Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Rule of Fear (PFRPG)

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Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Rule of Fear (PFRPG)
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A Cursed Land

For thousands of years, the Immortal Principality of Ustalav has labored beneath the legacy of its dark past. Within the shelter of its mist-shrouded hills and decaying, decadent cities, things that have no right to live stalk the night, and superstitious residents lock their doors tight against the howls and scratchings that summon them forth. Vampires, werewolves, undead monstrosities, and stranger things make their homes here, and even those fools who ignore such threats tremble at the thought of the Whispering Tyrant, the nation’s former conqueror, who even now shifts restlessly beneath his prison-tower of Gallowspire. Though most of Ustalav’s citizens are ordinary men and women, canny urban merchants, or fallen nobles coasting on their last shreds of wealth and reputation, no one here dares peer too far into the shadows, for fear of what might be looking back.

Rule of Fear provides a comprehensive overview of the nation of Ustalav, a realm of urban intrigue and gothic horror, and the setting of Pathfinder Adventure Path’s Carrion Crown Adventure Path.

    Inside this 64-page book, you’ll find:
  • A complete overview of 13 adventure-packed counties, from the ghost-haunted wastelands of Virlych to the bustling ports of Caliphas, including detailed descriptions of significant locations, notable personages, and the rulers of each region
  • In-depth gazetteers of seven major cities, including key locations, city stat blocks, and local rumors to draw your players into the action
  • Six conspiracies and secret societies, and how they fit into Ustalav’s baroque government
  • Eleven terrifying adventure locations, plus details on their masters, inhabitants, and supernatural hauntings
  • Information on local superstitions, secrets about notable families (and the unspeakable curses they bear), tips for running classic horror-themed campaigns, and more!

Rule of Fear is intended for use with the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game and the Pathfinder campaign setting, but can easily be incorporated into any fantasy game setting.

by F. Wesley Schneider

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-301-9

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Lost Omens Subscription.

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Amazing sourcebook

5/5

Lore-wise, this is an amazing rpg book.

Great npcs, great conspiracies, inspiring adventure hooks and a lot more info on the region.

A must have if you are planning to GM carrion crown.

Just be aware that this is not a book with "crunch" for players.


Where is Carrion Hill again?

1/5

1.- the map is awesome great detail with it
2.- narrative is some kind of tedious but do it well
3.- theres not stat for the rulers, and not advice if u can role it, and some stories are good and other just dont... (bad thing i guess)
4.- no character sheet or something, no cultural issues at all.
5.- the adventures ideas are good enough to keepingme reading it
6.- the maps for the cities and description are very good at all

in advice to buyers... this is not the same as varisian and korvosa reviews there was good enough that just happen once in this books.

in page 30 it refeers to explain a carrion hill altar and... there is not a carrion hill at all in any way to mention it... where is carrion hil???

is a lazy setting... maybe with it issues...
or i missing something? maybe my copy comes with bugs


Decent book, could have been great

3/5

I love the Carrion crown AP, and I'm a sucker for creepy stuff and horror. Therefore I had high expectations for this book. Unfortunately, it didn't deliver for me. The ideas for building atmosphere were nice, but not as compelling/great as GM ideas presented in the Gamemaster's guide.The history section was nice. For the cities and settlements I would have liked some more details on inhabitants, e.g. a in a few lines fleshed out inn/innkeeper/captain of the guard who captures the location. The note in introduction is something that really captured my attention, and I was hoping for more of that.


A mixed curse

4/5

First off, I bought this to get pure fluff, and that is what I got. Way to go campaign setting book!

History (Poor)
Not a big fan of timelines done this way - tries to jam a lot of info into short entries, and ends up being not very interesting at all.

Counties (OK)
The actual county texts ends up being bland, over the top flavorfull and at times edited so it is both at the same time. The npcs are way better handled (often with fantastic portraits), making up for the counties.

Cities and Settlements (Very Good)
Better editing and better writing, plus good maps and fantastic sites makes me want to use nearly everything in this chapter. Karcau is possibly my favorite location in Pathfinder now...

