Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Chronicle of the Righteous (PFRPG)

5.00/5 (based on 6 ratings)
Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Chronicle of the Righteous (PFRPG)
Show Description For:
Non-Mint

Add Print Edition $19.99 $9.99

Add PDF $13.99

Non-Mint Unavailable

Facebook Twitter Email

Pray for Mercy
The empyreal lords watch over the infinite expanses of the multiverse to ensure that good can flourish and that evil, no matter its form, can be vanquished. But even these powers cannot stem the tide of evil by themselves, and they must often rely on their celestial servants—noble angels, wise agathions, unrelenting archons, and free-spirited azatas—to lead the charge against the forces of corruption. Together, these virtuous forces wage an unending war against the blasphemous and the profane, all the while lifting worthy mortals to stations of ever-greater glory among the boundless celestial spheres.

Inside this book, you’ll find:

  • A thorough exploration of over 50 empyreal lords, including details on their minions, the divine powers they bestow upon mortal worshipers, and the celestial realms from which they hail.
  • Rules for the mystery cultist prestige class and details on the various types of mystery cults.
  • Methods to bolster mortal spellcasters’ efforts while summoning all the different types of celestials.
  • New spells for spellcasters to hurl at their wicked foes and new magic items to aid adventurers in their battles against evil.
  • Rules for rituals of self-mortification and the divine powers that can be gleaned by such acts of devotion.
  • A bestiary of five new celestials to assist or oppose player characters, including the keen-eyed spyglass archon and the veranallia, azata master of seasons, growth, and decay.

Chronicle of the Righteous is intended for use with the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game and Pathfinder Campaign Setting, but can easily be used in any fantasy game setting.

By Amber Scott

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-506-8

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Lost Omens Subscription.

Product Availability

Print Edition:

Available now

Ships from our warehouse in 1 to 5 business days.

PDF:

Fulfilled immediately.

Non-Mint:

Unavailable

This product is non-mint. Refunds are not available for non-mint products. The standard version of this product can be found here.

Are there errors or omissions in this product information? Got corrections? Let us know at store@paizo.com.

PZO9255


See Also:

1 to 5 of 6 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | next > last >>

Average product rating:

5.00/5 (based on 6 ratings)

Sign in to create or edit a product review.

Heavenly!

5/5

Chronicle of the Righteous is about the servants, worshippers, and homes of a group of beings in Golarion (Pathfinder's campaign setting) called "Empyreal Lords." Empyreal Lords are hard to define exactly; they're divine beings that inspire small groups of worshippers (called Mystery Cults), but they're not major deities that attract thousands of worshippers and the building of major temples. They might be best thought of as demigods, because they're below deities but above normal "celestial" races like angels. That's my best guess anyway, as I'm still a little bit fuzzy on the role of Empyreal Lords in Golarion. But put that to one side: Chronicle of the Righteous is a fascinating book that has inspired me to want to integrate Empyreal Lords, Mystery Cults, and more into my campaigns. The book is a 64-page entry in the Campaign Setting line. The inside front cover is a list of approximately fifty Empyreal Lords, their alignment, areas of concern (portfolios), domains (that they grant to clerical worshippers), and favored weapons. The inside back cover is a full-page reproduction of the cover art, which is quite impressive in its own right. Between the the covers are nine sections.

1. "Tabris's Return to Heaven" (two pages): This is a dense account, written in a "handwritten" font, that tells the tale of a warrior-scholar angel named Tabris who was obsessed with fully exploring and detailing the heights and depths of the heavenly and fiendish realms. Tabris disappeared for decades before returning with his Chronicle of the Righteous, and the book contained secrets that even the celestial realms would have rather been suppressed! It's quite evocative and well-written, and surprisingly effective. It's definitely a flavourful way to start the book off.

