Pathfinder Player Companion: Animal Archive (PFRPG)

4.50/5 (based on 15 ratings)
Pathfinder Player Companion: Animal Archive (PFRPG)
Show Description For:
Non-Mint

Add PDF $7.99

Print Edition Out of print

Non-Mint Unavailable

Facebook Twitter Email

From a witch’s black cat to a ranger’s mighty wolf companion or a cavalier’s noble steed, animals have always had a place in fantasy adventuring—but why should only a few classes have all the fun? With the proper training, animals can be invaluable allies for adventurers of all stripes. Whether you’re a scholarly spellcaster looking for a familiar to deliver spells or help turn the pages of your spellbook, or a brawler ready to lead your armored animal into the thick of battle, this book is a treasure trove of rules and advice aimed at helping you and your animal friends get the most out of your fantastic adventures.

Animal Archive presents a player-focused, in-depth discussion of animals and the various roles they can play in your game. Each Pathfinder Player Companion includes new options and tools for every Pathfinder RPG player. Inside this book, you’ll find:

  • A complete list of every familiar in the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, to make choosing yours quick and convenient.
  • New archetypes like the mad dog barbarian or carnivalist rogue to help classes that haven’t traditionally used animals work with their bestial allies, as well as tips on how every class can employ animals.
  • New animal companions and familiars, from innocuous squirrels and rabbits to bizarre platypuses, armored armadillos, and powerful pandas.
  • Information on which animals are closely associated with the various races and deities of the Pathfinder campaign setting.
  • Tons of new tricks and feats to customize your animals, plus archetypes for animal companions and familiars.
  • New animal equipment, spells, magic items, information about the personalities of magically intelligent animals, and more!

Written by Amanda Hamon, Philip Minchin, Jason Nelson, Patrick Renie, Owen K.C. Stephens, and Christina Stiles

Each monthly 32-page Pathfinder Player Companion contains several player-focused articles exploring the volume’s theme as well as short articles with innovative new rules for all types of characters, as well as traits to better anchor the player to the campaign.

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-488-7

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Player Companion Subscription.

Product Availability

PDF:

Fulfilled immediately.

Print Edition:

Out of print

This product is out of print.

Non-Mint:

Unavailable

This product is non-mint. Refunds are not available for non-mint products. The standard version of this product can be found here.

Are there errors or omissions in this product information? Got corrections? Let us know at store@paizo.com.

PZO9429


See Also:

11 to 15 of 15 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | next > last >>

Average product rating:

4.50/5 (based on 15 ratings)

Sign in to create or edit a product review.

Solid Product

4/5

I should start this review by saying that this product impressed me by offering content that touches on unfilled design space that I've never thought of before. This is very rare and great to see. I definitely want to see more books in this vein in the future.

Onto specifics...

Animal Companion/Familiar Magic Item Slot Allotments by Body Type

This is awesome and something that the system has needed for long time. I'm not going to say that the whole thing is balanced (because it's not) but the fact that this is broken down in an easy to use simple format is a great resource for a standardized format like PFS.

Archetypes - Carnivalist (Rogue), Huntermaster (Cavalier), and Mad Dog (Barbarian)

These are all great thematically and mechanically.

One major nitpick is the Mad Dog's Ferocious Fetch ability which allows him to command his animal companion to use the Drag manuever as a Swift action. Commanding an animal companion is already a Free action. Pay attention to these things editors.

Animal Tricks

The expanded options here are great and some really surprised and impressed me. Bombard, Aid, and Flank I'm looking at you. Never again will hard-nosed DMs be able to claim that your wolf/bear/koala isn't clever enough to step into a flank for you.

Feats

There's nothing really inspiring here but I love the precedent set here. There are feats in this chapter designed for familiars and animal companions to take - with their feat slots. I'm especially impressed that the text makes mention of the fact that familiars can pick up these feats by trading out feats they come with by default (very smart).