Legends and Hauntings (Very Good)
Has tonnes of interesting things, finding the Bloodlines part the most usefull. Makes me wish there was some kind of Inner Sea Bloodlines book...


Ughh

2/5

This is a hard book to read through. I have an entire laundry list of complaints, but I have narrowed it down to 3 of the bigger (least whiny sounding) ones:

1) The introduction is 100% flavor text, 0% introduction.

2) The History is entirely unsatisfying. It is a timeline of esoteric events that seem largely unrelated. Too much info in not enough space.

3) I agree with some of the other reviews here that suggest a reorganization of the content into a different format.

There is definitely a ton of good information in this book, but I'm hoping that I will be able to find a wiki somewhere that presents it a little better


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Paizo Employee Creative Director

Generic Villain wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:


Thrushmoor is more or less meant to be a stand-in for Arkham.

The ancient Kellids mostly movied into areas like the Realm of the Mammoth Loards, Numeria, and Sarkoris (which is now the Worldwound), where in time they became the modern Kellids. There are indeed still isolated pockets of them in Ustalav, and some of them DO still worship the Great Old Ones.

Cool, thanks for the reply James. I figured Rozenport was Ustalav's Arkham, given that it's home to the suspiciously named "Sincomakti School of Sciences," but I s'pose there's room for two homage-towns.

Rozenport's probably closer to Kingsport.

Contributor

Question: There were 16 original counties in Ustalav. Now, 9 form the Soivoda, 3 form the Palatinate, 2 became Virlych, and 1 was annexed by Razmir. That only adds up to 15. Where am I missing the last original county?


Pathfinder Adventure Subscriber

Lastwall was part of Ustalav before the Shining Crusade (if I remember things correctly).


Adventure Path Charter Subscriber
F. Wesley Schneider wrote:
Alephtau wrote:
On page 10 in the Amaans section it states that there is supposed to be a section for Katapesta in chapter 3, but looking in chapter 3, and everywhere else in the book, i dont see a section for Kavapesta. Is this a typo, or is my copy just missing the section detailing Kavapesta?

Quite the opposite. Kavapesta is ONLY in my version of the book. One of the towns I wrote up had to die to fit within the book's 64 pages and that was the one, though sadly that mention apparently survived. Fortunately, much of the information on the city found its way into the timeline and the description of Bishop Ulametria and the Pharasmin Penitence. And before people ask to see the handful of idea drained locations I had written for this, no, I'm not sharing.

So nah. :P

So I take it there's no chance of seeing the write up on Kavapesta in any of the other installments of the AP or anything? Unfortunate. One of my PC's is playing an Inquisitor and follower of the Pharasman Penitence. When I saw the referral in the Amaans description and then realized it didn't make the cut I was heartbroken. Guess I'll just have to soldier on and come up with something myself. As you said there is still a good amount of info scattered throughout RoF. Don't suppose I could convince you to share? ;)


F. Wesley Schneider wrote:
Yup. That cinches it. My time off request form will be completed by week's end. I'm already planning a lovely trip to bed until noon, followed by not reading or writing anything, and maybe a trip to Mass Effect 2.

Good luck with that. I've tried to have a couple of those and they got filled in pretty quick (although strangele enough by the end I was getting bored and ready for work).

James Jacobs wrote:
The ancient Kellids mostly movied into areas like the Realm of the Mammoth Loards, Numeria, and Sarkoris (which is now the Worldwound), where in time they became the modern Kellids. There are indeed still isolated pockets of them in Ustalav, and some of them DO still worship the Great Old Ones.

Oh wow that's awesome. Thanks for posting that. I'll certainly be keeping an eye out for any Kellid connections in Wake of the Watcher.

RPG Superstar 2011 Top 16

How do you get from the north side of the country to the south side? Looking at the map, I'm a little confused. It says many nobles uprooted from Ardis and moved to Caliphas... how?

I'm assuming a lot of trade comes in through Caliphas, and thus that's probably how the PCs first come to Ustalav, but from there, how to do they get to Ravengro, or wherever they're going?