2. " Lords of the Empyrean" (29 pages): Each of the major Empyreal Lords receives at least a half-page entry that describes them and their particular interests, along with a drawing of their holy symbol and information on what types of people worship them, where their shrines might be located, and what sorts of celestial beings act as their minions. I would say that every third or fourth Empyreal Lord receives a full-colour picture, and these are done quite well. Perhaps the most important thing in this section is the introduction of the concept of "Celestial Obedience" and "Boons." Celestial Obedience is a feat that can be taken by worshippers of Empyreal Lords and provides them with an immediate +4 sacred bonus to something like (depending on the particular Emypreal Lord worshipped) a certain type of saving throw, combat maneuver check, AC against a particular type of enemy, etc. The benefit is narrow in scope and certainly not game-breaking, but additional powers ("boons") are gained at character levels 12, 16, and 20--and some of these are pretty cool. The best part of the Celestial Obedience concept is that, although it can certainly be taken by clerics, paladins, and other divinely-focussed classes, it doesn't have to be. If your Cavalier is a worshipper of the Ragathiel, the Empyreal Lord of chivalry or your Bard is a worshipper of Seramaydiel, the Empyreal Lord of communication and music, they can gain the benefits of Celestial Obedience. It's a great way to make the gods (or demigods) meaningful to more than just clerics in a campaign.

3. "Celestrial Realms" (2 pages): This is a description of the major geographical features of the celestial realms: Elysium, Heaven, and Nirvana. I have to admit I've never had characters adventure in celestial realms, and I have no idea what it would be like to GM or role-play such a place. I suppose it's good to have something more concrete to heaven than fluffy clouds. I did like how there was mention of where mortals who plane shift to each realm are most likely to appear.

4. "Celestialkind" (6 pages): After an introduction to celestial races and a sidebar about what happens to mortal souls who reach the celestial realms ("petitioners"), each of the following varieties of good-aligned denizens of the celestial planes receives a full page description: Agathions, Angels, Archons, and Azatas. I think this would be especially useful for those pesky spellcasters who are prone to summoning celestial beings willy-nilly.

5. "Concordance" (2 pages): Although only two pages long, this is one of my favorite sections of the book. The premise is that "once an eon, and only in times of great danger or turmoil" all of the divine powers of the celestial planes gather together to reach an accord on what should be done. There's material here about the death of Aroden, Lamashtu's rise to power, hints about a deity interested in time-travel, and, most intriguing of all, "The Seventh Accord", a Concordance never spoken of in the centuries or millennia since it happened and considered so blasphemous and dangerous that no mention of it is permitted to exist. Great fodder for creative GMs!

6. "Empyreal Worship" (14 pages): This section is a grab-bag of material, but it's useful. There's a page on how the different divine classes relate to Empyreal Lords, two pages on different types of Mystery Cults (drawn broadly among themes, but useful), and two pages on "secret offerings" that can be made to improve one's chance in summoning a particular type of celestial being. Two pages are also devoted to Rituals of Mortification, which requires a character to invest a certain number of days going without food, water or sleep in order to gain both an affliction and a benefit. The actual rituals listed are said to be examples only and GMs should feel free to add more. The Ritual of Appetite, for example, requires two days' fasting, afflicts the character with a -2 penalty on Constitution checks and saves vs. disease and poison, but grants the character a +2 sacred bonus on concentration checks and Will saving throws. Other rituals are far more powerful, with one providing a +4 sacred bonus on attack rolls against evil creatures and a +4 bonus on caster level checks to overcome their spell resistance! I haven't used these rituals in play, and I'm not sure whether they would be balanced or not, especially because part of the mechanism is the infliction of nonlethal damage once a day, but nonlethal damage heals quite easy. So the idea is interesting, but I'd have to test this concept out more before I'd be confident it's a good addition to the game. Next, there's an important new prestige class introduced here: the Mystery Cultist. A Mystery Cultist gains spells at the same speed as their prior class and several celestial-themed abilities, but a big reason for playing one is that they can receive the "boons" of the Celestial Obedience feat a few levels earlier than a regular character. I'd be very tempted to try this class out, as it seems to both fit the flavour of Empyreal Lord worship and be mechanically sound. After this, here are two pages of new spells (6 in all), with specific mention that these are not restricted to worshippers of Mystery Cults (and a couple of the spells are arcane in nature). I would love to see "Charitable Impulse" in a game, as it forces someone to help others and gradually give away all of their possessions instead of committing acts of violence. Last, there are two pages of celestial-themed magic items.

