Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Advanced Class Guide (OGL)

3.20/5 (based on 51 ratings)
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Advanced Class Guide (OGL)
Show Description For:
Non-Mint

Add PDF $9.99

Hardcover Unavailable

Non-Mint Unavailable

Facebook Twitter Email

A New Breed of Hero

Adventure like never before with the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Advanced Class Guide! Explore new heights of heroism with 10 new base classes, each with 20 levels of amazing abilities. Incredible powers also await existing characters, with more than a hundred new archetypes and class options. Prepare characters for their most legendary adventure ever with massive selections of never-before-seen spells, magic items, and more!

The Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Advanced Class Guide is a must-have companion volume to the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Core Rulebook. This imaginative tabletop game builds upon more than 15 years of system development and an open playtest featuring more than 50,000 gamers to create a cutting-edge RPG experience that brings the all-time best-selling set of fantasy rules into the new millennium.

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Advanced Class Guide includes:

  • Ten new base classes—the magic-twisting arcanist, the ferocious bloodrager, the cunning investigator, the daring swashbuckler, the formidable warpriest, and others.
  • Variant class abilities and thematic archetypes for all 29 base classes, such as the counterfeit mage and the mutagenic mauler.
  • Nearly a hundred new feats for characters of all classes, including style feats, teamwork feats like Coordinated Shot, and more.
  • Hundreds of new spells and magic items, such as feast on fear and skullcrusher gauntlets.
  • An entire armory of amazing equipment, from vital new adventuring gear to deadly alchemical weapons.
  • ... and much, much more!

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-671-3

Errata
Last Updated - 7/22/2015

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Rulebook Subscription.

Product Availability

PDF:

Fulfilled immediately.

Hardcover:

Unavailable

Non-Mint:

Unavailable

This product is non-mint. Refunds are not available for non-mint products. The standard version of this product can be found here.

Are there errors or omissions in this product information? Got corrections? Let us know at store@paizo.com.

PZO1129


See Also:

1 to 5 of 52 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>

Average product rating:

3.20/5 (based on 51 ratings)

Sign in to create or edit a product review.

A Great (if errata-filled) Book for Players

4/5

This book has gotten a lot of flack for two reasons: (1) A number of people were upset by the large amount of errata posted after the book came out. (2) A number of people were upset by the perceived power-creep that this book carried with it, especially in the archetype section.

Both of these are reasonable complaints that I largely agree with.

That said, this book also contains a cornucopia of player options that are great fun. A number of the classes it introduced are now mainstream: it’s hard to imagine playing the game without options like the Brawler, the Investigator, the Slayer, the Bloodrager, the Hunter, or the Warpriest. Or to play without archetypes like the Bolt Ace (Gunslinger), Mutation Warrior or Martial Master (Fighter).

Moreover, the book introduced a number of feats that improve on the available build options available to most players (Extra Hex! Slashing Grace!). Likewise, although the spells in this book seem to have flown under the radar, there are a lot of nice and interesting spells are introduced in this book (Glue Seal, Communal Align Weapon, Wall of Blindness/Deafness, Wall of Nausea, Anti-Incorporeal Shell, Adjustable Disguise, Adjustable Polymorph, Investigative Mind, etc).

Easily 5 stars worth of good material here. Given the unusually large amount of errata, I feel compelled to deduct a star. But all that said, it’s hard to imagine playing Pathfinder without this book -- after the Core Rulebook and Advanced Players Guide, it’s probably the best book for players to pick up.


Unbalanced, uninspired and rushed.

1/5

This book still sticks out as one of Paizo's biggest missteps. It was extremely rushed and it shows.

At least half of the new classes don't even need to exist as anything other than archetypes. Even among the ones that actually work, most feel very uninspired.

There are a few good things in it, but not really enough to justify buying it. It's not worth your money and it's best not to encourage sloppy work.

Hopefully Paizo learns from this and prioritizes quality over quantity and speed from now on.


A continuing disappointment

1/5

The ACG had problems. Many problems. And it continues to have problems.

