Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Ultimate Campaign (OGL)

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Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Ultimate Campaign (OGL)
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Where the dungeon ends, another adventure begins! Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Ultimate Campaign takes you on a guided tour through the parts of the game that happen between monster attacks and quests for ancient artifacts. As some of the most powerful and prestigious heroes around, do your player characters want to build up a kingdom of their own, or lead an army against a neighboring nation? Perhaps they want to start a business, craft magic items, or embark on a quest that will come to define them. Whether you're looking for help generating a young character or seeking ways to challenge adventurers who've grown bored of fighting monsters one-on-one, this book has everything you need!

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Ultimate Campaign is a must-have companion volume to the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Core Rulebook. This imaginative tabletop game builds on more than 10 years of system development and an open playtest featuring more than 50,000 gamers to create a cutting-edge RPG experience that brings the all-time best-selling set of fantasy rules into a new era.

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Ultimate Campaign includes:

  • A detailed guide to generating character backstories, including a new system for random character generation and traits and drawbacks to meld your background with your statistics.
  • Story feats that increase in power as you achieve key goals, making quests and crusades more than just flavor!
  • A complete downtime rules system to flesh out those parts of a PC's life that take place between adventures, such as running a business, gaining power and influence in a community, or starting a magical academy.
  • New rules for retraining and switching classes; honor, reputation, and fame; young characters; investment; magic item creation; and other key adventuring topics.
  • Rules for building up a kingdom, including construction and technological advancements, governing your people, and more.
  • Mass combat rules to help you lead clashing armies and conduct epic battles in a fun and efficient manner—without losing sight of the PCs themselves.
  • ... and much, much more!

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-498-6

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The Ultimate Ultimate

5/5

Read my full review on my blog.

The latest hardcover rulebook from Paizo is Ultimate Campaign, a book dedicated to an aspect of roleplaying that most books completely gloss over, something some people even gloss over in actual play: non-adventuring time. The vast majority of the rules in Pathfinder (and indeed, most roleplaying games) cover adventuring—fighting monsters, disarming traps, casting spells, travelling through dungeons and wilderness, etc.—and pay very little attention, if any, to what players’ characters get up to between adventures. But for many people, downtime is as much part of the game as the adventuring side is. Where do these characters live? What do they do when they’re not adventuring? What happens if characters try to run a business? What about ruling a nation? How about their families and other relationships? The answers to these questions and more help to define fully fleshed-out and believable characters. They add an additional dimension to the game and provide character motivations beyond just loot. Ultimate Campaign helps players provide answers to these questions and more. Is it a necessary book? No, of course not—no book is really necessary other than the Core Rulebook and maybe the first Bestiary—but it is a very different and useful book. It’s also a very good book and has quickly catapulted itself to one of my favourite books in the hardcover line.


Decent offering

3/5

Arggghhh, I had a big review written, then I submitted it only to have it not be posted! Then clicking back in the browser window left me with an empty review! Not happy. Irritated, I now only give a capsule review of the two things I'm really not happy about.

First is the paper. I don't like the matte finish paper. I've come to expect glossy paper from Paizo and this matte paper makes it look unfinished to me. I also don't like the feel of the paper it just feels uncomfortable in my hands.

The other is the background section. This reminds me a whole lot of the Central Casting's various Heroes background books, only not as detailed. These tables hit on pretty much everything that Heroes of Legend did, just not as well. The only thing that I do like about the background section is the fact that there are class specific tables to help tie your background more to your choice of class. This is definitely something missing from Heroes of Legend. The background section in Ultimate Campaign is probably quite useful for anyone who has never heard of the Heroes of Legend, doesn't want to track a copy down (the books are all long out of print) or don't want to pay the high OOP print prices for them.

Don't get me wrong there a quite a few things that I like in the book, however these two really let it down in my opinion. I would like to give it a four, but three is all I can do.


Bordering on Superb

4/5

A very useful book for broadening campaigns. People, whether DMs or players, who are looking for dungeonearing or adventuring tips should look elsewhere - there are other products for that. This one is aimed at bringing life to other aspects of the campaign, and it does that very well.

In my experience, even experienced gamers often neglect many aspects of their character's background, so while the first section is not exactly pathbreaking (get it? <---Plinkett voice), it's still a broadly useful gathering of background considerations. Especially if one remembers that the "random tables" do not need to be used randomly.

