Gingerbread Kaiju PDF

4.70/5 (based on 3 ratings)

Our Price: $2.99

Add to Cart
Facebook Twitter Email

Eat Your Enemies!

It’s Christmastime in Tokyo, and sirens are blaring. Men, women, and children put aside work, school, shopping, and the many distractions that life in modern Japan offers. They move quickly, but calmly to the nearest emergency shelters, for they know only too well what these klaxons mean. Soon the air will be filled with the smell of freshly baked dough, cinnamon, and nutmeg—the kaiju are coming!

Gingerbread Kaiju is a none-too-serious board game where each player takes on the role of a kaiju—a giant monster of incredible destructive force—that happens to be made entirely of gingerbread. As anyone who has seen a Godzilla or Gamera movie will tell you, kaiju do not generally get along very well . . . and they ALL hate Tokyo!

In this game, your kaiju will smash up the city to gather power, then unleash this confectionary wrath on the other monsters in hopes of destroying them all and being crowned the King of the Kaiju!

Product Availability

Fulfilled immediately.

Are there errors or omissions in this product information? Got corrections? Let us know at store@paizo.com.

PZOPDFRGG0201E


See Also:

Average product rating:

4.70/5 (based on 3 ratings)

Sign in to create or edit a product review.

An Endzeitgeist.com review

5/5

This game-pdf is 13 pages long, 1 page front cover, leaving us with 12 pages of content, so how does this work?

Well, first skip to page 10, which includes a tasty gingerbread recipe and instructions to make Gingerbread. 2 pages contain a total of 8 silhouettes you can print out, cut and then put on the gingerbread to make your characters - for this is all about gingerbread monsters fighting the delicious fight.

In order to play, not much is required - 1 Gingerbread Kaiju per player, 1 deck of standard playing cards and a d12. Optionally, icing can be used to make the Kaiju more detailed (and tasty!) and the game also requires some assorted cookies, baked goods or alternatively inedible markers. Before play, sort the cards into two decks: The ward deck and the karma deck. The ward-deck contains 20 cards (10s, Jacks, Queens, Kings and Aces of suits) and is evenly distributed on a table on a 4x5 grid, face down. The other deck contains the remaining numbers and two jokers. The d12 is used to determine from where the Kaiju enters Tokyo and to determine who goes first.

Now I've mentioned other markers: Full-sized candy represents buildings, fun-sized candy equipment, round baked goods (like oreos and chips) are UFOs and Skittles, M&M's and similar small pieces would be people - all of these enter the resource bank.

Now each ward-card corresponds to a special event with buildings and people and is revealed upon flipping the card, which happens as soon as a Kaiju enters the area. Every round, you may spend up to two action points to move, bite stomp (which are resolved efficiency-wise with the d12), use special powers or even mutate in the right areas. Destroyed areas and people net the Kaiju more power, which in turn helps it stave off damage and conserve its delicious hit points. (Also, power consumed means that you may eat goodies! Yay!)

Also, every round, at the end, you draw a karma-card, which, depending on the card, usually allows you do unpleasant things to other Kaiju, though you may have a maximum of karma cards at one time equal to the amount of parts your Kaiju has - which are determined by 8 general basic statblocks for the respective prototypical Kaiju. These include, btw., Cocoonra, the Guardian of all Baked Goods, Globbulon, Giddy Ra (the dragon who can't make up his mind), King Konk and, of course, Bakedzilla. It should be noted that each of the Kaiju has its own signature attacks and tactical options, which karma cards that allow you to reveal adjacent wards (or plainly do mean things to the other Kaiju) further expand.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are top-notch, I didn't notice any glitches. Layout adheres to a nice, easy to read two-column portrait standard with Stan!'s signature artworks throughout. The pdf has no bookmarks, which is a slight pity, but since one probably should print these pages out anyway, that will not be considered detrimental in this case.

