Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Chronicle of the Righteous (PFRPG)

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Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Chronicle of the Righteous (PFRPG)
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Pray for Mercy
The empyreal lords watch over the infinite expanses of the multiverse to ensure that good can flourish and that evil, no matter its form, can be vanquished. But even these powers cannot stem the tide of evil by themselves, and they must often rely on their celestial servants—noble angels, wise agathions, unrelenting archons, and free-spirited azatas—to lead the charge against the forces of corruption. Together, these virtuous forces wage an unending war against the blasphemous and the profane, all the while lifting worthy mortals to stations of ever-greater glory among the boundless celestial spheres.

Inside this book, you’ll find:

  • A thorough exploration of over 50 empyreal lords, including details on their minions, the divine powers they bestow upon mortal worshipers, and the celestial realms from which they hail.
  • Rules for the mystery cultist prestige class and details on the various types of mystery cults.
  • Methods to bolster mortal spellcasters’ efforts while summoning all the different types of celestials.
  • New spells for spellcasters to hurl at their wicked foes and new magic items to aid adventurers in their battles against evil.
  • Rules for rituals of self-mortification and the divine powers that can be gleaned by such acts of devotion.
  • A bestiary of five new celestials to assist or oppose player characters, including the keen-eyed spyglass archon and the veranallia, azata master of seasons, growth, and decay.

Chronicle of the Righteous is intended for use with the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game and Pathfinder Campaign Setting, but can easily be used in any fantasy game setting.

By Amber Scott

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-506-8

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Lost Omens Subscription.

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Heavenly!

5/5

Chronicle of the Righteous is about the servants, worshippers, and homes of a group of beings in Golarion (Pathfinder's campaign setting) called "Empyreal Lords." Empyreal Lords are hard to define exactly; they're divine beings that inspire small groups of worshippers (called Mystery Cults), but they're not major deities that attract thousands of worshippers and the building of major temples. They might be best thought of as demigods, because they're below deities but above normal "celestial" races like angels. That's my best guess anyway, as I'm still a little bit fuzzy on the role of Empyreal Lords in Golarion. But put that to one side: Chronicle of the Righteous is a fascinating book that has inspired me to want to integrate Empyreal Lords, Mystery Cults, and more into my campaigns. The book is a 64-page entry in the Campaign Setting line. The inside front cover is a list of approximately fifty Empyreal Lords, their alignment, areas of concern (portfolios), domains (that they grant to clerical worshippers), and favored weapons. The inside back cover is a full-page reproduction of the cover art, which is quite impressive in its own right. Between the the covers are nine sections.

1. "Tabris's Return to Heaven" (two pages): This is a dense account, written in a "handwritten" font, that tells the tale of a warrior-scholar angel named Tabris who was obsessed with fully exploring and detailing the heights and depths of the heavenly and fiendish realms. Tabris disappeared for decades before returning with his Chronicle of the Righteous, and the book contained secrets that even the celestial realms would have rather been suppressed! It's quite evocative and well-written, and surprisingly effective. It's definitely a flavourful way to start the book off.

2. " Lords of the Empyrean" (29 pages): Each of the major Empyreal Lords receives at least a half-page entry that describes them and their particular interests, along with a drawing of their holy symbol and information on what types of people worship them, where their shrines might be located, and what sorts of celestial beings act as their minions. I would say that every third or fourth Empyreal Lord receives a full-colour picture, and these are done quite well. Perhaps the most important thing in this section is the introduction of the concept of "Celestial Obedience" and "Boons." Celestial Obedience is a feat that can be taken by worshippers of Empyreal Lords and provides them with an immediate +4 sacred bonus to something like (depending on the particular Emypreal Lord worshipped) a certain type of saving throw, combat maneuver check, AC against a particular type of enemy, etc. The benefit is narrow in scope and certainly not game-breaking, but additional powers ("boons") are gained at character levels 12, 16, and 20--and some of these are pretty cool. The best part of the Celestial Obedience concept is that, although it can certainly be taken by clerics, paladins, and other divinely-focussed classes, it doesn't have to be. If your Cavalier is a worshipper of the Ragathiel, the Empyreal Lord of chivalry or your Bard is a worshipper of Seramaydiel, the Empyreal Lord of communication and music, they can gain the benefits of Celestial Obedience. It's a great way to make the gods (or demigods) meaningful to more than just clerics in a campaign.

3. "Celestrial Realms" (2 pages): This is a description of the major geographical features of the celestial realms: Elysium, Heaven, and Nirvana. I have to admit I've never had characters adventure in celestial realms, and I have no idea what it would be like to GM or role-play such a place. I suppose it's good to have something more concrete to heaven than fluffy clouds. I did like how there was mention of where mortals who plane shift to each realm are most likely to appear.

4. "Celestialkind" (6 pages): After an introduction to celestial races and a sidebar about what happens to mortal souls who reach the celestial realms ("petitioners"), each of the following varieties of good-aligned denizens of the celestial planes receives a full page description: Agathions, Angels, Archons, and Azatas. I think this would be especially useful for those pesky spellcasters who are prone to summoning celestial beings willy-nilly.

5. "Concordance" (2 pages): Although only two pages long, this is one of my favorite sections of the book. The premise is that "once an eon, and only in times of great danger or turmoil" all of the divine powers of the celestial planes gather together to reach an accord on what should be done. There's material here about the death of Aroden, Lamashtu's rise to power, hints about a deity interested in time-travel, and, most intriguing of all, "The Seventh Accord", a Concordance never spoken of in the centuries or millennia since it happened and considered so blasphemous and dangerous that no mention of it is permitted to exist. Great fodder for creative GMs!