The "campaign system" section allows for (perhaps overgenerous) retraining of virtually all aspects of a character, which can be useful given that new products can often make a player want to go in a different direction than they originally did, but without wanting to throw out the character (personality & all - a character is moer than just their feat, skill, or even class level choices). If this section has one obvious weakness, it's in its treatment of alignment. I won't go into quibbles over its *descriptions* of the various alignments, but rather the potential perverse result of the new mechanic: as a *mechanic* (setting aside the admonishment not to let players "game" it), it allows characters who are designed to be "purer" examples of whichever alignment they choose to be more morally flexible without suffering immediate negative consequences, but characters who are, by design, intended to be "border-cases," or "shades of grey" characters must, under this mechanic, behave strictly in accordance with their alignment without deviation, because even a "small" deviation will precipitate an alignment change, and such characters can suffer the disadvantage of frequent penalization as they cross and recross the border area. Whether one likes this aspect probably depends upon the sort of campaign one wants to experience, but it's worth noting that this cuts out a fair amount of common character types (so common that the old "Great Wheel" had "planes" for all these "border-case" alignments, not just for the "pure" examples). As a mechanic I think this is strictly inferior the old system of DM judgement adjudicating when someone has strayed far enough that they have changed alignment.

The downtime system provides decent mechanics for developing a character's non-adventuring interests, home & organization building. At first reading it seems fairly balanced between allowing characters to build "strongholds" and income-generating organizations & enterprises *without* generating so much income that adventuring becomes superfluous. If it has a drawback, it is potentially too complex for many people to want to manage. I can imagine a KoDT-type situation where players get both embroiled in and confused by their character's downtime activities.

However, both the downtime system and the next section, the kingdom rules, have among the best understandings of fantasy-economics found in games, including a structure of production and comprehension of the heterogeneous nature of capital goods, and as long as players are having fun - however they are having it (even if "downtime" becomes a focus of the campaign), IMO it's RPing. It's just worth noting that the rules for these activities are complex enough that I can imagine them consuming a lot of campaign time; but this "drawback" is limited by the fact that players only have to engage in them as much or as little as they want to; - the downtime rules are scalable and modular so it does not have to turn into a complex business-management endeavor unless PCs want to get involved in that.

The kingdom building rules (and mass combat rules) are "just" a tweeked version of the same rules that appeared in the Kingmaker AP, but with the helpful admonishment that the DM can intervene to prevent players from exploiting the system by making unrealistic settlements filled with magic shops or graveyards (this tip would also apply to any exploits of the downtime rules that players will surely find). I'm all for people using rules intelligently to get the most from them, but "within reason."

Criticisms aside, this is a well-conceived product, and any of the flaws consist of mechanics that can be easily tweeked or safely ignored without throwing out the whole.


Worth its money!

5/5

I've only browsed through the book, but I've already liked it!
It's got a little bit of everything, and the pictures are amazing.
Extra food for the one that drew little iconic paladin with the helmet!

We won't be using everything all at once, but slowly let things trickle in (like we did with heropoints). If we like it, we'll keep it. If we don't, we tried something which seemed very nice :)

For the 40 USB/EUR you're paying for the book... Well, I've spend my money on a lot of worse deals :P


Neat idea, lots of flaws

2/5

My group and I were very excited about this book. Since it's release, our excitement has been scaled back quite a bit. Many things in the Downtime, Kingdom, and Mass Combat rules seem haphazard and not well thought out. It's got great ideas, and I'm not regretting my purchase, but be prepared to have many questions, and many house rules, if you want this to be a big part of your campaign.

Edit: Upon further playing, I have to rate it even lower. We've pretty much thrown the entire book out. It raises as many questions as, if not more than, it solves.


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Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Optional systems usually aren't a Player focused option. It seems like this is more a GMG 2 with some side advice to players for me.

Dark Archive

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Stratagemini wrote:

Optional systems usually aren't a Player focused option. It seems like this is more a GMG 2 with some side advice to players for me.

