Pathfinder Player Companion: Pirates of the Inner Sea (PFRPG)

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Pathfinder Player Companion: Pirates of the Inner Sea (PFRPG)
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Draw your cutlass and set sail for adventure!

For thousands of years, pirates have captured the imagination, their rough-and-tumble lives filled with a boundless lust for blood, gold, and glory. Being a pirate is the ultimate freedom—freedom to take what you want and never apologize. Whether from the decks of massive slave galleons or beneath the sails of swift ships, pirates hunt the seas, singing chanteys and hoisting the Jolly Roger as they seek out the next unsuspecting merchant. They are the wolves of the sea, and their hunger can never be sated.

Whether you want to abandon the life of a landlubber to join a pirate crew, hunt down their murderous ships in the name of justice, or simply follow a mysterious map to buried treasure, Pirates of the Inner Sea has everything you need to know about piracy on Golarion, all of it one hundred percent player-friendly and ready to guide you on your journey.

    Inside this book, you’ll find:
  • In-depth overviews of six major pirate organizations in the Inner Sea region, including the government-backed privateers of Andoran, the slavers of Okeno, the high-seas buccaneers of Riddleport and the Shackles, and the quick-moving brigands of the River Kingdoms. Each entry details the pirates’ history, notable captains, activities and hideouts, preferred ships, and more.
  • Pages of new pirate weapons and equipment, from hook hands, cutlasses, and tar bombs to peg legs, treasure chests, and grog.
  • New pirate archetypes for several different classes, including the buccaneer bard, the freebooter fighter, the corsair ranger, and the smuggler rogue.
  • The Inner Sea pirate prestige class.
  • A detailed look at the faith of Besmara the Pirate Queen, goddess of all those who make their living spilling blood on the water.
  • New pirate-themed spells for casters of numerous types and faiths.
  • New character traits to help you customize your pirate character mechanically as well as thematically.
  • Sample pirate codes, minor pirate groups, a timeline of important pirate events, and more!

This Pathfinder Player Companion is intended for use with the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game and Pathfinder campaign setting, but can easily be used in any fantasy game setting. In addition, it is particularly useful for players of the Skull & Shackles Adventure Path.

Written by Amber E. Scott

Each bimonthly 32-page Pathfinder Companion contains several player-focused articles exploring the volume’s theme as well as short articles with innovative new rules for social, magic, religious, and combat-focused characters, as well as traits to better anchor the player to the campaign.

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-405-4

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Player Companion Subscription.

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Ring Side Report- Review of Pirates of the Inner Sea

5/5

Originally posted on www.throatpunchgames.com, a new idea everyday!

Product- Pathfinder Player Companion Pirates of the Inner Sea
System-Pathfinder
Price-~$11
TL;DR- Not much magic, but a darn fine book 93%

Basics- Ah hoy landlubber! It's time to be bad guys! Pirates of the Inner Sea discusses being a pirate in Golarion, Pathfinder's default setting. The book opens with a chapter discussing different pirate histories of the inner sea ranging from sanctioned privateers all the way to all and out pirates. Next the book moves to different pirate gear. After gear, several different archetypes are introduced as well as the Inner Sea Pirate prestige class. The book then discusses Besmara, the god of Pirates and sea monsters. After Besmara, the book introduces a few pirate focused spells and then pirate codes and rules aboard ship.

Mechanics- I liked this book, but it's not perfect. The prestige class is a nice pirate focused martial character. The archetypes are great pirate focused changes to the core classes. The magic spells build upon what you would expect a pirate would need. The gear is cool. All that is great, but I felt like magic was a bit left out. The spells are good, but there are not many of them. Spell casters didn't really get any pirate focused prestige classes. The bard got one, but his stuff didn't focus on magic. It's good for what you get, but it leaves half the available classes out. 4/5

Theme- This book is amazingly theme-tastic. I liked all the different kinds of pirates discussed in the book. I can play a scallywag, but at the same time I can be a good guy as an Andorian privateer. I can play evil and play a slaver. Awesome. The book ends with a small section on terminology and pirate codes. The codes give the feel of being on a lawless ship where someone has to hold court. The terms make my home game that much more interesting when I bust out random phrases to get my players into the game. Besmara has a nice pirate feel for a god who really doesn't care what you do! 5/5