7. "Lesser Empyreal Lords" (1 page): About two dozen Empyreal Lords that were, for whatever reason, not significant enough to be included in the first section receive a brief, one-sentence description here.

8. "Fallen Celestials" (1 page): Intriguing description of those celestial beings who have turned their back on the heavens, many of whom have joined the infernal realms.

9. "The Celestial Hosts" (8 pages): This is basically a bestiary. It helpfully puts into table format all of the Agathions, Angels, Archons, and Azatas introduced in other Pathfinder materials, and then describes five new ones: Cervinal Agathions, Balisse Angels, Choral Angels, Spyglass Archons, and Vernallia Azatas. I found the new creatures interesting and potentially useful (except for the Choral Angels, which were a bit too cliche for me).

In sum, there's a lot of material here and it's almost all great. I picked this book up by chance (it was half-price) and have never done much with the celestial realms in a game, but I can now definitely see why I might want to in the future; and if I do, I'm confident that Chronicle of the Righteous would be the first place I'd turn.


Want More!

5/5

Few of the books in RP that I never wanted to end. The flavor and stats in this book are awesome and highly useful for people that find that they are not fitting into the 'standard gods' but your not a deviant into the other alignments.

There is something for almost everyone good aligned, investigators have two options of Emperial Lords who they can follow and seem perfectly inline with their 'deity's' viewpoints. Spies and artisans have options, crusaders have more than just Iomedae's views. Good aligned nature gods - sure you don't have to be purely neutral.

There are many options and the mechanics are useful but are more geared towards games that would end up in higher level range (12+) but would add a lot of good flavor without being overpowered.


Everyman Product Reviews: Chronicles of the Righteous

5/5

Final Score & Thoughts
Crunch: 5/5 Stars
Flavor: 5/5 Stars
Layout: 4/5 Stars
Final Score: 14/15 Stars, or 4.5 Stars, rounded up for it’s flavor.

Chronicles of the Righteous is a must-own book if you do absolutely anything with good outsiders in your campaign. This book provides a much needed insight into the nature of the celestial races and provides plenty of fodder for potential gods and entities in your campaign setting. This product is a rich tapestry of righteousness that your Pathfinder collection is incomplete without.

Read the complete review at the Everyman Gaming blog.


Excellent Book!

5/5

Read my full review on my blog.

Overall, Chronicle of the Righteous is an excellent book, particularly due to its extensive list of Empyreal Lords. It helps to balance out the playing field between the forces of evil and the forces of good. While gamemasters may have less call for information on celestials than they do information on fiends, the do have some call for that information, and this book fills that niche splendidly.


This is a fantastic book!

5/5

It is up there with Lords of Madness, Book of Fiends and Demonomicon of Iggwilv in the amount and quality of information it provides on the various Empyreal Lords and the other celestials. The author should be proud of this creation!

As for the material, there is an awesome list of new sources for divine casters as well as other information on new celestial creatures. I especially like the inclusion of Tabriss, the Celestial Realms, Concordance and the Fallen Celestials.

Do yourself and your players a favor, go out and pick up this book now!


1 to 5 of 6 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | next > last >>
201 to 250 of 507 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>
Shadow Lodge

Jessica Price wrote:
The concept of "purity" is explicitly not tied to celibacy in Champions. Different Empyreal Lords have different approaches to the whole thing, however.

That's kind of disappointing. Why is that. Thre are already plenty of representations of sexual freedom in the setting, it would kind of be nice to expand past that and open up.


I hope at least one of those new celestials is an angel.

I can't wait for this book just two more months to go.

I wonder how many pages we are getting for new spells and magic items?

Lantern Lodge

"Devil's Advocate" wrote:
Jessica Price wrote:
The concept of "purity" is explicitly not tied to celibacy in Champions. Different Empyreal Lords have different approaches to the whole thing, however.
That's kind of disappointing. Why is that. Thre are already plenty of representations of sexual freedom in the setting, it would kind of be nice to expand past that and open up.

