Pathfinder Player Companion: Faiths of Purity (PFRPG)

4.30/5 (based on 12 ratings)
Pathfinder Player Companion: Faiths of Purity (PFRPG)
Show Description For:
Non-Mint

Add Print Editon $10.99 $5.49

Add PDF $7.99 $5.99

Add Non-Mint $10.99 $8.24

Facebook Twitter Email

True heroes know that evil is not an abstraction, nor a concept to be debated. Rather, it is a relentless adversary, a dark tide that seeks always to roll over the world, turning the hearts of gentle souls with its claws and whispers. Against this onslaught stand a proud and pious few: those priests and soldiers who dedicate themselves in body and soul to the forces of light, ready to lay down their lives in defense of the innocent. Aided by the powers of their gods, these stalwart champions use sword and spell, faith and ferocity to protect all that they hold dear. For they know that if they do not—who will?

Faiths of Purity presents a player-friendly overview of the good-aligned religions of the Pathfinder campaign setting, along with new rules and information to help players customize pious characters in both flavor and mechanics.

    Inside this book, you'll find:
  • Information on each of the major good-aligned gods and his or her corresponding religion, including what's expected of adventurers of various classes, ways for the faithful to identify each other, taboos, devotions and ceremonies, church hierarchies, holy texts, religious holidays, and more
  • New traits to help represent and cement a character's background in the church
  • New feats and combat tricks for all holy warriors
  • New god-specific spells for a wide variety of spellcasting classes
  • Paladin codes for sacred warriors of each major god, as well as new organizations and knightly orders
  • Details on good-aligned minor deities, racial gods, empyreal lords, and more!
    Faiths of Purity includes key information on:
  • Cayden Cailean, god of freedom, ale, wine and bravery
  • Desna, goddess of dreams, stars, travelers and luck
  • Erastil, god of farming, hunting, trade and family
  • Iomedae, goddess of valor, rulership, justice and honor
  • Sarenrae, goddess of the sun, redemption, honesty and healing
  • Shelyn, goddess of beauty, art, love and music
  • Torag, god of the forge, protection and strategy

Written by Colin McComb

Each bimonthly 32-page Pathfinder Companion contains several player-focused articles exploring the volume’s theme as well as short articles with innovative new rules for social, magic, religious, and combat-focused characters, as well as traits to better anchor the player to the campaign.

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-314-9

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Player Companion Subscription.

Product Availability

Print Editon:

Available now

Ships from our warehouse in 11 to 20 business days.

PDF:

Fulfilled immediately.

Non-Mint:

Available now

Ships from our warehouse in 11 to 20 business days.

This product is non-mint. Refunds are not available for non-mint products. The standard version of this product can be found here.

Are there errors or omissions in this product information? Got corrections? Let us know at store@paizo.com.

PZO9416


See Also:

11 to 12 of 12 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | next > last >>

Average product rating:

4.30/5 (based on 12 ratings)

Sign in to create or edit a product review.

5/5

An excellent resource for those who want to play as part of Golarion, instead of just in Golarion. The details on each deity for both worshippers and believers were concise and well-written, though specifically, this is more a book for laypeople as opposed to a details-for-clerics kind of work. In the same way that most Golarion setting books make me want to run an adventure in that setting, this book made me want to role-play.

The divine classes weren't left in the cold, however; I really enjoyed and appreciated the paladin codes. They seem like they could alleviate a great many alignment arguements, in addition to making a tangible difference in the way paladins from different deities would be played.


About Time

5/5

One of the best pathfinder companion to date. The highly need information about the pantheons is highly over due. Not just the cleric info but the general worshiper info was great but my favorite section is the paladin codes, really brings them to life.


11 to 12 of 12 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | next > last >>
151 to 189 of 189 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | next > last >>
Dark Archive

Chris Ballard wrote:
So, when do we get the evil version of this book?

Lisa strongly implied Christmas.

We gets coal in our stockings! Yay?


Paizo Charter Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

A question regarding Apsu's domains: The Inner Sea World Guide lists Apsu's domains as Creation, Good, Law, Scalykind and Travel, while Faiths of Purity lists Creation, Earth, Good, Law and Travel. Which is correct?

Also, in both cases, I think Creation should be Artifice.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Zaister wrote:

A question regarding Apsu's domains: The Inner Sea World Guide lists Apsu's domains as Creation, Good, Law, Scalykind and Travel, while Faiths of Purity lists Creation, Earth, Good, Law and Travel. Which is correct?