Execution- The book is arranged well. I loved what I saw. The art is beautiful. The test isn't hard to read. I'd like bigger, but then Paizo would have to cut stuff. I enjoyed reading this. Standard Paizo quality. 5/5

Summary- If you want to play pirates in Pathfinder, then go pick this up. If you want to fight pirates then go get this. In both cases, you need this book to make your game that much better. If you plan to run a game inland with absolutely no water, then don't get this book. All and all I liked what I saw and can't wait to put more of it to use in my home game. 93%


Pirates for Players

4/5

This book is set up in the typical places style. It begins by listing pirates for the different regions of Golarion. Andoran, Mediogalti, Okeno, Riddleport, River Kingdoms, and Shackles are the main regions with a page of other pirate-frequented nations. There is also a pirate timeline. Each of the major nations has the history, notable captains, ships, hideouts, types of pirating and 4 traits. These sections are 2 pages long, so they just hint at the nations. Amber Scott makes each region feel different from the other, and I was amazed at all the types of piracy in Golarion. This section is kind of odd for players, since it really seems more like background a DM would use, except for the traits. I'm kind of unsure as to the effectiveness of some of the traits, especially in the Shackled Skull AP, which players will want to use this book for.

The second half of this book is by far and away the better half. 4 pages of delicious pirate weapons and accessories, detailed and with charts. Wonderful for players and DMs. I will use the heck out of this section. Next, 2 pages of archetypes. These are varient "paths" for base classes, swapping out standard level abilities for pirate ones. Something I will definetly use on named NPCs. A whole new prestige class, Inner Sea Pirate is next. This class gives rogue skills to anyone who meets the simple pre-reqs. It has a very rogue feel, granting talents with a seafaring taste. Besmara is in the faith section. She is also detailed "The Wormwood Mutiny". Therefore, I'd rather have seen how Golarion's other faiths can be applied to seafarers. Spells has aquatic and necromantic spells for a wide range of classes. Finally, social mentions norms and laws for various ships. Pirate slang is under this heading and will add alot of flavour for campaigns.

My final thoughts are that this book is nice. It has some highly useful sections, and is well done in general. Each region feels distinct. However, I would rather have seen this book combined with the player's guide, especially the weapons and social sections. Although this book is good, if these sections were placed in other products, it would've been unnecessary.


kind of good

3/5

I have to say that I was a bit disappointed in this product. There isn't a great deal of meat on the bone here.

On the plus side, There is some good background information here that might be quite important if you run a pirate heavy campaign. The art is good and some of the table information is useful.

On the negative side I have to say that there is little here regarding ships, how to use them, not much for spells or sea-based items.

I would have to say that there is enough to make the product useful in some ways, but I would probably call it "Piratres at a glance".

Suppliment this book with (if you can find them) "The Seafarer's Handbook", "Pirates!", "Arms and Armor 3.5" (for special item creation)and applicable parts of "Swashbuckling" series.

To be fair, it's hard to get pirates into a mixed world without butchering the whole concept. Your DM is faced with a bit of a challenge when working with pirates, but it can be a fun addition.


4/5


A little of everything

4/5

This book sprinkled a little bit of pirate flavor on everything from spells to class archetypes to faith and my personal favorite, pirate gear. I was a little disappointed to see all of the pirates shown to be human in nature and no monstrous ones detailed or even mentioned, but still a great buy.


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Paizo Employee Chief Technical Officer

Dragon78 wrote:
Has the product info been updated yet?

It has now—thanks!


Thanks for the update Vic.

Sczarni

Yarr Ha Harr!!

Brigands be damned, it's about time fer the good people at Paizo to show us seafaring folks a bit o' loving. I be greatly anticipatin' finding out more about the matron o' these treacherous waters - Besmara 'erself!

Now all I need to do is wait fer the lads over at the Society to get around to updatin' their "additional resources" page and ol' Cap'n Swagger will finally be gettin' that pegleg.

Well done, Amber Scott, I tip me hat to you dear lady. And if ye ever be in need of voyage 'crost the water, look no further than Cap'n Swagger and his Revelry.


order is pending, countdown has begun.

