Pathfinder Campaign Setting: The Inner Sea World Guide (PFRPG)

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Pathfinder Campaign Setting: The Inner Sea World Guide (PFRPG)
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The Best of All Possible Worlds

Discover the world of Golarion, the official campaign setting for the smash-hit Pathfinder Roleplaying Game! A time of lost prophecies grips the world, bringing with it an unending maelstrom, a tear in the fabric of reality, a surge of diabolism, and the endless threat of war. Yet all is not lost, for these dark times provide ample opportunity for adventure and heroism.

    Inside this exciting and informative 320-page tome you will find:
  • Detailed summaries of the player character races native to Golarion, including more than a dozen distinct human ethnicities
  • Elaborate gazetteers of more than 40 crumbling empires, expansionist kingdoms, independent city-states, and monster-haunted wildlands of Golarion’s adventure-filled Inner Sea region, with locations perfect for nearly any type of fantasy campaign
  • Cultural information and Pathfinder RPG rules covering the 20 core deities of the Inner Sea, plus entries on other gods, demigods, forgotten deities, weird cults, strange philosophies, and more!
  • An overview of the Inner Sea’s history, a look at time and space, a discussion of magical artifacts and technological wonders, discussions of important factions and organizations, and hundreds of locations ripe for adventure!
  • Tons of new options for player characters, including Inner Sea-themed prestige classes, feats, spells, adventuring gear, and magic items!
  • Nine new monsters, including exotic humanoids of the skies and seas, undead and dragons, and an angry demon lord in exile!
  • A giant 21.75"x33" poster map that reveals the sweeping landscape of the Inner Sea in all its treacherous glory!

by James Jacobs with Keith Baker, Wolfgang Baur, Clinton J. Boomer, Jason Bulmahn, Joshua J. Frost, Ed Greenwood, Stephen S. Greer, Jeff Grubb, Michael Kortes, Tito Leati, Mike McArtor, Rob McCreary, Erik Mona, Jason Eric Nelson, Jeff Quick, Sean K Reynolds, F. Wesley Schneider, Leandra Christine Schneider, David Schwartz, Amber E. Scott, Stan!, Owen K.C. Stephens, Todd Stewart, James L. Sutter, Greg A. Vaughan, Jeremy Walker, and JD Wiker

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-269-2

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Lost Omens Subscription.

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Pathfinder Campaign Setting: The Inner Sea World Guide (PFRPG)

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The Kitchen Sink, and Everything But

5/5

To put it simply, the Inner Sea World Guide is *the* setting book for Pathfinder. There are several other books (softcovers) that provide more insight into particular areas, but this is the book that introduces the whole shebang. Weighing in at 318 pages, it provides an overview of everything that makes up Pathfinder's official campaign setting: the Inner Sea region of the planet Golarion. There are entries on each of the core races and human ethnicities, overviews of each of the nations of the region, a chapter on gods and religion, miscellaneous information like holidays and languages, an introduction to some major organisations that PCs might belong to (or fight against), player-facing material like new equipment and prestige classes, and finally a handful of new monsters for the GM. In short, there is a *lot* of information in the book and I've come to rely on it heavily.

In terms of overall production quality, a reader won't be disappointed. It's attractively laid out, with tons of maps, artwork (some of it recycled from earlier Paizo products), sidebars, etc. It's clear that a lot of love and attention to detail went into the book, which makes sense as it's one of the premier products in the Pathfinder line.

An Introduction (4 pages) kicks things off. One page is a map of the entire Inner Sea region. The theme of the setting is encapsulated nicely: against all prophecies, the God of Humanity, Aroden, has died suddenly, leading to a world "where nothing is foretold, and anything can happen." From another perspective, that's really what Golarion is: a kitchen-sink setting where no matter what kind of fantasy game-play your group wants, it can find a place for it--whether it's gothic tales of horror, swashbuckling tales of pirates, barbarians with laser-swords, steampunk gunslingers, or more traditional elves and wizards. The sum really is greater than the parts, and somehow it all works. The entire setting has a surprisingly rich and detailed history, which helps to tie everything together into a more coherent whole. The Introduction also contains a really nice in-game summary of the Pathfinder Society and a short sidebar explaining how the Inner Sea World Guide has expanded upon and updated the two previous overviews of the setting (the Gazetteer and Pathfinder Chronicles Campaign Setting, respectively).

