Pathfinder Player Companion: Bastards of Golarion (PFRPG)

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Pathfinder Player Companion: Bastards of Golarion (PFRPG)
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Unlock the powers of your ancestors and combine the might of two worlds with Pathfinder Player Companion: Bastards of Golarion! Whether you’re the abandoned progeny of elven royalty or the feared result of hag trickery, your lineage is both strange and storied, and you must channel the brawn and guile of your forebears to prove yourself to a harsh and uncaring world—no matter the costs.

Inside this book, you’ll find:

  • Ten new heritages and alternate racial traits for half-elves and half-orcs—from the seafaring children of aquatic elves to the brash kin of desert orcs.
  • Details and new character options for adventurers from the famous half-elven refuge of Erages and the half-orc port city of Averaka.
  • Four character themes to represent bastards of all races and pasts, including the envied celebrity, the misbegotten illegitimate, the scorned outcast, and the neglected unfortunate.
  • A slew of generation tables to inspire grim character backgrounds and determine the physical features inherited from non-human progenitors.
  • New archetypes, feats, spells, magic items, traits and more for bastard characters of all walks!

This Pathfinder Player Companion is intended for use with the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game and the Pathfinder campaign setting, but can easily be incorporated into any fantasy world.

Written by Judy Bauer, Neal Litherland, Ryan Macklin, and David N. Ross.
Cover Art by Ralph Horsley.

Each monthly 32-page Pathfinder Player Companion contains several player-focused articles exploring the volume’s theme as well as short articles with innovative new rules for all types of characters, as well as traits to better anchor the player to the campaign.

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-602-7

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Player Companion Subscription.

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Not worth the price

2/5

This product would have gotten four stars were it half the price. At its listed retail, however, the value just isn't there.

There are some wonderful illustrations of the common fantasy half-breeds, especially half-orcs. However, the work itself seems a bit unfocused, with not enough material in some cases (gill men) and bland material in others. What crunch there is seems to be so minor or insignificant as to be an after thought.

The true "bastards" - half-tiefling, half-aasimars, etc. - are relegated to a paragraph apiece. A true shame and a missed opportunity.

A large swath of this work was devoted to character backgrounds - material that could have been condensed to one or two paragraphs per concept, leaving more room for discussion on actual half-breeds.

A work on this subject could have easily been double this size and packed with awesome information. It's very unlikely we'll ever get that chance again for Pathfinder.


Bastards of Heroics

5/5

After looking at this book again recently, I can say that it is much better then I thought it would be. Not only do half-elves and half-orcs get a lot of love but several other races get a little something cool as well.


Pretty good

3/5

Read my full review on Of Dice and Pen.

Bastards of Golarion is a rather better book than I was expecting, even if it does at times seem unsure of its focus. It contains a lot of advice and suggestions for creating characters who are either half-human characters or outcasts from society in some way or another. As with any Pathfinder Player Companion, there are quite a few new mechanical options, but these are mostly limited to new traits that help support the “fluff” of the book. The emphasis of the book is very much on the background information, and this pleased me a great deal.


Disappointing

2/5

A disappointing book that tries to do too much. You get some good fluff and an occasional gem amidst a lot of chaff and a few real head-scratchers. Admittedly, Half-Elves are my favourite core race and I was hoping for better quality content than what I found here.

Positives: Good fluff all round. Half-Orc Subraces are well done. Great cover and I have to single out the Half-Orc pic on page 10 for making me consider playing my least favourite race.

Negatives: Most of the new options are forgettable. Far too many races with their own dedicated Players Companions are represented. Background and Distant Heritage options are things you could work out for yourself with little actual mechanics.

I have to call out some specifics now as examples; some of this stuff perplexes me. The Shoreborn give up Low-light Vision and Keen Senses for Swim and Sailing buffs; the buffs are understandable but you’d think Aquatic blood would make for better vision rather than worse. Spireborn are a little too good, they trade Adaptability for Spell-Like abilities. The rest generally trade Elven Immunities for terrain-specific skill buffs which are of questionable utility aside from very specific campaign settings.