I would love to see more traits that grant acrobatics amd swim as a class skill. Maybe escape artist as a class skill as well.


My group's campaign is set on an island chain, so this is being picked up by at least one of us there. My group (due to the nature of the campaign setting we use) house-ruled that all characters get access to swim and profession: sailor as class skills.


Not sure if this has been asked yet, but as this IS a pirate's book, there gonna be a bunch of ships?

Shadow Lodge RPG Superstar Season 9 Top 8

1 person marked this as a favorite.

If there's a pirate-themed archetype for the ninja will it unmake existence?


A pirate archtype for a ninja would be cool.


I really don´t like to be the boring guy, but i missed Taldor sponsored corsairs that prey on qadiran´s ships. But i really liked the book and the art.

Contributor, RPG Superstar 2010 Top 4

Got my PDF- they're shipping!

RPG Superstar 2009 Top 32

What is the Hit Die type of the Inner Sea Pirate?
Looking at the class, I have to assume d12, because Pirates are just that awesome!


There's no pirate class; however, there are archetypes for bard, fighter, ranger, and (shock!) rogue. Sort of what one would expect, as they all fit well with the pirate lifestyle—except the Ranger. What's that doing there? Basically, the archetype for the Ranger puts her in the position of a crew leader, trading a few land-oriented class features for things that help her allies win fights.The Ranger approach is interesting, something I may just have to play through for Skull and Shackles.

RPG Superstar 2009 Top 32

Chris Nehren wrote:
There's no pirate class; however, there are archetypes for bard, fighter, ranger, and (shock!) rogue. Sort of what one would expect, as they all fit well with the pirate lifestyle—except the Ranger. What's that doing there? Basically, the archetype for the Ranger puts her in the position of a crew leader, trading a few land-oriented class features for things that help her allies win fights.The Ranger approach is interesting, something I may just have to play through for Skull and Shackles.

But there is the "Inner Sea Pirate" prestige class.

Actually, I don't think you will be allowed to use any of these archetypes for Skull & Shackles. Remember, you start shanghied, not as pirates.

Dark Archive

Lord Fyre wrote:
Chris Nehren wrote:
There's no pirate class; however, there are archetypes for bard, fighter, ranger, and (shock!) rogue. Sort of what one would expect, as they all fit well with the pirate lifestyle—except the Ranger. What's that doing there? Basically, the archetype for the Ranger puts her in the position of a crew leader, trading a few land-oriented class features for things that help her allies win fights.The Ranger approach is interesting, something I may just have to play through for Skull and Shackles.

But there is the "Inner Sea Pirate" prestige class.

Actually, I don't think you will be allowed to use any of these archetypes for Skull & Shackles. Remember, you start shanghied, not as pirates.

Unless you was already a pirate, got shore leave in port. Got drunk and shanghied by another crew for your trouble to start all over at the bottom again. :)

RPG Superstar 2009 Top 32

Dark_Mistress wrote:
Lord Fyre wrote:
Chris Nehren wrote:
There's no pirate class; however, there are archetypes for bard, fighter, ranger, and (shock!) rogue. Sort of what one would expect, as they all fit well with the pirate lifestyle—except the Ranger. What's that doing there? Basically, the archetype for the Ranger puts her in the position of a crew leader, trading a few land-oriented class features for things that help her allies win fights.The Ranger approach is interesting, something I may just have to play through for Skull and Shackles.

But there is the "Inner Sea Pirate" prestige class.

Actually, I don't think you will be allowed to use any of these archetypes for Skull & Shackles. Remember, you start shanghied, not as pirates.
Unless you was already a pirate, got shore leave in port. Got drunk and shanghied by another crew for your trouble to start all over at the bottom again. :)

Possbible.


Pirates vs. Ninjas.

GO!


Multiclass Ninja 10 / Inner Sea Pirate 10.

Where's your god now?

RPG Superstar 2009 Top 32

Chris Nehren wrote:

Multiclass Ninja 10 / Inner Sea Pirate 10.

Where's your god now?

Which still doesn't actually answer what Hit Die the Inner Sea Pirate receives. :(

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Superscriber

Same question re hit die.