From concept ("Let's make ten classes as complicated and broken as the magus, or more so!"), to out-of-whack game design, to simply poor editing, the ACG is a mess. The book's philosophy seems to be "create a new utterly unbalanced mechanic, and proliferate it as far as possible." The (quickly issued) errata pulled some of it a bit more into line, but it just doesn't come close to correcting it.

Even something as simple as alchemical items are way out there. Holy Weapon Balm costs 5gp more than holy water, and does 1400% more damage. And that doesn't even include increasing damage to incorporeal creatures.

Even two years after it was released, I continue to be impressed with the complete disregard for balance and sense in this book. If power creep had happened this much every year, we'd be looking at 9999 damage caps by now. The ACG stands out for its insanity.

Perhaps pulping it for the cover error would have been the better move.


The first real dud in my Pathfinder collection

1/5

I am extremely disappointed in this product, and glad I only purchased the PDF version. As other reviewers have pointed out, the new classes are poorly balanced when compared to the preexisting ones, and would be a better fit for a book like Unchained, much like Unearthed Arcana's gestalt characters.

There's far too many feats and toys dedicated to these new classes, which drastically lessens this book's universal appeal, and even though some contrivances are provided to make some of said feats accessible to other classes, it ends up painting the book's title as a misnomer - it isn't an "advanced class guide" any more than it is a guide mostly about ten new classes, that are "advanced" only in the sense that they're more powerful than the others.

It's my fault for not properly researching the book before buying it, so buyer beware if you're expecting to find a literal advanced class guide, as opposed to a lengthy introduction to ten new ones.


Overall disappointing

2/5

Okay, there's a lot here that's just terribly rushed and it shows, like the editing here is painful at points. The classes themselves range wildly in value, and there's a lot of examples of Paizo's classic retro nerfing of things to help make options here look better. This was an obvious rush to gencon book, and it shows. While not everything in it is bad, and there's some salvageable content, you could easily continue to play the game without this book and miss out on absolutely nohthing.


1 to 5 of 52 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>
2,001 to 2,050 of 2,448 << first < prev | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | next > last >>
Silver Crusade

Okay, I've made a <dedicated thread> for discussion/FAQ flagging of the Pummeling style question.

Have at it!

:-)

Liberty's Edge

magnuskn wrote:
Cheapy wrote:
magnuskn wrote:
OMG, the Arcanist is crazy powerful. Move over, Wizard. :-/
Wait a few months for us to see the true power level of it.
True enough, but you can clearly see the things which are going to be very good and the ones which are very much not so good by reading once through the class. I think that the slower spellcasting progression of the Arcanist is the only thing which would prevent the Wizard from becoming second place in the power curve.

Well, that and the Exploiter Wizard Archetype. Which gets Arcane Exploits, only on a Wizard. It replaces School and Bond...bu there are Exploits to mostly get those back.

Now, Wizard didn't really need a boost, so this is a bit excessive when compared to everyone else, but it does mean Arcanist won't blow Wizards out of the water to the extent hypothesized by some.

Shadow Lodge

Pathfinder Companion Subscriber
Cheapy wrote:
magnuskn wrote:
OMG, the Arcanist is crazy powerful. Move over, Wizard. :-/
Wait a few months for us to see the true power level of it.

what do you mean "a few months"??


To be honest the feedback I'm getting is that the book is not particularly good.

Between slashing grace, slayer feint and canny tumble I'm seeing a bad patron for martial feats. While other stuff like deivine grace as afeat and arcanist are directly to the list of banned stuff.

Scarab Sages

The new classes are great. The archetypes are great. The feats vary between perfect power level, over powered, and underwhelming.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Jinete wrote:
So far, I'm totally underwhelmed by the feats section of the book. I'm creating a Swashbuckler character, and there isn't a single feat in this book I find useful.

Steadfast Personality will be helpful. I won't be able to take it for my level 14 guy, because I already pre-planned all the other feats (Critical Focus, Staggering Critical, Stunning Critical), but if you start up a new character, you almost can't go wrong with this one feat.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Deadmanwalking wrote:
Now, Wizard didn't really need a boost, so this is a bit excessive when compared to everyone else, but it does mean Arcanist won't blow Wizards out of the water to the extent hypothesized by some.