All right, after a match of industry legend Stan!'s "Plätzchen-Kaiju" (I substituted another dough), I can attest to this game being fun - especially for everyone who is gleefully nostalgic for the Kaiju and versed in their respective mythologies - when turtlesaurus just has its shell left and starts shooting fire out of every opening of its holes, I know that I was chuckling. The rules per se are simple to grasp, though at least in the beginning, a list of card-effects for the respective wards should always be handy. If there was one weakness to the rules and my understanding of them would be that the pdf could have made clearer how many karma cards one has at the beginning and that the buildings etc. retain their value when added to the power pool. Apart from that admittedly nitpicky complaint, we have a neat selection of Kaiju here and a game, where there is a real temptation for tacticians to ignore the more sound option to go for the favorite candy. All in all, a fun game and one that will not only be fun for roleplaying veterans and kaiju-aficionados, but also for kids (though one ability might require renaming, depending on your sensibilities - it involves the finger). I know I would have been ALL OVER this game; Bake Gingerbread, design it and then prove one's mettle versus my friends in a battle for chocolaty goodness? Yes! This is fun past-time and not only great for the gingerbread-time, but could also be played with bread, spicy food or the like. Fun, engaging and very affordable, this is easily worth a final verdict of 5 stars. Now... can we have expansions for more Kaiju? Something seems to have happened to the old ones - they're curiously gone... Final verdict? 4.5 stars, rounded up to 5.

Endzeitgeist out.


Scrumptious Fun

4/5

My family purchased Gingerbread Kaiju within days of its release and my children were eager to play it. After two days of preparation, we had our first session and the game did not disappoint in its cookie-kaiju goodness.

For those not yet aware of what Gingerbread Kaiju entails, it is a game in which you bake gingerbread monsters, stomp through Tokyo (or a card facsimile thereof) and eat your cookie foes. The citizens of Tokyo, major pieces of equipment, UFOs and city-buildings are represented by an assortment of candy and cookies, which, as you lose health, your enemies also eat (or sometimes you do as you spend to power up your special powers).

First a couple of nits: The rules could use a little clarification in some places, though the author Stan Brown was readily accessible via publisher Owen Stephens, and I cleared up confusion before playing on an issue (ie. Buildings and Equipment retain their point value after being added to the Power Pool), and the gameplay itself is light and fairly intuitive. Secondly, the rules suggest using playing cards for randomly drawn events and city wards. We did not do so and took the time to print up cards for each Karma and Ward cards and it made the game go much faster and smoother than I think it would have if we would have had to cross-reference charts every turn. Thirdly, one of the Kaiju has a power entitled “Give them the finger,” which for an otherwise extremely family friendly game was a little out of place.

Those nits aside, the gameplay was quick and easy and we had a lot of fun playing.

Let me take a moment and say that the Gingerbread Recipe included with the book is very good (I believe kudos are in order to LJ Stephens for the recipe) and the tastiness of the cookie made people all the more eager to get their Kaiju into the fray so they could eat some of their opponents. The cookies were sturdy enough for gameplay and yet not crunchy when eaten. I would use the recipe again apart from the game, just for gingerbread men.

We played with 6 people and the game did not drag. As written, the game can support 7 people, though I would hazard that 5 people is the sweet spot for play. Less than 5 and the monsters are going to take longer to come to blows (which is the heart and point of the game).

It isn't a deeply strategic game (though there is some strategy,) but thats fine for a game designed around eating cookies and candy. Essentially, gameplay is as follows: your Kaiju spend a little bit of time stomping on buildings and people for energy, and said energy goes into the monster's Power Pool. Then once your Kaiju are adjacent to other Kaiju, they head in to do battle or blast away with breath weapons. Damage comes out first from the Power Pool and then, after, from limbs. As you deal damage you get to eat (literally) the power pool tokens or cookie parts of the opponent. We did (we being the parental units) house-rule that while the players could eat as many Reese's Pieces a turn as they wanted (Reeses is made of people!), other larger pieces were limited to 1 a round and the rest went back into the general pile of food-tokens. Potentially there is an awful lot of candy and cookies to be consumed with this game and limiting consumption per turn prevented bellyaches and made each attack each turn that much sweeter.

Overall Gingerbread Kaiju a good, light game, quite appropriate for this time of year (December), and I would highly recommend it as a holiday party game. Indeed, while the preparation for the game precludes (practically speaking) playing it everyday, we are certainly planning on baking more cookies and playing it again with cousins. I would rate it a 4.5, rounded down for the lack of rules clarity, but rounded up to 5 once those are fixed.