Chapter 1 is Races (22 pages). It starts with a *very* brief overview (a sentence or two each) of where some of the uncommon humanoid races (like tieflings or kobolds) fit into the Inner Sea before devoting a single-page to each of the human ethnicities of Golarion (many with sensitively-handled analogues to real world cultures) and then the other core races like elves, dwarves, etc.. I'm not necessarily a fan of this way of handling things, as it gives the appearance that only humans have different ethnicities while all the other core races are homogeneous. Still, the chapter does succeed in adding a ton of Golarion-specific lore that is absent from the setting-neutral Core Rulebook.

Chapter 2, "The Inner Sea" (184 pages) is clearly the heart (and, by page-count, a full half) of the book. It starts by explaining that the Inner Sea consists of the continents of Avistan and (northern) Garund, explaining that the planet of Golarion contains several other continents that are outside the scope of the book. There's a detailed timeline of the setting's in-game history, which makes for interesting reading once some additional context is provided. The bulk of the chapter consists of four-page entries on each of the major countries/regions of the Inner Sea. Each entry starts with a sidebar giving basic information (like notable settlements, rulers, population, etc.) and is then sub-divided by topics: history, government, and a gazetteer of notable locations. There are 41 of these entries in alphabetical order, so it's pretty hard to cover them adequately in a review like this. I think the best thing to do is repeat my earlier point that there's a place for almost everything somewhere: revolutionary America has an analogue in Andoran, revolutionary France is Galt, Osiron is ancient Egypt, etc. But there are also some very original countries, like Razmiran (a theocracy ruled by a con-man), Rahadoum (a country that has turned against the gods and where worship is illegal), the Worldwound (a wasteland devastated by the presence of an open portal to demonic planes), the Mana Wastes (where magic doesn't work, and technology has stepped in), and so much more. If nothing else, each entry serves as a nice overview to give the area some basic flavour, and then a GM who really wants more detail can look for the matching softcover campaign setting line book for more depth. I was particularly intrigued by the eight page "Beyond the Inner Sea" section, which is more detailed than I would have thought (and definitely worth expanding someday, Paizo!).

Chapter 3, "Religion" (32 pages), contains a half-page introduction to each of the "Core 20" deities of the setting. Other gods get a paragraph or two, but there's also space devoted to archdevils, demon lords, elemental lords, dead gods, and philosophies. It's enough to get started, though serious players and GMs will likely want more detailed information. In terms of game-play mechanics, two new clerical domains (Scalykind and Void) are introduced here.

Chapter 4, "Life" is sadly just ten pages long. This is the chapter that covers the calendar, holidays and festivals, languages, weather and climate, and distinctive flora and fauna, among other subjects. There are some nice samples of things that make Golarion distinctive, but it would be good to someday have an "Inner Sea Almanac" that expanded on the little things that don't seem exciting but help add a major degree of verisimilitude to the setting.

Chapter 5, "Factions" (14 pages) provides a two-page introduction to five different organisations: the Aspis Consortium (an unprincipled group of colonialists & merchants), the Eagle Knights (anti-slavery freedom-fighters), the Hellknights (extremely strict "law and order" types), the Pathfinder Society (explorers and treasure-hunters), and the Red Mantis (assassins). Several lesser groups also get a one-paragraph overview. Overall, the chapter again serves nicely as a brief introduction, though more detailed information on each of the groups is available elsewhere.