Because, all the gods and demi-gods/powers of Golarion, knows that it is a number's game.

Celibacy does not help with making more worshipers.

:D

Shadow Lodge

It's actually not a numbers game at all in Golarion. Officially, deities do not require or benefit from followers, do not need them to be divine, and will not grow weaker if all their followers leave. The Empyreal Lords also really don't care about worshipers, which is kind of what makes them differnt than the deities. They can focus totally on their goals and areas of power rather than needing to worry about worshipers and splinter faiths. :)


Jessica Price wrote:
The NPC wrote:
I don't know. I don't see one the fellows using artificial means for a temporary means of mind "Expansion."
Cool stuff

Self mortification and other altered states of being usually all converge on the attempt to "escape one's body", and as mentioned by Jessica, show up in TONS of different religions. Self denial of the basic needs that punctuate your station in the universe (food, joy, sex, comfort, your own senses, etc), can, in some cultures, lift you into the realms that are usually unattainable by your rank.

Temporary "mind expansion" is more than just getting high/drunk in these cultures/religions, its a way to shed your icky human skin and reach into the heavens and commune with greater beings than you - its not something I would consider to be inherently "good" or "evil", so I don't know why a good-aligned celestial would necessarily be against it.

Budai is an awesome example of the religious trope that is emphasized by Cayden Cailean - I'd even go so far as to peg Budai as Chaotic Good, too.

Budai is the Chinese folkloric hero that reached enlightenment and became a Buddha by being as Ke$ha as he possibly could: partying, drinking, poor decision-making, and probably glitter. He was a Buddha of contentment; happiness despite lack of worldly riches. He made up for his lack of riches by partying with people any chance he got; so drinking heavily might make you a Buddha :)

Silver Crusade

1 person marked this as a favorite.
"Devil's Advocate" wrote:
Jessica Price wrote:
The concept of "purity" is explicitly not tied to celibacy in Champions. Different Empyreal Lords have different approaches to the whole thing, however.
That's kind of disappointing. Why is that. Thre are already plenty of representations of sexual freedom in the setting, it would kind of be nice to expand past that and open up.

I don't think she's saying that celibacy is on the outs with purity. It just doesn't have a monopoly on the concept of purity. It's going to be one of many approaches to it. That way the chaste nun isn't going to be on a higher or lower moral plane than the playful and caring lover guy.

Also have to give props for tackling the traditions involving stuff like peyote head on. That's something I didn't expect, and I fully trust that it'll be given a nuanced approach(like the real world traditions that Jessica's already mentioned) rather than what some might initially fear(Empyreals of LEGALIZE IT). ;)

Tirisfal wrote:

Budai is an awesome example of the religious trope that is emphasized by Cayden Cailean - I'd even go so far as to peg Budai as Chaotic Good, too.

Budai is the Chinese folkloric hero that reached enlightenment and became a Buddha by being as Ke$ha as he possibly could: partying, drinking, poor decision-making, and probably glitter. He was a Buddha of contentment; happiness despite lack of worldly riches. He made up for his lack of riches by partying with people any chance he got; so drinking heavily might make you a Buddha :)

Now I kinda want to play in a party alongside adherents of Cayden, Budai, and Pinkie Pie.

Project Manager

Devil's Advocate: As Mikaze noted, I'm not saying that there aren't any faith systems in Golarion tying celibacy to purity -- I'm saying that the vanilla version of purity isn't celibacy. Different faiths may add their own flavors to it, but it's not an automatic association.

Project Manager

Mikaze: I don't remember how head-on it is. :-) It might be more just a nuance. Don't want to promise anything that isn't in there because we sent it out a while ago and my exact memory of reading it is overlaid with a lot of "OMG WE HAVE TO GET THIS BOOK TO THE PRINTER." I just remember catching a bunch of different similarities to different earth traditions and thinking, "oh, I'm happy we included that...and that!...and that!"


