Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Lost Kingdoms (PFRPG)

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Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Lost Kingdoms (PFRPG)
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The shattered remains of dead civilizations lie dormant throughout the Inner Sea. Whether such ruins are entombed under tons of rubble, sunk beneath white-capped oceans, or warped into blasted wastelands by otherworldly energies, the perils of these obliterated empires are equaled only by the unfathomable treasures locked within their crumbling temples, crypts, and citadels.

Lost Kingdoms provides a detailed overview of six of Golarion’s most famous and mysterious ancient nations, fallen empires that promise intrepid adventurers the opportunity to claim untold riches, explore fantastical realms of antiquity, and unravel mysteries thought long lost to the sands of time.

    Ancient kingdoms explored in this 64-page book include:
  • Ancient Osirion, the pharaonic empire whose rulers constructed treasure-laden crypts, pyramids, and temples dedicated to their own honor.
  • Ghol-Gan, where cyclopes raised ziggurats to otherworldly deities, but whose works now serve as half-flooded temple-lairs for alien horrors.
  • The Jistka Imperium, the first true civilization to rise after the apocalypse of Earthfall, famed for its golem-crafting artificers and expansionist magistrates.
  • Lirgen and Yamasa, whose astrological divinations and ancestral spirits led their cultures to prosperity, but failed to warn them of the coming of the great hurricane destined to destroy their lands.
  • Sarkoris, where barbarian warlords and druids now raise spears against the demon-spawning rift in the center of their ancestral lands.
  • Thassilon, a divided empire ruled by the runelords, vile wizards whose sin magic enslaved entire tribes of giants and shackled them to building monuments to their glory.

Lost Kingdoms is intended for use with the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game and the Pathfinder campaign setting, but can easily be used in any fantasy game setting.

By Wolfgang Baur, Adam Daigle, Jeff Erwin, and F. Wesley Schneider.

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-415-3

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Lost Omens Subscription.

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Enough Lore to Launch a Thousand Adventure Hooks

4/5

Golarion is often known as a "kitchen sink" setting, with areas (if not whole countries) effectively devoted to specific themes or genres. I remember, years ago, being turned off by the notion, thinking that it sounded very generic. But the more I've read about Golarion over the past few years, the more I've come to appreciate how much depth underlies the setting. Lost Kingdoms is a perfect example. The book, a 64-page entry in the Campaign Setting Line, provides an overview of six different ancient nations whose legacies continue to influence the "present." Adventurers always need mysterious ruins, long-buried threats, and fantastical ancient treasures to encounter, and this book does a great job grounding the "present" of Golarion into its "past."

To get the formalities out of the way, the inside front cover shows the geographical extent of each of the ancient lands overlaid on a map of the Inner Sea. The inside back cover reproduces the front cover sans text. There is a two-page introduction that gives a one-paragraph nod towards some of the other "lost kingdoms" not covered in the book (notably, Azlant and Shory), as well as a timeline to help organize some of the major dates mentioned later in the book.

Now to the heart of the book. Each of the ten-page-long country entries is divided into sections: how the area was historically, how it is today, its denizens and dangers (past and present), and the treasures and rewards that await exploration. Each entry also includes a map of the ancient realm, general descriptions of some adventuring sites, at least one new monster or NPC, and a much longer, two-page description of a major locale. The artwork throughout is impressive (in particular, look at the picture of Areelu Vorlesh on page 46--it just doesn't get any better!). Six ancient empires are covered: the Abendego Gulf, Ancient Osirion, Ghol-Gan, the Jistka Imperium, Sarkoris, and Thassilon.

The Abendego Gulf is one of those topics I never really thought about: what existed before the massive, permanent, and cataclysmic storm known as the Eye of Abendego formed? The answer is a nation called Lirgen, whose leaders and populace were devoted to astrology and fortune-telling, and its breakway region, Yamasa, whose residents had to eek out a much more practical life in a swampy land. There's a thematic irony that the Eye formed when Aroden died and prophecy failed, meaning that an entire nation of fortune-tellers couldn't predict the destruction of their own nation! Today, the region is littered with sunken cities in which great treasures can still be found (as 90% of the inhabitants of Lirgen and Yamasa died when the Eye of Abendego formed), but it's a dangerous land filled with small bands of ruthless scavengers. The chapter introduces a thematically appropriate spell (Embrace Destiny) and details a flavourful adventure setting called the Dim Gate (an ancient observatory that, perhaps, can create a portal to Eox!).

