the next seventeen months, that’s likely to be awhile away.

But fear not good groundlings, for People of the Stars has also provided a host of options for characters that are influenced by the stars, even the characters aren’t going to be adventuring among them directly. This is especially true of the astrology-based traits. Each planet has a sidebar that contains just the right amount for someone with only a cursory knowledge of the planet to know. It also gives a trait that plays well for someone who is Golarion-based, but wants a connection to one of the other planets. This strikes me as a good way to give players a connection to the stars without ending up with a party composed of residents of n different planets.

People of the Stars also gives some good basic information on space rules without spoiling everything in the Technology Guide. For instance, gravity is discussed, so players have an idea about how combat could work. Other tidbits are given as well: you’ll need to prepare spells with somatic components using the Silent Spell feat if you want to cast them in the void. There’s also some very cool flavor in the gear options provided: the Traveler’s pocketwatch is so evocative of R. Buckminster Fuller’s watch from The Illuminatus! Trilogy I was ready to channel Hagbard Celine.

You can read the rest of this review at A Gaymer's Quest.


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ALIUMS! This'll be interesting. Can't wait to do interstellar space travel with my insane characters.


I have a few questions concerning kasathas (four as it happens):

- does any artwork feature a kasatha's uncovered face?
- if the above answer is "yes", how bizarre are their features?
- are the usual height, weight, age charts provided?
- are there any alternate traits?

Sovereign Court RPG Superstar 2009 Top 32, 2010 Top 8

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Imbicatus wrote:
Golarion could easily be in the Andromeda galaxy, but it doesn't really matter, since space whales, mi-go, and wormholes travel at the speed of plot.

Or the Pegasus Galaxy...

Spoiler:

*starts scribbling notes, hmm, Maybe the ship in Numeria was a twin to Destiny?*


Matthew Morris wrote:
Imbicatus wrote:
Golarion could easily be in the Andromeda galaxy, but it doesn't really matter, since space whales, mi-go, and wormholes travel at the speed of plot.

Or the Pegasus Galaxy...

** spoiler omitted **

Spoiler:
Destiny and the seed-ship were way past Pegasus long before the Ancients arrived there. Ida too, presumably.

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Necromancer wrote:

I have a few questions concerning kasathas (four as it happens):

- does any artwork feature a kasatha's uncovered face?
- if the above answer is "yes", how bizarre are their features?
- are the usual height, weight, age charts provided?
- are there any alternate traits?

.

No
See above
No & No.

doc the grey wrote:
Irnk, Dead-Eye's Prodigal wrote:

The thing is, it's not really a Race book. It's more like the other books in the 'People of' line, simply over a notably broader scope.

This is a Player Companion for people who want more Planetary Romance-type games.

As far as other races besides the four listed; there is rudimentary information for playing Formians, Kalo (an aquatic race found on one of the moons of Bretheda, Shobhads (the four-armed giants from Akiton), Vercites and Ysoki (ratmen found on Akiton).

Ohh do we actually get some idea of the stat arrays and abilities of the kalo or the vercites?

.

While I don't have my copy with me, to my recollection, Kalo simply use the Merfolk stats with a couple things switched out.
Likewise Vercites use Half-Elf for the most part, again with certain Racial features switched out for features specific to Vercites. The Castes are detailed somewhat but all I recall is that the ones who use cybernetics extensively are directed to the Technology guide.

Bellona wrote:

What about the red-skinned Barsoo-, er, Akitronians?

And the lizardfolk from the same planet?

The Shobhad peoples use the same stats as the Kasatha as PC's, with some adjustments, which I don't have my copy to specify. The only other Akitonian people mentioned are the Ysoki, who use standard Ratmen out of the ARG.


I though the Shobhad were already statted up in the Distant Worlds bestiary and Bestiary 4?

Over here Linky


Irnk, Dead-Eye's Prodigal wrote:
Necromancer wrote:

I have a few questions concerning kasathas (four as it happens):

- does any artwork feature a kasatha's uncovered face?
- if the above answer is "yes", how bizarre are their features?
- are the usual height, weight, age charts provided?
- are there any alternate traits?