Ultimate Campaign blurb wrote:


- Innovative new story feats that tie your character’s background and experiences into the game, giving players goals to accomplish for even greater rewards
- A complete system for tracking what your character does between adventures, from opening a tavern to crafting a powerful magic item.
- A number of systems to add expand Pathfinder play, including fame, honor, relationships, and more (all for the PC).
- Rules for building and maintaining a kingdom, from a small town to a mighty nation (focused on PCs yet again).

This is an APG 2 disguised as the GMG 2.

An "Ultimate Campaign" book should be about helping the DM out in his campaign, not a series of rules and subsystems that revolve around the PC or more PC options/feats/abilities.

Again, won't know more till this is out but for me this isn't a DM aid, it's just another player book.

Scarab Sages RPG Superstar 2008 Top 4; Contributor; Publisher, Legendary Games

12 people marked this as a favorite.

Hi Auxmalous,

I can only speak directly for 33,600 words of the book, but that chapter is a GM aid.

Actually, I can speak for the outline and purpose of the rest of the book, and what I can tell you is that you are creating a false dichotomy between GM aid and player stuff. The PCs, after all, are supposed to be part of the campaign world. The fact is that in many campaigns... they aren't. They're just these sort of roving free-riding heroes that float around and nothing happens when they're not on screen in the middle of "the adventure."

This book is all about filling in the rest of the screen. What are PCs doing when it's not "the adventure"? What is the rest of the world doing when the PCs aren't there?

You could, of course, only use these subsystems to deal with PC actions, if that were your preference as a GM. Alternatively, you could stat up the entire world and have players interact with the defined system you've created. You could also land anywhere in between.

Without giving anything away, this book is miles away from an APG2 and right next door to the GMG2. You're welcome to your preconceptions if you like, but I'd advise you to wait for more information before passing judgment.


Quote:
What are PCs doing when it's not "the adventure"?

Ale.

Quote:
What is the rest of the world doing when the PCs aren't there?

Making Ale.

Did we really need a 256 page book for this?

Spoiler:

Kidding! I'm quite excited for this. The idea of feats where you must do something to get a higher benefit is really cool.


Whose idea was it to have the story feats, anyways? I want to thank them next year at PaizoCon.

Dark Archive

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Jason Nelson wrote:
Actually, I can speak for the outline and purpose of the rest of the book, and what I can tell you is that you are creating a false dichotomy between GM aid and player stuff. The PCs, after all, are supposed to be part of the campaign world. The fact is that in many campaigns... they aren't. They're just these sort of roving free-riding heroes that float around and nothing happens when they're not on screen in the middle of "the adventure."

No, I am not creating a false dichotomy between GM aid and player stuff.

I know you need to jump in to pitch or defend product and your work, and that's fine - but don't try to present this as something I am trying to construct out of a figment of my imagination. This wasn't an attack upon you or any of the contributors of this book, I am just making an observation based on facts presented and the direction that Paizo decided to go with on this product (targeting both DMs and players).

There is campaign design material and there is running campaign support material and rules (as they concern the PCs and world as a whole), and based on the information provided this looks like a whole lot of the latter and only focusing on the PC part (not the world outside of the PCs).

Campaigns actually "do exist" beyond the players - as in starting up a new one with no one having actually played in said campaign?
You know - when a DM is creating (or modifying) the world the players are going to play in. Designing countries/empires, faiths, economies, cause and effect of magic on the world, etc - how things may work in a low magic world, or heck - even a low combat/heavy rpg campaign? Or any number of things that could go into a campaign at day 0/inception up untill game day and after. You know - some of the things an Ultimate Campaign-style of book should tackle?

These would be options and design considerations for the DM, not extended collection of down-time player abilities and class features that didn't fit in the last "ultimate PC" book.

This doesn't look like a DM toolkit - but in any case I will "wait and see" as I stated two times so far in this thread. Not expecting much but a bunch of expanded player-based campaign rules and abilities for players though.

Thanks for your attempt at clarification Jason.

Scarab Sages Reaper Miniatures

Quote:
Innovative new story feats that tie your character’s background and experiences into the game, giving players goals to accomplish for even greater rewards.

When I read this, I wonder how it works:

you gain the ability X from the feat, and if you accomplish Goal Y, then the feat grants you Ability X AND Ability Z,

or if you accomplish Goal Y you now Qualify for Feat 2 which gives you ability Z.