Aw, hell, I didn't even get to that. And so far as I have seen, the Sorcerer doesn't even get in on the fun the Arcanist and Wizard are having.

Why do you hate Sorcerers, Paizo devs?!? :p

Shadow Lodge

Man I don't know whether to be excited at how awesome the Arcanist is sounding and how I'll be able to kiss the Wizard goodbye forever, or disappointed that the Sorcerer seems to be getting curbstomped in the process.

Shadow Lodge

Nicos wrote:

To be honest the feedback I'm getting is that the book is not particularly good.

Between slashing grace, slayer feint and canny tumble I'm seeing a bad patron for martial feats. While other stuff like deivine grace as afeat and arcanist are directly to the list of banned stuff.

Ive only gotten it and flipped through. So far its much better than "meh" but not in the great category Id hoped for from the start. Not digging the Warpriest which was the one I was most interested in, and kind of seeing two of its archtypes as the default class, with the actual default Warpriest sort of just there. Disappointed that there are no Aasimar/Tiefling Favored Class options, as well as some of the more common played races.

Part of me wishes that they had done two books. 1 focusing exclusively on the 10 new classes and another focusing on options to bring the other Core (or even Base) classes new options. Id have to agree, it does sort of seem like there was a lack of communication between the different options in the book.

A lot of the options seem all over the place, too. Going back to the Warpriest, we have a single Cleric Archtype, but rather than being about making the Cleric more Warpriesty, we get a White Mage type, (which I get, there are those that have been begging for it), but why is it in this book? There seems to be little consistency as to what is too strong/good between the various new classes, leading me to continue to believe that some writers just liked some concepts more than others rather than and sort of real balance concerns or playtest feedback. Might not be true, and like I said, still digging in at this point, just my impression.

Too early to make a judgment over all just yet, but so far Id say somewhere between 3-4 stars (out of 5).

Scarab Sages

Mongrel Mage is pretty awesome for Sorcerers. It adds a lot of versatility to a sorcerer in spells known and in bloodline arcana.

Shadow Lodge

Imbicatus wrote:
Mongrel Mage is pretty awesome for Sorcerers. It adds a lot of versatility to a sorcerer in spells known and in bloodline arcana.

Yay!

So looking forward to reading this when I get home.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Orthos wrote:
Man I don't know whether to be excited at how awesome the Arcanist is sounding and how I'll be able to kiss the Wizard goodbye forever, or disappointed that the Sorcerer seems to be getting curbstomped in the process.

Well, he still is an arcane full spellcaster and remains my favorite of the now three available ones. Even if he now clearly is worse than the Wizard and Arcanist. Still better than all the rest, nyah-nyah. :p


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Imbicatus wrote:
Mongrel Mage is pretty awesome for Sorcerers. It adds a lot of versatility to a sorcerer in spells known and in bloodline arcana.

I don't know, I thought it read a bit weak. I may have simply not really understood it, though, at the point I got to Sorcerer archetypes I was firmly in "information overload" territory. ^^

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure, Rulebook Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber

Maybe when I get my hardcopy here in the next day or so I can delve into it and find some new understanding that I missed skimming the PDF. As it is, very little grabbed me from this one.

Scarab Sages

magnuskn wrote:
Imbicatus wrote:
Mongrel Mage is pretty awesome for Sorcerers. It adds a lot of versatility to a sorcerer in spells known and in bloodline arcana.
I don't know, I thought it read a bit weak. I may have simply not really understood it, though, at the point I got to Sorcerer archetypes I was firmly in "information overload" territory. ^^

Basically, it's main draw is to change your bloodline each day (including bonus spells known at 7th level). It only applies to base bloodlines, not wild-blooded, and you need to spend pool points to activate the bloodline powers, but it gives you back a lot of flexibility that you lost by being a spontaneous caster.


Hmm, would the Sacred Fist Warpriest archetype flurry of blows and increased unarmed damage stack with levels of monk I wonder...?

prototype00


Deadmanwalking wrote:
Now, Wizard didn't really need a boost, so this is a bit excessive when compared to everyone else, but it does mean Arcanist won't blow Wizards out of the water to the extent hypothesized by some.