.

No
See above
No & No.

Thanks.

Sovereign Court RPG Superstar 2009 Top 32, 2010 Top 8

Alleran wrote:
Matthew Morris wrote:
Imbicatus wrote:
Golarion could easily be in the Andromeda galaxy, but it doesn't really matter, since space whales, mi-go, and wormholes travel at the speed of plot.

Or the Pegasus Galaxy...

** spoiler omitted **

** spoiler omitted **

Oh I know, and as,much fun as Rovagug worshiping hive ships vs. Numerian inspired replicator based androids of Saranae may be, I was thinking of a galaxy so far from earth that the wreck is a similar size and design as Destiny, but with more automation.


Graeme Lewis wrote:
Neongelion wrote:
** spoiler omitted **
** spoiler omitted **

Spoiler:
It was never canonically stated where Golarion and Earth are in relation to each other on the Material Plane, only that one of the developers (James Jacobs I think) said that, for their head canon at least, they exist in three separate galaxies.

Still, I think Golarion and Earth can easily exist in the same galaxy and never know of each other's existence for a very, very, very long time. 400 billion stars leaves a little bit of wiggle room, I would think.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

It only took one thing for me to like this book: the trait that lets your sorcerer bloodline be that of a outer dragon. I just wish that the trait's wording worked for bloodragers as well, so I could make a Solar Dragon Bloodrager for PFS :D

Shadow Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber
Matrix Dragon wrote:
It only took one thing for me to like this book: the trait that lets your sorcerer bloodline be that of a outer dragon. I just wish that the trait's wording worked for bloodragers as well, so I could make a Solar Dragon Bloodrager for PFS :D

Lol I feel you though I will say in my homegame I've had a void dragon bloodrager now since b4 launched and it's been a blast. If it is a home game you could just talk to your GM and see if you could use the cone/line and energy type of your preferred outer dragon.


I also liked the outer dragon bloodline stuff though I don't think it should have had been a trait and why no primal or imperial dragons.


Androids, Kasathas, Triaxians, and Lashuntas are not new races


For those of you that have seen both this book and the Andriod article in the first installment of Iron God's....is the information just a cut and paste from one to another ? Or do they cover different material ?


Has anyone found favored class options for any of the new races?


Are their rules for star ships in this book (sorry for double post)


Shanwolf wrote:
Are their rules for star ships in this book (sorry for double post)

I think Jacobs Rex has said before that spaceships (and other high tech vehicles) won't show up until an AP needs them too. So, not yet.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
nighttree wrote:
For those of you that have seen both this book and the Android article in the first installment of Iron God's....is the information just a cut and paste from one to another ? Or do they cover different material ?

They cover significantly different areas. The Android pages in People of the Stars give you everything you need, mechanically, to play an Android. They also give you some new Android only Feats that significantly 'open the box', as it were. The article in Fires of Creation gives information on what makes an Android an Android, as opposed to 'some other Humanoid type'. It does include the new feats shown in People of the Stars, but focuses much more on the 'who am I/why am I here?' types of questions.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Can someone tell me more about the Nanite Disruption feat I've heard about? It's the one Android feat not detailed in the Iron Gods article about Androids.


Mwa ha ha, I got everything, and I didn't even have to assault a UPS driver!


I'd like to post an image of Randy/Bane confronting the UPS man, but I don't want to make the effort. I'm busy reading this and two other books that just came out.

Scarab Sages

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Major_Blackhart wrote:
I'd like to post an image of Randy/Bane confronting the UPS man, but I don't want to make the effort. I'm busy reading this and two other books that just came out.

It is done.


Mal_Luck wrote:
Can someone tell me more about the Nanite Disruption feat I've heard about? It's the one Android feat not detailed in the Iron Gods article about Androids.