Also related to the Inner Sea Pirate prestige class, is it safe to assume that the advancement table for when you get a Pirate Talent is correct rather than the text description on page 24?

RPG Superstar 2009 Top 32

xellos wrote:
Same question re hit die.

Yes, that is why I am saying it has got to be a d12. Pirate are just that awesome.


Pathfinder Companion, Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber
Lord Fyre wrote:

What is the Hit Die type of the Inner Sea Pirate?

Looking at the class, I have to assume d12, because Pirates are just that awesome!

Since it is a .75 BAB it should be a d8.


xellos wrote:

Same question re hit die.

Also related to the Inner Sea Pirate prestige class, is it safe to assume that the advancement table for when you get a Pirate Talent is correct rather than the text description on page 24?

The general rule is that text takes precedence over table entries when they do not agree.

EDIT: Of course, that being said, with only getting tricks at levels 4, 7, and 10, the Advanced Tricks at 6th, 8th, and 9th seem off. It seems more likely that this time, the table's right.

RPG Superstar 2009 Top 32

Justin Franklin wrote:
Lord Fyre wrote:

What is the Hit Die type of the Inner Sea Pirate?

Looking at the class, I have to assume d12, because Pirates are just that awesome!
Since it is a .75 BAB it should be a d8.

I know that, I am just trying to poke the Paizo people for an offical ruling. ;P ... and I cannot FAQ, on this thread.

Paizo Employee Chief Technical Officer

Lord Fyre wrote:
...I cannot FAQ, on this thread.

Psst: That's a hint that you should put rules questions in the rules questions forum!

Paizo Employee Creative Director

They have d8 HD.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Superscriber
Vic Wertz wrote:
Lord Fyre wrote:
...I cannot FAQ, on this thread.
Psst: That's a hint that you should put rules questions in the rules questions forum!

Starting a thread in the Rules forum.


How is anyone seeing the class if the book is not out yet, or do the subscribers already have it?

Contributor

wraithstrike wrote:
How is anyone seeing the class if the book is not out yet, or do the subscribers already have it?

We started shipping subscribers their shipments yesterday, I believe.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Card Game, Companion, Maps, Pathfinder Accessories, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Charter Superscriber

Got mine today... Very happy camper.

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber; Pathfinder Card Game, Companion, Maps, Pathfinder Accessories, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Maps, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Charter Superscriber

And subscribers get access to their PDF when their shipment is sent our or at least when there credit card is charged. I had access to the PDF yesterday and got the hardcovers today. I love living an hours drive from Paizo.

Sovereign Court RPG Superstar 2009 Top 32, 2010 Top 8

I agree with one lament above, that we didn't get Taldan corsairs.

My second grief so far is a) Andoran Pirates and b) NG Andoran Pirates. Can we please remember that Andoran isn't happy shiny land?


What are the new archtypes like?

Any interesting new spells?

What is your favorite thing(s) in the book?


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens Subscriber; Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber

I'm curious to know if we'll get more ship stats in the associated AP or Player's Guide as this book mentions several different types of ships, but all the ships in Ultimate Combat are either too big or flat bottom.

RPG Superstar 2009 Top 32

Matthew Morris wrote:

I agree with one lament above, that we didn't get Taldan corsairs.

Also missing:
A trait for the "minor" pirate groups they do list. :(

My second grief so far is a) Andoran Pirates and b) NG Andoran Pirates. Can we please remember that Andoran isn't happy shiny land?

Andoran Privateers are actually a good idea. Some people actually like the idea of "Pirate Paladins."

And, just except the fact, one of the reasons so much of Golarion is dark and grim is that all the goodness and light are concentrated in Andoran (CG) and Lastwall (LG).


Anything interesting?

Liberty's Edge

Paizo Charter Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

I was really hoping for some Gunslinger support in this... :(


Pathfinder Companion Subscriber
Dragnmoon wrote:
I was really hoping for some Gunslinger support in this... :(

You aren't the only one. Now Rogues have 2 pirate archetypes, and can easily go into shackles pirate or the new pirate PrC.

I'm really thinking they should create an actually list of professions though if they are going to start building feats/prcs that require a certain amount of ranks in a specific profession.

Cause my Mysterious Stranger Gunslinger can't qualify for this Pirate PrC cause I took Profession: Pirate.