There is a feat that would be really good for wizards, building off of the Spell Mastery feat. Can't recall the name offhand, though. Starts with an 'E'.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Downloaded this, tech guide, and people of the stars.
Working on my half-orc Primal Steelblood Bloodrager. The psycho may wield a chainsaw for giggles. In fact, that may be his name, Giggles. Not sure yet. Dammit this is awesome.
I'm now trying to work on the proper build for this guy, and man is it NOT easy. All new feats to match up, makes things a bit difficult. Tough choices all around really.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

Insain Dragoon wrote:

A lot a cool stuff, but some major weirdness. It feels like the people who wrote the classes, the people who wrote feats, and the people who wrote archetypes had minimal communications. Also feels like the people who wrote feats and archetypes weren't around in the respective feedback threads for the playtest. Too many oddities and unwritten things in this book makes me feel a little disappointed as I read. I'm used to missing and the occasional oddity within Paizo books, but this book has too many.

Maybe SKR was right about the production schedule being too crunched and how trying to get this out by Gen-con constrained them a lot. I would have preferred this stayed another month in development and editing.

You have no idea how many moving parts there are to a book like this. With so many new classes and things that rely on them, simple changes to a class feature can ripple throughout the book. I'm not saying its perfect (it isn't), but I don't think it is in any way more or less flawed than previous years' Gen Con releases, including the Core Rulebook. I dare you to do better.

I also doubt that another month would have brought it to your level of satisfaction. Please, do not misconstrue that as saying you're impossible to please. What I mean is that everyone has a pet issue with a book like this where they disagree with decisions that were made. Something left out they wanted, something included they didn't, or just something they wanted not done to their own personal taste. It's easy to say that if the book had more time, or more developers, or a different developer, that it would match the mental ideal the person built during the run up to release. It's sort of a way of saying "I'm right, and if Paizo had just tried harder, they would have realized that." Even though that if the book was different it would be some other person making a slightly different complaint about the thing that was different.


Ross Byers wrote:
I dare you to do better.

sheesh...thats a lil raw

i'm not complaining about pet ideas, but stuff like class abilities, archetypes, and feats should all jive before print...

i don't have the book, but it is something that burns me with all the splat lately

Scarab Sages

prototype00 wrote:

Hmm, would the Sacred Fist Warpriest archetype flurry of blows and increased unarmed damage stack with levels of monk I wonder...?

prototype00

Yes. The archetype specifically states he uses his warpriest levels as monk levels for determining the amount of damage dealt with an unarmed strike.


Mista Moore wrote:
The Shaman doesn't have either summon natures's ally/monster spell. I was playing this class during the playtest in PFS and I'm left a moot feat in augment summons. I'm not seeing any literature in the new guide for season six about dealing with this conflict from the playtest. Do I have to suck it up and spend the prestige and gold for a retrain or do I get the benefit of the doubt and get to pick a new feat?
Huh you're right there isn't anything official though I think it would/should follow under the
Season Six Guide to Organized Play wrote:
If a class or prestige class changes in such a way that you no longer have proficiency with a given weapon or armor type: You may sell back the affected equipment and only the affected equipment at full market value.

They should add changes to spell lists and allow changes to feats instead of just equipment I mean you'd have a wasted feat if you had Weapon Focus in a weapon that the class changed that you could no longer use; or say for the playtest of the Magus they had a whole bunch of Necromancy spells and you bought items to buff up their power but we the Magus actually came out and they had no Necromancy spells you'd have a completely wasted item that under the rules you can do nothing about and have wasted money.


As much as I hate it, I can see why PFS banned Spirit Summoners. A Spirit Summoner with the Battle or Life spirits can be pretty crazy. One can give bard-like boosts to the party, while the other gets *channel energy*. Crazy, though they do lose their summon SLA's as a cost.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

Sandbox wrote:
Ross Byers wrote:
I dare you to do better.
sheesh...thats a lil raw

I'm not trying to be harsh. But the Open Game License means you really can make your own book, the way you want, and put it on sale. It's harder than it looks.

Quote:
i'm not complaining about pet ideas, but stuff like class abilities, archetypes, and feats should all jive before print...