6. "Empyreal Worship" (14 pages): This section is a grab-bag of material, but it's useful. There's a page on how the different divine classes relate to Empyreal Lords, two pages on different types of Mystery Cults (drawn broadly among themes, but useful), and two pages on "secret offerings" that can be made to improve one's chance in summoning a particular type of celestial being. Two pages are also devoted to Rituals of Mortification, which requires a character to invest a certain number of days going without food, water or sleep in order to gain both an affliction and a benefit. The actual rituals listed are said to be examples only and GMs should feel free to add more. The Ritual of Appetite, for example, requires two days' fasting, afflicts the character with a -2 penalty on Constitution checks and saves vs. disease and poison, but grants the character a +2 sacred bonus on concentration checks and Will saving throws. Other rituals are far more powerful, with one providing a +4 sacred bonus on attack rolls against evil creatures and a +4 bonus on caster level checks to overcome their spell resistance! I haven't used these rituals in play, and I'm not sure whether they would be balanced or not, especially because part of the mechanism is the infliction of nonlethal damage once a day, but nonlethal damage heals quite easy. So the idea is interesting, but I'd have to test this concept out more before I'd be confident it's a good addition to the game. Next, there's an important new prestige class introduced here: the Mystery Cultist. A Mystery Cultist gains spells at the same speed as their prior class and several celestial-themed abilities, but a big reason for playing one is that they can receive the "boons" of the Celestial Obedience feat a few levels earlier than a regular character. I'd be very tempted to try this class out, as it seems to both fit the flavour of Empyreal Lord worship and be mechanically sound. After this, here are two pages of new spells (6 in all), with specific mention that these are not restricted to worshippers of Mystery Cults (and a couple of the spells are arcane in nature). I would love to see "Charitable Impulse" in a game, as it forces someone to help others and gradually give away all of their possessions instead of committing acts of violence. Last, there are two pages of celestial-themed magic items.

7. "Lesser Empyreal Lords" (1 page): About two dozen Empyreal Lords that were, for whatever reason, not significant enough to be included in the first section receive a brief, one-sentence description here.

8. "Fallen Celestials" (1 page): Intriguing description of those celestial beings who have turned their back on the heavens, many of whom have joined the infernal realms.

9. "The Celestial Hosts" (8 pages): This is basically a bestiary. It helpfully puts into table format all of the Agathions, Angels, Archons, and Azatas introduced in other Pathfinder materials, and then describes five new ones: Cervinal Agathions, Balisse Angels, Choral Angels, Spyglass Archons, and Vernallia Azatas. I found the new creatures interesting and potentially useful (except for the Choral Angels, which were a bit too cliche for me).

In sum, there's a lot of material here and it's almost all great. I picked this book up by chance (it was half-price) and have never done much with the celestial realms in a game, but I can now definitely see why I might want to in the future; and if I do, I'm confident that Chronicle of the Righteous would be the first place I'd turn.


Want More!

5/5

Few of the books in RP that I never wanted to end. The flavor and stats in this book are awesome and highly useful for people that find that they are not fitting into the 'standard gods' but your not a deviant into the other alignments.

There is something for almost everyone good aligned, investigators have two options of Emperial Lords who they can follow and seem perfectly inline with their 'deity's' viewpoints. Spies and artisans have options, crusaders have more than just Iomedae's views. Good aligned nature gods - sure you don't have to be purely neutral.

There are many options and the mechanics are useful but are more geared towards games that would end up in higher level range (12+) but would add a lot of good flavor without being overpowered.


Everyman Product Reviews: Chronicles of the Righteous

5/5

Final Score & Thoughts
Crunch: 5/5 Stars
Flavor: 5/5 Stars
Layout: 4/5 Stars
Final Score: 14/15 Stars, or 4.5 Stars, rounded up for it’s flavor.

Chronicles of the Righteous is a must-own book if you do absolutely anything with good outsiders in your campaign. This book provides a much needed insight into the nature of the celestial races and provides plenty of fodder for potential gods and entities in your campaign setting. This product is a rich tapestry of righteousness that your Pathfinder collection is incomplete without.

Read the complete review at the Everyman Gaming blog.


Excellent Book!

5/5

Read my full review on my blog.

Overall, Chronicle of the Righteous is an excellent book, particularly due to its extensive list of Empyreal Lords. It helps to balance out the playing field between the forces of evil and the forces of good. While gamemasters may have less call for information on celestials than they do information on fiends, the do have some call for that information, and this book fills that niche splendidly.


This is a fantastic book!

5/5

It is up there with Lords of Madness, Book of Fiends and Demonomicon of Iggwilv in the amount and quality of information it provides on the various Empyreal Lords and the other celestials. The author should be proud of this creation!

As for the material, there is an awesome list of new sources for divine casters as well as other information on new celestial creatures. I especially like the inclusion of Tabriss, the Celestial Realms, Concordance and the Fallen Celestials.

Do yourself and your players a favor, go out and pick up this book now!


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Dragon78 wrote:
Yes but angels tended to look male or female depending on which specific angel or type of angel you were talking about.

Godlike creatures may recognize that most mortals are more comfortable interacting with something humanoid if its gender is identifiable, and take on a mortal form accordingly, but that doesn't mean that the perceived gender is inherent.

Silver Crusade

2 people marked this as a favorite.

I don't have the book in front of me at the moment, but doesn't not performing the Obedience lose only the Boon-based abilities associated with it rather than all of the Mystery Cultist features(including spellcasting)?

I have to admit, Ragathiel's Obedience set off some alarms for me when I first saw it in the blog, but I wanted to wait to see what the full deal was before passing judgment. I really doubt the intention is for Ragathiel worshippers to start racking up daily living sacrifices, especially considering how ugly that scene can get.(drumlord's example with the orcs is one, but there's also the rather insane situation where an evildoer who one party member is trying to redeem has to be protected from the allegedly good guy who wants his boon-boost).

In the case of Ragathiel's obedience, I figured it was less something that his worshippers set out to do to get their boons and more that the boons were something granted should the Ragathielites happen to have to do their grim duty and follow it up with the hour-long ritual(be it one of cleansing, affirmation, etc.).

That is, I don't think Ragathiel's obedience is something that is meant to be sought out daily. But if it happens, you consecrate the act and then you're granted boons to aid you, because apparently you're now close to situations that call for them. But the spellcasting and such would remain in place.

At least I think that's how it's intended. :)

If it becomes problematic, copying Dammerich's Obedience might be a good replacement. It really falls in line with how I'd imagine good Ragathiel worshippers think.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Companion, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

It does actually specifically specify for Angels that:

Quote:
All angels are blessed with extraordinary beauty, though their actual appearances vary widely. Their natural shapechanging ability means they may appear to mortals as male or female, depending on their personal preference or the will of their deity. As they are spiritual creatures given a physical form rather than creatures of flesh born of other creatures, their gender is mutable; some angels always use a male form, some strictly a female one, and others use either or both, or prefer an androgynous or sexless shape.

That said, I did originally think it was an error since some of them are fairly clearly referred to as being a particular gender, but maybe they still aren't really set in a particular gender, not really having an inherent one.