Dark Archive

Pathfinder Card Game, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
Ævux wrote:
Dragnmoon wrote:
I was really hoping for some Gunslinger support in this... :(

You aren't the only one. Now Rogues have 2 pirate archetypes, and can easily go into shackles pirate or the new pirate PrC.

I'm really thinking they should create an actually list of professions though if they are going to start building feats/prcs that require a certain amount of ranks in a specific profession.

Cause my Mysterious Stranger Gunslinger can't qualify for this Pirate PrC cause I took Profession: Pirate.

Unless you are playing PFS, talk to your GM. I'm guessing that it needs Profession Sailor? Any sane GM would allow you to use ranks of Prof: Pirate to count.

Also there sort of is a list of pre set professions in that there is a list of common professions in the skill description. I'd be shocked if a PrC ever used a profession that isn't on that list.

On the bigger point of Gunslinger support, Paizo have repeatedly said that Golarion Pirates aren't gun toting 18th century style pirates.


Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

Really? Where has Paizo said this? Every single picture of a pirate I've seen looks exactly like a classic 18th century pirate, just don't have a pistol on them.

In the pirate gear section one of the things they have is bayonettes, like the one that appeared in UC.

Mentioning UC, Pirate Archetype for rogue suggests firearm training.

Also regardless of what they said in the past.. The entery in this book on shackles pirates pretty much overrules them now. Just like how most adventures aren't firearm toting hobos, but some are, Captian Kerdak Bonefist's ship is one of the few that does carry firearms and cannons.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

Aevux,
How does that overrule them? It calls him out as being unusual for having cannons. That means rthe vast majority of pirates don't have them, which is exactly what the official position has been. If anything, that's support for the existing position, not overruling it.

As for bayonets, they are also mentioned as fitting crossbows, so nope, still no firearm support there, either.

Liberty's Edge

Paizo Charter Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
Paul Watson wrote:

Aevux,

How does that overrule them? It calls him out as being unusual for having cannons. That means rthe vast majority of pirates don't have them, which is exactly what the official position has been. If anything, that's support for the existing position, not overruling it.

As for bayonets, they are also mentioned as fitting crossbows, so nope, still no firearm support there, either.

Part of the problem is the lack of Gunslingers in Golarion all together, which means for support it is going to be a very sad class... :(


However, for those who want guns to be very rare such as myself, one man's bug is another man's feature. I'm very glad the official stance didn't change.


Pathfinder Companion Subscriber
Paul Watson wrote:

Aevux,

How does that overrule them? It calls him out as being unusual for having cannons. That means rthe vast majority of pirates don't have them, which is exactly what the official position has been. If anything, that's support for the existing position, not overruling it.

As for bayonets, they are also mentioned as fitting crossbows, so nope, still no firearm support there, either.

It overrules it because they say that there is not, but then there is. And its not just some random minor pirate ship either. It is the leader of the shackels pirates. But then it also DOES NOT SAY that its ONLY that pirate leader that has it. But one of the few pirate ships with firearms. What does this mean? It means there are a few pirates beyond that that do have firearms, just as there are a few adventures out there who have firearms.

Yes the vast majority of pirates(and adventures) do not have firearms, however SOME do. Like for example a random ragtag band of six hobos who do various adventuring jobs.. AKA your players. Perhaps a random villain (course as a GM is far easier to justify anything you make, cause you are well.. The Game master.)

Bayonett is both crossbow and firearm. Yes there is crossbow but it is also firearms.

However, you did not answer the third point, Rouge archetype says that firearm training is good for it.

BPorter wrote:
However, for those who want guns to be very rare such as myself, one man's bug is another man's feature. I'm very glad the official stance didn't change.

Then don't allow it in your game. Seriously. You have like what? Six or seven players in a game right? If one of the builds a gunslinger.. and for some reason you allow it, does the ability to choose a piraty archetype some how make fire-arms less rare?

Shadow Lodge Contributor, RPG Superstar 2010 Top 8

Ævux wrote:

It overrules it because they say that there is not, but then there is. And its not just some random minor pirate ship either. It is the leader of the shackels pirates. But then it also DOES NOT SAY that its ONLY that pirate leader that has it. But one of the few pirate ships with firearms. What does this mean? It means there are a few pirates beyond that that do have firearms, just as there are a few adventures out there who have firearms.