Also, in both cases, I think Creation should be Artifice.

No matter how many times the folks at Paizo attempt to squish the Creation domain it will always find a way to creep into another book...


Zaister wrote:

A question regarding Apsu's domains: The Inner Sea World Guide lists Apsu's domains as Creation, Good, Law, Scalykind and Travel, while Faiths of Purity lists Creation, Earth, Good, Law and Travel. Which is correct?

Also, in both cases, I think Creation should be Artifice.

This has already been covered in the Inner Sea World Guide errata thread.


Paizo Charter Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
Enevhar Aldarion wrote:
This has already been covered in the Inner Sea World Guide errata thread.

Only the part about the Creation/Artifice domain was. This is about the ISWG saying Apsu grants the Scalykind domain, while FoP replaces that with th Earth domain.

Liberty's Edge

ZenithTN wrote:
No, I'm greatly enjoying $11 + S&H.

The two are not mutually exclusive. :)


Zaister wrote:
Enevhar Aldarion wrote:
This has already been covered in the Inner Sea World Guide errata thread.
Only the part about the Creation/Artifice domain was. This is about the ISWG saying Apsu grants the Scalykind domain, while FoP replaces that with th Earth domain.

I know I have seen that one too. It may have been dealt with in the thread for the Golarion Day blog, Other Gods and New Subdomains, or in the one after that, Subdomains for Everyone!

Paizo Employee Creative Director

3 people marked this as a favorite.

Apsu's official domains should be:

Artifice, Good, Law, Scalykind, and Travel


REEEAAALLLY enjoyed reading this one!

The Paladinic oaths are particularly good for helping players roleplay. The writing is very enjoyable, easy to read, and lots of great ideas.


Just bought the print version of this and was expecting to be able to download the PDF version too (without paying) like I get to do with the adventure paths. Am I wrong in my understanding?


ussugu wrote:
Just bought the print version of this and was expecting to be able to download the PDF version too (without paying) like I get to do with the adventure paths. Am I wrong in my understanding?

You get that with the adventure paths because you subscribe to the line. If you subscribed to the companion line, you would have received the PDF of this. However, just buying a book does not give you the associated PDF for free.

EDIT:Had wrong product line identified first.


Ok. Thanks for the reply Sniggevert.


Pathfinder Companion, Maps Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Superscriber

About the picture on page 7: Is that the actual size of a starknife? I had always pictured them as being smaller. It looks like she'd hurt herself if she tried to sit down ... or others if she was walking through a crowd.

Dark Archive

Joana wrote:
About the picture on page 7: Is that the actual size of a starknife? I had always pictured them as being smaller. It looks like she'd hurt herself if she tried to sit down ... or others if she was walking through a crowd.

That did strike me as a way-larger-than-expected starknife. At first glance, I thought that it was a halfling woman holding an inapppropriately sized medium starknife, or something. (The halfling version of Amiri?)

For a weapon that weighs 3 lbs, the one on p. 7 looked like it should weight *at least* as much as 4 daggers strapped together, if not 8 lbs or so (since the daggers looked like they were oversized for the wielder).

In further starknife quibbling, I didn't really get the way it was being held on p. 25 either. That's a pretty awkward grip she's got there, and it seems like the weapon would be difficult, if not impossible, to use effectively the way she's got it positioned.

Less 'holding a weapon' and more 'modeling the latest fashion from Varisia...' :)

But hey, that's pretty much my biggest quibble with the book (other than the Illuminator and Eye of the Father traits), so it's probably a testament to the quality of the book that I'm bickering over the proportions and use of perspective in a couple of the pictures. :)

Silver Crusade

Sean K Reynolds wrote:
This book is "What does this belonging to religion do for my character, even if I'm not a divine spellcaster?"

This remark, along with its descriptive text, is what prompted me to purchase the book. Ultimately, I found it only lived up to half of the expectations I had. The story/world aspects explaining how the deities think and what is expected of their followers were very good; I enjoyed those overviews, plus the bits about holy days and deity-specific organizations.

However, I was very disappointed to find that some classes got little to nothing in the way of game content in this book. It's very good that Druids, Rangers, and Bards picked up a few divine-themed things to use, but I was personally hoping for a little content for Wizards and Sorcerers too. Especially the latter, since Celestial Bloodlines are an option for them and this seemed like an interesting place to expand on the concept. This struck me as particularly weird since a few deity write-ups explicitly mention these two classes are welcome so long as they otherwise adhere to the faith (Sarenrae's section in particular notes this).