I agree different faiths with different ideas of what is right or good. This will be an interesting read.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

I have the Know Direction podcast which is titled Homosexuality in Golarion waiting on my phone to be listened to, so this this will be interesting, along with this release

Dark Archive

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Rulebook, Starfinder Society Subscriber

Three campaign setting books in May?


Pathfinder Adventure Subscriber

The product schedule entry for May doesn't include Dragons Unleashed, so I suspect that one might get bumped to June.

Also - no Campaign Setting book in April, so this one is in My due to being delayed.

Dark Archive

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Damn, wish this got bumped back to April...ah, well.

I'm an agathion fan, so I'm wondering if there will be a new type?
I'm hoping for a remake of the lupinal from 3.0's MM2, or the musteval from Exalted (though as a CR 2, I guess the silvanshee takes its place).

Hyperative ferret celestial stealing those devil's socks and shiny things!


ALL OF MY YES!


No previews yet?

Shadow Lodge

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber

Don't know if this has been mentioned up thread at all but am I the only one hoping for a "tempter for good"? I would love to see a succubus styled azata or angel who's eternal goal is to tempt evil into either joining the forces of good or aiding good through their actions.


Doc, you may be.


doc the grey wrote:
Don't know if this has been mentioned up thread at all but am I the only one hoping for a "tempter for good"? I would love to see a succubus styled azata or angel who's eternal goal is to tempt evil into either joining the forces of good or aiding good through their actions.

Nah, I'm there with ya, doc. :)

Shadow Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber
Heine Stick wrote:
doc the grey wrote:
Don't know if this has been mentioned up thread at all but am I the only one hoping for a "tempter for good"? I would love to see a succubus styled azata or angel who's eternal goal is to tempt evil into either joining the forces of good or aiding good through their actions.
Nah, I'm there with ya, doc. :)

thanks, it always bugs me that there seems to be this monopoly on duplicity amongst non good alignments while good is forced to always be upfront and honest about everything. Now I can maybe see that for LG but CG azatas are just begging for some interesting tricksters for good to come along and con evil into good.

All I want at the end of the day is to see an outsider who provokes the lines "Damn you good! You've made me care about the welfare of others and want to see everyone treated with care and respect!"

Barring that the idea of an angel or other good outsider who literally stops a demonic incursion by convincing half the army betray the other because it is "Would bring more chaos then anyone could imagine!" mixed in with insinuations of said side being able to become the new masters of their piece of the abyss while said angels just watch and mop up what survives is too just cool.

Lantern Lodge

doc, you just gave me a weird thought...

How does angels interrogate demons? Feather + tickle torture? @_@...


I think exploring the various shades of LG and good in general is worth several volumes Doc. I like where you're coming from, and others in this thread. For my part, I'd like to see some vehement disagreements portrayed between CG and LG outsiders. It's always kind of bugged me that the good guys pretty much always get along. SURE, I get that they are devoted to the welfare and uplifting of goodly forces in the multiverse. But an Azata is as diametrically wired from an Angel as an Inevitable is from a Protean. There HAS to be some kind of friction worth delving into there.

It's probably well beyond the scope of this particular book, but it might be nice to at least see one lawful good Empyreal Lord having a mention made about how they have a deep and abiding disagreement running with a chaotic good Empyreal Lord. Taking a nod from An Unexpected Journey: "...Do not speak to me of Radagast the Brown. He is a foolish fellow..."

Dark Archive

2 people marked this as a favorite.

It might be neat to see a Chaotic Good 'crossroads angel' type of Azata that shows up to desperate people who are trying to find a way to make a deal with a fiend to get out of some terrible circumstances, such as the sickness of a child, by appearing before they find their goal and leading them to a better solution (such as guiding them to a good cleric who can heal their loved one), or, in the case of someone who has ignorantly attempted such a summons, but lacked the knowledge or power to conjure a true fiend, appears in the guise of what they thought they were going to summon and 'makes a deal' with them that gives them what they sought, in exchange for a series of good deeds.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Herbo wrote:
... an Azata is as diametrically wired from an Angel as an Inevitable is from a Protean.