5/5

I am associated with Adventureaweek.com, were I operate as the main PDF monkey. My reviews are written with a desire to remain unbiased as many of the designers, writers, artists and publishers are considered friends to me. Having said that I am first and foremost a reviewer, and in respect to these people and their product I intend to evaluate this product honestly and fairly.

Every now and then a product comes along that is utterly so hilarious that one can not help but instantly find themselves drawn in. Gingerbread Kaiju from Rogue Genius Games is one such product. Billed as an edible board game (yes, you just read that) this self contained game requires the usage of a deck of standard playing cards, some markers (preferably with candies), and of course the cookies themselves. But we’ll get to those devour-able game pieces in a few minutes, let’s talk about the game play itself first, shall we?

Kaiju craze has come into its own, with a love for the genre generating a resurgence in the classic giant creature destruction tale. With video games and big budget movies jumping on board to fuel our love of some major monster devastation, not to mention the already impressive body of classic kaiju film material in existence, it was only a matter of time before the genre was taken to a new level, as only the Geniuses could. Laying out a “board” representing the wards, or neighborhoods, of Tokyo with 20 of the cards from a standard deck into a simple 4x5 grid the players prepare to lay waste to this famous of so many kaiju battles throughout history. Populated with both real world areas as well as fictional locations, the cards represent the areas the kaiju will travel through and interact with as they both battle with each other and destroy the locations around them. The remaining cards make up the resource deck, usable by the players with various different effects depending upon the cards drawn. Everything from getting a bonus to damage from using a battleship to strike a foe to a nuke attack. The game stays tongue in cheek and light hearted with a easy set of rules presented here with two lists for the different card decks and their effects, as well as a list of abilities for the kaiju, their special attacks, and a player’s actions available each turn. The game is easy enough that within a matter of 30 minutes to an hour you could fully understand and be playing.

So, there is the basics right? So let’s get to why this is so much more than just a cool and easy game. The kaiju are FREAKING COOKIES!!!! 8 kaiju are presented here in this guide, with templates for each to be used to make your own cookie cutters (kids, find an adult, then tech them to play also). The kaiju all invoke the art of Stan! But that should be to assume, as he illustrated and gave this game its look (which is awesome by the way). The game blatantly states the longest part of setting up for this game is the baking, heck the PDF even gives up 3 ½ pages to the baking between the templates and the recipe. Personally, I would have it no other way. The game is perfect for playing with your friends and taking the steps to design the individual kaiju, planning an afternoon with your kids to bake a batch or two of monsters to let them loose on some cookie carnage. Seriously, a game that is completely tied around the concept of allowing so much interaction and playability from the idea of putting out a plate of cookies…how can you not want this in your world? Adding a bag of Skittles or M&Ms to represent people, and perhaps some wafer cookies to be used as buildings and boom, your in the game folks. Now, before anyone screams about all the sugar, these are suggestions, you can easily use celery for the buildings, perhaps raisins for people, or grapes or equipment and such…the point is, the markers can be anything. The game mechanics are solid enough to be a real game, the fact that it is represented along with the idea of using cookies is just a cool bonus…a very cool bonus, lol.

Now, being as how this is a review, let’s make sure we have covered everything. All art here is from the hand of Stan!, the PDF is laid out in a dual column format, the editing is top notch, and the recipe appears to be solid. I have already made plans to get together with my partner in crime when it comes to baking to make up some batches of Kaiju for friends for the holidays, as this game strikes me as one that would make a great way to get friends and family to slow down and have fun, across the generational gaps of age. I can easily see this being the type of product that sees the Geniuses adding a Kaiju to the game or two in expansion products, if not even going so far as talking Stan! into designing a full deck of cards to make available through either the POD options over at RPGNow or just by PDF.

An excellent enjoyable game, and one I can see bringing many hours to a gametable. More than happy to recommend this game for a full 5 stars, and well worth the price of admission folks! Very well done Geniuses, very well done indeed.


Webstore Gninja Minion

Om nom nom nom!

Scarab Sages Contributor

Thanks, Liz!

The Exchange

Christmas Day. This will be the game played by my friends after all the presents are open.

Scarab Sages Contributor

1 person marked this as a favorite.

And to be clear (since it's come up)
Yes, you really fight with monsters made of gingerbread cookie.
Yes, there's a recipe and a template for the monsters.
Yes, it's a stand-alone game of munchie silliness.