Personally, overall, I definitely liked it, I thought the empyreal lords were a varied and interesting lot. Ragathiel's obedience is somewhat tricky, but I think the benefit it grants as well as his boons are perhaps some of the best there, so that might be intentional...maybe unlike the others, it's not supposed to be so easy to get those benefits every day. That said, I might consider asking the DM if it has to be a ritualized killing, or if just killing an evil creature that matches the criteria is enough...after all, it does say it 'typically' takes an hour. Regardless, that does make life difficult for a mystery cultist of Ragathiel, though.

I was a little disappointed with Vildeis, but that's mostly because of my own expectations; I was kind of hoping for the flavor of 'The Cardinal Martyr' to be more along of finding enlightenment and transcendence in pain to go along with the rituals of mortification. Instead, they just seem kind of...deranged, really. Neshen isn't quite what I had in mind either, but he's closer, I think. But I definitely loved a lot of them and their fluff.

The few problems I actually had...well, the two things that kind of leaped out.

Firstly, Ritual of Possession. If you don't have the ability to channel energy, and gain the ability to channel energy, how often can you use the ability? As it stands, it seems to be at-will due to a lack of restrictions in that ability, but was it meant to be the more normal 3 + Charisma modifier times per day?

Secondly, Vinetrap, it looks like someone swapped design directions at some point in the spell and forgot to change everything to match. It's an area effect spell, yet the flavor text acts like it's a single target spell; furthermore, it takes ten minutes to cast and lasts for hours, yet the flavor text presumes (despite having 'trap' in the name of the spell) that you will actually have a 'subject' while you are casting it. It's very confusing, and I'm honestly not sure what direction it's supposed to go in.

Beyond that, minus some minor typos and errors here and there, I definitely liked it, though. The Tabris stuff was definitely fascinating, you all are terrible awful teases about The Seventh Accord and should feel prou- ashamed of yourselves, I mean.

I did kind of wish there were more fallen celestials listed than the ones Asmodeus snagged plus Tabris, though I definitely like that he's fallen to 'neutrality', instead of to evil.

The Rituals of Mortification are certainly interesting, and I like that you don't need a feat to use them...I kind of wish there was more material like that...if you're willing to accept the consequences and know of them, you can use them. And the fact that you can research them with knowledge (religion) checks is interesting.

As I said, I liked the vast majority of the empyreal lords and their boons are definitely neat, making me sad that few characters will get access to them without being quite high level, even with the Mystery Cultist prestige class (and incidentally, Sacred Haven is a really cool concept, though I kind of wish that high level clerics and/or paladins got that too, even if only at level 20, as favored servants of their deity).

The spells are mostly interesting; Blood of the Martyr is an extremely creepy healing spell, I am sad Charitable Impulse only works on humanoids because it is hilarious, Elemental Assessor amuses me since it sounds like a divination spell when in fact it is a 'blast them with everything and see what works!' spell. Summon Stampede also seems hilarious, though the spell level seems a little high to me...but hey, when you've got to reenact the death of Mufasa, you definitely know what spell to cast for your lion traumatizing needs.

The items didn't really do much for me, personally, though, but I thought the new celestials were pretty neat, and I especially liked the Spyglass Archons, though the Veranallia is also pretty interesting, and I like that they can reincarnate people as aasimar, I thought that was a really nice touch. The notion of the Balisse Angel also really interests me, just imagining them coming and going to aid those struggling with ethical problems, and coming back to visit every now and then with an odd off-and-on relationship...definitely a cool concept.

But yeah. Definitely a good book for me, and I hope you'll be tossing out some solid books for Chaos and Law in the future...we've got more of an idea of what Good is out to do, and the manifold Evils, but what agendas are the Axiomites and Inevitables working towards, or the Proteans, for that matter? Though further expansion on Good would be welcome as well, of course...I'm especially hoping for more in-depth stuff about Azata, their culture, such as it is, and specific instances of things they've done on Golarion.

Edit: Actually, Mikaze...

Chronicle of the Righteous wrote:
Obedience (Ex): In order to maintain the abilities granted by this prestige class (including all spellcasting abilities that have been augmented by this prestige class), a mystery cultist must indulge in an daily obedience to her chosen empyreal lord.


Damerrich: Empyreal lord of executions, judiciousness, and responsibility

Ragathiel: Empyreal lord of chivalry, duty, and vengeance

There is a nice difference between Damerrich and Ragathiel that is well played out through their differing views on the execution of wrongdoers. A follower of Damerrich does not take pleasure in his grim but necessary task - whereas Ragathiel himself struggles constantly to master his baser impulses in service to the light. Damerrich is Blue to Ragathiel's Red.

So it makes sense that Damerrich is more concerned with ensuring his task was just and true (hence the reflective nature of his obedience), while Ragathiel is more about revelling in the moment and fervor of action (active killing).

If Ragathiel's obedience was to be modified to something more achievable, then I'd suggest it would be similar to Arya Stark's mantra. The penitent should focus upon those that he/she is yet to slay, and the reason they deserve to die.


I'm having issues with Summon Stampede. It's a conjuration (summoning) spell, but its summoned "herd of animals" is an effect with no creature stats. Shouldn't there be some kind of mechanic to represent the possibility of killing the stampede or turning it aside?

EDIT: Also, Blood of the Martyr. You know it's pretty set in stone that drinking the blood of the unwilling is an evil act, right? At least the spell doesn't actually have the Good keyword. And shouldn't positive-energy-infused blood be called out as harming undead who go for the bait?


Mark Sweetman wrote:

Damerrich: Empyreal lord of executions, judiciousness, and responsibility

Ragathiel: Empyreal lord of chivalry, duty, and vengeance

There is a nice difference between Damerrich and Ragathiel that is well played out through their differing views on the execution of wrongdoers. A follower of Damerrich does not take pleasure in his grim but necessary task - whereas Ragathiel himself struggles constantly to master his baser impulses in service to the light. Damerrich is Blue to Ragathiel's Red.

So it makes sense that Damerrich is more concerned with ensuring his task was just and true (hence the reflective nature of his obedience), while Ragathiel is more about revelling in the moment and fervor of action (active killing).

If Ragathiel's obedience was to be modified to something more achievable, then I'd suggest it would be similar to Arya Stark's mantra. The penitent should focus upon those that he/she is yet to slay, and the reason they deserve to die.

What was Damerrich's Obedience again?

And now I'm wondering whether my Demon-Spawn Tiefling Paladin is a follower of Damerrich or a follower of Ragathiel.