Animal Archetypes

Again, I love the prescedent set with this section and it's something I've never considered myself.

Again, a nitpick.

One archetype gives an animal companion ridden by a cavalier a bonus when charging. This replaces Share Spells.

Designers/Editors, Please Read

New Companions

Panda, Llama, Walrus, Moose.

NO LARGE BEAR


I see a future in this!

5/5

This book could be the start of a new hard back book called the Advanced Companion Guide. I truly do. I feel this has just scratched the surface of what is possible and that little scratch has revealed some very flavorful and fun ideas.

As another reviewer said, who wouldn't want to try a barbarian with a T-rex that can run out and drag that poor victim back for a proper mud stomping? Who doesn't dream of dive bombing birds dropping flasks of pain from on high?

I can understand why one poster was upset that he wanted more awesomeness out of this player companion, but not because it isn't awesome, it just leaves you wanting more!

The lists in this guide are very helpful, and gives you a very nice one stop shop resource for most things companion/familiar related. But I will say it again, the ACG (Advanced Companion Guide) should be on Paizo's to do list one day. I will gladly fork over $30+ for more of this goodness and some expanded ideas on building interesting class/companion combinations!


Not bad, but unimpressive

2/5

I was looking forward to Animal Archive's release for more than a month now and I gotta say I'm rather underwhelmed. It looks and feels awfully thin. $11 got me THIS??? As to the content, it's not bad, but there isn't all that much new stuff in it. There are only 3 archetypes for characters. There are a bunch of archetypes for animal companions/familiars, which is nice, but only a handful seem useful to adventurers. Some might be nice for a DM to put on an enemy, though. The feats are nothing impressive and some are even duplicates from other Pathfinder books.

I wouldn't say I wasted my money, but I didn't get what I was hoping for, by any means.


The way such Companions should be done!

5/5

This cute lil' book has all the stuff a player actually needs and none of any useless filler.

It has rules for animalcomp/familiar magic item slots, something that's pretty much done for the first time in 3e publication history.

It has the oft-requested "hound master"-like cavalier archetype, among two others.

It has an another no-brainer: new animal tricks. Beware of Bomber Bat Squadrons!

It has a complete list of all familiars printed insofar. (Wish there was an animal companions list too).

It has animal gear and prices of animals. And a picture of Droogami-Battlecat style. Cute!

It has animal feats (we're still in Nobrainerland and happy to see more of natives) and ANIMAL ARCHETYPES now that wasn't obvious but it's turbo cool.

It has the oft-requested 2 pages on awakened animals.

It has spells and magic items, surprise!

It has 4 new animalcomps (llama. panda. walrus. moose. HELLO INTERNET!)

It has 5 new familiars. But seriously, it's all about platypuses.

It has also a neat list of animal associated with major Golarion deities.

While this book is perhaps the least Golarion-sey of Player Companions, this does not alter the fact that it's perhaps the most useful and thoughtful one. 32 pages of pure victory and win. And platypuses. Seriously, can you play a caster and NOT have a platypus familiar?


Absolutely excellent

5/5

Just got my hands on this and it have so far been really impressed with what I've been finding. Forewarned this review is still in progress and I will add info on the other sections as I manage to get through them.

The Art:
The art as always has been an absolute treat with everything from the awesome picture of our new cavalier arch to the spiked full-plate triceratops every piece has just been on the money.