In the end, I am pleased with the 'story content' of the book, and unhappy with the rest due to what I see as serious omissions. Unless I missed something, there doesn't appear to be even a token offering to the Sor/Wiz classes to facilitate character concepts of these casters having strong faith-based themes to their magic (which a few of the Sorc Bloodlines do encourage as one interpretation of their power, after all). I hope future products will offer some additional attention to this idea, as it's of particular interest to me.


This may deserve its own thread but it's semi appropriate to here: Could there exist characters and/or a culture where two deities are revered above most others? I have this weird idea for a ranger, race is built using Fursona pdf but is essentially a mixture of wolf and bear, whose alignment is Neutral Good, hunts undead and aberrations, that has a few things going on with him simultaneously in that he is more or less Green Faith whose idea of divinity is duality in that he is faithful to both Desna and Erastil. He carries a Star Knife and a Composite Long Bow as part of his devotion. Among the traits and feats I want for him are Faithful Artist (Desna Trait to make him a kind of singing ranger, performing mainly John Denver type songs) and Bull's Eye Shot (his combat style is going to be archery after all). How much of an oddball would he be? Or would very few people take him seriously?

Contributor

Considering that you're using Fursona to make an anthropomorphic wolf-bear PCs, you're already very far from a standard Golarion compaign, so your character's choice of deities and his culture that led to that choice isn't really any more "oddball" than your character's race.


The standard Golarion campaign is one that only makes provisions for the "standard races" which I actually find boring. I canceled my companion description to ensure I would not be getting Halflings of Golarion or Humans of Golarion so this really does not answer the question I posed about faith.


Paizo Charter Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

It answers you question perfectly as your character will be an oddball anywhere in Golarion, no matter what kind of faith he pursues, as that kind of "furry" character is practically unheard of in Golarion.

Contributor

Exactly my point.
Your character is an intelligent anthropomorphic animal, which isn't a common, uncommon, or rare thing in any part of the Inner Sea region--it's extremely rare. Therefore, "how I was raised to worship both of these deities" isn't what makes your character an oddball in the standard setting, it's the fact that you're an intelligent anthropomorphic animal.

It's like being on Earth and saying, "Hey, I'm a Seventh-Day Adventist and I also worship the Greek gods. Does that make me an oddball? Also, I'm a talking wolf-bear." People wouldn't freak out because of your unusual religion combo, they'd freak because you're a talking wolf-bear.

If your specific question is "are people going to think I'm weird because I worship Green Faith/Erastil/Desna?" then the answer is "no," most people are fairly polytheistic. People wouldn't think that was weird at all. They'd think it was weird you're a talking anthropomorphic animal (to be fair, they'd probably be just as freaked if an orc or treant were talking to them).

Liberty's Edge

I would be thrilled to see more information on my beloved Lamashtu.

Check out Lords of Chaos!


Sara Forlenza's artwork in this product was AWESOME. I really hope we see more of her stuff in the future.

Really liked the Torag and Erastil worshipers in particular.

Silver Crusade

Kain Darkwind wrote:

Sara Forlenza's artwork in this product was AWESOME. I really hope we see more of her stuff in the future.

Really liked the Torag and Erastil worshipers in particular.

It was solid work, but I have to admit I hope she does some female characters that don't veer so hard away from the Kyra/Seelah standard.

Don't get me wrong, it was good. But it was a bit jarring to have all of the female characters in a Pathfinder book lean hard in the cheesecake direction with no practically dressed examples.


Mikaze wrote:
Kain Darkwind wrote:

Sara Forlenza's artwork in this product was AWESOME. I really hope we see more of her stuff in the future.

Really liked the Torag and Erastil worshipers in particular.

It was solid work, but I have to admit I hope she does some female characters that don't veer so hard away from the Kyra/Seelah standard.

Don't get me wrong, it was good. But it was a bit jarring to have all of the female characters in a Pathfinder book lean hard in the cheesecake direction with no practically dressed examples.

I guess I'm utterly of no specific opinion on the cheesecake. I like good cheesecake, beefcake, and whatever you call it when they are dressed (frosted cake?) I like Seelah and I like Seoni.


Sorry if this has already been answered, but is there a Neutral Gods book yet, or is that still in the works? I'm going to be starting my subscription next month with this book, but would also snag a copy of the neutral book at the same time, if there is one.