For 2/3rds of the length of the country, you have the Hungry Mountains, then you have an open stretch through Versex, but then it's blocked by the Furrows and the Kingfisher River.

The writeup for Ammas didn't indicate that trade flows through it (or Versex). So how do you navigate this country? Why isn't it two countries, divided north&south?

Dark Archive

Erik Freund wrote:

How do you get from the north side of the country to the south side? Looking at the map, I'm a little confused. It says many nobles uprooted from Ardis and moved to Caliphas... how?

I'm assuming a lot of trade comes in through Caliphas, and thus that's probably how the PCs first come to Ustalav, but from there, how to do they get to Ravengro, or wherever they're going?

For 2/3rds of the length of the country, you have the Hungry Mountains, then you have an open stretch through Versex, but then it's blocked by the Furrows and the Kingfisher River.

The writeup for Ammas didn't indicate that trade flows through it (or Versex). So how do you navigate this country? Why isn't it two countries, divided north&south?

Bridges, mountain passes? Same thing can be said about the US. App and Rockies Mnt ranges and then the Miss River.

RPG Superstar 2011 Top 16

That's because of the unique settlement history of the United States: it was rapidly conquered by a technologically advanced culture without any other advanced cultures to resist it. I speculate that if the Americas had developed more organically, then yes, we'd have a different country along the westcoast than we do elsewhere (like how Portugal formed off the side of Spain).

Anyway, to bring it back on-topic: where are those mountain passes? If they exist, that's cool, but I'd like to know where to put them. Because these are going to be major trade routes, and there's going to therefore be towns or at least watchtowers along them. If there was a massive exodus of nobles from Ardis, that would have left a trail. I'm just curious where it is.

Dark Archive

I am assuming you are going off the map on the inside cover. If so it shows no roads at all. Yet we know it has roads, so the passes and bridges and such are where ever the roads are. I agree in that i wish the map showed stuff like that. I was merely saying i am sure roads, bridges and passes are how the country is connected.


James Jacobs wrote:
Generic Villain wrote:

Q2: What happened to the anicent Kellids of Ustalav? Based on what I can piece together, Ustalav was originally ruled by primitive people who worshiped the Great Old Ones. However, there seem to be hints that, at some point, they realized the folley of propitiating such awful things, and found some more friendly deities (maybe - I'm not sure on this). Despite being scattered by the Varisians, I figure pockets of Kellids had to survive. What did they do? I know some interbred with Varisians (the swamp people of Sinaria for example), but what of the rest of them? And do they continue worshiping their dark gods?

As a side note, I think the Kellids would make a perfect backdrop for a Pathfinder version of "The Rats in the Walls," wherein a PC slowly learns that his/her ancestors were cannibals who enslaved - and fed on - subhuman Kellids.

The ancient Kellids mostly movied into areas like the Realm of the Mammoth Loards, Numeria, and Sarkoris (which is now the Worldwound), where in time they became the modern Kellids. There are indeed still isolated pockets of them in Ustalav, and some of them DO still worship the Great Old Ones.

Heck, those man-eating ancestors might still be around, given the ghoul love we see in Golarion/Pathfinder.

And thanks for the info on the Kellids and their continuing worship of eldritch abominations. Hmm, given the tendency of such horrors to dwell in the endless night between the stars, and the Kellids living in Numeria, and that fallen starship... I wonder, was the crash entirely an accident?


1) Shouldn't a book title give a hint of what a book is about? I'm pretty sure it's primarily about a country, and not an emotion.

2) Did you receive feedback from certain bookstore owners that stated they were stupid (ie: "I don't like seeing words I don't know in book titles"), or was there some kind of poll somewhere that stated a majority percentage of them were stupid, or what? I don't mean to be offensive, but a word not recognized in a book title is a stupid reason not to order a book.

"What's an Azkaban? I'm not going to carry that book!"

Vic Wertz wrote:
Uninvited Ghost wrote:

Am I the only one who wishes these types of books were name in a format like:

Ustalav: Rule of Fear

Many bookstore buyers don't like seeing words they don't know in book titles. It makes them order fewer copies. So we generally (but not always) try to avoid that.