Archetypes:
With this book we get archetypes for both player characters, familiars, and companions. On the class front every one of them has been incredibly cool. The rogue archetype (carnivalist) can be described as get monkey familiar, teach sneak attack, profit with your rogue gaining some bardic abilities to complement his familiar's abilities and distract opponents as well as allow it to sleight of hand and disable device. The barbarian mad dog gives you an animal companion from the start but with the loss of quite a few rage powers. Luckily this is counteracted by both you animal companion gaining quite a few of your abilities including rage and DR and some awesomely terrifying unique abilities including the ability to run out and FETCH AN ENEMY FOR YOU, I mean I'm really at a loss to describe how much I want to see a T-Rex rush out, grab an owlbear off my parties wizard, and drag it back to me for a savage rage fueled beating. The sleeper hit though has to be the cavalier archetype the Huntsmaster. With this archetype we finally gain a way to play a cavalier and not have to worry about a mount, instead gaining a literal pack of dogs and falcons to hunt down your enemies with your companions even benefiting from your challenge, teamwork feats, and gaining the ability to provide you free flank regardless of positoin. Also we get an awesome picture of the Iconic cavalier with a new white wippet hound to match his archetype.

Now for the animal arch's they have so far been pretty appealing with an archetype to match just about whatever you want to build with options like bodyguard, charger, and racer. Particular notes though go out to the Valet and Totem guide with the former allowing you to create that servant cohort many have always wanted with a familiar that gains craft, perform, and profession as class skills as well as the ability to run around the battle field using aid another and slinging buff spells with ease. In short he's the monkey butler, he does your crafting, buffs your party, and draws enemy attention so your fighter can hit the troll. The totem guide works as a connection to your totem spirit with your animal companion losing evasion and devotion but gaining the ability to cast spells to help lead you towards your goals, the ability to talk to you, eldritch claws, and the ability to fight ethereal targets. I personally loved Totem guide but am a little annoyed that some of the spellcasting that it allows requires you to burn spell slot, leaving a chunk of it's abilities locked off from classes that have animal companions but not spells (like the barbarian) and could have been easily solved by including a cap of something like 1-3/day for these classes.

Gear:

The gear is interesting with prices for animal feeds, ways to poison you creatures bite attacks, and alchemical drops that give your animal a minor rage. On the magic side we get things like collars that allow your animal to speak, new rods to take advantage of the new metamagic introduced, and a set of silver holy horseshoes to allow you mount to hoof stomp your current evil outsider of choice. Finally we get prices for just about every single animal that's come out for pf as well as information on what kinds of hoops one might have to jump through in order to buy one, including some truly outlandish creatures like the blue whale, mongoose, and glyptodons.


11 to 15 of 15 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | next > last >>
451 to 480 of 480 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>

Fromper wrote:
Which brings up another point, which I highly doubt is addressed in this book (I don't have it, but I'll definitely buy it if I ever get around to doing a PC with an AC). Merida's bear companion was a mama bear with 3 cubs. How would you handle something like that in Pathfinder?

Ranger with the Beastmaster archetype. Split the levels four ways, then use Boon Companion for momma bear.


Patrick Renie wrote:
Ssalarn wrote:
Patrick Renie wrote:

Just so people are aware, I am still in the process of evaluating the Charger/cavalier discrepancy (as well as other potential errata posters have pointed out), and am formulating an official response. Since we've got a lot of projects going on right now, I haven't been able to devote as much time to these issues as I'd like, but rest assured they are being considered and should be addressed within the next few weeks.

Until then, Jason's excellent suggestions should more than suffice for players and GMs running home games. :]

It has been about a month since this post, has there been any follow up on this issue, or a clarification given?

The simplest and fairest solution to the charger archetype issue is to remove the last sentence from the charger archetype's mounted challenge ability and replace it with the following: "This ability replaces link."

Reasoning: Finding a mount that is bred to ride into battle clad in armor and bearing a heavily armored rider would no doubt be a dauntless task, and these war horses are likely more obstinate than their less-outfitted counterparts. As such, a cavalier who gains a charger as a mount would need to have ranks in Handle Animal to make the most of such a wild and powerful breed.

This brings up a question that has come up before, does Ride replace Handle Animal? Near as I can figure, it does not. It requires both a Ride check AND a Handle Animal check to get your mount to attack while you are making an attack.

If Link is removed then it is no longer a Free action to use Handle Animal to tell the mount to attack.