The entry on Ancient Osirion covers the Egyptian-themed country's long, long history. Fortunately, it's an interesting history, though I wonder if another "lost kingdom" should have been covered instead, since Osirion is already the subject of a Campaign Setting book (Osirion, Legacy of Pharaohs). On the other hand, a *lot* of modules and adventures are set in the region, as it's hard to resist the lure of recently-uncovered pyramids and the like. A few things that stood out for me in this entry was the Ubashki Swarm (a swarm of undead cats!), a drug called mumia (made from . . . you guessed it), and an NPC patron who often sends adventurers out on digs and explorations (except he's secretly a ghoul!).

Ghol-Gan is one of the lesser known lost kingdoms: an empire ruled by cyclops! It has a classic rise and fall (into degeneration) arc, but it frankly doesn't sound that interesting for exploration. It needs a cooler hook to set it apart from other, more flavourful areas. And although I've already mentioned how good the artwork is, the portrait of a new monster in this section (a one-eyed sort of organgutan called a Ngoga) is a bit too much on the silly-side.

The Jistka Imperium, on the other hand, has a fascinating history full of founding myths (complete with scriptures), marvels of golem-building artifice, clashes with Ancient Osirion, and the terrors of unstoppable plagues. Although largely invisible and forgotten to those living in Golarion today, there are some really great possibilities for adventure here. Need I mention they once built a golem so large it carried a castle on its back?

I already knew a bit about Sarkoris from the Worldwound Campaign Setting book. In essence, Sarkoris was what existed before reality was torn asunder to let the demons of the abyss pour into the area, rendering it a nightmarish hellscape. Sarkoris is described as being the birthplace of the kellid peoples (before they spread elsewhere) and as having hundreds of faiths, cults, spirits, and village idols (a really different approach to "religion" that I wish appeared more in fantasy literature). The section describes a surprising site: a small town named Gundrun that has somehow been reborn in the Worldwound and is populated by descendants of Sarkoris who dream that someday the nation might rise again.

Last up is the area I have a special affection for since I've devoted the last couple years' worth of Sunday nights to running Rise of the Runelords: Thassilon. It's great to see the whole thing laid out in such a clear overview and to see the forest for the trees. So much fantastic lore (and cool monuments) are presented in this section. A new monster, an "Inverted Giant", has the most awesomely perverse backstory, and I really liked the extended description of an monument called the Emerald Chambers (999 rooms of death, and 1 of untold wealth!).

Of the six entries, I would say the ones on the Abendego Gulf, the Jistka Imperium, and Thassilon are the most interesting and important. Ancient Osirion and Sarkoris already have some historical coverage in other sourcebooks, and the Ghol-Gan empire just wasn't particularly interesting. On the whole, however, Lost Kingdoms is a really solid book that has moments of brilliance and enough lore to add depth to countless adventure hooks and stories. It's definitely worth purchasing.


Review got erased by taking too long AGAIN

4/5

So since I had already forgotten stuff when I wrote this article first time, I'll have to do shorter version now that I have to write it again due to it disappearing to "No back ups :D" space.

Abendago Gulf: I felt like this info might as well have been in Sodden Lands Campaign Setting Book and that article's space should have been reserved for something like Shory mentioned earlier. Lirgen's culture was interesting sure and helps me flavor stuff in Seers of the Drowned City, but its not really interesting for adventuring purposes because 1) Lirgen's lost culture is still known and remembered unlike actual ancient empires' cultures 2) fortune telling doesn't work anymore nowadays 3) article doesn't really present any interesting threats of bbegs, most of foes mentioned are just bandits or monstrous humanoid tribes 4) most interesting thing about sodden lands is eye of abendago and that isn't really mentioned at all since its not directly related to the culture 5) Yamasa is basically mentioned as after thought as "Its swamp land, was about rice fields and nowadays inhabited by cults". If I went by article alone, I'd guess Abendago Gulf is if I want to make underwater city exploration adventure. Sure I know from other sources that its one of primary places to find Night Heralds in, but this article doesn't really do good job of presenting it as interesting location for campaign.