Being an avid fan of Prestige Classes, I also realized that the Mystery Cultist is technically opposite to the Demoniac. The Soul Eater is opposed by the Magaambyan Arcanist (though they are not reflections of one another in any way), but the Diabolist doesn't seem to have a Good counterpart at all. The Blackfire Adepts and Riftwardens also fight each other quite often, but that's a given. Also, I really wanna see my initially Lawful Neutral Changeling Ice Witch realize that her patron was Tolc all along, and let her advance as a Mystery Cultist. Now if only I knew which campaign I can have that happen in...


Damerrich's Obedience: Recite all the names you can recall of those who have died by your hand. Mediate upon their faces and the circumstances of their deaths, evaluating your actions in the light of cold law.


Icyshadow wrote:
Mark Sweetman wrote:

Damerrich: Empyreal lord of executions, judiciousness, and responsibility

Ragathiel: Empyreal lord of chivalry, duty, and vengeance

There is a nice difference between Damerrich and Ragathiel that is well played out through their differing views on the execution of wrongdoers. A follower of Damerrich does not take pleasure in his grim but necessary task - whereas Ragathiel himself struggles constantly to master his baser impulses in service to the light. Damerrich is Blue to Ragathiel's Red.

So it makes sense that Damerrich is more concerned with ensuring his task was just and true (hence the reflective nature of his obedience), while Ragathiel is more about revelling in the moment and fervor of action (active killing).

If Ragathiel's obedience was to be modified to something more achievable, then I'd suggest it would be similar to Arya Stark's mantra. The penitent should focus upon those that he/she is yet to slay, and the reason they deserve to die.

What was Damerrich's Obedience again?

And now I'm wondering whether my Demon-Spawn Tiefling Paladin is a follower of Damerrich or a follower of Ragathiel.

I also realized that the Mystery Cultist is technically opposite to the Demoniac. The Soul Eater is opposed by the Magaambyan Arcanist (though they are not reflections of one another), but the Diabolist doesn't seem to have a Good counterpart. The Blackfire Adepts and Riftwardens also fight each other quite often. Also, I really wanna see my initially Lawful Neutral Changeling Ice Witch realize that her patron was Tolc all along, and let her advance as a Mystery Cultist. Now if only I knew which campaign I can have that happen in...

Remember, to the best of your abilities, all who have fallen to your blade. Remember their faces, your actions, and contemplate how you acted in accordance with Law. A hell of a lot less convoluted than offing a provable wrongdoer on a daily basis.

Edit: Dang ninja leshy.


I just checked Tolc's Obedience again. It just strikes me as both weird and awesome.

Also, I hope we get some developer comments concerning Ragathiel's Obedience, for obvious reasons.


Pathfinder Companion, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Evil Midnight Lurker wrote:
I'm having issues with Summon Stampede. It's a conjuration (summoning) spell, but its summoned "herd of animals" is an effect with no creature stats. Shouldn't there be some kind of mechanic to represent the possibility of killing the stampede or turning it aside?

I'm guessing they were mostly just trying to simplify it. If you really wanted to math it all out, I think you could probably fit roughly eight to ten large animals within a 20-ft.-radius space, the DC would be a static DC 19 with stampede (or 21 if you have Augment Summoning) and do 2d6+9 (or 2d6+11 with Augment Summoning) per auroch stampeding over them, but that amount would be depend where they are in the radius, ie, how many aurochs are trampling over their space, and they would get to pick whether they make an attack of opportunity or make that Reflex save for half damage...it's doable, but it would be kind of complicated, so I almost prefer the 'fire and forget' approach there.

That said, there are already mechanics for turning it aside to a certain extent, if you can impose a solid barrier in their path, they will turn aside in a randomized direction, which should definitely be doable with a wall spell (or arguably silent image?). As for killing them, I would probably just go with area effect spells working (fireball would probably annihilate them promptly.

Evil Midnight Lurker wrote:
EDIT: Also, Blood of the Martyr. You know it's pretty set in stone that drinking the blood of the unwilling is an evil act, right? At least the spell doesn't actually have the Good keyword. And shouldn't positive-energy-infused blood be called out as harming undead who go for the bait?

That's why if you're good, you use it on yourself, or at least on a willing target. Presuming your party isn't squeamish, bleah! But yeah, it can certainly be abused if you manage to get an enemy helpless with a hold person or somesuch, but such an act is certainly not good, and I would personally say an evil one, but we all know that the works of Good can be twisted and abused by the opportunistic forces of Eeeeeeeevil.


Are any of the Empyreal Lords gunslinger related in fluff or crunch? I ask because I have an Aasimar Mysterious Stranger idea and was just hoping to tie it to one of them. Haven't had a chance to see a book yet.


Pathfinder Companion, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Devastation Bob wrote:
Are any of the Empyreal Lords gunslinger related in fluff or crunch? I ask because I have an Aasimar Mysterious Stranger idea and was just hoping to tie it to one of them. Haven't had a chance to see a book yet.

Not really, no. Bharnarol is an inventor, but he's not explicitly tied in with guns in particular; that said, I'm sure there are plenty you could tie in to a gunslinger based on their personality and/or worldviews, even if they're not explicitly related to guns in particular.


Yeah, the only one would be Bharnarol, and even he's not much of a close match.

Shadow Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber
Devastation Bob wrote:
Are any of the Empyreal Lords gunslinger related in fluff or crunch? I ask because I have an Aasimar Mysterious Stranger idea and was just hoping to tie it to one of them. Haven't had a chance to see a book yet.

I would say the aforementioned empyreal lord of alchemy fits the bill. That being said I think you could work out a really cool background on that concept like a gunslinger who wants to use the power of blackpowder (an alchemical substance) to bring peace and stomp out evil.

Shadow Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber

Also Vildeis might work, she's not associated directly with blackpowder but she really can't stand evil.


Mark Sweetman wrote:
Damerrich: Empyreal lord of executions, judiciousness, and responsibility.

They have an Empyreal lord of executions? Wow. Color me surprised. I would have seen executions more as something overseen by the neutrally-aligned psychopomps.

And I noticed some people commenting both on why the Empyreal Lords aren't more widely venerated in Golarion, and why some of their obediences seem a bit extreme. Perhaps the latter is the reason for their being worshipped less often than the less demanding deities?


Not just executions... but prostitution, scars, sexuality, lonely spirits, hallucinations, and another of my favorites: Empyreal lord of ignorance, placidity, and simplicity.