The Unusual Origins feat is actually four feats, depending on which of the applicable races you are. Why isn’t it four separate feats? I don’t know, I can’t think of a single reason why. This one feat takes up an entire double page spread too with some seriously ugly artwork. I hate saying that but that particular piece of artwork rubs me in every wrong way possible.


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"Devil's Advocate" wrote:
Joana wrote:
Shisumo wrote:
The problem there, though, is that Vic's right - we've already had a Paizo book with "Bastards" in the title, and no one seemed to flinch then.
I'm not at all offended by the word, just by the inaccuracy. The title implies that humans and elves never marry each other and have children -- or, for that matter, half-elves don't marry half-elves or half-orcs, half-orcs. As if Golarion has a blanket law forbidding the solemnization of interracial marriage (or preventing half-humans from marrying at all). The word bastard in its non-pejorative sense refers to birth resulting from an unsanctioned relationship, not mixed blood.
That's my main gripe, too, it implies something that is clearly wrong and negative. Half-Elves and Half-Orcs are NOT shunned in Golarion, or viewed as lesser races. They are generally accepted and liked, as I pointed out above. It also implies that most Half-Elves and Half-Orcs only come from a scandalous mating between a Human and an Elf or Orc, which is probably not the case that often anymore.

Irregular =\= Scadalous

The mixing of Elf or Orc and Human sure ain't regular.

So, it implies exactly what I would think it implies.

Also, Half-Orcs are not generally accepted. I've lost count how many books I have read about towns where accepting them makes the town or area unusual. If I'm not mistaken one of those was Land of the Linnorm Kings.

Half-Elves are not shunned, but they tend to not really belong either.

Contributor

Heh.

This is like watching the sparks from the Advanced Race Guide fly again.

I still can't believe that people claims that retail stores would confuse that book for Nazi propaganda or whatever the concern was based on title alone. Give it two weeks and the next cool thing to complain about will roll around and everyone will forget that this book was announced until they're begging for their subscriptions to ship. :-P


Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Pathfinder Accessories, Pawns, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
The Block Knight wrote:
Gorbacz wrote:
"that nice bastard in the grocery store sold me some great apples!". Wait, that would be Canadians...
I wished we talked like that. Might spice up conversation a bit. Maybe I'll bring it up at the next "all Canadians know each other" meeting. ;)

Good idea! I'll bring the poutine!


Interestingly, a synonym for Bastard is Crossbreed, also Hybrid, Half-Caste, Combination, Mule etc...


theneofish wrote:
brock, no the other one... wrote:
GeraintElberion wrote:
If this was a UK forum then 'bastard' would be censored in the same way that 't+$!', 's!$&' and 'wanker' would be.
I've been turning it over in my head all evening, and the only place where I've heard the word used to represent a 'mixture' would be in 'bastardise', and even then it implies corruption and pollution.
To be fair, it's used often in faux mediaeval literature to denote illegitimate - I'd be astonished if it hasn't appeared in Game of Thrones, for instance. Of course it still carries a pejorative tone, hence the corruption of the original word into one of abuse.

Oh, does it ever! :D


On the name, there's something of a precedent. Green Ronin published Bastards & Bloodlines, which covers the same basic subjects.

Speaking of that, any hope this is a project the Bastards & Bloodlines author Owen Stevens might be put on?


I'd imagine being one of the key minds at Super Genius Games keeps Owen fully occupied, but you never know.

The Exchange

Mead Gregorisson wrote:

Besides, no one against it is offering an alternative. I would guess even more people would complain about halfbreeds, halfbloods, or other terms. I did offer Swirlies of Golarion, but my guess is that's a no go.

So, does anyone have a better name?

Halfbreeds or halfbloods would have been fine. As would dualborn or mongrels.

Mead Gregorisson wrote:

I really wish people in this world would grow up and stop complaining about everything. I swear, we live in a world of 10 year olds on a playground.

You are also insulting anyone that has had kids or relatives born out of wedlock by treating it as if it is a negative.