Any details you can share at this point in development?

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Auxmaulous wrote:
You know - when a DM is creating (or modifying) the world the players are going to play in. Designing countries/empires, faiths, economies, cause and effect of magic on the world, etc - how things may work in a low magic world, or heck - even a low combat/heavy rpg campaign? Or any number of things that could go into a campaign at day 0/inception up untill game day and after. You know - some of the things an Ultimate Campaign-style of book should tackle?

All that was already tackled in Game Mastery Guide.

Dark Archive

Gorbacz wrote:
Auxmaulous wrote:
You know - when a DM is creating (or modifying) the world the players are going to play in. Designing countries/empires, faiths, economies, cause and effect of magic on the world, etc - how things may work in a low magic world, or heck - even a low combat/heavy rpg campaign? Or any number of things that could go into a campaign at day 0/inception up untill game day and after. You know - some of the things an Ultimate Campaign-style of book should tackle?
All that was already tackled in Game Mastery Guide.

It covered a few of the issues but yes, that was a nice 29 page chapter in that book.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Spiral_Ninja wrote:

So, I'm definitely interested. This goes on my list.

One question, though (not that it will affect my getting it,I'm just curious). While it looks like it includes all the various subsystems you've used so far, I don't see a refence to the caravan rules. Will you be updatig and including those as well?

Not every subsystem we've tried out in the Adventure Path is going into this. The caravan rules won't be here, for example. We won't have the additional ship combat stuff or fleet battles from Skull & Shackles in there too, I don't think...

Paizo Employee Creative Director

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Auxmaulous wrote:

Again, won't know more till this is out but for me this isn't a DM aid, it's just another player book.

A significant amount of this book's contents first appeared in various Adventure Paths, where we needed rules for GMs to run unusual adventures. Adventures revolving around things like kingdom building, honor, mass combat, and the like that the core rules didn't cover all that well.

There's no reason to suspect that the transition of these GM tools from the Adventure Paths will somehow become only player tools once they're between hard covers.


Auxmaulous wrote:
Again, won't know more till this is out but for me this isn't a DM aid, it's just another player book.

Roleplaying games are about players, you know: Bestiary - a catalogue of PC opponents, GM Guide - a toolbook for enhancing player experience.

So what's your point? What kind of a book would be interesting to you?

Regards,
Ruemere

Grand Lodge

1 person marked this as a favorite.

In my experience as a GM is that the PCs are as much the GM's responsibility as they are the Player's. The PCs cannot be cool if the GM does not allow them the opportunities to be so. I believe that this is what the book is largely about, giving the PCs all of the opportunities to feel like they are heroes, or just a sense of accomplishment outside of raiding monsters and stealing their loot. ^_^


In my experience of DMing games I found that the campaign is much better when the player has more choices and anything that makes the player feel more in tune with the character the richer the campaign and story. Also any tool the player has your also as the DM is able to tap into. Any book can be a gm's aid if use right. Just got to be creative. :)

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber

Frankly, if you're GMing a homebrew? Character backgrounds can help develop the setting as much as anything you come up with on your own (depending on the level of detail in the backgrounds). Also, as a GM, I find that I need to have the Player books on reference anyway for my players' convenience. All books are GM-Books. a better distinction is "non-player" book. But even then. this book seems more slanted towards GMs than players.

Sovereign Court

Pathfinder Maps, Pawns Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Looking forward to this one. Great looking cover as well!!

The Exchange

I'd love to see a preview of Story feats.


As I understand Lisa's most recent history post, I think that the spring 'slot' is the hardest to come up with quality books for after the first few givens.

This is an intriuging book and I'm looking forward to seeing how it finally comes out. The Game Master Guide really helped me learn Pathfinder, so the bar is high.

Contributor

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Mead Gregorisson wrote:
We may need a Midgard verson of the Quests and Campaigns book to supplement it, too. :)

Shiny idea!

Contributor

This book does sound like a must-have fore me. Looking forward to it.


If I didn't already have all the APs and didn't already modify the subsystems to be a perfect fit for my group and I and already integrate them into our setting, I would be all over this book.

Really, much of it is the 'book of subsystems'. This is something that D&D needed decades ago, and I'm glad we're finally seeing it now.