Kain Darkwind wrote:
Mikaze wrote:
Kain Darkwind wrote:

Sara Forlenza's artwork in this product was AWESOME. I really hope we see more of her stuff in the future.

Really liked the Torag and Erastil worshipers in particular.

It was solid work, but I have to admit I hope she does some female characters that don't veer so hard away from the Kyra/Seelah standard.

Don't get me wrong, it was good. But it was a bit jarring to have all of the female characters in a Pathfinder book lean hard in the cheesecake direction with no practically dressed examples.

I guess I'm utterly of no specific opinion on the cheesecake. I like good cheesecake, beefcake, and whatever you call it when they are dressed (frosted cake?) I like Seelah and I like Seoni.

Hey, I'd be happy if they got Olivia DeBeradinis to do some artwork! Heh, like that will ever happen, but we can dream!

Seriously though, that's part of the genre. Long time fans of Paizo should remember when they got droves of letters because they had a shirtless man on the cover of a Dragon magazine and "OMG I can't buy that, it's got a naked man on the cover that is so gross!" and those of us with at least half a brain and/or that are comfortable in our sexuality were like "Are you Fing serious? You won't buy a magazine cause it has a shirtless guy on the cover? Seriously? Hello, ever seen CONAN!?"

I once subscribed to a video game magazine and they had an issue with The Rock, shirtless on the cover... they never got any "OMG WTF" letters (or if they did, they didn't publish them for sane readers to laugh about) so why does the roleplaying game industry have the only idiot gamers?


AbsolutGrndZer0 wrote:
Sorry if this has already been answered, but is there a Neutral Gods book yet, or is that still in the works? I'm going to be starting my subscription next month with this book, but would also snag a copy of the neutral book at the same time, if there is one.

Faiths of Balance

Faiths of Corruption


Heine Stick wrote:
AbsolutGrndZer0 wrote:
Sorry if this has already been answered, but is there a Neutral Gods book yet, or is that still in the works? I'm going to be starting my subscription next month with this book, but would also snag a copy of the neutral book at the same time, if there is one.

Faiths of Balance

Faiths of Corruption

Awesome, thanks! I really need to improve my search fu, huh?

The Exchange RPG Superstar 2010 Top 16

Sean K Reynolds wrote:
It's like being on Earth and saying, "Hey, I'm a Seventh-Day Adventist and I also worship the Greek gods. Does that make me an oddball? Also, I'm a talking wolf-bear." People wouldn't freak out because of your unusual religion combo, they'd freak because you're a talking wolf-bear.

Okay, I laughed out loud. Nicely done.

Although, if 7th-Day Adventists include a bunch of werewolfs, and there's a pack of weebears down in Cyprus still worshipping the Greek gods, then it all starts to make sense.

Liberty's Edge

How odd is it to have a character who worships a deity not associated with his class? For example, one of my current Pathfinder Society characters is a wizard who likes having good strategies and happens to be Lawful Good in alignment. So, I had him pick Torag as going against type, although the god is shown to have a fair number of human worshipers? How odd is this as a choice, and how do most people react when they see a character who is a member of a class not often associated with the worship of a given deity.


William Ronald wrote:
How odd is it to have a character who worships a deity not associated with his class? For example, one of my current Pathfinder Society characters is a wizard who likes having good strategies and happens to be Lawful Good in alignment. So, I had him pick Torag as going against type, although the god is shown to have a fair number of human worshipers? How odd is this as a choice, and how do most people react when they see a character who is a member of a class not often associated with the worship of a given deity.

Hmm good question. I tend to pick a deity based on their portfolio and such, not was "class" suggestions might be, so this would be interesting to know.

On a side note, something I like about Golarion is that the gods are the gods, there is no "race gods" with like elves have their own pantheon, halflings have their own pantheon, etc.

Dark Archive

William Ronald wrote:
How odd is it to have a character who worships a deity not associated with his class? For example, one of my current Pathfinder Society characters is a wizard who likes having good strategies and happens to be Lawful Good in alignment. So, I had him pick Torag as going against type, although the god is shown to have a fair number of human worshipers? How odd is this as a choice, and how do most people react when they see a character who is a member of a class not often associated with the worship of a given deity.

Tenser, back in ye olde days, was a pretty non-traditional wizard who was LG and focused on martial matters, over arcane stuff.

Arazni, in Golarion, seems to have been similar, a tactical war-wizard sort of figure.