They should. I'm not excusing that. But it could definitely be worse, and it isn't something that I've noticed getting worse, in particular.

Anyway, where Insain Dragoon says it sounds like there was no communication between people working on different sections of the book, it isn't a matter of communication. It's a matter of bandwidth and working in parallel. There wouldn't be time to write all the spells, feats, and archetypes after the playtest finishes. That work has to be done at least partially in advance. Which means it gets revised, more than once, when playtest feedback is incorporated and designs evolve. It's kind of like trying to change the tire on a car that's still in motion.

It's a hard job, and I guess what I'm saying is I'm consistently amazed that things come out as well as they do.

Scarab Sages

Spirit Summoner looks like it was banned from PFS due to theme argument reasons, not power ones. The Eidolon cannot take powers or abilities that are not appropriate to the chosen spirit. This can cause all kinds of angst at the table and is a pain to enforce.


Imbicatus wrote:
Spirit Summoner looks like it was banned from PFS due to theme argument reasons, not power ones. The Eidolon cannot take powers or abilities that are not appropriate to the chosen spirit. This can cause all kinds of angst at the table and is a pain to enforce.

That's a very good point. I was kind of wondering how that would be enforced in PFS, and now I know XD

Grand Lodge

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure, Rulebook Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber
Sandbox wrote:
i'm not complaining about pet ideas, but stuff like class abilities, archetypes, and feats should all jive before print...

Have you ever put on a stage production? If not, consider it like so.

Except you can't physically hold the props to make sure they look good in the lights. And each actor is prepping his lines alone, so revisions in one scene might not match revisions in another. And instead of physically building the set, you have to crunch numbers to make sure the pieces fit together.

Perfection is unfeasible. It certainly is possible, but the likelihood of a 256 page book being completely free of conflicts in a reasonable timeframe is so miniscule that, as the editors have said, sometimes you just have to accept that 'one more pass' isn't going to be worth delaying the release.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

anonymous101 wrote:
This might a bit embarrassing to Paizo, but it needs to be said; Your South Koreans (Republic of Korea) customers won't be able to purchase your products, while North Koreans (Democratic People's Republic of Korea) customers will be able to. Please, fix this silly mistake and make your products available for S. Koreans.

I'm confused. What is stopping South Koreans from buying this book?


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Class building guidelines feels tacked-on. Very lack luster. Most (if not all) of the info are very broad and very generic design goals that have been openly stated in other places. This section REALLY needed crunch in the form of examples. This is HOW to compare this class ability to that class ability. This is HOW to go about designing a new class feature. This is HOW to combine them in a reasonable progression of power.

Also this section of the book was begging for skeleton classes of each BAB progression and a variety of "archetype by numbers" examples of how to put together custom classes. I understand they didn't want to make a point-buy system (most likely to avoid the back lash for proposed "values" and/or having to admit that the existing base classes aren't going to come out even,) but seriously this whole section is really a series of blog posts.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

Point buy does not work except for very simple systems.

Also, the spell design section in Ultimate Magic, or the entirety of the GameMastery Guide could have been blog posts. What is your point?


My point is that it isn't helpful. My point is that the space is wasted in the book. My point is that the writing wasn't particularly good.


A couple of questions regarding the Eldritch Scion archetype:

1) Do you have to spend a point from the Eldritch Pool to enter a mystic state, and then another point per use of bloodrage ability? Or do you spend a point, enter the mystic state, and for the duration of the state have free access to bloodrage abilities?

2) How does "Abyssal Bloodrage" (Abyssal bloodline, level 12 ability) work, since you don't gain the benefits of bloodrage? Does it not function at all because you're not bloodraging, or do you gain only the modifying benefits of the ability (+2 Str, -4 AC)?

Dark Archive

Just purchased / read through this book today and I have to say the new options do look great! My personal favorites are the Bloodrager (that Destined bloodline gets better the more I look at it), Hunter, Investigator, Slayer, and Swashbuckler (the flying blade is awesome). Some of my favorite classes, like the magus, got really cool new archetypes and features, and the new Style and Unarmed Strike feats are making the monk look waaaay more appealing than before.