Contributor

A few comments here--

1. Ragathiel's obedience is pretty onerous. My thought process as I created his boons and obedience was the idea that this is an incredibly powerful empyreal lord with very strict standards (and correspondingly powerful rewards). I think most games in which a PC plays a mystery cultist would see the PCs come into conflict with evildoers on a regular basis and that would allow for the obedience to be fulfilled. During downtime/between adventures there may not be opportunity to fulfill the obedience which I think is important too. Even the most devout servants can't serve perfectly all the time.

I think what I didn't do was anticipate how popular Ragathiel would be as a choice for players. I could have taken that into account more as I created the entry. If the obedience is too strict for an individual game, I agree that Dammerich's obedience makes a good substitute.

2. Ritual of Possession was supposed to grant channel energy 3+Cha times per day, yes, if you don't already have the ability. That was a mistake on my part.

3. Blood of the Martyr was added in development, but I agree it would seem that good-aligned casters would only use it on willing targets. Summon Stampede was likewise added in development.

4. Vinetrap was originally much different when I wrote it. It was a persistent area spell that targeted flying creatures passing through its area. I think what happened is my original spell block at the top of the spell was accidentally left unchanged (but I can't say for sure). I'm going to guess it should be a standard action to cast with a target of a single creature.


Thanks for staying with us Amber. It's nice to get feedback from the writer.

Shadow Lodge

Ragathiel was always intended to be the Old Testament-ish archangelic smash evil in the face. In addition to be one of the few redeemed/ascended evils, he really captures a lot of the best parts of some very powerful and classic troupes, between concepts like the original St. Cuthbert, real world angel mythology/story, and kind of stands out from even some of the Golarion gods in pure cool factor.

Game wise, he offers cool domains and favored weapon, something that for his followers can really set their character apart from the generic, and flavor-wise, he does have a very relatable and ongoing concept to like and roll with.

Iomedae just sort of sits in her tower (or whatever) and watches crusaders do their thing while Ragathiel leads the forces of good into hell himself. He also had to earn his place and the respect of his forces and allies, for example.

Pathfinder also made the rule that paladins could work with evil "for the greater good", and for those that don't dig that idea, Ragathiel is sort of the perfect guy to stand up and aftr slapping you in the back of the head, "um, no, we don't". He also sort of captures the Rorschach, (from Watchmen) principle of "Never compromise. Not even in the face of Armageddon. That's always been the difference between us . . .!".

Shadow Lodge

Also, not being tied to Golarion really, it's something that you can literally just lift and put into any setting, and because his history and backstory are much less defined, it leaves a lot of room for individuals to kind of run with it however they want and not be wrong according to canon.


Pathfinder Companion, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Eric Hinkle wrote:
Mark Sweetman wrote:
Damerrich: Empyreal lord of executions, judiciousness, and responsibility.
They have an Empyreal lord of executions? Wow. Color me surprised. I would have seen executions more as something overseen by the neutrally-aligned psychopomps.

Yup, he presides specifically over necessary executions and just deaths...and that those executions and deaths are a responsibility that should never be taken lightly.

Eric Hinkle wrote:
And I noticed some people commenting both on why the Empyreal Lords aren't more widely venerated in Golarion, and why some of their obediences seem a bit extreme. Perhaps the latter is the reason for their being worshipped less often than the less demanding deities?

Well, honestly, I think it's really more because they're not actually gods, they're essentially demigod-level outsiders, on par with the Archdevils of Hell, the Demon Lords of the Abyss, the Eldest of the First World, the Elemental Lords of the elemental planes, and the Horsemen of Abaddon. As such, full-fledged gods probably overshadow them for the most part, but they are all mighty figures in their own right. And not all of the obediences are that onerous. Some even look like quite a lot of fun...

And thanks for the clarifications, Amber; I figured that there had been a change in direction for the spell somewhere, but wasn't sure which way it was supposed to be going. That said, I definitely liked the idea of it as a large area effect spell that you have to use some thought in setting up but can lead people into...or, as you suggested, snag a few flying types.

Unrelatedly, Marishi and Kurgess, best bros, or bestest bros? They seem to have almost identical spheres of interest, so I definitely imagine them hanging out a lot and maybe making contests or competitions out of almost anything...


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I think how I'll handle Ragathiel's obedience in my own games, should it come up...

1) The one-hour ritual doesn't involve killing a person. Killing in cold blood isn't really what Ragathiel's about. But the ritual does "prime" the devotee.

2) A "primed" devotee receives his boons upon the death of an evil foe that he either killed himself in combat, or at least meaningfully and directly contributed to the death of in combat (so he still gets credit if a buddy scores the fatal blow after the devotee cut it down to 20 HP or whatever).

3) The boons last for 24 hours from the final "appropriate" kill of the day. So if the last evil creature killed in combat was at 5:00 pm, then the devotee has the powers until 5:00 p.m. the next day. Priming himself with the ritual the next morning and then killing something in righteous combat resets the timer.

4) I'd allow a Ragathiel mystery cultist who had to experience downtime still prep his spells that are coming from the cultist levels, but they're "dormant" and can't be accessed until he kills something in righteous combat again.

5) I like the notion that for a true Ragathiel devotee, peace and downtime are unwelcome and unwanted. I also like the notion of a Ragathiel devotee being diminished because he couldn't find a fight for some time, and then having all his abilities come back in a blistering wave of power as he shanks some evildoer.

I find Ragathiel interesting because he wants to do the right thing, combined with having a battle lust rivaling Gorum itself. I can certainly see why there was a concordance solely on the issue of Ragathiel's acceptance into the heavenly ranks, with the whole issue of "This guy might be completely smurfing bonkers - do we really want him around?"

And that the heavens answered that question with "yes."

Silver Crusade

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Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Incidentally, I find Ragathiel uninspired - yet another TurboGood entity that thinks that might makes right. Yawn. George W Bush foreign policy with wings and a sword.

Luckily, every other empyreal in the book is pure gold, so it's no biggie.


For Ragathiel to work well I think it really needs the ragged edge to be played up significantly. More Barbarian than Paladin, struck to religious fervor and what not.

But I agree Gorbacz, when I line up the list of Empyreal Lords I'd like to follow he's pretty far down the line.


Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Maps, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Maybe a good change to the Obedience for Ragathiel would be that the devotee must walk a certain distance and scrutinize everyone he meets for evildoing, then kill at least one being that qualifies. The Obedience is successfully completed when he either kills an evildoer or completes the allotted time and distance without meeting even one qualifying evildoer.

Most of the other Obediences have similar escape clauses -- a couple of them mention doing certain things without being observed, then provide a follow-up action in the event that the devotee is observed. The Ragathiel Obedience does not need that escape clause but does need one to cover the case of there being no deathworthy evildoers in the vicinity.


Amber Scott wrote:

A few comments here--

1. Ragathiel's obedience is pretty onerous. My thought process as I created his boons and obedience was the idea that this is an incredibly powerful empyreal lord with very strict standards (and correspondingly powerful rewards). I think most games in which a PC plays a mystery cultist would see the PCs come into conflict with evildoers on a regular basis and that would allow for the obedience to be fulfilled. During downtime/between adventures there may not be opportunity to fulfill the obedience which I think is important too. Even the most devout servants can't serve perfectly all the time.

I think what I didn't do was anticipate how popular Ragathiel would be as a choice for players. I could have taken that into account more as I created the entry. If the obedience is too strict for an individual game, I agree that Dammerich's obedience makes a good substitute.

Just to ask, as it didn't really get a clear answer I think, was Ragathiel's obedience intended to be full out ritual sacrifice? Would full out ritual sacrifice qualify for it despite being, well, full out ritual sacrifice of someone likely bound and helpless for it? My own takeaway had been that killing someone appropriately evil in the course of battle as it might come up would qualify, along with requisite ritual prayer after.

Contributor

First of all, this is an awesome book. :)

Secondly, if I can snare Amber's ear, I've got one question now (and probably more later) since this book really develops the celestials in places that weren't highly developed originally in TGB and elsewhere early on, and it also clarifies some of the differences present between there and some of the core material (like the role of angels).

I like the reference to Lady Taramyth the Singing Flame that shows up in the book. Makes me happy. :) Was she originally going to get a full writeup, or did the agathion paragons/leaders (like Taramyth, Kelumarion, etc) get a slightly downgraded status versus some of the other NG empyreal lords that weren't linked to a specific agathion subtype?


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Gorbacz wrote:

Incidentally, I find Ragathiel uninspired - yet another TurboGood entity that thinks that might makes right. Yawn. George W Bush foreign policy with wings and a sword.

Luckily, every other empyreal in the book is pure gold, so it's no biggie.

I disagree. It isn't that Ragathiel thinks might makes right, but that evil means smite. If there is evil, and you have the ability to destroy it, then you should. They didn't that alignment for nothing after all.

I quite like the way Ragathiel is written, it's different from many current interpretations of good, very much in the classical Old Testament style if you will. Honestly it's a pretty bold move, and I applauded Amber for going with it. Wouldn't have anyone else leading the charge against hell. Now as for fellows you'd like to kick back with... that may be a different story, and I think that's part of the point.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Lloyd Jackson wrote:
Gorbacz wrote:

Incidentally, I find Ragathiel uninspired - yet another TurboGood entity that thinks that might makes right. Yawn. George W Bush foreign policy with wings and a sword.

Luckily, every other empyreal in the book is pure gold, so it's no biggie.

I disagree. It isn't that Ragathiel thinks might makes right, but that evil means smite. If there is evil, and you have the ability to destroy it, then you should. They didn't that alignment for nothing after all.

I quite like the way Ragathiel is written, it's different from many current interpretations of good, very much in the classical Old Testament style if you will. Honestly it's a pretty bold move, and I applauded Amber for going with it. Wouldn't have anyone else leading the charge against hell. Now as for fellows you'd like to kick back with... that may be a different story, and I think that's part of the point.

I believe that Warhammer (both Fantasy and 40k) has covered the "turn off your brain and kill everything in sight in the name of the Absolute", and in particular Ragathiel feels like a ripoff Blood Angels space marines (due to the added "brood over my sinister nature" and "my peers think I will flip out some day" tropes).

And more than that, both Warhammers are a subtle parody of that, while Pathfinder plays the trope straight and dead serious.

Contributor

mark kay wrote:


Just to ask, as it didn't really get a clear answer I think, was Ragathiel's obedience intended to be full out ritual sacrifice? Would full out ritual sacrifice qualify for it despite being, well, full out ritual sacrifice of someone likely bound and helpless for it? My own takeaway had been that killing someone appropriately evil in the course of battle as it might come up would qualify, along with requisite ritual prayer after.

It was intended to be the latter--the mystery cultist comes across Evil Person, slays Evil Person, and gets boons. Not all the obediences would necessarily take an hour, but none should take longer than an hour. For example, Black Butterfly's obedience of doing an anonymous act of charity could involve leaving some gold on a doorstep, knocking, and running--no need to turn it into an hour-long ritual.

I see under Celestial Obedience on page 5 it says the rituals are "typically an hour" but for the feat it says "only an hour." The former was my intention. I'm guessing the discrepancy occurred when the feat text was aligned with the Demonic Obedience feat. (I am only the author though and don't have the 'official' answers :) ).

Contributor

Todd Stewart wrote:
First of all, this is an awesome book. :)

Thank you!

Quote:

Secondly, if I can snare Amber's ear, I've got one question now (and probably more later) ...

I like the reference to Lady Taramyth the Singing Flame that shows up in the book. Makes me happy. :) Was she originally going to get a full writeup, or did the agathion paragons/leaders (like Taramyth, Kelumarion, etc) get a slightly downgraded status versus some of the other NG empyreal lords that weren't linked to a specific agathion subtype?

No, none of the empyreal lords were downgraded or left out from the outlined version of the book. I can't say why (cause I don't know), but perhaps the mysterious inner circle of Paizo has plans for them. :)


Gorbacz wrote:

I believe that Warhammer (both Fantasy and 40k) has covered the "turn off your brain and kill everything in sight in the name of the Absolute", and in particular Ragathiel feels like a ripoff Blood Angels space marines (due to the added "brood over my sinister nature" and "my peers think I will flip out some day" tropes).

And more than that, both Warhammers are a subtle parody of that, while Pathfinder plays the trope straight and dead serious.

Not that there is necessarily anything wrong with that though... just like a Longsword +1, simple and easy to understand is good sometimes. I just prefer to think of him as a gateway empyreal... enough to get you in the door and soon enough you're gorging on more complex fare.