Dim Gate part of article was the best part about it though, lich being instructed by mysterious entity to build a gate sure is intriguing.

Ancient Osirion: I spent paragraph wondering about cover mummy's comic book cover pose spine, apparently use of enlarge person and questioned what is up with fantasy artists and mummies having mammaries.

Besides that, I liked that article managed to present Ancient Osirion background as mysterious(with Nethys and stuff) without mentioned ancient astronauts stuff at all, I noted that Ancient Osirion is already easy to like due to Ancient Egypt irl giving images to what adventuring there is like and that I liked present day stuff info too and mummia drug was interesting.

Ghol-Gan: Wondered how Amiri fighting raptor is related to ancient cyclops empire, noted that I found empires' fall kinda lazy(serpentfolk's brutal culture just happened to spread through cyclops' mighty empire so fast their relationship with Azlant just eroded to hostilities? Why would cyclops adopt their culture? Because giants are just inherently more evil than humans? Seriously, I don't get the reasoning), and noted that Ghol-Gan makes much more interesting underwater ruin exploration adventures than Lirgen's ruins. Also its cool to get details about ancient non human civilization in otherwise human dominated world.

Jistka Imperium: I liked setting enough to almost wish for spinoff setting featuring past of Golarion. Also sad it isn't mentioned more often, I got image from PFS that they were fiend worshippers, but article made it more clear they were just pragmatic and used fiends to power up their golems near end of their empire's existence. Pity that Osirion destroyed most of their ruins, but I'm sure there are enough of Jistka ruins that Paizo could feature them in one module at least pretty please? :D

Sarkoris: Noted that it shares same "not ancient empire, just kingdom lost hundred years ago" thing with Lirgen, but that I found it much more interesting locale than Lirgen. Whats with druidic main faith and lots of small pantheons. I basically wish I could have adventures in pre worldwound Sarkoris.

Thassilon: I like Thassilon already so not much to say there. I noted though that I thought History of Thassilon part contradicted other source materials a little bit and would have liked that part more if it was presented through in universe lens that might include element of it being incomplete and such. Also Inverted Giant is my favourite monster in the book.


Wonderfully evocative

4/5

I came into this book with very few expectations. All I knew was the list of authors and that somewhere within this tome there were golems. That's all I needed, really, as I've been a huge fan of the artificer character archetype for a long time and have held a special fascination for golems.

And golems there were. After reading the section on the Jistka Imperium, my mind was full of wonderfully evocative character, monster, and encounter ideas. Reforging the golem controlling rod to control a massive beast, entire towns on the backs of roaming monsters...And thankfully, this would be a theme oft repeated in this book. The chapters were wonderful for inspiring campaigns, archetypes, and character concepts.

After reading about the Jistka Imperium, I dove into the Sodden Lands to learn about Lirgen and Yamasa. Lirgen in particular was highly interesting. Any nation whose entire deal was the use of astrology and prophecy to tell the future, directly before the death of Aroden, is bound to be fascinating just for the mysteries it raises. And mysteries it raises in spades. Why couldn't they fortell this? What exactly is that otherworldly thing that saved the last 'surviving' astrologer, now holed up in her own observatory fortress? I never thought I'd want to play a character based on astrology, but after reading this chapter I immediately had to make one.

The bloodied past of Ancient Osirion is laid out for us as well. Again, I wasn't expecting Egypt, The Fantasy Land to catch my attention as much as it did. But there were many great sections here as well. The revelation of everyone's favorite drug of choice was both revolting and intriguing at the same time. One almost hopes that there were alchemist discoveries associated with this article, if only to see the twisted things that alchemists could do with a little ground up mummy.

For now, I definitely think the book is worth the price. I honestly did not expect to see so many evocative ideas in here, and I was very pleased with how it turned out. I'll give it 4 stars for now, as I haven't fully read the book. But this review will hopefully be a place holder for a more in-depth review at a later date. And if such an event occurs, I'll be sure to revise the score if necessary.