Paizo Employee Chief Technical Officer

Uninvited Ghost wrote:

Did you receive feedback from certain bookstore owners that stated they were stupid (ie: "I don't like seeing words I don't know in book titles"), or was there some kind of poll somewhere that stated a majority percentage of them were stupid, or what? I don't mean to be offensive, but a word not recognized in a book title is a stupid reason not to order a book.

"What's an Azkaban? I'm not going to carry that book!"

You have chosen an excellent example! Note that the title of the first Harry Potter novel had to be changed in the US because Scholastic said they couldn't market a book with "Philosopher's Stone" in the title.

Of course, by the time the second book came out, as long as "Harry Potter" was in the title, she could have called it pretty much anything and it would have sold just fine.

Perhaps someday the "Pathfinder" portion of the title will be a big enough draw that we can use words like "Ustalav" in the title without seeing diminished sales, but for now, we have noticed that when we put unfamiliar words in titles—even the word "Golarion"—we usually get lower initial orders at distribution than we do for other books in the same line that use only recognizable words in the title.


Vic Wertz wrote:
Perhaps someday the "Pathfinder" portion of the title will be a big enough draw that we can use words like "Ustalav" in the title without seeing diminished sales, but for now, we have noticed that when we put unfamiliar words in titles—even the word "Golarion"—we usually get lower initial orders at distribution than we do for other books in the same line that use only recognizable words in the title.

Okay, if your data shows that they are stupid (my word, not yours) then I understand why you're doing it. Being a business, and all.

Would having it (the name of the country, or whatever) be on the cover somewhere, but not part of the official title, be possible? I'm guessing yes, but not worth the trouble?

I'm finding it hard to articulate, but RPG books are meant to sit on a bookshelf, sorted by subject matter, and a country book called Rule of Fear just annoys me a lot. Not enough to cancel my subscription of course, which again, bottom line, you're here to sell products.

Paizo Employee Chief Technical Officer

Uninvited Ghost wrote:
Vic Wertz wrote:
Perhaps someday the "Pathfinder" portion of the title will be a big enough draw that we can use words like "Ustalav" in the title without seeing diminished sales, but for now, we have noticed that when we put unfamiliar words in titles—even the word "Golarion"—we usually get lower initial orders at distribution than we do for other books in the same line that use only recognizable words in the title.

Okay, if your data shows that they are stupid (my word, not yours) then I understand why you're doing it. Being a business, and all.

Would having it (the name of the country, or whatever) be on the cover somewhere, but not part of the official title, be possible? I'm guessing yes, but not worth the trouble?

I'm finding it hard to articulate, but RPG books are meant to sit on a bookshelf, sorted by subject matter, and a country book called Rule of Fear just annoys me a lot. Not enough to cancel my subscription of course, which again, bottom line, you're here to sell products.

We do occasionally have titles and subtitles, like "Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Book of the Damned—Volume 3: Horsemen of the Apocalypse," but we also don't really like having covers that are full of text.

Still, we do have the upcoming "Pathfinder Campaign Setting: Lands of the Linnorm Kings" coming as a retest....

Sovereign Court

Riptide777 wrote:
F. Wesley Schneider wrote:
Alephtau wrote:
On page 10 in the Amaans section it states that there is supposed to be a section for Katapesta in chapter 3, but looking in chapter 3, and everywhere else in the book, i dont see a section for Kavapesta. Is this a typo, or is my copy just missing the section detailing Kavapesta?

Quite the opposite. Kavapesta is ONLY in my version of the book. One of the towns I wrote up had to die to fit within the book's 64 pages and that was the one, though sadly that mention apparently survived. Fortunately, much of the information on the city found its way into the timeline and the description of Bishop Ulametria and the Pharasmin Penitence. And before people ask to see the handful of idea drained locations I had written for this, no, I'm not sharing.