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Gorbacz wrote:


I believe that Warhammer (both Fantasy and 40k) has covered the "turn off your brain and kill everything in sight in the name of the Absolute", and in particular Ragathiel feels like a ripoff Blood Angels space marines (due to the added "brood over my sinister nature" and "my peers think I will flip out some day" tropes).

And more than that, both Warhammers are a subtle parody of that, while Pathfinder plays the trope straight and dead serious.

Once again, I'm going to disagree. Nothing written about him even suggests that he kills without thinking, nor that he kills anything that isn't LG.

As for his nature, plenty of people worry that they are destined to repeat the mistakes/failings of their parents. A very reasonable concern, and natural thing to obsess over.

As for peers, think of it like a small town. He comes from a bad family, and people worry that he'll end up like his parents, which is legitimate because more often than not people do. Ragathiel knows that, and so he overcompensates, trying to prove, to himself and everyone else, that he is not his heritage.

This is why I like Ragathiel. He is at once the classical avenging angel, as Mark said, the sword, simple and straightforward. He is also more than this. The person who has deliberately turned his back on his heritage and strives to overcome it. The son of a criminal who has become a police officer, as it where. A very human, and relatable, character. Who better for a Pitborn paladin to follow?

Dark Archive

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Gorbacz wrote:

Incidentally, I find Ragathiel uninspired - yet another TurboGood entity that thinks that might makes right. Yawn. George W Bush foreign policy with wings and a sword.

Luckily, every other empyreal in the book is pure gold, so it's no biggie.

Still awaiting my book, but if he's the only one like that, I'm fine with it. Such things can exist, so long as LG isn't presented in that universaly one flavor.

Silver Crusade

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Luthorne wrote:

I was a little disappointed with Vildeis, but that's mostly because of my own expectations; I was kind of hoping for the flavor of 'The Cardinal Martyr' to be more along of finding enlightenment and transcendence in pain to go along with the rituals of mortification. Instead, they just seem kind of...deranged, really. Neshen isn't quite what I had in mind either, but he's closer, I think. But I definitely loved a lot of them and their fluff.

I kind of like Vildeis possibly having at least a bit of crazy at her edges, but I can see how she might not be an exact match for certain expectations. I think there's plenty of room for transcendant ascetics among her faithful though.(though yeah, Neshen might be a more sane/balanced choice)

Thinking about her some more, I wonder if she percievd the multiverse as a sort of Omelas situation. She literally can't take joy in the better parts of reality, or she can't allow herself to, because the fact that there is suffering happening somewhere is always scratching at her mind. She just can't turn it off. Her Empathy Levels are over 9000.

So she sets out to become Omelas' martyr-child, because she can't bear to not suffer as long as another is.

How would that affect her peers? Does it drive many to live life to the fullest, to enjoy that which she can't allow herself to, for her sake?

Do many of those who follow her path do it to try and share and ease her burden? Would she want that burden eased?

Surely there are angels that have sought to comfort Vildeis. But is that comfort something that Vildeis would, or should, or must refuse?

Augh, now I really want to know how Vildeis and her faithful relate to the faiths of Shelyn and Zon-Kuthon.

Hmm...peris and risen kytons... That would be one hell of a scary following.


Lloyd Jackson wrote:
Gorbacz wrote:


I believe that Warhammer (both Fantasy and 40k) has covered the "turn off your brain and kill everything in sight in the name of the Absolute", and in particular Ragathiel feels like a ripoff Blood Angels space marines (due to the added "brood over my sinister nature" and "my peers think I will flip out some day" tropes).

And more than that, both Warhammers are a subtle parody of that, while Pathfinder plays the trope straight and dead serious.

Once again, I'm going to disagree. Nothing written about him even suggests that he kills without thinking, nor that he kills anything that isn't LG.

As for his nature, plenty of people worry that they are destined to repeat the mistakes/failings of their parents. A very reasonable concern, and natural thing to obsess over.

As for peers, think of it like a small town. He comes from a bad family, and people worry that he'll end up like his parents, which is legitimate because more often than not people do. Ragathiel knows that, and so he overcompensates, trying to prove, to himself and everyone else, that he is not his heritage.

This is why I like Ragathiel. He is at once the classical avenging angel, as Mark said, the sword, simple and straightforward. He is also more than this. The person who has deliberately turned his back on his heritage and strives to overcome it. The son of a criminal who has become a police officer, as it where. A very human, and relatable, character. Who better for a Pitborn paladin to follow?

Amen!

Mikaze wrote:
Luthorne wrote:

I was a little disappointed with Vildeis, but that's mostly because of my own expectations; I was kind of hoping for the flavor of 'The Cardinal Martyr' to be more along of finding enlightenment and transcendence in pain to go along with the rituals of mortification. Instead, they just seem kind of...deranged, really. Neshen isn't quite what I had in mind either, but he's closer, I think. But I definitely loved a lot of them and their fluff.

I kind of like Vildeis possibly having at least a bit of crazy at her edges, but I can see how she might not be an exact match for certain expectations. I think there's plenty of room for transcendant ascetics among her faithful though.(though yeah, Neshen might be a more sane/balanced choice)

Thinking about her some more, I wonder if she percievd the multiverse as a sort of Omelas situation. She literally can't take joy in the better parts of reality, or she can't allow herself to, because the fact that there is suffering happening somewhere is always scratching at her mind. She just can't turn it off. Her Empathy Levels are over 9000.

So she sets out to become Omelas' martyr-child, because she can't bear to not suffer as long as another is.

How would that affect her peers? Does it drive many to live life to the fullest, to enjoy that which she can't allow herself to, for her sake?

Do many of those who follow her path do it to try and share and ease her burden? Would she want that burden eased?

Surely there are angels that have sought to comfort Vildeis. But is that comfort something that Vildeis would, or should, or must refuse?

Augh, now I really want to know how Vildeis and her faithful relate to the faiths of Shelyn and Zon-Kuthon.

Hmm...peris and risen kytons... That would be one hell of a scary following.

Mikaze, don't ever stop being awesome! :D


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Thanks Amber and Wes for a deeply groovy product. I dig it muchly. Will we ever get any follow-ups? I'm sure much more can be said about the good guys. They are quite a diverse bunch, are they not?


Anyone know if Ylimancha is included?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Lareg wrote:
Anyone know if Ylimancha is included?