I'd be all for it. A wizard or magus who reveres Irori, an Asmodean ranger / bounty hunter who idealizes the infernal ecology of the Hells, or a halfling cavalier who is a devout follower of Calistria, seem like credible lifestyle choices.

Particularly with the racially-connected gods, like Calistria and Torag, as long as dwarves can be wizards and elves can be cavaliers, it would make sense that there would be the occasional Calistrian cavalier or Toragite wizard, and both dieties seem to have plenty of human followers as well.

There probably aren't a ton of monks that revere the teachings of Gorum or Rovagug, but, otherwise, most things are pretty easy to rationalize. One might worship Abadar merely because one's parents / home community did, and not have ever felt a calling to switch a more class-appropriate diety.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber
AbsolutGrndZer0 wrote:
On a side note, something I like about Golarion is that the gods are the gods, there is no "race gods" with like elves have their own pantheon, halflings have their own pantheon, etc.

Elves do have their own pantheon. Findeladlara, Ketephys and Yuelral the Wise, in addition to Desna, Calistria and Nethys.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

May I lodge a pretty irritated complaint?

The author of the book apparently was under the mistaken impression that Inquisitors cannot be of chaotic alignment, because otherwise I can't explain why he thought it necessary to actively discourage players from being Inquisitors of Cayden Cailean and Desna. >.<

I was looking for inspirations what an Inquisitor of Cayden would be like, not for advice to not take the class for a worshipper of those faiths.

Senior Designer

magnuskn wrote:

May I lodge a pretty irritated complaint?

The author of the book apparently was under the mistaken impression that Inquisitors cannot be of chaotic alignment, because otherwise I can't explain why he thought it necessary to actively discourage players from being Inquisitors of Cayden Cailean and Desna. >.<

I was looking for inspirations what an Inquisitor of Cayden would be like, not for advice to not take the class for a worshipper of those faiths.

I understand your irritation, even though I don't think Cayden Cailean is a common choice for an inquisitor character.

I'm going to be playing one in James Jacob's upcoming Sandpoint campaign--Rejald Unthara, expatriate of (true) Galt, and inquisitor of Cayden Cailean.

Rejald is on the hunt for craven creatures too stupid or evil to enjoy life's pleasures, all in the pursuit to live a brave an unrepentant life. Rumor has it that he and his companions will be going up against a fair number of undead, which may be his perfect enemy. After all, the undead can't drink and are rarely merry. Many of them are too mindless to be brave, the rest are often fearful of true death, which isn't exactly brave either. We'll see how how he does. Worse comes to worst, his companions can raise copious glasses in memory his heroic death found in the pursuit of making Golarion safe for true libertines.

I'll let you know how it goes, but that's my take on an inquisitor of Cayden Cailean.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Thanks for the advice. I am more than a bit at odds with the general perception that Inquisitors need to be dour and joyless, which is what many a flavor text about the class seems to imply. The class is alignment compatible with every god/dess there is, as such it should be expected that gods like Cayden, Desna, Kurgess and so on produce Inquisitors who are more fun to be around.

If the class was planned to not be for merry characters, it should have been reflected via restrictions.


Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Lost Omens Subscriber
magnuskn wrote:
If the class was planned to not be for merry characters, it should have been reflected via restrictions.

I think any alignment can be merry. Lawful != humorless. I'm sure there are characters who are dourly chaotic as well.

I do agree that if a class doesn't have alignment restrictions, it should have support for gods of all alignments.


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
deinol wrote:
magnuskn wrote:
If the class was planned to not be for merry characters, it should have been reflected via restrictions.

I think any alignment can be merry. Lawful != humorless. I'm sure there are characters who are dourly chaotic as well.

I do agree that if a class doesn't have alignment restrictions, it should have support for gods of all alignments.

I was quite aware that you cannot restrict merriment via alignment. ^^ Hence I just said "restrictions", because I wasn't sure yesterday on how to do that via the alignment system.

If the Inquisitor is thought to be so intense that it cannot have a good time, maybe they should just have restricted gods of good feelings from the class from the outset. I'm still planning to go for my Inquisitor of Cayden and will play him as laid back as possible.


Was there ever any clarification on Butterfly's Sting, and the whole "I'm using a 15-20 kukri and a x4 weapon" thing?

151 to 189 of 189 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | next > last >>
Community / Forums / Paizo / Product Discussion / Pathfinder Player Companion: Faiths of Purity (PFRPG) All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.