So nah. :P

So I take it there's no chance of seeing the write up on Kavapesta in any of the other installments of the AP or anything? Unfortunate. One of my PC's is playing an Inquisitor and follower of the Pharasman Penitence. When I saw the referral in the Amaans description and then realized it didn't make the cut I was heartbroken. Guess I'll just have to soldier on and come up with something myself. As you said there is still a good amount of info scattered throughout RoF. Don't suppose I could convince you to share? ;)

Sorry, but I think that is pretty weak...not writing anything on Kavapesta in chapter 2 because it will be detailed in chapter 3...then just leaving it out all together. I don't really care what the reason is...the buyer is the one who gets NOTHING on the biggest city in the county. If the author doesn't want to share, then he is as much at fault as the editor. I see nothing humorous in this tease.

Contributor

11 people marked this as a favorite.

I started to write a pretty irked post about how folks were still harping on the Kavapesta typo in here. Then it finally clicked that that reference replaces what would usually be a description. And that actually is lame. SO!

Kavapesta: The largest city in Amaans and a holy city for Pharasmins, Kavapesta is a somber place possessed by a dour variety of religious fanaticism. The city takes its name from Mother Kavapesta, a Pharasmin missionary and teacher whose sermons on perseverance and suffering laid the foundations for the philosophies today known as the Pharasmin Penitence. After the priestess's death, her followers began the construction of Cryptgate Cathedral, which through centuries of renovations and expansions would become the largest church and monastery of Pharasma in the nation. The effort of constructing this monument and the tombs beneath brought droves of pilgrims to the banks of Lake Divirmis, which the faithful eventually renamed Lake Kavapesta. With the cathedral's completion, the assembled congregation lingered on, hoping to create a community based on the tenets of their faith. This community grew slowly, finally becoming the city known today.

Yet a city needs more than faith to survive, a fact the people of Kavapesta stubbornly defy. The foothills around the city are poorly suited to farming and the lake is tainted by poisonous minerals from the Hungry Mountains. A few mines in the surrounding hills scrape tin and coal out of the earth, though one has to wonder if the coin won from these efforts is worth the lives lost to cave-ins, choking maladies, and more mysterious disappearances. But worst of all are the plagues, the rampant sicknesses that seem to boil up from lake Kavapesta once a generation and burn through the city like a field fire. Scourges like the Whithers, Tol's Voice, and, most fearfully, the Black Breath have killed thousands in their beds, with lesser scares and reemergences occurring every few years. But the people claim that their city is blessed - not cursed like so many visitors say - insisting that each new calamity is a test from Pharasma and an opportunity for the citizens to experience ever greater trials, assuring greater rewards after death.

Contributor, RPG Superstar 2009, RPG Superstar Judgernaut

F. Wesley Schneider wrote:
Kavapesta: The largest city in Amaans and a holy city for Pharasmins, Kavapesta is a somber place...

Awesome stuff, sir. I'm a big fan of all things Pharasma and this is cool add-on material.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
F. Wesley Schneider wrote:


Kavapesta: The largest city in Amaans and a holy city for Pharasmins, Kavapesta is a somber place possessed by a dour variety of religious fanaticism...

I read that and immediately made a Human Cleric of Pharasma with the "Child of the Temple" and "Princess" traits. You monster.

RPG Superstar 2008 Top 32

A question for Mr. Schneider: I'm having a bit of trouble wrapping my brain around part of the Ustalavan timeline. The timeline mentions a King Ardurras Virholt and his son Prince Ardurras II, both in 3204 AR. Then in 3206 AR, it mentions King Ardurras, the Last King of Ustalav.

Do both of these dates refer to the same monarch, or are these Ardurras I and Ardurras III?

Also is 'Ustalavan' the correct adjectival form of 'Ustalav'?

Paizo Employee Creative Director

I can answer that last part: the Adjective form is "Ustalavic."


Pathfinder Adventure Subscriber

Curse you Eva Widermann! Driders are not supposed to be sexy!! :)


Paizo Charter Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
Kajehase wrote:
Curse you Eva Widermann! Driders are not supposed to be sexy!! :)

Huh? I'm not seeing any driders in this book? What are you talking about?