Note: I know the RAI is that Ride is a replacement for Handle Animal but the RAW does not support it since no exception seems to be provided.

- Gauss

Dark Archive

It's always been my interpretation that it is a Ride check to get your mount to attack, while it is a Handle Animal check to train it to do so in the first place.


Fromper wrote:


Which brings up another point, which I highly doubt is addressed in this book (I don't have it, but I'll definitely buy it if I ever get around to doing a PC with an AC). Merida's bear companion was a mama bear with 3 cubs. How would you handle something like that in Pathfinder?

Well Mama bear has to be size M at most, which is a pain, although the three cubs could notionally be 'bought' and trained as pets (as opposed to Fams/Comps).

With a bit of wrangling the Houndmaster Archtype from the original Superstar comp could probably work (Though it is a Cav) or the Beastmaster Ranger (bu you will absolutely need Boon Companion).

Still shirty about the No Large Bears conspiracy.


Marik, technically, for a trained animal to attack requires a Handle Animal check. Nothing in the ride skill specifically overrides this. Since nothing in the Ride skill overrides this it means that first you must make a Handle Animal check to order your mount to attack and THEN you must make a Ride check to allow you to both attack in the same round.

Note: I do not think this is RAI, but it is RAW (even if nobody uses it this way).

- Gauss


So, does the book present rules for more mystical "animal companions" such as hippogriffs, gryphons, unicorns, etc?

3.5 used to allow Paladins to gain unicorn companions and such, but Pathfinder doesn't seem to allow this for anyone but a particular ranger archetype. This has always been a problem for me, especially since I have long had a major player in my setting who is a paladin with a unicorn mount, and the lack of that option in the legitimate rules is very frustrating.

If it does have them, how do they shape up? If it lacks them, will Paizo ever address this lack of backwards (and thematic) compatibility?

Dark Archive

Disciple of Sakura wrote:

So, does the book present rules for more mystical "animal companions" such as hippogriffs, gryphons, unicorns, etc?

3.5 used to allow Paladins to gain unicorn companions and such, but Pathfinder doesn't seem to allow this for anyone but a particular ranger archetype. This has always been a problem for me, especially since I have long had a major player in my setting who is a paladin with a unicorn mount, and the lack of that option in the legitimate rules is very frustrating.

If it does have them, how do they shape up? If it lacks them, will Paizo ever address this lack of backwards (and thematic) compatibility?

nope. outta luck

Paizo Employee Developer

Disciple of Sakura wrote:
So, does the book present rules for more mystical "animal companions" such as hippogriffs, gryphons, unicorns, etc?

This book is strictly about creatures of the animal type, so magical beasts such as the ones you mentioned aren't covered in here.

Quote:

3.5 used to allow Paladins to gain unicorn companions and such, but Pathfinder doesn't seem to allow this for anyone but a particular ranger archetype. This has always been a problem for me, especially since I have long had a major player in my setting who is a paladin with a unicorn mount, and the lack of that option in the legitimate rules is very frustrating.

If it does have them, how do they shape up? If it lacks them, will Paizo ever address this lack of backwards (and thematic) compatibility?

Actually, it is very much within the rules to acquire a unicorn as a mount with the Leadership feat. I encourage you to check out Appendix 6 on page 316 of the Pathfinder RPG Bestiary for information on how to do this.


Patrick Renie wrote:
Quote:

3.5 used to allow Paladins to gain unicorn companions and such, but Pathfinder doesn't seem to allow this for anyone but a particular ranger archetype. This has always been a problem for me, especially since I have long had a major player in my setting who is a paladin with a unicorn mount, and the lack of that option in the legitimate rules is very frustrating.

If it does have them, how do they shape up? If it lacks them, will Paizo ever address this lack of backwards (and thematic) compatibility?