(Apologies for my nit-picking habit.)

I think that you mean Archon (must be LG) there, not Angel (can be any flavour of Good).


Herbo wrote:
But an Azata is as diametrically wired from an Angel as an Inevitable is from a Protean. There HAS to be some kind of friction worth delving into there.

...No, an Inevitable and a Protean have absolutely nothing in common; Azatas and Angels (edit: Archons?) are both good.

Silver Crusade

doc the grey wrote:


thanks, it always bugs me that there seems to be this monopoly on duplicity amongst non good alignments while good is forced to always be upfront and honest about everything. Now I can maybe see that for LG but CG azatas are just begging for some interesting tricksters for good to come along and con evil into good.

All I want at the end of the day is to see an outsider who provokes the lines "Damn you good! You've made me care about the welfare of others and want to see everyone treated with care and respect!"

Barring that the idea of an angel or other good outsider who literally stops a demonic incursion by convincing half the army betray the other because it is "Would bring more chaos then anyone could imagine!" mixed in with insinuations of said side being able to become the new masters of their piece of the abyss while said angels just watch and mop up what survives is too just cool.

She may not be Good, but Calistria has a truly awesome instance of that under her belt. :)

And yeah, I do love the idea of some kinds of celestials tricking folks into the "Good Feels Good" trope.

Also @Doc the grey, self-plugging, but: If you're looking for celestials that use trickery to get good done... :D

Secane wrote:

doc, you just gave me a weird thought...

How does angels interrogate demons? Feather + tickle torture? @_@...

"Inflicting" the capacity for empathy and remorse, perhaps? It's territory they'd have to tread carefully, but there could be something there.

Herbo wrote:
For my part, I'd like to see some vehement disagreements portrayed between CG and LG outsiders.

There's probably a lot of fun to be had in exploring just how celestials carry out these disagreements when it moves beyond debate. Sure, if it's outright warfare, someone somewhere is probably falling. But uncompromised celestials could still come to blows, so to speak, using any number of non-lethal and fantastic methods. Like temporary petrification for archons. Animal/plant polymorphing for angels/agathions. Synaesthesia bombing for azatas. Stuff that focuses on subduing or removal from the conflict rather than killing.

Have to wonder how many azatas might actually be in archon jails at the moment. And for what and how long? On the flipside, maybe there's some archon who's been prepetually distracted by some party azatas keep throwing for him.

Set wrote:

It might be neat to see a Chaotic Good 'crossroads angel' type of Azata that shows up to desperate people who are trying to find a way to make a deal with a fiend to get out of some terrible circumstances, such as the sickness of a child, by appearing before they find their goal and leading them to a better solution (such as guiding them to a good cleric who can heal their loved one), or, in the case of someone who has ignorantly attempted such a summons, but lacked the knowledge or power to conjure a true fiend, appears in the guise of what they thought they were going to summon and 'makes a deal' with them that gives them what they sought, in exchange for a series of good deeds.

Want this.


Mikaze wrote:
Want This

Well you're going to have to eat your meat before you get your pudding.


Bellona wrote:
I think that you mean Archon (must be LG) there, not Angel (can be any flavour of Good).

Ah criminy! Thanks for the kick, that's embarrassing.

Evil Midnight Lurker wrote:
...No, an Inevitable and a Protean have absolutely nothing in common; Azatas and Angels (edit: Archons?) are both good.

My mistake, nothing to see here. Sorry bro!

I swear I will get my goggles of anti-ineptitude on the next time...

(•_•)
( •_•)<⌐-
(⌐_)

Dark Archive

In my 'Engine of Creation' notion, I posited that Archons, Axiomites, Inevitables and Devils might (begrudgingly, and with the occasional friendly fire 'accident') end up working together to protect some important site of law, something that perhaps helped to form the universe from the primordial chaos of the Maelstrom in the first place, from waves of Proteans (and the occasional Qlippoth) seeking to tear it down and let the universe return to 'its natural state of undifferentiated chaos.'

Azata would tend to sit this one out, as they aren't as invested in safeguarding law, but neither do they explicitly want to 'tear it all down.'