Nanite Disruption allows you to use your nanite surge to short-circuit nearby creatures that have circuitry and electronics as part of their make-up. You make a touch attack and if that hits the creature makes a Will save (DC = 10 + 1/2 your character level + 1/2 your Constitution modifier). If failed they take a penalty equal to 1 + 1/2 your level on the next d20 roll they make before the end of your next turn.


What are the Name of the Archetype and what is their Flav??
Thanks in advance for the Info ^.^


SamuraiFlamenco wrote:

What are the Name of the Archetype and what is their Flav??

Thanks in advance for the Info ^.^

The 3 Archetypes are:

Bow Nomad for Kasatha rangers
Qabarat Outrider for Lashunta cavaliers
& Season Keeper for Triaxian druids

The Bow Nomad uses the four arms of the Kasatha to fire two bows at once. Very cool looking!

Qabarat Outriders defend the city-states of Castrovel by leading small units and linking their minds together to make very effective strike forces.

The Season Keepers use their connection to the extreme season changes on Triaxus to help the communities survive and thrive through the radical shift.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Alleran wrote:

What does the artwork look like for the female Lashunta? I'm wondering if they hold true to their depiction in Distant Worlds, or if the art follows the style of the Inner Sea Bestiary.

(Also, does the book in general have the "pulp sci-fi" a la John Carter going on a lot?)

It has it's moments of Burroughs and Lovecraft. Take that as you will.


What general kinds of cool stuff from this can be legally used in PFS?

Could a strictly-society player benefit from this book?


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Seriously, this book and the Technology Guide have lit a fire under my brain (I'll be sending the insurance claim later). Thank you for giving us rules for Outer Dragon bloodlines!


James suggested I ask this here(or hereabouts): What happens if you point a Harvesting Lens at the Sun?

While I'm at it, the back inside cover shows a red star at the tip of the Fang constellation. Would you be able to collect red starlight from it?


1 person marked this as a favorite.

There's a large and glaring typo in the upper left corner of page 16.

That's not a representation of the Solar System. There's only one Solar System, and we're in it. It's called Solar because our sun is named Sol. Other star systems are called by their stars' names. Please give Golarion's sun a proper name so we can start calling its star system by its proper name.

Grand Lodge

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Evil Midnight Lurker wrote:

There's a large and glaring typo in the upper left corner of page 16.

That's not a representation of the Solar System. There's only one Solar System, and we're in it. It's called Solar because our sun is named Sol. Other star systems are called by their stars' names. Please give Golarion's sun a proper name so we can start calling its star system by its proper name.

Solar system is also used as a generic term as well. Star system is used to describe systems composed of multiple stars orbiting each other.

Dark Archive

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Evil Midnight Lurker wrote:

There's a large and glaring typo in the upper left corner of page 16.

That's not a representation of the Solar System. There's only one Solar System, and we're in it. It's called Solar because our sun is named Sol. Other star systems are called by their stars' names. Please give Golarion's sun a proper name so we can start calling its star system by its proper name.

Perhaps, by amazing coincidence, Golarion's sun is also named Sol! (We are all Kosh.)

(For the same reason that the Elemental Plane of Earth and the Cleric Domains of Air, Earth, Fire and Water aren't called the Elemental Plane of Golarion and the Cleric Domains of Air, Fire, Golarion and Water?)

If Golarion's sun is not named Sol, then we'll also have to change the name of the Solar (Bestiary 12-13) to the Greebleschmutzalar or whatever.

Seems persnickety and unnecessary.


LazarX wrote:
Solar system is also used as a generic term as well. Star system is used to describe systems composed of multiple stars orbiting each other.

You're correct in the latter case -- I should have said "planetary system" -- but use of Solar System as a generic term is still an error. "Extrasolar systems" or "exoplanetary systems" are proper generics.


Set wrote:

Perhaps, by amazing coincidence, Golarion's sun is also named Sol! (We are all Kosh.)

Well that guy's name was actually Ulkesh. :P

Set wrote:
If Golarion's sun is not named Sol, then we'll also have to change the name of the Solar (Bestiary 12-13) to the Greebleschmutzalar or whatever.