Scarab Sages

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook Subscriber

OMG... WTF... WTB...

This honestly looks completely silly, but it will be in my cart on Friday, I fear.


Review posted here, RPGNow and Thoughts With Broken Dice.

Quite possibly one of the coolest party game I can see becoming a favorite around my house. Well done!


Awesome (and fast!) review! :D

Contributor

Owen, you should show them your game play video ... oh, wait ... maybe I just did!


Guys, how many players? How long do I have to wait to eat the c... I mean, how long is the game play?

Scarab Sages Contributor

2-8 players. And honestly, game play duration likely depends on how hungry you are. Players CAN go right for each other and make it a pretty short game. Set-up (not including baking and decorating your kaiju, which you CAN skip and use different counters) takes about 5 minutes.

Scarab Sages Contributor

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Many thanks to KTFish7 for the review!


Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

My girlfriend loves craft projects and the board game king of tokyo...sounds like a fun holiday activity. Definately going to need to pick this up.


I managed to bring this game up in discussion last night during dinner. DW was at first a little skeptical, but when I informed her that:
1: It's only $2.99
B: It supports a small business
3 (or C): It's just a pdf with a recipe, so it doesn't take up space on the (FULL) game shelf

We bought it. I have not had a chance to read it yet, but the concept is hilarious and fun. I think my son is a bit young for it yet, but he would have fun EATING gingerbread Kaiju. He certainly enjoys eating the Gingerbread dinosaurs that we bake. Also, we have older neices and nephews who will enjoy the game over Christmas.

My only "complaint" is that Rogue Genius Games doesn't have a website up yet, so I bought through Paizo (supporting a small business through another small business).

-Aaron

Edit: I wonder how much it would cost to take the templates to a metal fabricator and get cookie cutters made? Probably prohibitively expensive, but it would be fun!

Scarab Sages Contributor

We're looking into Kaiju Cookie Cutters. *So* far all our options are prohibitive one way or another, but we continue to look.

The website is under development. It's likely be done if not for the holiday rush. In any case, we are *delighted* with our business arrangement with Paizo, so NEVER feel bad buying our things here (or at any of our other online venders). They all give us great tools and exposure in return for their small cut of our sales, so we feel we are getting good value from every sale here.


Question: What did you print the templates on to make them useful. It seems as though standard printer paper would not stand up to the abuse of cutting a cookie around it. Maybe something stiffer?

I just looked over the recipe page. If I might make a suggestion:

You could include a recipe for making the frosting that you use to decorate them. Maybe even mention that you can put the frosting into a ziplock type baggie and cut off a corner to make a decorating dispenser.

Granted, we can all look online to find a recipe for that type of frosting, but it's handy to have it all in one place.

-Aaron

Scarab Sages Contributor

We just printed the templates on normal printer paper. The dough isn't hard to work with, and is just a touch moist so the templates stay in place easily.
We used pre-made decorator's frosting, so a recipe for it didn't even occur to me.

Anyone else want us to add a frosting recipe to Gingerbread kaiju? :)


1 person marked this as a favorite.

Will there be a supplement with Soul Brother powered Mecha with Pimp Slap action?

Scarab Sages Contributor

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Gingerbread Mecha, as a follow up and/or expansion, is on our radar.

No promises about that specific option...


This is so awesome! Picking up for sure on payday.


Owen K. C. Stephens wrote:
Gingerbread Mecha, as a follow up and/or expansion, is on our radar.

Seconding for that Mecha.....well, since we're asking...Cthulhubread, the elder cookie! What? You know you want to make one, lol.

And while we are talking about the cool idea of cookie cutters (ahem, plastic, go 3D print route gents to get a core set made then take them into the full production direction for more refined cutters), what about getting a set of cards? Seriously, a set of 20 cards for the board with art from Stan! that help bring the table to life. I know, lots of art and work......but come on...I said purty please....with cherries on top, lol.

Alright, alright, I'll crawl back in my cave and be good....yes Lord Cthulhubread, I informed them....the seeds have been planted my dark master....all will be as you have directed....with raisins and butterscotch chips....yes my master...

Scarab Sages Contributor

1 person marked this as a favorite.