Contributor

Zaister wrote:
Kajehase wrote:
Curse you Eva Widermann! Driders are not supposed to be sexy!! :)
Huh? I'm not seeing any driders in this book? What are you talking about?

Maybe we have some cross-thread confusion with the Rivals Guide discussion?


Paizo Charter Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber
Brandon Hodge wrote:
Zaister wrote:
Huh? I'm not seeing any driders in this book? What are you talking about?
Maybe we have some cross-thread confusion with the Rivals Guide discussion?

Ah, that's entirely possible.


1 person marked this as a favorite.
Pathfinder Adventure Subscriber

That's definitely the case. Grr... stupid sexy drider.

Contributor

1 person marked this as a favorite.
CNichols wrote:

A question for Mr. Schneider: I'm having a bit of trouble wrapping my brain around part of the Ustalavan timeline. The timeline mentions a King Ardurras Virholt and his son Prince Ardurras II, both in 3204 AR. Then in 3206 AR, it mentions King Ardurras, the Last King of Ustalav.

Do both of these dates refer to the same monarch, or are these Ardurras I and Ardurras III?

Also is 'Ustalavan' the correct adjectival form of 'Ustalav'?

King Ardurras Virholt is the ruling monarch of Ustalav from a time in the late 3100s to the time of his death in 3206. He and his sons Ardurras II and Adamondais are remembered as heroes, who valiantly gave their lives defending their country. Ardurras's bastard son Andriadus is cursed as a betrayer in most places his name hasn't been stricken from records. This time in Ustalavic history is something of a plot point in Dave Gross's Pathfinder Tales novel Prince of Wolves. There's a b$+$&in' picture of Ardurras on page 4, and his doom is further detailed on page 39.

Looks like you've already got the line on the second question.

Dark Archive

Quick question;

The 'Old Chapel' and 'New Chapel' in Thrushmoor do not have a diety listed. Are they churches to Pharasma?

Are there any churches to Desna or Urgathoa, the other two 'major religions' of Ustalav, or do they generally not build chuches (for very different reasons, either 'cause of being wanderers by nature, or being underground, by necessity)?

Sovereign Court

F. Wesley Schneider wrote:

I started to write a pretty irked post about how folks were still harping on the Kavapesta typo in here. Then it finally clicked that that reference replaces what would usually be a description. And that actually is lame. SO!

Kavapesta: The largest city in Amaans and a holy city for Pharasmins, Kavapesta is a somber place possessed by a dour variety of religious fanaticism. The city takes its name from Mother Kavapesta, a Pharasmin missionary and teacher whose sermons on perseverance and suffering laid the foundations for the philosophies today known as the Pharasmin Penitence. After the priestess's death, her followers began the construction of Cryptgate Cathedral, which through centuries of renovations and expansions would become the largest church and monastery of Pharasma in the nation. The effort of constructing this monument and the tombs beneath brought droves of pilgrims to the banks of Lake Divirmis, which the faithful eventually renamed Lake Kavapesta. With the cathedral's completion, the assembled congregation lingered on, hoping to create a community based on the tenets of their faith. This community grew slowly, finally becoming the city known today.

Yet a city needs more than faith to survive, a fact the people of Kavapesta stubbornly defy. The foothills around the city are poorly suited to farming and the lake is tainted by poisonous minerals from the Hungry Mountains. A few mines in the surrounding hills scrape tin and coal out of the earth, though one has to wonder if the coin won from these efforts is worth the lives lost to cave-ins, choking maladies, and more mysterious disappearances. But worst of all are the plagues, the rampant sicknesses that seem to boil up from lake Kavapesta once a generation and burn through the city like a field fire. Scourges like the Whithers, Tol's Voice, and, most fearfully, the Black Breath have killed thousands in their beds, with lesser scares and reemergences occurring every few years. But the people claim that their city is blessed - not...