Actually, it is very much within the rules to acquire a unicorn as a mount with the Leadership feat. I encourage you to check out Appendix 6 on page 316 of the Pathfinder RPG Bestiary for information on how to do this.

That's a handy link, but it doesn't address the issue that characters with special mounts used to be able to obtain mystical mounts without leadership. As of right now, there's only one class that can - the Ranger, with an archetype, can acquire a hippogriff.

I'd like some expansion of that concept for all the animal companion classes, honestly. Cavaliers riding pegasi, paladins astride unicorns... that sort of thing would be cool, but requiring the leadership feat isn't the best way to do it. It'd work, sure, but it's not exactly what I'm looking for when there was another way to do it in the past.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Jason Nelson wrote:
Personally I'd allow it, but I think by RAW they are not officially animal companions so it wouldn't work. Patrick may add it to the FAQ if you flag it.
Paladin Divine Bond wrote:
The second type of bond allows a paladin to gain the service of an unusually intelligent, strong, and loyal steed to serve her in her crusade against evil. This mount is usually a heavy horse (for a Medium paladin) or a pony (for a Small paladin), although more exotic mounts, such as a boar, camel, or dog are also suitable. This mount functions as a druid's animal companion, using the paladin's level as her effective druid level. Bonded mounts have an Intelligence of at least 6.

RAW would actually seem to state that they are officially Animal Companions. I know I have a Paladin in a RotRL game, who will be taking the Totem Guide Archetype for her Mount once she reaches 5th level. Granted, that was the GM's decision to allow it, but the wording seem to me to indicate it is legal.


Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber
Jason Nelson wrote:
I don't know that cavaliers are so overpowered as a class that this would be a big problem to add an extra benefit for them, but I'd have to take a closer look at the archetypes again to suggest anything different.

how about:

The Chavalier has to expand one use of her challange to confer the bonuses to his Mount.

The Mount get the full bonus, till the cavalier has two uses per day at 4th level both get half the benefit.


The Piscine(fishy!) category is listed as Belt, chest (saddle), eyes

is that supposed to be belt (saddle), or chest, belt (saddle)

Paizo Employee Developer

BigNorseWolf wrote:

The Piscine(fishy!) category is listed as Belt, chest (saddle), eyes

is that supposed to be belt (saddle), or chest, belt (saddle)

The Available Slots text for Piscine creatures should be changed to "Belt (saddle), chest, eyes". Similarly, the magic item slot for the saddle of the sky-river on page 26 of Animal Archive should be changed to "belt" rather than "chest".


Thanks!


The Ferocious Beast rage power does not state that its use is optional. This differs from the wording of Ferocious Mount. Was that an intentional design choice? Or should Ferocious Beast also be optional?

What I want to do is dip 2 levels of barbarian with my lunar mystery oracle. My only rage power would be Ferocious Beast, which would allow the tiger companion gained from my mystery to rage along with me. But if Ferocious Beast is an "always-on" rage power, then I will burn through my rage rounds way too fast for my liking, even if I take the Extra Rage feat.

If it is optional to activate the rage power, then is it safe to assume that it is a free action to toggle it on/off?

The feat also states that the AC gains the benefits of rage, but it does not mention the drawbacks (i.e. -2 to armor class, inability to use certain skills, fatigue). Is that part intentional?

Finally, what should be the range limit of the AC's rage effect?

Thanks!


1 person marked this as a favorite.

I hope this is not considered bad form, but I thought I should acknowledge that Patrick Renie responded to a PM I sent him about these questions. He clarified the rage power quite well with his response, which I have copied below:

Hey Gliz,

The language of the Ferocious Beast rage power should change as follows (changes in bold):

Ferocious Beast (Ex): While the barbarian is raging, her animal companion also gains the effects of rage (including greater rage, mighty rage, and tireless rage), though the barbarian must spend 1 additional round of rage per round if her companion begins or ends its turn adjacent to her, and 2 additional rounds of rage per round if not. She can elect not to pay this cost, in which case her animal companion does not rage. Regardless, the animal companion must remain within 30 feet of the barbarian to gain the effects of the barbarian's rage.