Looking forward to this! I for one do not run the APs, but I would love a compendium of the optional GM rules introduced in them.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Maps, Rulebook Subscriber

Out of all the books ever released thus far, this is one I've got the highest hopes for.


Mixed feelings of hope and dread, I really wish they would drop the "Ulitimate" from the title of their suplement book is seems to lead to more disapointment. A good product dont need to call itself Ultimate anything the peaple that by it will simply know.

Grand Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure, Rulebook Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber
TheLoneCleric wrote:
I'd love to see a preview of Story feats.

They probably started out as Achievement feats. Here's to hoping they have improved since then.


I do find it fairly strange that this book will have "tons of player options" in it while at the same time seeming to be a book for GMs to get heavy use out of for GM-specific stuff. Perhaps it's the name that gives that perception.

To a certain extent, the same thing happened with Ultimate Magic and Ultimate Combat. The majority was non-GM specific, but there were parts mixed here and there that were (designing a new spell for your campaign, basic rules for setting the technological level). Sure, those can be used by players, but at the same time they seemed more oriented to the GM.

Maybe it's just the name, kind of like how some people for whatever reason thought Ultimate Combat was going to be Ultimate Not-Magic.

Contributor, RPG Superstar 2010 Top 4

Wait and see is a-okay. Because it could turn into a purchase and word of mouth recommendation to friends.

Let's not burn bridges. Caution and concern are not crimes. But you can aggravate people into not even taking a look.

Grand Lodge

Auxmaulous, I understand what you are going for. There were some good things in the GMG for what you were mentioning, though I think Paizo is cautiously wary about having options that are solely for NPCs, because it becomes an issue of, "Why can he do it, but I can't?" They want the PCs to be the special ones, rather than the NPCs.

As for the title, it occurs to me that this is called Ultimate Campaign because many of these rules were a basis or jumping point for many of the APs. Many of these rules were created simply because, in order to be able to craft the Adventure Path, they needed to come up with these rules. In my interpretation, a mechanic can be a starting point for a new campaign and that's what they started with. The next step is to add detail to an existing Campaign, which would be the other, more Player-centric options that GMs could offer to his/her Players.

I guess it is just a matter of perspective. I guess that your own desires filled you with a preconception that lead you to be disappointed with what was being offered.

I, for one, would love to see the book that you were hoping for, but I am just as happy to see this one!

Waiting and being cautious is probably wise. At least the pdf option will be less of a gamble than plopping $40+ on this.


7 people marked this as a favorite.
Paizo Charter Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

I don't understand this discussion. In my eyes, the GM is a player, too.


Auxmaulous wrote:


I was looking for a book that was a true campaign set-up book (to restate yet again), you know - details or information about setting up a game or campaign world that didn't directly interact or rely on PC interaction/decision?

That's cool, but the piece that you're overlooking is that the book was never billed as what you're seeking. It was billed from the beginning in the teasers at Paizocon & GenCon as a book to flesh out campaign details -- things like downtime between adventures, running a business, etc.

It's fine if that's not what you want, but it's not really fair to ding contributors for not fulfilling your dream GM book when that wasn't the assignment they were given.

I can appreciate your issue with the title "Ultimate Campaign". I didn't find Ultimate Combat to be everything I had hoped. I'm not getting hung up on naming conventions, though.

Grand Lodge

1 person marked this as a favorite.

Well regardless of the quality of the content of the book, this is in my eyes far and away the coolest looking cover page of any Paizo product thus far. I know no poster prints have been sold of any past cover, but one can dream that an exception might be made! I'd love to put a framed copy of this up on my wall.

Assistant Software Developer

I removed a post and a bunch of replies. Name-calling is unacceptable.

Liberty's Edge

I'll admit. I am concerned. Particularly about the kingdom building rules.

The rules presented in kingmaker were horribly broken and open to abuse by players. I sincerely hope this has been addressed. As it was my players and decided to just throw the rules out the window and run kingmaker a lot more free form. The rules in my opinion and in the opinion of a few others on this forum did not need a few minor tweaks but rather some major changes.

Has this been addressed?

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
Snow Crash wrote:

I'll admit. I am concerned. Particularly about the kingdom building rules.