Yes, she is indeed included. :)

Paizo Employee Developer

mark kay wrote:
Just to ask, as it didn't really get a clear answer I think, was Ragathiel's obedience intended to be full out ritual sacrifice? Would full out ritual sacrifice qualify for it despite being, well, full out ritual sacrifice of someone likely bound and helpless for it? My own takeaway had been that killing someone appropriately evil in the course of battle as it might come up would qualify, along with requisite ritual prayer after.

To echo Amber's response to this, no, Ragathiel's obedience wasn't intended to be "ritual sacrifice," and yes, your interpretation of the obedience is more what we had in mind. The intention was that most adventurers slay at least one bad guy per day anyway, so as long as you do so in Ragathiel's name and perform an hour-long rite after doing so, you should be peachy. Ragathiel probably wouldn't bestow much power unto individuals who aren't out in the field slaying evil everyday anyway, so if you're in town for a while with no proven evildoers to slay, then yes, you might not get all your Ragathiel boons.

No doubt this ruling wouldn't work for all groups' styles of play, so GMs should feel free to adjust Ragathiel's obedience to match their campaigns' particular needs. </stating the obvious ;]>

Paizo Employee Developer

Amber Scott wrote:
2. Ritual of Possession was supposed to grant channel energy 3+Cha times per day, yes, if you don't already have the ability. That was a mistake on my part.

Woops, yep, that should have been caught in development. If you do the ritual of possession, you can channel energy a number of times per day equal to 3 + your Cha modifier (or more, if you could channel more times per day already).

Paizo Employee Developer

Evil Midnight Lurker wrote:
I'm having issues with Summon Stampede. It's a conjuration (summoning) spell, but its summoned "herd of animals" is an effect with no creature stats. Shouldn't there be some kind of mechanic to represent the possibility of killing the stampede or turning it aside?

To simplify the summon stampede spell, I opted to not include stats for the individual creatures in the stampede (since there are likely dozens of them anyway, and while individually they might be cake to take care of, it's still quite another thing when you have Jumanji-esque rhino/elephant/zebra stampedes stomping through the battlefield). The stampede turns aside if it meets a solid obstacle (so a wall of ice spell would be very handy against this effect, since the stampede could feasibly be used against the creature that cast it if the opposing spellcaster is crafty enough). I can also see ad hoc rulings being made for using area-of-effect spells against the stampede to hinder/destroy it.

Quote:
EDIT: Also, Blood of the Martyr. You know it's pretty set in stone that drinking the blood of the unwilling is an evil act, right? At least the spell doesn't actually have the Good keyword. And shouldn't positive-energy-infused blood be called out as harming undead who go for the bait?

Is that set in stone? I can't find a specific reference saying one way or the other. And yes, since it is positive energy, an undead who takes the full round to sup on the blood of a willing or helpless creature affected by this spell would take damage instead of being healed.

Paizo Employee Developer

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Luthorne wrote:
Secondly, Vinetrap, it looks like someone swapped design directions at some point in the spell and forgot to change everything to match. It's an area effect spell, yet the flavor text acts like it's a single target spell; furthermore, it takes ten minutes to cast and lasts for hours, yet the flavor text presumes (despite having 'trap' in the name of the spell) that you will actually have a 'subject' while you are casting it. It's very confusing, and I'm honestly not sure what direction it's supposed to go in.

Oops! That was definitely a copy/paste mistake on my part during development. The upper portion of the vinetrap spell should actually look like this:

VINETRAP
School conjuration (creation); Level cleric 5, druid 5
Casting Time 1 standard action
Components V, S, DF
Range long (400 ft. + 40 ft./level)
Target one creature
Duration 1 round/level (D)
Saving Throw Reflex negates; Spell Resistance yes

The rest of the spell's text remains the same. Sorry about the confusion!


Patrick Renie wrote:
Is that set in stone? I can't find a specific reference saying one way or the other.

I think you'll find that James Jacobs has some strong opinions on that one. :)

Dark Archive

then it will be lama vs t-rex!

Silver Crusade

I gotta say, the worshippers and minions entries for each Empyreal gets a lot of flavor-milage out of so few words.

Ashava's entries in those areas are a particularly awesome dramabomb. :)

And for all the worry I had about celestial haterade being aimed at nagas because of the garudas, they get a LOT of positive representation here.

Half-celestial calikangs and girtablilus*?! YES PLZ

Ylimancha has a particularly "OH @#$%" type of minion.

*Every visual that comes to mind is all sorts of cool. Can't help but imagine wings of mixed chitin and sand-crafted glass.

Silver Crusade

!

Okay, Cernunnos has got to have some sort of connection to the late Curchanus.

Really curious about any possible deeper meaning behind the maze-like pattern behind Chadali's holy symbol and her choice of minions. I mean, wow. She could be pulling some good-aligned House of Leaves shenanigans there, and it would click perfectly with her goals.


I had a few questions to ask about Lymnieris.

First off...

Obedience wrote:

Lie on a hard, flat surface wearing nothing but a

cowl. Concentrate on the feeling of the surface and the air while achieving sexual release without touching yourself. Healing spells you cast heal 1 more point of damage per die.

...How is that even physically possible?

Secondly, because he is portrayed as a defender of virgins and enemy of rapists, would a paladin of Lymnieris essentially be Liam Neeson in full-plate?

Then there's the matter of Arshea.

Obedience wrote:

Achieve sexual release by yourself or with one or

more partners. Praise the most beautiful aspects of yourself and any partners aloud, and offer a prayer to Arshea while still naked. Gain a +4 sacred bonus on Charisma checks and Charisma-based skill checks when interacting with an intelligent creature who could be sexually attracted to you.

Honestly, I can understand why this was included, with Arshea being a good-aligned deity of sexual expression and liberation.

But can you imagine how unbelievably AWKWARD it would be playing a Cleric of Arshea?

"Okay, I'm going to the edge of camp to rub one out and maintain my bonuses."

"You...what??"

I'm not saying it's a bad idea. Maybe every gaming group wouldn't be comfortable with it, but you'd probably have the whole table laughing their asses off, and in a best-case scenario playing this kind of character would be a neat roleplaying challenge.


Mikaze wrote:

!

Okay, Cernunnos has got to have some sort of connection to the late Curchanus.

Really curious about any possible deeper meaning behind the maze-like pattern behind Chadali's holy symbol and her choice of minions. I mean, wow. She could be pulling some good-aligned House of Leaves shenanigans there, and it would click perfectly with her goals.

I realized Chadali has a lot in common with a homebrew deity of mine that I made for a homebrew race related to minotaurs...

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