Stellar? :)

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

While our solar system is called the solar system because our sun is called Sol, Golarion's solar system is called a solar system because it's watched over by a bunch of CR 23 "Angel, solar"s.

Dark Archive

3 people marked this as a favorite.

If the sun is named after Sarenrae, perhaps Sarenar, it could be the Sarenar System? Still, there are tons of things in Golarion, like the Tarrasque or the Phoenix or the Wendigo, that have names based on languages that don't exist in Golarion, so I'm fine with 'solar' system, as well.

After Eberron decided to name their dinosaurs things like Battletitan, Glidewing and Clawfoot, I'm very much okay with Golarion having 'inappropriate' names like Tyrannosaur, Pterodactyl and Deinonychus. (Even if I probably misspelled at least one of those...)

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Matthew Morris wrote:
Imbicatus wrote:
Golarion could easily be in the Andromeda galaxy, but it doesn't really matter, since space whales, mi-go, and wormholes travel at the speed of plot.

Or the Pegasus Galaxy...

** spoiler omitted **

The Numerian Ship wasn't nearly that small.


Set wrote:
If the sun is named after Sarenrae, perhaps Sarenar, it could be the Sarenar System?

Sounds good...

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

2 people marked this as a favorite.

Eh. Calling other star systems 'stellar systems' or 'planetary systems' never seems to have caught on. 'Solar system' isn't even actually wrong - the Sun is named Sol, but that's just Latin for Sun. Any system is a solar system if you are close enough that it stops being a star (stellar) and starts being a sun (solar).

The one with Sol and Earth in it is the only one you should capitalize in the middle of a sentence ('a/the solar system' vs. 'the Solar system), but other than that the ship has sailed.

What is Golarion's moon called? I would you object to referring to the 'lunar surface' in an adventure like The Moonscar?

An aside:
We never really came up with a proper name for Earth, either. 'Earth' just means dirt or ground, and the sci-fi alternatives of 'Terra' or 'Telluria' are just the Latin or Greek way of saying the same thing.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Someone on the boards here corrected me a year or so ago when I referred to our star/sun as Sol. I was told that the official name is (the) Sun. That said, personallly I still prefer Sol over (the) Sun when dealing with multi-system nomenclature. (As for Earth, I like equally Earth and Terra as terms.)

I once asked about the names of Golarion's sun and moon (shortly after Distant Worlds came out), and got no definitive reply. :(


Ross Byers wrote:
What is Golarion's moon called? I would you object to referring to the 'lunar surface' in an adventure like The Moonscar?

It actually has an official name -- Somal.

...Of course that presents the problem of referring to "the Somalian surface." ^.^


Bellona wrote:

(As for Earth, I like equally Earth and Terra as terms.)

I prefer Terra, mostly because I prefer Terran over Earthing

.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
SAMAS wrote:

James suggested I ask this here(or hereabouts): What happens if you point a Harvesting Lens at the Sun?

The exact same thing as when you point it at any other star.


I was really wanting to see alternate racial traits for androids, but I am still pleased with this book. I understand that androids may not actually get them, since they are a manufactured race.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Picking this up from the local store tomorrow! Can't wait to put my characters IN SPACCCCCCCEEEE!!!


I have a problem with the Empathy feat for Android; 13 Cha? MAD build...

Grand Lodge

3 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Guy St-Amant wrote:

I have a problem with the Empathy feat for Android; 13 Cha? MAD build...

Empathy is by design something that's supposed to be rare for Androids. The pre-req makes perfect sense.

Liberty's Edge

Additionally, since it allows Rage Cycling from level 1 as a Barbarian and similar things, on a purely mechanical level it'd probably be too good without some such prerequisite.


Deadmanwalking wrote:
Additionally, since it allows Rage Cycling from level 1 as a Barbarian and similar things, on a purely mechanical level it'd probably be too good without some such prerequisite.

11 maybe? (Androids have a minus to Cha).

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

some explain to me what rage cycling is given that you wind up being fatigued for 2 round for every round spent in rage, and that you can't rage while fatigued?

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