Yes the vast majority of pirates(and adventures) do not have firearms, however SOME do. Like for example a random ragtag band of six hobos who do various adventuring jobs.. AKA your players. Perhaps a random villain (course as a GM is far easier to justify anything you make, cause you are well.. The Game master.)

Bayonett is both crossbow and firearm. Yes there is crossbow but it is also firearms.

However, you did not answer the third point, Rouge archetype says that firearm training is good for it.

I think you're reading too much into Enlight_Bystand's comment, I don't think he intended to make an absolute statement ("NO GUNS FOR PIRATES! NYAH :P"). I remember reading the comments he referred to, and they were along the lines of what Paul Watson said--guns aren't common outside of Alkenstar, so most pirates don't use them.

As for the Pirate archetype from UC--well, that's from UC. The rulebook line is (for the most part) setting neutral, it suggests firearm training for the pirate because that fits the generic pirate flavor, not specific Golarion flavor.


Pathfinder Companion Subscriber

However!

the first fact is that there are some pirates out there that do use guns. Now if it just said that guy, the limitation would infact be applied, however it isn't just that guy with guns.

They are rare, but really are gunslinger pirates any rarer than gunslinging hobos? (I say hobos, because most PCs don't actually have a home when you think about it.)

That is by far, the first most important fact. They do exist even in Golarion. And they exist even in the innersea.

So I'm not here saying they must put in this book, but debating the whole idea that in order for an archetype to exist, that it MUST be something common. I mean look at all the bloodlines for sorcerer.. If all those bloodlines are suppose to be so utterly common.. You have like a couple hundred sorcerers being born during plagues. Another couple hundred are destined. Another are both plagued and destined.

Adding a rare archetype to a rare class does very little, other than giving a new option to a rare class that the GM can outright deny because it is a rare class. Right now I'm playing a gunslinger pirate, even if I don't have an archetype to use for it. But its not like now every time we smash a vase suddenly we are attacked by a pirate with a firearm.

Shadow Lodge Contributor, RPG Superstar 2010 Top 8

Ævux wrote:

However!

the first fact is that there are some pirates out there that do use guns. Now if it just said that guy, the limitation would infact be applied, however it isn't just that guy with guns.

They are rare, but really are gunslinger pirates any rarer than gunslinging hobos? (I say hobos, because most PCs don't actually have a home when you think about it.)

That is by far, the first most important fact. They do exist even in Golarion. And they exist even in the innersea.

So I'm not here saying they must put in this book, but debating the whole idea that in order for an archetype to exist, that it MUST be something common. I mean look at all the bloodlines for sorcerer.. If all those bloodlines are suppose to be so utterly common.. You have like a couple hundred sorcerers being born during plagues. Another couple hundred are destined. Another are both plagued and destined.

Adding a rare archetype to a rare class does very little, other than giving a new option to a rare class that the GM can outright deny because it is a rare class. Right now I'm playing a gunslinger pirate, even if I don't have an archetype to use for it. But its not like now every time we smash a vase suddenly we are attacked by a pirate with a firearm.

I don't think anybody is saying that it must be common in order to make it in the book.

I think the point is that if you put a gunslinger archetype in the book, you need to cut something else out to make room for it. Buccaneers, freebooters, corsairs, and smugglers take precedence since the bulk of Inner Sea Pirates are going to be represented by those classes, and so those archetypes are going to be more useful for more people.

I would have liked to see a gunslinger archetype too, but I understand why they didn't include one.


to those who have this already.

what are the archtypes in this book and will sone of you or all of you do a review...

I need to know whether or not its worth wanting to shell out the 12 bucks or so to get it(s&h)

Liberty's Edge

Dragnmoon wrote:


Part of the problem is the lack of Gunslingers in Golarion all together, which means for support it is going to be a very sad class... :(

The position concerning guns in Golarion when it came to pirates results from a decision that it was more important to be "true" to the Golarion setting and the preferences of some fans (and some Paizo staff) than to be "true" to the entire idea and underlying technological rationale of pirates in the Age of Sail.