Um, no - you have this exactly backwards. It is because the word is now used purely as a (pretty bad) derogatory term regardless of 'legitamacy' that I commented. It's similar to calling a book 'B@$%&es of Golarion'.

Edit: Seriously? The boards filter canines of the feminine gender but not the word 'bastard'? That honestly surprised me. Separated by a common language indeed :)

Now, Vic has (a way back) popped in to say that the implied slur on the reputation of dual-heritage people in Golarion is intentional. So I'm fine with this now. If it's intentional by design, rather than poor word choice for the international market, fair enough.

Besides, I believe it's been printed in hard copy in the catalogue. So beyond Vic's metaphorical boat sailing with the Bastards of Erebus, a boat has literally sailed!

Unless Paizo get their catalogue printing done domestically.

Sovereign Court RPG Superstar 2009 Top 32, 2010 Top 8

Mead Gregorisson wrote:


That isn't the original meaning.

Then I look forward to your presenting the documentation.


My Northern European sensibilities are not offended by the word, but then we Scot's have the first recorded use of the 'f' and 'c' words in literature (William Dunbar's A Brash of Wowing - http://mediaevalfollies.tumblr.com/post/9749728877/william-dunbar-a-brash-o f-wowing - read the glossary at the end!) and a fair few modern Scot's writers also use them freely.

I think the offence lies with Victorian snobbery and hypocrisy so I for one am more than happy to reclaim the words as worthy of a place in everyday language of us modern-day 'Ynglis' speakers.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

I like it. When I play an halfblood, knowing that villains will call me a "bastard" makes me feel a BADASS... who will have all the more pleasure in making them laugh from the other part of their faces! ^_^


Matthew Morris wrote:
Mead Gregorisson wrote:


That isn't the original meaning.
Then I look forward to your presenting the documentation.

So I have to buy you a dictionary? Or look it up for you? Ever heard of expanding your own knowledge?

The word came from the proto-Germanic word for 'low born'. It was originally for irregular, dubious and inferior births. it has also been posted several times in this thread. Hel, if you check a thesaurus you'll find crossblood and related words are synonyms. The marriage-related definition was just one of several.

Unless you think pre-Christian folk cared about marriage in the way people did when Christianity became big. If that is the case, your ignorance isn't my fault.

There are plenty of people in this thread that understood this usage had nothing to do with marriage. So it clearly isn't a problem with the word, only peoples' knowledge of the word.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

This isn't the first time we've used the word "Bastards" in a title on the cover of a product we printed. "Bastards of Erebus" was the very first Pathfinder RPG Adventure Path title, and the world didn't explode at that point when we released it, so I wouldn't worry too much about this one causing many problems.

Scarab Sages Contributor; Developer, Super Genius Games

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Trace Coburn wrote:
I'd imagine being one of the key minds at Super Genius Games keeps Owen fully occupied, but you never know.

Not to mention writing material for other people's Kickstarters as stretch goals, but I do like to keep up the occasional Paizo freelance project. Not that I have any reason to believe this one is going to have any freelancers on it, since it's written by "Paizo Staff."

But yeah, anything is possible. :)

Sovereign Court RPG Superstar 2009 Top 32, 2010 Top 8

Shorter Mead.

"What? You expect me to back up what I'm saying without proof?"

Thank you for conceding the point.

Owen I'd be happy to see your name on it.


Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber
brock, no the other one... wrote:
Mead Gregorisson wrote:

So, does anyone have a better name?

Halfbreeds or halfbloods would have been fine. As would dualborn or mongrels.

I'm pretty sure "halfbreeds" and "mongrels" would be way more objectionable than "bastards" here in the US. When applied to people, those terms have a history of bigotry behind 'em, at least to me.

For me, the title reminded me of Scott Lynch's Gentlemen Bastards books. I'm still hoping for some scoundrelry in the book.


Talk about a can of worms unnecessarily opened...

If you think its not offensive, try offering up as a title over on one or more of the multi-racial forums on Facebook.