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Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Companion Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Black Dow wrote:

Any chance Iobaria will be featured in any way?

I too would like to know this.

Sczarni RPG Superstar 2012 Top 32

Diego Rossi wrote:
Black Dow wrote:

Any chance Iobaria will be featured in any way?

I too would like to know this.

Gets a vote from me as well.


Larcifer wrote:
I would love to see more on the Jistka and their imperium. A detailed map of their territory and other cities during their hey day. More on their Magistracy, Golem Artificers, the fiends behind their downfall, and how they became the morlocks found in their ruins today. A look into the technology and golem crafting during their time. Details of their temple-foundries, and maybe a statblock or two of new constructs from that era such as a Jistkan War-hound and/or Jistkan Behemoth. A look into the fiend-fueled,green oily residue-like essence that animates their creations. I could go on and on. :)

Jistka sounds really interesting...! Any references in the current books about their temple-foundries or the green residue?


Mark me as voting for more information on Iobaria. Currently I am using the Danger at Daggerrock placed in Iobaria, with plans for placing more encounters in there.

Dark Archive

And another tally for Iobaria... every since i first read about it, i wanted to know more!!! and I also second some stats for more of the Runelords, not necessarily all of them, but one or two would be nice. Cheers!!!

Contributor

We've updated the authors for this product.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Wolf Baur returns to writing Golarion? Awesome.


3 people marked this as a favorite.

Jeff Erwin is me!
I'm thrilled to be sharing credit with Adam and Wolfgang. This will be my first freelance credit in ten years!

Paizo Employee Managing Developer

Jeff de luna wrote:

Jeff Erwin is me!

I'm thrilled to be sharing credit with Adam and Wolfgang. This will be my first freelance credit in ten years!

Rock on wit' yo bad self!

Dark Archive

Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Adventure, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber
Jeff de luna wrote:

Jeff Erwin is me!

I'm thrilled to be sharing credit with Adam and Wolfgang. This will be my first freelance credit in ten years!

To be followed on by your Vudra and Casmaron Gazetteer credits?


Kvantum wrote:
Jeff de luna wrote:

Jeff Erwin is me!

I'm thrilled to be sharing credit with Adam and Wolfgang. This will be my first freelance credit in ten years!
To be followed on by your Vudra and Casmaron Gazetteer credits?

Hopefully something sooner. But keep asking for those... :)


This book looks spiffy. Color me intrigued.


The book looks and sounds magnificent; and add me in as one more vote for more on Iobaria.


I Greatly enjoyed "Lost Cities" of Golarion, and "Dungeons" of Golarion... and now we have a forthcoming "Lost Kingdoms"... I can't wait.
I agree with several posters above me, Iobaria would be nice to have more information on, Jistka as well... and I've really liked the Shory since "Crucible of Chaos" (as well as the Derhii... one of my favorite monsters. Ever).
And, excited to see that Wolfgang Baur is involved (as well as Adam and Jeff)!

And as "requested" Jeff (and slight thread-jack) how about a Vudra Gazetteer and a Casmaron Gazetteer in late 2012 or 2013)? /end threadjack.

Dean

The Exchange

Oh yes. Oh yes. Now this I can USE.


I hope there will be maps of the various kingdoms at their height. I love maps.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Filby Pott wrote:
I hope there will be maps of the various kingdoms at their height. I love maps.

We'll see, but at this point it's unlikely that there'll be significant maps in this book.


Ancient Osirion, Ghol-Ghan and Thassilon has me hooked.
But no Azlant?!! 0.0

As for my votes/guesses on the final 3.

Tar Taargadth:
First Dwarven empire in which the 10 sky citadels we're founded. We only know of 6, with 3 eluded to. Definite area for expanding the lore, as Dwarf's need more love.

Sarkoris:
The Worldwound's a popular adventuring hotspot what with those pesky demon Tourists. This barbarian civilisation foresaw their own doom and went down fighting, and yet we know very little about them.

Shory:
Flying cities? Mysterious crash sites the world over? Aeromantic Infadibulum? Need I say more?