Since I took the time to whine and complain, I also should take to time to express my appreciation at your post, Mr. Schneider! Your response is the exact reason why Paizo rocks it over ALL OTHER RPG companies! Well written...but mostly, the fact that you were willing to respond to address costumer complaints is awesome. Keep up the great writing and thanks for reading our posts.

Dan

Dark Archive

F. Wesley Schneider wrote:
Scourges like the Whithers, Tol's Voice, and, most fearfully, the Black Breath have killed thousands in their beds, with lesser scares and reemergences occurring every few years. But the people claim that their city is blessed - not...

The timeline on page 6 of Rule of Fear refers to the Bleak Breath in AR 4249.

Is one of them a typo, or are they two different diseases? (Its for the wiki; I'm not normally this pedantic!)


There is a mention of the "Shining Son" in the book as one of the great old ones. Is there any other mention in the Pathfinder or Lovecraft mythos regarding this being?

Sovereign Court

I love the fact there's a Lovecraft Country inside Ustalav. I like even more the fact it's ruler basically is HPL:

"the middle-aged count was long known for a near-crippling social awkwardness that he transformed into arrogant introversion."

(...)

"Haserton used to apply himself to a rigorous but erratic curriculum
of history, theology, antiquarianism, philology, poetry, and occultism. Refusing to tolerate tutors — considering such instruction beneath his grand intellect — he spent hours daily corresponding with peers and rivals."

And then he turns into one of his characters, dissmissing all of his servants, hiring mysterious foreigners and buying weird books to study them long into the night? Priceless!

Maybe it's just the subject matter but "Rule of Fear" is by far my favorite Pathfinder book after the Camapign Setting itself.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Andros Morino wrote:
There is a mention of the "Shining Son" in the book as one of the great old ones. Is there any other mention in the Pathfinder or Lovecraft mythos regarding this being?

Based on what I know about the Cthulhu Mythos (a fair amount), neither Lovecraft nor his contemporaries wrote about a Shining Son - unless the SS is a reference to Cthugha, a fire god created by August Derleth. Also consider that the other two Great Old Ones (Mhar Massif and Tylicharius [sp?]) listed in that entry are unique to Pathfinder.

My guess? The SS is probably related to the shining child monster from "Bestiary II." My other guess? We'll learn much more about Pathfinder's Great Old Ones in the soon-to-be-released "Wake of the Watcher."

Sovereign Court

Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Adventure, Lost Omens Subscriber
David Schwartz wrote:
Question: There were 16 original counties in Ustalav. Now, 9 form the Soivoda, 3 form the Palatinate, 2 became Virlych, and 1 was annexed by Razmir. That only adds up to 15. Where am I missing the last original county?

Good question that has yet to be answered I think. The reply about Lastwall refers to the 2 counties Grodlych and Virholt that became Lastwall and Virlych. There does seem to be only fifteen not sixteen mentioned.

J

Dark Archive

Maybe the last one got swallowed up by a strange fog and no one can find it anymore. :)

Dark Archive

I am marking this for reference. I had a question about this book and this thread answered it.


F. Wesley Schneider wrote:

I started to write a pretty irked post about how folks were still harping on the Kavapesta typo in here. Then it finally clicked that that reference replaces what would usually be a description. And that actually is lame. SO!

Kavapesta: The largest city in Amaans and a holy city for Pharasmins, Kavapesta is a somber place possessed by a dour variety of religious fanaticism. The city takes its name from Mother Kavapesta, a Pharasmin missionary and teacher whose sermons on perseverance and suffering laid the foundations for the philosophies today known as the Pharasmin Penitence. After the priestess's death, her followers began the construction of Cryptgate Cathedral, which through centuries of renovations and expansions would become the largest church and monastery of Pharasma in the nation. The effort of constructing this monument and the tombs beneath brought droves of pilgrims to the banks of Lake Divirmis, which the faithful eventually renamed Lake Kavapesta. With the cathedral's completion, the assembled congregation lingered on, hoping to create a community based on the tenets of their faith. This community grew slowly, finally becoming the city known today.