We are, in fact, looking into the feasibility of Ward cards, Karma cards, and cookie cutters. That would all have to be for a Gingerbread Kaiju Deluxe and/or expansions, but we're looking into them. My guess is that's going to take time, and the better sales of the core pdf are, the more effort we'll spend looking into them. :)


Ha! I didn't even think of pre-made decorators frosting. We mostly make everything at home in my house. I'll just look up a recipe online. Ward and Karma cards would be fun, but we'll be fine playing with a pack of cards...

I think it's awesome that my offhand thought, "I'll bet cookie cutters would be awesome! I'll bet they would be too expensive to be realistic." is actually being seriously considered.

I joked with DW the other day that if we DID find someone to make cookie cutters that I would have to send a set to the Rogue Geniuses just because. She agreed that it was a good idea.

-Aaron

Liberty's Edge

To anyone that is interested in some design insight, you can read my interview with Stan! about Gingerbread Kaiju here.

Scarab Sages Contributor

For the curious, here's a link to the short video representation of what Gingerbread Kaiju is all about.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Card Game, Rulebook Subscriber
Itchy wrote:

Question: What did you print the templates on to make them useful. It seems as though standard printer paper would not stand up to the abuse of cutting a cookie around it. Maybe something stiffer?

I just looked over the recipe page. If I might make a suggestion:

You could include a recipe for making the frosting that you use to decorate them. Maybe even mention that you can put the frosting into a ziplock type baggie and cut off a corner to make a decorating dispenser.

Granted, we can all look online to find a recipe for that type of frosting, but it's handy to have it all in one place.

-Aaron

We used Card-Stock to print out the templates which worked well enough in conjunction with a paring knife on the dough.

Our frosting recipe was 1 TBSP Butter, 1 1/2 TBSP milk, 1/4 tsp vanilla, about 2 cups of powdered sugar, mixed well and then thinned just a little more with water. It worked for both cement (after 1 night of drying) and for the decorations using a cake decorating bag and small-medium sized decorating tip.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Card Game, Rulebook Subscriber

Oh and reviewed.

Scarab Sages

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Card Game, Rulebook Subscriber
KTFish7 wrote:
And while we are talking about the cool idea of cookie cutters (ahem, plastic, go 3D print route gents to get a core set made then take them into the full production direction for more refined cutters), what about getting a set of cards? Seriously, a set of 20 cards for the board with art from Stan! that help bring the table to life. I know, lots of art and work......but come on...I said purty please....with cherries on top, lol.

We took the time to make our own cards and I don't regret it one bit. Printed them on Cardstock and can reuse them, though I suspect for next year we will take the time to make better ones if Owen and Stan don't go ahead and produce something. Having everything preprinted made the game go very smooth.


2 people marked this as a favorite.

Strangely enough, I just started dating someone who used to be a gamer and wants to start again. This is going to happen for date night.


Wicht wrote:
Oh and reviewed.

I'm curious because we have not had time to play the game yet. Your review mentioned some rules clarifications? What rules required clarification?

I'm planning to play a short game with DW after the kids go to bed so that we can have the rules cemented into our heads for real gameplay over Christmas. I would love to benefit from your experience!

-Aaron

Scarab Sages Contributor

Many thanks to Wicht for the review!


Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Owen K. C. Stephens wrote:
We are, in fact, looking into the feasibility of Ward cards, Karma cards, and cookie cutters. That would all have to be for a Gingerbread Kaiju Deluxe and/or expansions, but we're looking into them. My guess is that's going to take time, and the better sales of the core pdf are, the more effort we'll spend looking into them. :)

So is Ginerbread Kaiju shaping up to be a core Rogue Genius Product line? I think this is the first serious discussion of non-pdf products I've seen from a genius product since the adventurers handbook.

Not that I'm complaining, I enjoy both games about stompy monsters and delicious cookies and look forward to whatever comes in the cookie based board game genre.

Scarab Sages Contributor

I think it is safe to say we are seriously considering possible expansions of our cookie based board game line, and that may include print and/or cookie cutter products.

But research on those questions is going to take time, so we'd be looking at things for mid-to-late next year.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Card Game, Rulebook Subscriber
Itchy wrote:
Wicht wrote:
Oh and reviewed.

I'm curious because we have not had time to play the game yet. Your review mentioned some rules clarifications? What rules required clarification?