As for the Class Building chapter, while I agree that there's not much info I think it's still good. I've tried "point-based class design" before and it tends to produce characters that are overpowered when compared to existing classes. My recent attempts to build a Trickster base class are proof enough for me.


LuniasM wrote:

Just purchased / read through this book today and I have to say the new options do look great! My personal favorites are the Bloodrager (that Destined bloodline gets better the more I look at it), Hunter, Investigator, Slayer, and Swashbuckler (the flying blade is awesome). Some of my favorite classes, like the magus, got really cool new archetypes and features, and the new Style and Unarmed Strike feats are making the monk look waaaay more appealing than before.

As for the Class Building chapter, while I agree that there's not much info I think it's still good. I've tried "point-based class design" before and it tends to produce characters that are overpowered when compared to existing classes. My recent attempts to build a Trickster base class are proof enough for me.

I'm not saying that there should have been a point-buy system. Indeed, I understand why one was not included. I would have like to see some crunchy stuff though. And I really think the section leaves a hole where some kind of basic custom class guidelines should have gone.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

Rules about making rules suffer from the inner platform effect, at a minimum. I'd much rather get an essay of advice from an expert than an inaccurate set of mechanics. What were you expecting to see in those pages?


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I don't think it's been mentioned that arcanists can't qualify for arcane discoveries, so we're not quite in wizard replacement territory yet. As for sorcerers, actually look at what the eldritch scrapper does and what it's capable of doing before throwing in the towel.

people act like spontaneous casting isn't an advantage


BigDTBone wrote:
My point is that it isn't helpful. My point is that the space is wasted in the book. My point is that the writing wasn't particularly good.

I agree that it was really sparse, but I think that pretty much the entire *rest* of the book (with the exception of the Magic, Magic Items, and possibly Feats) serves as a really excellent practical example of how to take the information in this chapter and put it into use.


Cthulhudrew wrote:
BigDTBone wrote:
My point is that it isn't helpful. My point is that the space is wasted in the book. My point is that the writing wasn't particularly good.
I agree that it was really sparse, but I think that pretty much the entire *rest* of the book (with the exception of the Magic, Magic Items, and possibly Feats) serves as a really excellent practical example of how to take the information in this chapter and put it into use.

I hope so, I haven't made it through the rest of the book yet.


Ross Byers wrote:
Rules about making rules suffer from the inner platform effect, at a minimum. I'd much rather get an essay of advice from an expert than an inaccurate set of mechanics. What were you expecting to see in those pages?

I would have liked to see something akin to the basic classes in unearthed arcana with some sort of base system for how to arrange abilities. There was really good info in the chapter of UA. Something I remember now even off the top of my head is that in order to give a class evasion they should have a +3 reflex at the point they get it. That's an example of the kind of info I would have liked.

I think it would have been nice to discuss general comparisons. IE, if you were going to take the bard and give him 4 spell level progression instead of 6, what would that look like? What would he get in exchange? What would it look like if you gave the sorcerer 3/4 BAB, what would he give up in exchange.

If you wanted to take an archetype for one class and make it available to another class how would you go about it? If you wanted to combine two base classes how would you go about it (ie, the design process/theory behind much of this book.)

Basically, how to make my own classes. That's what I wanted. Instead they gave me design goals. I wanted that section of the book to explain the "how" not just tell me the "what."

Shadow Lodge

Any word on how we need to rebuild for PFS?


Philip Pickard wrote:

A couple of questions regarding the Eldritch Scion archetype:

1) Do you have to spend a point from the Eldritch Pool to enter a mystic state, and then another point per use of bloodrage ability? Or do you spend a point, enter the mystic state, and for the duration of the state have free access to bloodrage abilities?

2) How does "Abyssal Bloodrage" (Abyssal bloodline, level 12 ability) work, since you don't gain the benefits of bloodrage? Does it not function at all because you're not bloodraging, or do you gain only the modifying benefits of the ability (+2 Str, -4 AC)?

1 - Correct, one to enter mystical focus and one to activate an ability. I'm an idiot, it's one point to enter a two-round focus and activate an ability.