Yet a city needs more than faith to survive, a fact the people of Kavapesta stubbornly defy. The foothills around the city are poorly suited to farming and the lake is tainted by poisonous minerals from the Hungry Mountains. A few mines in the surrounding hills scrape tin and coal out of the earth, though one has to wonder if the coin won from these efforts is worth the lives lost to cave-ins, choking maladies, and more mysterious disappearances. But worst of all are the plagues, the rampant sicknesses that seem to boil up from lake Kavapesta once a generation and burn through the city like a field fire. Scourges like the Whithers, Tol's Voice, and, most fearfully, the Black Breath have killed thousands in their beds, with lesser scares and reemergences occurring every few years. But the people claim that their city is blessed -...

wow i was driving me mad searching for this at the book... mr F. i guess u owe us a map and the 2pdf pages as all the cities described in the Rule of Fear as an errata

that will be a nice for me


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A few questions if I may about the Venacdahlia family.

From p13 it seems to suggest that Countess Solismina Venacdahlia is in charge in Ardeal - she gets the same treatment in the book as other county leaders. This begs a few questions:

1. What happened to her husband, Count Olomon Venacdahlia? Is he dead? When did he die?

2. If he is dead, why didn't his oldest daughter become the ruling countess as he had no sons? Under normal European primogeniture laws, Solismina would become a dowager countess with no obvious political power I think (I am no expert and I know Ustalav is not in Europe).

3. Separately from the questions above, was Olomon the ruler at the time Ardis was demoted as capital of Ustalav?

These are detail I know, but I'd like to add the answers to the Pathfinder Wiki.

Thanks

J


Doing a good ol' thread necro to point out a couple errors, mostly with Rule of Fear and the Chronicles' campaign settings depictions of Solismina Venacdahlia.

A.) Solismina Venacdahlia was a loved theatre lady for two decades, as stated in RoF.
B.) In 4648 she married her husband, Count Olomon Venacdahlia.
C.) Solismina is stated as being 65 in this book, which is set in 4711.
D.) After she had her first child, she began to show her age. She blames the birth of her child on this fact.

So, either Solismina was two when she married the count, or there is an age issue here. Assuming that her leading theatre years were a prelude to her marriage, let us say that she is around 30, a generous age to begin "aging." This would put her at around 90 at this time.

E.) In the Pathfinder Chronicles Campaign Settings, Solismina is said to be nearing her nineties. In addition...
D.) This book was set in 4708.
F.) Campaign settings was released in 2008, Rule of Fear in 2011.
G.) Both books refer to her daughters as "young," Rule of Fear says she looks forward to the "encroaching years" to undermine their beauty.

So, Rule of Fear's details on Solismina better fits the earlier account of her age from Chronicles Campaign Setting. Were she in her nineties now, the years match up for her birth, marriage, decline of beauty. What doesn't match is the age of her children. Either Solismina gave birth in her sixties (which wouldn't fit her age showing just post-birth), there is some flawed history in Ustalav, or there are some inconsistencies.

Lastly, she is described as having "waves of raven hair" despite being portrayed as a brunette.

I only mention this as I created a character whose backstory involves falling in love with Solismina's daughter, Opaline. Checking on the characters later, I noticed these inconsistencies. If Opaline was 60, it would be rather strange for my 18 year old character.

Silver Crusade

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Pathfinder Chronicles Campaign Setting is 3.5 and not up-to-date. Inner Sea World Guide is the updated for Pathfinder version.

I would go with the Rule of Fear stats, Franti ;)


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Hrothdane wrote:

Pathfinder Chronicles Campaign Setting is 3.5 and not up-to-date. Inner Sea World Guide is the updated for Pathfinder version.

I would go with the Rule of Fear stats, Franti ;)

Fancy seeing you. I had no idea on the campaign settings, shows me for a browser rather than a full reader. Though is it not still lore relevant?

Even so, while that would fix some of the issues, Solismina still has a strange age issue where she should be older than she is stated. Even looking just at RoF, unless she was a theatre starlet for two decades and became married at the tender age of two. The dates just don't line up for being married in 4648, and 65 years old in 4711.

#WhoIsSolismina

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