So..what about half-orcs and half-elves you say? Those descriptions refer to mixes of two different and distinct species - not races - and how a fantasy culture may refer to them - not the blending of two types of orc or two types of elf or two types of human.

Paizo has plenty of folks who can do better than this and come up with something really unique, like 'Twixers ("between worlds") or something else that could fit within the campaign setting.

For the adventure, the word bastard works just fine as a description of "sorta bad dudes".


2 people marked this as a favorite.
Matthew Morris wrote:

Shorter Mead.

"What? You expect me to back up what I'm saying without proof?"

Thank you for conceding the point.

Owen I'd be happy to see your name on it.

I don't see you posting proof for your side either. There has been nothing definate on either side.

Though I do apologize to everyone for my irritation. I am sick of how everyone, no matter what it is in this world, has to start whining.

The name of this book is perfectly fine, and spot on. But no... whining must commence.

It's like that Hitler teapot billboard incident. The teapot looked nothing like Hitler, but people decided to b##+* anyway. We live in a world of children staying up past thir bedtimes.

Liberty's Edge

Here is a link to supporting evidence.

Paizo Employee Chief Technical Officer

Owen K. C. Stephens wrote:
Not that I have any reason to believe this one is going to have any freelancers on it, since it's written by "Paizo Staff."

"Paizo Staff" is a generic author placeholder for books that haven't been contracted at announcement time; freelancers *often* wind up writing or cowriting such books. (Prior to that, nearly all books were announced with "James Jacobs" as the author...)


graywulfe wrote:
Here is a link to supporting evidence.

Wikis are not good links to support either side.

Neither is etymology.com which was posted earlier. Though that supported that the word descended from the proto-Germanic word for 'low born'.

Many people don't get that language evolved and even if 'bastard' evolved to have to do with marriage, among other things... before it did it was not a word dealing with that. Early Germanics didn't care if a child was born of marriage, or out of marriage. A child was a child... So instead their word had nothing to do with marriage. That came later when the church took over.

The bottom line is the word is perfectly acceptable. People just like to complain about things.

Project Manager

15 people marked this as a favorite.

I've never found, when someone says, "The thing you said/did hurt or offended me," that it's particularly useful or makes the world a better place to say, "You're just oversensitive," or "Stop whining," without finding out why it bothers them.

Given that we all have very different life experiences, none of us are in a very good position to decide for others whether they have a "right" to be offended by something, and the same word or symbol may have very different meanings for different people, especially when a product is being sold internationally.

I'm glad that the people who are upset by the use of the term "Bastard" in one of our titles have taken the time to let us know and to explain why. It's helpful in continuing to try to make better and better products.

Thanks to those who have commented -- I think a lot of you have made very fair points about how this usage differs from "The Bastards of Erebus," and we'll definitely take it into consideration in future naming.


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Point taken, Jessica Price.

Dark Archive

6 people marked this as a favorite.
Vic Wertz wrote:
"Paizo Staff" is a generic author placeholder for books that haven't been contracted at announcement time; freelancers *often* wind up writing or cowriting such books. (Prior to that, nearly all books were announced with "James Jacobs" as the author...)

He lies to conceal the horrible truth that 'Paizo Staff' is a hive-mind operating out of the basement of Paizo HQ (the real one in the Hollow Earth, not the mockup in Washington state), formed from the spirits of the interns fed to the cave-raptors, and interpreted from their squawks and cries by the Cave Raptor Whisperer.

Project Manager

11 people marked this as a favorite.
Set wrote:
Vic Wertz wrote:
"Paizo Staff" is a generic author placeholder for books that haven't been contracted at announcement time; freelancers *often* wind up writing or cowriting such books. (Prior to that, nearly all books were announced with "James Jacobs" as the author...)

He lies to conceal the horrible truth that 'Paizo Staff' is a hive-mind operating out of the basement of Paizo HQ (the real one in the Hollow Earth, not the mockup in Washington state), formed from the spirits of the interns fed to the cave-raptors, and interpreted from their squawks and cries by the Cave Raptor Whisperer.