It's a debate upon which I think the "official view" is, when applied specifically to pirates as a genre -- a serious mistake.

You wouldn't try and do an Eastern setting without Samurai and Ninjas or eastern weapons. Trying to do pirates in the Age of Sail without gunpowder is, imo, FAR more heretical than that.

Now, the reality is, the decision has been made and this book reflects that decision. Regrettably, we can fully expect Skull and Shackles to double down on it. However, that doesn't mean:


  • That I have to like it (I don't);
  • That I need to be supportive of the decision (I'm not - as it sacrifices a critical aspect of Pirates on the wrong altar); and
  • That I need to be quiet about the crappy flavor that decision is going to have upon Skull & Shackles (at least as written), either.

Gunpowder is a contentious issue in FRPGs and I'm willing to defer to the non-gunpowder preferences of fans and developers in every subgenre of the fantasy setting EXCEPT when it comes to Pirates. The line must be drawn there; that far and no further.

Without gunpowder, the Age of Sail makes no sense and all warships should be rowed vessels. That is the one aspect of pirates where the entire underlying technology of the setting (the Age of Sail) REQUIRES gunpowder in order for it to make any sense at all.

Unless you want the Battle of Salamis with eyepatches, that is. (No thanks.)

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Steel_Wind wrote:
Dragnmoon wrote:


Part of the problem is the lack of Gunslingers in Golarion all together, which means for support it is going to be a very sad class... :(

The position concerning guns in Golarion when it came to pirates results from a decision that it was more important to be "true" to the Golarion setting and the preferences of some fans (and some Paizo staff) than to be "true" to the entire idea underlying ratinale of pirates and the Age of Sail.

It's a debate upon which I think the "official view" is, when applied specifically to pirates as a genre -- a serious mistake.

You wouldn't try and do an Eastern setting without Samurai and Ninjas or eastern weapons. Trying to do pirates in the Age of Sail without gunpowder is, imo, FAR more heretical than that.

Now, the reality is, the decision has been made and this book reflects that decision. Regrettably, we can fully expect Skull and Shackles to double down on it. However, that doesn't mean:


  • That I have to like it (I don't);
  • That I need to be supportive of the decision (I'm not - as it sacrifices a critical aspect of Pirates on the wrong altar); and
  • That I need to be quiet about the crappy flavor that decision is going to have upon Skull & Shackles (at least as written), either.

Gunpowder is a contentious issue in FRPGs and I'm willing to defer to the non-gunpowder preferences of fans and developers in every subgenre of the fantasy setting EXCEPT when it comes to Pirates. The line must be drawn there; that far and no further.

Without gunpowder, the Age of Sail makes no sense and all warships should be rowed vessels. That is the one aspect of pirates where the entire underlying technology of the setting (the Age of Sail) REQUIRES gunpowder in order for it to make any sense at all.

Unless you want the Battle of Salamis with eyepatches, that is. (No thanks.)

You know, one might just go ahead and question the whole idea of sea-faring vessels in a world where some crazy guy can teleport, sink an entire flotilla by a barrage of quick fire-based spellcasting and teleport away before anybody gets a chance to shout "abandon ship", so you might as well just let go with any pretense of "realism" in this department.

Liberty's Edge

The problems of flying wizards and ships becoming aircraft carriers for flying people using wands of fireballs is another issue. That can be easily corrected with some fire suppressant ship enchantments, a few new spells, and some new rules for cannon. Cannons bigger than a swivel gun need to be treated as area affect weapons, impossible to affect via true strike, (say the entire crew needs it and coordination inherent in it prevents it) AND incapable of targeting anything smaller than a colossal target with individual fire. Cannon hit an area, not individuals. They also need their rate of fire reduced.

Star Wars: SE used this approach for ship based weapons and it worked just fine in that system.

Move on from there and it is very easy to make a magical Pirates of the Caribbean.

As for teleportation, the economy of Golarion relies upon trade of bulky and heavy commodities via ship. Teleportation does not solve that problem and it's far too expensive to install on an industrial scale. If the bulky ships are carrying cargo, you need bulky ships carrying cannon to protect them from other bulky ships trying to seize them.

So no, I'm not throwing "reality" out the window.

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