A Law vs. Chaos divide as meaningful as the ubiquitous Good vs. Evil tropes would be a neat shout out to the old, old-school D&D, where it was all Law vs. Chaos, and reminiscent of Moorcock's Elric saga (or Babylon 5's Vorlons vs. Shadows situation, where it was easy at first to fall into the 'Law = Good' and 'Chaos = Evil' trope, but increasingly became clear that the 'good' Vorlons were anything but...).

But that sort of thing wouldn't really be relevant to books focused explicitly on fleshing out options for good aligned characters and options. Any sort of development on the red-headed alignment stepchildren of law and chaos would be welcome 'though! (And perhaps lead to some interesting development options for Irori, Calistria, Abadar and Gorum!)

Shadow Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber
Herbo wrote:

I think exploring the various shades of LG and good in general is worth several volumes Doc. I like where you're coming from, and others in this thread. For my part, I'd like to see some vehement disagreements portrayed between CG and LG outsiders. It's always kind of bugged me that the good guys pretty much always get along. SURE, I get that they are devoted to the welfare and uplifting of goodly forces in the multiverse. But an Azata is as diametrically wired from an Angel as an Inevitable is from a Protean. There HAS to be some kind of friction worth delving into there.

It's probably well beyond the scope of this particular book, but it might be nice to at least see one lawful good Empyreal Lord having a mention made about how they have a deep and abiding disagreement running with a chaotic good Empyreal Lord. Taking a nod from An Unexpected Journey: "...Do not speak to me of Radagast the Brown. He is a foolish fellow..."

Wow cool to see so much discussion on this ^-^. In my mind though I would love to see them take the angle that they really do get along most of the time. To me it seems one of the biggest powers of good is that they can cooperate and I would love to see it set up where even though good outsiders do have issues they will more often then not cooperate and work together with one another and usually avoid actual open conflict with those that do being the ones that fall from grace. That being said I am with everyone in wanting to see their differences

Ohh and on the grounds of the crossroads demon trope what would be even better is an angel who's purpose is to be "captured" by planar binding cultists and uses his detainment as a way to seed their minds with good. Could you imagine a game where you have to work with a cult that is being manipulated toward good by the vary outsiders they have captured and been interrogating? Things i want to see from azatas and agathions


Has the release date been changed?


Any previews available?

Paizo Employee Developer

Shalafi2412 wrote:
Any previews available?

This was on the blog last Tuesday.


Pathfinder Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Are there going to be any empyreal lords that would work for an alchemist? We got one demon lord for alchemy, there should be a counter empyreal for that as well.


Thanks Adam! I saw it!

Paizo Employee Developer

Shalafi2412 wrote:
Thanks Adam! I saw it!

Cool! Just making sure. :)

Dark Archive

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
zergtitan wrote:
Are there going to be any empyreal lords that would work for an alchemist? We got one demon lord for alchemy, there should be a counter empyreal for that as well.

I am hoping for one as well - I'm thinking agathion, but azata would be just as likely.

Maybe like a medicine portfolio?

Paizo Employee Developer

2 people marked this as a favorite.
zergtitan wrote:
Are there going to be any empyreal lords that would work for an alchemist?

Yes.


Pathfinder Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Patrick Renie wrote:
zergtitan wrote:
Are there going to be any empyreal lords that would work for an alchemist?
Yes.

Nice. By the way AWESOME Llama picture, brightened my day. :)


1 person marked this as a favorite.

It looks like this will have roughly the same format as Lords of Chaos, but with Empyreal rather then Demon lords. It's great that the good guys are taking the spotlight for once.


Set wrote:
(or Babylon 5's Vorlons vs. Shadows situation, where it was easy at first to fall into the 'Law = Good' and 'Chaos = Evil' trope, but increasingly became clear that the 'good' Vorlons were anything but...).

That mistake was made easier by having one of the best of the Vorlons as the only one anyone on the show interacted with. You find out later how different he was than the rest.


Hmm, I wonder if the Mystery Cultist PRC will blend well with a Mystic Theruge?