Send out the drones for this one--

I mean, what a charming joke you made there! Hee hee hee!


Well I guess Pazio will just have to come out with The Loved and Socialy Accepted Children of Happily Interracial Married Couples of Golarion book sometime in the future to cover the happy innterracial kids.

Me when I play a half-elf or half-orc I kinda want to play a outcast...so 'bastard' kinda fits with the what I want of my characters.


And I assume Aasimar are also included in this book?
AFAIK, these 'hybrids' don't need to have parents of different races,
they can both be Human but carry the bloodline enough to create a half-Elf/Aasimar/whatever...?


Wee semantic point, would 'Bastard RACES of Golarion' be less offensive?

Because then it specifies the usage of the word in terms of its 'Mixture of Species' context (which is an appropriate usage of the word within the dictionary) or is this something that still carries some social offense?

You see this illustrates the point also about social offense, someone, somewhere will almost always be offended (in the case of D&D often with a conservative religious agenda). Ultimately you must decide for yourself Paizo (a commercial organisation) where you draw this line but I suspect those who cannot see past their emotional reaction to the word will be in the minority. Also you risk making your products bland and sterile, which would lose you customers too.

Personally I say: "F*ck 'em" but them I'm probably too prone to use the old Anglo-Saxon...

Silver Crusade

9 people marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I'm still waiting for Brothels of Golarion.


Gorbacz wrote:
I'm still waiting for Brothels of Golarion.

I am too. We should start a thread asking for it.

Dark Archive

3 people marked this as a favorite.

It would probably be released as 'Dancing Halls' of Golarion.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

And all the nipples will be covered. But the cover will feature Amiri slashing a Whore Queen in half with blood and guts splattering all over.

Dark Archive

Gorbacz wrote:
I'm still waiting for Brothels of Golarion.

The Welcome Wench needs to find a home in Golarion.

Probably somewhere alongside the Rancid Raconteur.

Gorbacz I want my masterwork chastity belt back.

Dark Archive

Well, at least sex is no longer a greater evil than serial murder as both have good entities promoting them ...


Gorbacz wrote:
And all the nipples will be covered. But the cover will feature Amiri slashing a Whore Queen in half with blood and guts splattering all over.

Don't worry though. They'll make sure not to say bastard. Wouldn't want to offend your sensibilities ;)

Silver Crusade

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Odraude wrote:
Gorbacz wrote:
And all the nipples will be covered. But the cover will feature Amiri slashing a Whore Queen in half with blood and guts splattering all over.
Don't worry though. They'll make sure not to say bastard. Wouldn't want to offend your sensibilities ;)

They'll say "katana" instead. Because as we all know, katana=bastard.


Gorbacz wrote:
I'm still waiting for Brothels of Golarion.

Just wait till you see the list of new 'feats' in it!

Sovereign Court

Mead Gregorisson wrote:
graywulfe wrote:
Here is a link to supporting evidence.

Wikis are not good links to support either side.

Neither is etymology.com which was posted earlier.

Etymonline.com has this list of sources.

Which of these is acceptable to you?


Paizo Charter Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
Quandary wrote:

And I assume Aasimar are also included in this book?

AFAIK, these 'hybrids' don't need to have parents of different races,
they can both be Human but carry the bloodline enough to create a half-Elf/Aasimar/whatever...?

There's already Blood of Angels for aasimars.

Paizo Employee Developer

Quandary wrote:

And I assume Aasimar are also included in this book?

AFAIK, these 'hybrids' don't need to have parents of different races,
they can both be Human but carry the bloodline enough to create a half-Elf/Aasimar/whatever...?

The goal of this book is to represent half-elves and half-orcs as well as any other characters that might be considered "bastards" (using a truncated form of the second definition from this dictionary: "Something that is of irregular... or dubious origin"). This is not limited solely to characters of half-human, half-other origins such as half-elves, aasimars, or changelings—the aim is to serve characters of particular backgrounds as well as races. Thus, the fully dwarven child who discovers his talent for magic in a magic-fearing dwarven society would be just as well served by this book as the aasimar born into the demon-worshiping human society.