Honorable mention - Lost civilisations of the Expanse:
Heart of the jungle is one of my favourate books from Paizo, but it brings up more questions than it answers. Seems that there have been several mighty human empires that have risen and fallen in that subcontinent. Yet we know almost nothing about them! So many ruins and lost cities, who built them? You could fill another 64 pages on just these! Please Paizo, tell us more!

Paizo Employee Creative Director

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Oggron wrote:

Ancient Osirion, Ghol-Ghan and Thassilon has me hooked.

But no Azlant?!! 0.0

Azlant is more than a kingdom. It's an empire. The first human empire. Also a continent. Also not in the Inner Sea region. Also, a topic that could easily fill an entire 64 page book. Also a topic we're not quite ready to pull that many curtains back on.

Sczarni RPG Superstar 2012 Top 32

This book needs to hurry! I want to run a Then/Now campaign.


This is my favorite book Paizo will publish in 2012 and I haven't even received it yet. I am a serious fan of gaming world history and so far this seems to be the best book for the subject.

Oh, and if it's not too late, I want NPCs! As I said elsewhere, history is the context for the present that guides us to shape the future. As a corollary, it is the hands of the people of ancient societies which shape that context. So, more NPCs please!

Paizo Employee Chief Technical Officer

I've updated the cover image and product description to reflect the finished product.

Silver Crusade

1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Holy bananas, awesome cover? Who's the artist?

Sovereign Court Contributor

Chris Nehren wrote:

This is my favorite book Paizo will publish in 2012 and I haven't even received it yet. I am a serious fan of gaming world history and so far this seems to be the best book for the subject.

Oh, and if it's not too late, I want NPCs! As I said elsewhere, history is the context for the present that guides us to shape the future. As a corollary, it is the hands of the people of ancient societies which shape that context. So, more NPCs please!

I hope the book meets your expectations. :)


Gorbacz wrote:
Holy bananas, awesome cover? Who's the artist?

+1. Wowza.

Paizo Employee Chief Technical Officer

Gorbacz wrote:
Holy bananas, awesome cover? Who's the artist?

Michal Ivan.

Dark Archive

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Pawns Subscriber

This book is listed both under the Campaign Setting and the Companion sections...I think the Paizo Golem got confused.

Web Product Manager

the Haunted Jester wrote:
This book is listed both under the Campaign Setting and the Companion sections...I think the Paizo Golem got confused.

That was certainly strange. It's been corrected now.


Scott McFarland wrote:
Gorbacz wrote:
Holy bananas, awesome cover? Who's the artist?
+1. Wowza.

+2. We've all heard of dracoliches, but dracomummies?

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
James Jacobs wrote:
We'll see, but at this point it's unlikely that there'll be significant maps in this book.

No ancient maps? This saddens me. Don't all RPG players love Maps? I thought it was a prerequisite.

Eric Hinkle wrote:
+2. We've all heard of dracoliches, but dracomummies?

In Pathfinder they're called Raveners not Dracoliches. But yeah... Dracomummies... Do they get a standard Mummy Rot? Or is it a Mummy Rot Breath weapon? Argh! I want to fight them already! This book had better have the stats for one after such an enticing cover!

Also, Will this book have more Thassilonian Magic Items like the Alara'Hai? Or Maybe Rules for Thassilonian Runes updated for the Pathfinder system? that would be nice.

Liberty's Edge

I'm going to miss a couple months because of budget, but this book will be my first one back on the Campaign Setting subscription.

I want to read tomorrow's book of yesterday today!

Lantern Lodge

James Jacobs wrote:
Filby Pott wrote:
I hope there will be maps of the various kingdoms at their height. I love maps.
We'll see, but at this point it's unlikely that there'll be significant maps in this book.

I'd like to see a product at one point that covers that. The Historical Atlas of Golarion has something of an awesome ring to it... though something tells me that this is unlikely.


Silly question, but is there any rules crunch in this book? Character traits, rules settings? Fun stuff that you won't mention until June 20th comes closer?


Wow how did I miss the update for the art and info.

I love the mummified Dragon on the cover.

The Exchange Kobold Press

There is definitely some crunch in this book, though a lot of the emphasis is history and adventure hooks. I wrote a new Thassilonian monster for it, for instance.