2 - You'd only gain the minimum bonus/AC penalty since the mystical focus is considered being in bloodrage without actually bloodraging.


Necromancer wrote:
Philip Pickard wrote:

A couple of questions regarding the Eldritch Scion archetype:

1) Do you have to spend a point from the Eldritch Pool to enter a mystic state, and then another point per use of bloodrage ability? Or do you spend a point, enter the mystic state, and for the duration of the state have free access to bloodrage abilities?

2) How does "Abyssal Bloodrage" (Abyssal bloodline, level 12 ability) work, since you don't gain the benefits of bloodrage? Does it not function at all because you're not bloodraging, or do you gain only the modifying benefits of the ability (+2 Str, -4 AC)?

1 - Correct, one to enter mystical focus and one to activate an ability.

2 - You'd only gain the minimum bonus/AC penalty since the mystical focus is considered being in bloodrage without actually bloodraging.

Hrm, if that's the case, that seems awfully expensive, point-wise. I'm not sure it's worth it. I interpreted the text as restating the mechanic; that is, I took "see below" to mean a more in-depth explanation rather than a listing of related rules.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Ross Byers wrote:
Insain Dragoon wrote:

A lot a cool stuff, but some major weirdness. It feels like the people who wrote the classes, the people who wrote feats, and the people who wrote archetypes had minimal communications. Also feels like the people who wrote feats and archetypes weren't around in the respective feedback threads for the playtest. Too many oddities and unwritten things in this book makes me feel a little disappointed as I read. I'm used to missing and the occasional oddity within Paizo books, but this book has too many.

Maybe SKR was right about the production schedule being too crunched and how trying to get this out by Gen-con constrained them a lot. I would have preferred this stayed another month in development and editing.

You have no idea how many moving parts there are to a book like this. With so many new classes and things that rely on them, simple changes to a class feature can ripple throughout the book. I'm not saying its perfect (it isn't), but I don't think it is in any way more or less flawed than previous years' Gen Con releases, including the Core Rulebook. I dare you to do better.

I also doubt that another month would have brought it to your level of satisfaction. Please, do not misconstrue that as saying you're impossible to please. What I mean is that everyone has a pet issue with a book like this where they disagree with decisions that were made. Something left out they wanted, something included they didn't, or just something they wanted not done to their own personal taste. It's easy to say that if the book had more time, or more developers, or a different developer, that it would match the mental ideal the person built during the run up to release. It's sort of a way of saying "I'm right, and if Paizo had just tried harder, they would have realized that." Even though that if the book was different it would be some other person making a slightly different complaint about the thing that was different.

I don't see how any of that matters when the result is a sub par book by Paizo's own standards. Any person can put out an incomplete product and try to sell it as the best thing since sliced bread, but Paizo isn't any person. They are Paizo Publishing and the current leader in the market for TRPGs and every major hardcover they release should at least be internally consistent and not feel like 4-5 books smooshed together with gum and duct tape.

I couldn't do better, but then again I am not the leading RPG book publisher am I?

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

1 person marked this as a favorite.
BigDTBone wrote:
Basically, how to make my own classes. That's what I wanted. Instead they gave me design goals. I wanted that section of the book to explain the "how" not just tell me the "what."

I agree that making a 'case study' out of some of the other classes/archetypes in the book could have been educational without ending up introducing an 11th class as the example in that chapter.


Philip Pickard wrote:
Necromancer wrote:
Philip Pickard wrote:

A couple of questions regarding the Eldritch Scion archetype:

1) Do you have to spend a point from the Eldritch Pool to enter a mystic state, and then another point per use of bloodrage ability? Or do you spend a point, enter the mystic state, and for the duration of the state have free access to bloodrage abilities?

2) How does "Abyssal Bloodrage" (Abyssal bloodline, level 12 ability) work, since you don't gain the benefits of bloodrage? Does it not function at all because you're not bloodraging, or do you gain only the modifying benefits of the ability (+2 Str, -4 AC)?

1 - Correct, one to enter mystical focus and one to activate an ability.

2 - You'd only gain the minimum bonus/AC penalty since the mystical focus is considered being in bloodrage without actually bloodraging.