I'm planning to play a short game with DW after the kids go to bed so that we can have the rules cemented into our heads for real gameplay over Christmas. I would love to benefit from your experience!

-Aaron

I mention the rules in question in the review, but I can expound. Buildings take 4 points of damage to destroy, equipment 2, and people one. Once you have stomped them they go into your Power Pool. Once in the Power Pool they retain their value of 1, 2 and 4 for usage in either powers or absorbing damage. The rules do not make it clear that items in the power pool retain their value, at least not that I could see, but they do.

We also played that you could not make change for various items, though that was not spelled out either in the rules, but that if you took 2 points of damage and all you had was a building in your Power Pool, you either marked off the damage (we used homemade character sheets with squares to mark damage) or sacrificed the whole building.

Essentially, I think the rules-as-written could stand to have more clarity spelled out concerning the Power Pool and how to use it.


Thanks, Wicht! Good to know!

If you used Twix or Wafer Cookies for the buildings, you could use a knife to mark them out into quarters, then just bite off the appropriate number of points.

As a healthier option, use celery sticks for the building, fill the "groove" with peanut butter, then place 4 even spaced raisins (ants on a log) to act as power point markers.

When I play through the test game with DW, we will just be using paper scraps or different denominations of dice as the markers.

-Aaron

PS: DW = Dear Wife

Scarab Sages Contributor

We *do* mention some less cookie-filled options, for people who want to avoid too many sweets in the giant monster battles. :)


Three cheers for the "ants on a log" mention.

And Owen is right, the product does mention clearly that you can use healthier variant items for the game pieces.

I suggest a small list

  • raisins
  • golden raisins
  • craisins
  • dried blueberries
  • carrot sticks
  • dry roasted peanuts
  • pecans
  • blah blah blah various other nuts....:P

Heck, you could even (perish the thought) just use the templates for the cookies and let your players attack those with markers and use the printouts for the creatures and use meeples and blocks for the buildings/items/people.....buy where's the satisfaction in the eating your opponent's stuff???

Scarab Sages Contributor

While we feel the game has play value on its own, I'll happily admit we expect some of the fun to come from eating your enemies. :)

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Liz Courts wrote:
Om nom nom nom!

They don't feed you at ninja school do they? :)

Scarab Sages Contributor

1 person marked this as a favorite.

I'll just leave this right here.


Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Owen K. C. Stephens wrote:
I'll just leave this right here.

So when do we get the chocolate chip ninja expansion to the gingerbread kaiju core rules?


Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Do you have any advice for tracking damage to body parts that are not completely disabled by a 'hit'? IE if bakedzilla takes 3 points of damage to his arm, how should we track that it is damaged but not destroyed?

I think my current plan is to get some red candies to frost on to the limb as it takes damage, and when its 'rendered useless' break it off and allow the damaging player to eat it. If it gets regrown with regeneration, just frost on a candy bar or something as a replacement. I didnt notice a specific rules in the pdf as to when you get to eat your opponent, so if you have better ideas I'd love to hear them.

Scarab Sages Contributor

I tracked limbs with either M&Ms, or hashmarks on an index card. It's not extensive bookkeeping.


Funny, Kolokotroni, DW and I were discussing that same question last night. We thought it would make sense to put the correct number of frosting "dots" on each limb and pull them off and eat them as the limb takes damage.

-Aaron

Scarab Sages Contributor

I am all in favor of more frosting.... as a damage tracking mechanism.


Kolokotroni wrote:
So when do we get the chocolate chip ninja expansion to the gingerbread kaiju core rules?

It's not a chocolate chip cookie expansion, but I saw a box of gingerbread ninjas at a grocery store yesterday. Cookie mix, icing and cookie cutters. It looked interesting, but not enough to spend my money on.

-Aaron


Reviewed first on Endzeitgeist.com, then submitted to Nerdtrek and GMS magazine and posted here and on OBS.

Cheers!

Scarab Sages Contributor

As always, many thanks for the review!

Scarab Sages Contributor

There's another review, with pictures of the reviewer's Kaiju cookies, on IO9!


One year later...

Any plans to release any more edible board games?


Hi Itchy! Yes, we do have plans in the works to be published next year. Thanks for the question!

Community / Forums / Paizo / Product Discussion / Gingerbread Kaiju PDF All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.