Without spoiling anything, I think readers will be quite pleased with the amount, scope, and treatment of content in this book.


Pathfinder Companion, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Patrick Renie wrote:
Quandary wrote:

And I assume Aasimar are also included in this book?

AFAIK, these 'hybrids' don't need to have parents of different races,
they can both be Human but carry the bloodline enough to create a half-Elf/Aasimar/whatever...?

The goal of this book is to represent half-elves and half-orcs as well as any other characters that might be considered "bastards" (using a truncated form of the second definition from this dictionary: "Something that is of irregular... or dubious origin"). This is not limited solely to characters of half-human, half-other origins such as half-elves, aasimars, or changelings—the aim is to serve characters of particular backgrounds as well as races. Thus, the fully dwarven child who discovers his talent for magic in a magic-fearing dwarven society would be just as well served by this book as the aasimar born into the demon-worshiping human society.

** spoiler omitted **

Without spoiling anything, I think readers will be quite pleased with the amount, scope, and treatment of content in this book.

Hmm. I am now considerably more intrigued as to the contents of this book than when I thought it was just a half-elf/half-orc book. Well played.


Agreed. That sounds much better to me.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

10 people marked this as a favorite.
Jadeite wrote:
It would probably be released as 'Dancing Halls' of Golarion.

nah.

They're only "dancing halls" in the rulebook line.

Golarion has PLENTY of brothels.

Silver Crusade

4 people marked this as a favorite.
Jadeite wrote:
Apparently Wankers of Golarion would also be possible.

I'm assuming that would have a chapter dedicated to Drandle Dreng.


Patrick Renie wrote:
Quandary wrote:

And I assume Aasimar are also included in this book?

AFAIK, these 'hybrids' don't need to have parents of different races,
they can both be Human but carry the bloodline enough to create a half-Elf/Aasimar/whatever...?

The goal of this book is to represent half-elves and half-orcs as well as any other characters that might be considered "bastards" (using a truncated form of the second definition from this dictionary: "Something that is of irregular... or dubious origin"). This is not limited solely to characters of half-human, half-other origins such as half-elves, aasimars, or changelings—the aim is to serve characters of particular backgrounds as well as races. Thus, the fully dwarven child who discovers his talent for magic in a magic-fearing dwarven society would be just as well served by this book as the aasimar born into the demon-worshiping human society.

** spoiler omitted **

Without spoiling anything, I think readers will be quite pleased with the amount, scope, and treatment of content in this book.

So I am curious...why go with bastards and not outcasts?


Actually I agree with John. Why not Exiles of Golarion or Pariahs of Golarion? I feel that actually fits more than Bastards does. I mean, we have two schools of thought about the bastard (one thinks it's villains, the other half-breeds) and what you described doesn't quite fit with either of them. I say use Bastards of Golarion for a villain book and use something that means "outcast". I personally like Pariahs of Golarion, but I may be a bit biased :)


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Misfits of Golarion ... they aren't wholly outcasts, exiles, or pariahs, but they don't fit in. :)


Well, I second that, and going on what Patrick wrote,
I think the product description is just misleading, since it does focus solely on 'race' and 'blood heritage'.
What Patrick described sounds like a cool concept, but nobody would expect that sort of thing based on the description as-is.


Quandary wrote:

Well, I second that, and going on what Patrick wrote,

I think the product description is just misleading, since it does focus solely on 'race' and 'blood heritage'.
What Patrick described sounds like a cool concept, but nobody would expect that sort of thing based on the description as-is.

I agree. I'm already confused. First I thought this was about villains, then I'm told it's about half-breeds, now I'm told it's about misfits. I'm so confused! ;)

Thirding Misfits of Golarion. It rolls of the tongue. And I don't think we need another Blood of the Night issue.


Odraude wrote:
Thirding Misfits of Golarion. It rolls of the tongue.

This book has nothing about flumphs.

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