Quote:

The Ferocious Beast rage power does not state that its use is optional. This differs from the wording of Ferocious Mount. Was that an intentional design choice? Or should Ferocious Beast also be optional?

This was not an intentional design choice; use of the Ferocious Beast feat should also be optional.

Quote:

If it is optional to activate the rage power, then is it safe to assume that it is a free action to toggle it on/off?

I'd say that's safe to assume.

Quote:

The rage power also states that the animal companion gains the "benefits" of rage, but it does not mention the drawbacks (i.e. -2 to armor class, inability to use certain skills, fatigue). Is that part intentional?

RAI, the animal should receive the penalties of raging as well. Changing "benefits" to "effects" clears up this.

Quote:

Finally, what should be the range limit of the companion's rage effect?

30 feet. Adding a sentence to the end of the feat fixes this.

Hope this helps!

P

Paizo Employee Developer

Gliz wrote:

I hope this is not considered bad form, but I thought I should acknowledge that Patrick Renie responded to a PM I sent him about these questions. He clarified the rage power quite well with his response, which I have copied below:

Was just about to post this as well. Thanks for taking care of it, Gliz!


Is the bombard trick supposed to use just the critters BAB? No size, dex, or other modifiers?


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Jason Nelson wrote:
Protoman wrote:

I think the Charger companion archetype has a typo/need for errata.

The mounted challenge ability says it works for cavaliers riding the companion and replaces shared spells, but cavalier mount class feature doesn't get shared spells. As of now, cavalier mounts don't qualify for the archetype and only times cavaliers seem to benefit off the mounted challenge ability are if riding an animal companion that belongs to another character or it obtained an animal companion via multiclassing (not with the Mount class feature) but that seems rather weird.

Oops!

You are absolutely right. I missed that note in paragraph 2 of the mount ability for cavaliers about no share spells.

The question then becomes what they *should* exchange for the ability, and one answer could be nothing. Simply add a specific exemption for cavaliers, like:

A cavalier's mount gains this ability automatically when selecting the charger archetype even though it does not have the share spells ability.

I don't know that cavaliers are so overpowered as a class that this would be a big problem to add an extra benefit for them, but I'd have to take a closer look at the archetypes again to suggest anything different.

Just a suggestion.

What about the familiar ones? Kinda sucks that only basic animal familiars can take archetypes, when they're the ones most likely to get killed doing the stuff. Plus, why can't a lyrakien be a valet just cause she's... not able to speak with others of her kind... except she is... ? Or same with an Imp... why not an Imp Valet? Cause they don't get what is for them a completely worthless ability?


Jason Nelson wrote:
Protoman wrote:

I think the Charger companion archetype has a typo/need for errata.

The mounted challenge ability says it works for cavaliers riding the companion and replaces shared spells, but cavalier mount class feature doesn't get shared spells. As of now, cavalier mounts don't qualify for the archetype and only times cavaliers seem to benefit off the mounted challenge ability are if riding an animal companion that belongs to another character or it obtained an animal companion via multiclassing (not with the Mount class feature) but that seems rather weird.

Oops!

You are absolutely right. I missed that note in paragraph 2 of the mount ability for cavaliers about no share spells.

The question then becomes what they *should* exchange for the ability, and one answer could be nothing. Simply add a specific exemption for cavaliers, like:

A cavalier's mount gains this ability automatically when selecting the charger archetype even though it does not have the share spells ability.

I don't know that cavaliers are so overpowered as a class that this would be a big problem to add an extra benefit for them, but I'd have to take a closer look at the archetypes again to suggest anything different.

Just a suggestion.

What happens with this if a Paladin wants his mount with this archetype?

Scarab Sages Modules Overlord

Thaumaturgos Rainmaker wrote:
What happens with this if a Paladin wants his mount with this archetype?