The rules presented in kingmaker were horribly broken and open to abuse by players. I sincerely hope this has been addressed. As it was my players and decided to just throw the rules out the window and run kingmaker a lot more free form. The rules in my opinion and in the opinion of a few others on this forum did not need a few minor tweaks but rather some major changes.

Has this been addressed?

No Idea if it's been addressed or not, but the wonderful thing about this game is that the optional rules are optional, and if you don't like the rules as given you can house rule them or discard them. I'll be grabbing this book even though I know I won't be using more than half the rules in it. Even if I don't use the rules, having the rules there helps me come up with my own optional systems.

So, I hope they've updated and fixed some of the issues with the rules, but even if they haven't I'll but the book (despite owning Kingmaker) anyway, for some of the newer stuff in it.

Silver Crusade

Stratagemini wrote:
Snow Crash wrote:

I'll admit. I am concerned. Particularly about the kingdom building rules.

The rules presented in kingmaker were horribly broken and open to abuse by players. I sincerely hope this has been addressed. As it was my players and decided to just throw the rules out the window and run kingmaker a lot more free form. The rules in my opinion and in the opinion of a few others on this forum did not need a few minor tweaks but rather some major changes.

Has this been addressed?

No Idea if it's been addressed or not, but the wonderful thing about this game is that the optional rules are optional, and if you don't like the rules as given you can house rule them or discard them. I'll be grabbing this book even though I know I won't be using more than half the rules in it. Even if I don't use the rules, having the rules there helps me come up with my own optional systems.

Yep. I already know some rules mentioned in the product blurb are teh kind of thing I won't be using(rules for downtime for example, which is something most of us would rather actually play out), but even the stuff that doesn't get used can be useful when cobbling together your own stuff for your campaign.

Hoping for alternate rules for magic gear-less/light PCs that could be used to get them through a standard AP as written. If they can enable "gearless" PCs to work fine alongside traditionally geared PCs, even better.

Liberty's Edge

1 person marked this as a favorite.

The problem with optional rules is that they are shiny and new and everyone wants to use them.

It's not until after you've played with them for a while that you start to find the flaws in them. By then it's too late. If I spend money on a product, I expect the product to be polished. Especially when the rules in question re pretty much essential. Ie kingdoms building rules in kingmaker. I really felt they'd just been thrown together. My players and I felt like we were play testing them. Unfortunately in our opinion they were too broken for a couple of house rules to fix. They needed a complete rewrite. And that in itself would then need to be tested. Not something you want to do in the middle of a campaign.


Snow Crash wrote:


The problem with optional rules is that they are shiny and new and everyone wants to use them.

It's not until after you've played with them for a while that you start to find the flaws in them. By then it's too late. If I spend money on a product, I expect the product to be polished. Especially when the rules in question re pretty much essential. Ie kingdoms building rules in kingmaker. I really felt they'd just been thrown together. My players and I felt like we were play testing them. Unfortunately in our opinion they were too broken for a couple of house rules to fix. They needed a complete rewrite. And that in itself would then need to be tested. Not something you want to do in the middle of a campaign.

Then wait and see how it goes. It's not like the book won't be disected, examined, praised and cursed on these boards. If you don't mind waiting that should be all the information you'll need for an informed purchase.

*edit* As for me, I'm picking it up. Whether I use all, some, or none of it I'm sure it will be a good read. If I don't use any major part of it I'll just canibalize bits of it and take inspiration from it for my own in-place homebrew systems.


Lots of discussion here, but nobody's brought up what I see as the biggest dilemma...

What do we call it?!

Scarab Sages RPG Superstar 2008 Top 4; Contributor; Publisher, Legendary Games

As for the kingdom-building rules, some things were changed a little, some were changed a lot, some things stayed the same. Some things will change further during development. Hopefully the final result is something that pleases most!


Paizo Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories, Starfinder Society Subscriber
Oladon wrote:

Lots of discussion here, but nobody's brought up what I see as the biggest dilemma...

What do we call it?!

UCa (in contrast to UC, or UCo, as it may be called in the future).


Paizo Charter Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

I'll call it "Ultimate Campaign".

Shadow Lodge

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Snow Crash wrote:
The problem with optional rules is that they are shiny and new and everyone wants to use them.

No I don't.

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