RPG Superstar 2011 Top 16

Hey! I know that dragon! Tukanem-Hanam, right?


Does this mean we will get mummified template?

The Exchange Kobold Press

I could not possibly comment on the template issue.

Maybe Adam Daigle or Wes Schneider will spill the beans, but I would not count on it.


2 people marked this as a favorite.
BenS wrote:

If I could cast Wish or Miracle, I would like to see this product as a springboard for an AP set in an earlier (more "mythic") time period of Golarion. Come to think of it, this could also be a great way to satisfy the itch of those who want epic/mythic adventures. Put it far back enough that it wouldn't interfere w/ modern continuity and/or hesitation at having high-level material in today's Golarion.

Or just a "regular" AP (starting at level 1), but set in the mythic past in one of these great kingdoms of old...that would be epic in and of itself.

Agreed--that would be a nifty 'setting within a setting'.

Paizo Employee Developer

Golden-Esque wrote:
Silly question, but is there any rules crunch in this book? Character traits, rules settings? Fun stuff that you won't mention until June 20th comes closer?

Plenty of rules crunch as well as flavor. The exact ratio of fluff-to-crunch is very similar to that found in Dungeons of Golarion.


Patrick Renie wrote:
Golden-Esque wrote:
Silly question, but is there any rules crunch in this book? Character traits, rules settings? Fun stuff that you won't mention until June 20th comes closer?
Plenty of rules crunch as well as flavor. The exact ratio of fluff-to-crunch is very similar to that found in Dungeons of Golarion.

... I don't own that one! The analogy, it does NOTHING! :-P

Paizo Employee Developer

Golden-Esque wrote:
Patrick Renie wrote:
Golden-Esque wrote:
Silly question, but is there any rules crunch in this book? Character traits, rules settings? Fun stuff that you won't mention until June 20th comes closer?
Plenty of rules crunch as well as flavor. The exact ratio of fluff-to-crunch is very similar to that found in Dungeons of Golarion.
... I don't own that one! The analogy, it does NOTHING! :-P

Well go out and buy it then, silly! ;)

Each section has at least a couple rules elements. Without giving away too much, I can assure you that there are plenty of monsters, traps, and items to sate one's appetite for crunch. All of these new rules elements are tightly integrated into the history and lore of each lost kingdom, but they can certainly be used in other settings as well.

Shadow Lodge

Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber

Sadly I just noticed the cover has gone up - oh well better late than never. Awesome cover, but i looked at it without really looking, so I thought "Whoa mummified Jabberwock! Cool", but it's only a ravager (or as suggested possibly a mummy). Having used a Dragon mummy with rot breath apainst my players before I can 100% say they were not happy! This book just gets better


I'm assuming this book will focus on the lost cultures/empires/nations of the Inner Sea region, but would it be going too far if there was some more info about the lost empire of Ninshabur? Personally, I'd be happy if there was just some stuff about the olden days on the other continents period.

Paizo Employee Developer

MrHankinson wrote:
I'm assuming this book will focus on the lost cultures/empires/nations of the Inner Sea region, but would it be going too far if there was some more info about the lost empire of Ninshabur? Personally, I'd be happy if there was just some stuff about the olden days on the other continents period.

This book concentrates on the lost kingdoms of the Inner Sea region; since Ninshabur was located on the southwest corner of the Castrovin Sea and is technically more a part of Casmaron than Avistan, it unfortunately falls outside the scope of this book.


June 20th can't get here fast enough.


Can someone tell me the "crunch" content in here? Or is PFSRD people going to do that at some point? Thanks! :D


Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Maps, Pathfinder Accessories, PF Special Edition Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Superscriber

Who drew Areelu Vorlesh on page 46? Is that signature db - Dmitry Burmak?

Scarab Sages

A quick count turns up the following crunch:

NPCs:1
Spells:1
Magic Items:7(2 are connected to a new (awesome)golem)
Monsters:7
Traps:1
Drug:1

I might have missed something, since I only downloaded my copy this morning and haven't had the time to read much.


Any mor information on the 7 new monsters?

And how´s the fluff? Especially about Jistka, Lirgen, Yamasa and Ghol-Gan?

Thank´s in advance!

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