RAW the full template applies. That means the paladin;s steed loses share spells, even though the ability ti gets for that only applies if a cavalier is riding it. (And still would, if an allied cavalier happened to leap onto the steed and use challenge).

I think just skipping that ability for paladins is a perfectly reasonable houserule.

Silver Crusade

I have a question concerning the Mad Dog barbarian archetype, and if this has already been asked, then my apologies for not noticing. According to the archetype, it gains Damage Reduction at level 10, but the regular barbarian gains it 7. Yet the Mad Dog doesn't lose this class feature at 7th level. Is this a typo or was the archetype supposed to follow the normal progression, with the addition that the animal companion gains it as well?


Blayde MacRonan wrote:
I have a question concerning the Mad Dog barbarian archetype, and if this has already been asked, then my apologies for not noticing. According to the archetype, it gains Damage Reduction at level 10, but the regular barbarian gains it 7. Yet the Mad Dog doesn't lose this class feature at 7th level. Is this a typo or was the archetype supposed to follow the normal progression, with the addition that the animal companion gains it as well?

Since it doesn't replace anything, I believe the damage reduction gets delayed to 10 for both the barbarian and the animal companion with a stated maximum of DR 4 rather than the regular barbarian's DR 5.

Scarab Sages Modules Overlord

Protoman wrote:
Blayde MacRonan wrote:
I have a question concerning the Mad Dog barbarian archetype, and if this has already been asked, then my apologies for not noticing. According to the archetype, it gains Damage Reduction at level 10, but the regular barbarian gains it 7. Yet the Mad Dog doesn't lose this class feature at 7th level. Is this a typo or was the archetype supposed to follow the normal progression, with the addition that the animal companion gains it as well?
Since it doesn't replace anything, I believe the damage reduction gets delayed to 10 for both the barbarian and the animal companion with a stated maximum of DR 4 rather than the regular barbarian's DR 5.

That's how I read it as well. It's like the rage ability for the mad dog, which states when she does get it, rather than noting that at 1st level she doesn't get it yet.

That's not ideal wording, and I'll watch for such issues going forward.

Silver Crusade

Thanks for the response. I wasn't sure since this was the first time I had seen something like that with an archetype.

Liberty's Edge

It would probably be safest to have included a line that said something like "This acts as and replaces Damage Reduction" or some such. There is precedence in some sources for that kind of line. I swear I have seen it, just not sure where.

Scarab Sages Modules Overlord

We use the language "This ability modifies... " fairly often. The Huntmaster, also in Animal Archive says "This ability modifies the challenge ability." for bestial challenge, and something like that is my preference.

Contributor

graywulfe wrote:
It would probably be safest to have included a line that said something like "This acts as and replaces Damage Reduction" or some such. There is precedence in some sources for that kind of line. I swear I have seen it, just not sure where.

As of the ACG archetypes section, the official language is either "alters" or "replaces."

If something "replaces" an ability, that ability is gone. Nothing of the original ability remains. If something "alters" an ability, you apply the changes listed by the archetype but otherwise, the ability is still that ability.

For example, if something "alters" wild shape, you still qualify for all of the spells, feats, and prestige classes that go with wild shape. The greensinger's plant shape is a good example of this. But if an ability "replaces" wild shape, then you no longer have that class feature and don't qualify for feats / prestige classes / etc that require it.

Liberty's Edge

I was not trying to suggest specific language but rather the addition of any language to that effect. Sorry if I was not clear. :)

Grand Lodge

Funny question. Anyone know why the circlet of speaking was banned/disallowed from PFS? Is your animal speaking, talking to their master, and calling out danger really that broken that it's not allowed to be in the game?

451 to 480 of 480 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | next > last >>
Community / Forums / Paizo / Product Discussion / Pathfinder Player Companion: Animal Archive (PFRPG) All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.