Did anyone else notice that even though this book is about powerful celestial beings of good and yet they are calling there helpers "minions"?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Dragon78 wrote:
Did anyone else notice that even though this book is about powerful celestial beings of good and yet they are calling there helpers "minions"?

Which would you prefer? 'Subjects' or 'Lackeys'?


I think that a PrC dealing with serving Good should grant an Aura of Good. And vice versa, of course. For flavor.


"Subjects" would be a lot better then "minions", but how about "followers", "believers", "friends", "comrades", etc.

Silver Crusade

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I believe the term "minions" in question refers to avatars, heralds, helpers and underlings.

Also, being Good does not mean you can't be condescending ;-)


Sorry, but the term "minion" will always sound like a villain thing to me.


'Minion' actually has more to do with the relative importance of the follower than the character of the leader.

My theory is that it's just that an evil leader is more inclined to treat his followers like dirt than a good leader, so we associate the term minion with those downtrodden followers of an evil leader.

Or, to state it another way, the context the word is usually used in has colored our personal definitions of the word. (I had to check the dictionary, but it agreed with the non-alignment-based use of the word.)

Contributor, RPG Superstar 2010 Top 4

I hope that to a large extent that the entities depicted in this book reflect 'good' from the humanoid or mortal perspective.

AS a B5 fan, I appreciate the comments that have been shared about the Vorlons, and I agree with them. At the same time I hope this book doesn't have any "Vorlons" in them with their distant and alien ethics. Or rather, such notions of character design are reserved for inevitables or proteans.

One thing I have really enjoyed about Golarion's cosmology is that alignment really seems to start with mortal creatures and radiates out to the Outer Planes.

This is opposed to the original D&D cosmological model (as I understood it) where the Outer Planes were the source of alignment—which focused inwards toward the mortal plane. Perhaps I misunderstood the way the cosmology worked, so pardon me if that was inaccurate.

To me it is a question of where does good and evil begin? Some alien abstract dimension? Or in the hearts and souls of mortal folk?

My impression that as where Golarion is concerned, such things begin with mortals.. and those mortals (unintentionally) create those abstract alien places like the Abyss, Hell, Heaven, and Elysium.

So to get back on topic, I would want my Good Outsiders to be derived from the concept of what is good from a mortal perspective.

A little more rambling behind the spoiler tag, but not really a spoiler (just did it for length)

Spoiler:
To me, certain outsiders seem abstract while others do not. Qlippoth, Proteans, and Inevitables seem somewhat abstract, as do the Eldest from the First World. They seem to fall into certain categories of Destruction, Chaos, Law, and raw Creation. This may not be absolutely accurate, but I'm just having fun on the message board.

Demons are what happens when mortal souls are exposed to the Abyss, where once only Qlippoth existed. This is not speculation, this is cannon taken from Lords of Chaos by James Jacobs. I know, I did some research for Wrath of the Righteous and read the book again recently. Ergo, first there were mortals, and then there were demons. The Qlippoth however predate both.

So, I draw a conclusion from that the Qlippoth are abstract from mortal life, but demons are inter-related to it.

I expect or hope to see a similar relationship between mortals and good outsiders.

Note, be kind. This is just a guy sharing his love of the game on the message board.

Liberty's Edge

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Starfinder Superscriber

Law vs. Chaos was one of the core themes of Planescape, abut the Golarion developers have explicitly said they're not trying to duplicate Planescape (e.g. there's no "Blood War" between devils and demons).

Maybe I'm just a goody-goody, but to me one of the strengths of good vs. evil is that they ARE more able to find a way to work together despite divergent philosophies. So, while evil has a whole host of tactics available to it that are barred from good (abuse of innocents, wanton duplicity, torture, etc.), good has the advantage that individuals can trust their allies not to turn on them when the allies have a chance for personal gain.

As such, I like to see the lawful and chaotic good outsiders more buddy-buddy and working together than their evil counterparts.

201 to 250 of 507 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>
Community / Forums / Paizo / Product Discussion / Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Chronicle of the Righteous (PFRPG) All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.