Hrm, if that's the case, that seems awfully expensive, point-wise. I'm not sure it's worth it. I interpreted the text as restating the mechanic; that is, I took "see below" to mean a more in-depth explanation rather than a listing of related rules.

Hang on, I was recalling from memory. rereads section

Actually, you're right, there's no mention of points per ability. I'll correct my last post.

Dark Archive

BigDTBone wrote:
Ross Byers wrote:
Rules about making rules suffer from the inner platform effect, at a minimum. I'd much rather get an essay of advice from an expert than an inaccurate set of mechanics. What were you expecting to see in those pages?

I would have liked to see something akin to the basic classes in unearthed arcana with some sort of base system for how to arrange abilities. There was really good info in the chapter of UA. Something I remember now even off the top of my head is that in order to give a class evasion they should have a +3 reflex at the point they get it. That's an example of the kind of info I would have liked.

I think it would have been nice to discuss general comparisons. IE, if you were going to take the bard and give him 4 spell level progression instead of 6, what would that look like? What would he get in exchange? What would it look like if you gave the sorcerer 3/4 BAB, what would he give up in exchange.

If you wanted to take an archetype for one class and make it available to another class how would you go about it? If you wanted to combine two base classes how would you go about it (ie, the design process/theory behind much of this book.)

Basically, how to make my own classes. That's what I wanted. Instead they gave me design goals. I wanted that section of the book to explain the "how" not just tell me the "what."

I think the way they explained everything in the chapter is how they went about it. When combining classes to form a hybrid, you take the flavor of the two and mix it up a bit, then use what you came up with as the basis for designing your class. I see what you mean about the "crunch" stuff, though.


Cheapy wrote:
Insain Dragoon wrote:
Cthulhudrew wrote:
Insain Dragoon wrote:

Anticipate Dodge and Counter reflexes?

Please don't tell me those feats negate dodge and mobility.

Effectively, yes. They will negate the dodge bonus received from Dodge and the AC bonus from Mobility.

Those are probably the saddest feats I ever heard of....

Seriously? This in the same book as Divine Grace for Oracles and Cha Clerics?

Ahhhhh, I was waiting for this comment from you. But I got the wording wrong, so I guess I do in fact owe up on that bet :(

I probably almost said what you wanted, but edited my post just in case of a great thread purging. If you don't mind my asking can you either post or PM the contents of the bet?


Ross Byers wrote:
Sandbox wrote:
Ross Byers wrote:
I dare you to do better.
sheesh...thats a lil raw

I'm not trying to be harsh. But the Open Game License means you really can make your own book, the way you want, and put it on sale. It's harder than it looks.

I'm doing this... though I don't necessarily expect anyone to actually buy it, but, it is fun, so much fun. Also lots of work.

I am very glad to finally have this monster in my hands, as, the playtest versions of these classes were very popular with my group, to the point where almost all of my group has played a character using one of them.
The revised playtest versions worked well for us, not perfectly, but pretty great. So, I'm hoping these finalized versions only work better. I'll be using them a lot for baddies too, so will have a chance to get a feel for them myself.

I haven't had a chance to check out the new archetypes and feats much yet, so can't comment too much on who I agree with on here as far as those... but I'm sure they'll get used.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Insain Dragoon wrote:

I don't see how any of that matters when the result is a sub par book by Paizo's own standards. Any person can put out an incomplete product and try to sell it as the best thing since sliced bread, but Paizo isn't any person. They are Paizo Publishing and the current leader in the market for TRPGs and every major hardcover they release should at least be internally consistent and not feel like 4-5 books smooshed together with gum and duct tape.

I couldn't do better, but then again I am not the leading RPG book publisher am I?

My assertion is that it isn't a 'sub par book'. Every hardcover, back to the Core Rulebook has editing mistakes, development missteps, outright errors, and seams where the writing of multiple authors came together.

It's amazing that it comes out as well as it does, and that is why Paizo is the market leader.

2,001 to 2,050 of 2,448 << first < prev | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | next > last >>
Community / Forums / Paizo / Product Discussion / Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Advanced Class Guide (OGL) All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.