Chapter 6, "Adventuring" (30 pages) is for the players. It starts with suggestions on where in the Inner Sea various classes might hail from. It then introduces four new prestige classes: the Harrower (a cool fortune-teller with an interesting suite of special abilities), the Hellknight (an armored juggernaut), the Low Templar (a sort of cowardly knight; it's hard to envision this one appealing widely), and the Red Mantis Assassin (maybe more for GMs than players, but with some eye-raising abilities). The chapter introduces several new feats; most of them are forgettable but a couple (like Rapid Reload and Fey Foundling) have become crucial to some builds and are, frankly, probably overpowered. The chapter provides updated rules for several pieces of equipment introduced in earlier adventure paths, including goblin weapons like dogslicers, Shoanti weapons like the Earth breaker, and more. It also briefly covers firearms, which are suitably rare and problematic (until someone plays a Gunslinger). Finally, there are some new spells (the most famous of which is infernal healing) and magic items (many of which are essential to parts of the campaign setting, like the final blades for Galt, the sun orchid elixir for Thuvia, and wardstones for the Worldwound). On the whole, I don't think buying the book purely for the "crunch" would be a good idea; the material in this chapter is only a supplement to what's essentially a "flavour/fluff" book.

Chapter 7, "Monsters" (14 pages) starts off with a nice overview of the role that various traditional groups of monsters (like dragons, trolls, ogres, etc.) play in Golarion. It then goes on to introduce seven new monsters, each with a 1-page Bestiary-style entry. Potential players will be interested to see that two of them, Gillmen and Strix, are given rules to make them playable races. Rise of the Runelords GMs may be interested to see full stats for the Sandpoint Devil.

As I write this review, Pathfinder Second Edition is on the horizon and Paizo has said they plan to update the official setting with the "results" of all previous adventure paths. For now, however, the Inner Sea World Guide is the best one-stop resource to get started on anything involving the Inner Sea. Lots of books have more on a single given topic, but no book has so much on so many different topics when it comes to the Inner Sea.


Incredible Product

5/5

So I had a few new players starting a session zero, but after making characters, they wanted to jump in to a game. I had nothing prepared because we were deciding what type of game we were going to play. After thirty minutes and this book, I had a strong beginning to a campaign. Every location, government and current events in this book is PERFECT for a campaign. So many starting points and storyline openings. Rich with interesting information and plot hooks. Easy five star and beautiful map. Thanks paizo


An Engaging Setting

5/5

This was the first Pathfinder Campaign Setting product I bought. That would have been early in 2013. I was curious about the references to Golarion in the Core Rule Book and wanted to know more. I got what I wanted in spades! This is an excellent resource for the Golarion setting.

I recently bought the PDF because I forgot where I had put my hard copy. It's excellent because I can just open the file on my computer, find what I'm looking for with a bookmark and I'm good to go.


The Inner Sea is Good for Me

5/5

This is a great resource book. The layout is great and even if you don't feel like using the various nations of The Inner Sea itself it the book gives you tons of ideas on how to build your own fantacy nations. The kinds of civilizations are diverse and all look like great places to have adventures in and make me want to read all of the Campaign Setting product line.

Add to that the feats, prestige classes, items, and the handful of monsters and you've got icing on what is already a great cake of a book.

All in all definitely worth the $9.99 asking price for the PDF!


Best RPG Product Ever

5/5

I can honestly say this is the best RPG product I've ever bought. There's so much reading in it, and I keep dipping back into it over and over again.

This book made me fall in love with Golarion, and each entry has made me dive off looking for more in the campaign setting and tales line.

If you haven't already hit the link to buy, then stop reading and do it now, you deserve it!


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Liberty's Edge

gbonehead wrote:
Ramses135 wrote:
All other posts are like "if I own the old book, will I need / want the new book?" - I would like to get answer to the exact opposite. If I plan to buy the new book for sure, is there any sense in buying the old Campaign Settings right now?

I got the old one:

A. To get it off the shelves so they'd print the new one :)

B. To complete my collection now.

C. Because I'm Veruca Salt (See B).

Nice...kind of what my thinking was when I got the book awhile back.....

Sean

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Ramses135 wrote:
All other posts are like "if I own the old book, will I need / want the new book?" - I would like to get answer to the exact opposite. If I plan to buy the new book for sure, is there any sense in buying the old Campaign Settings right now?

The revised book due out this Fall is going to expand on the current book by 64 pages. It's also going to condense and reorganize information, and in some cases will shift focus from some elements to others. My goal for the revision is to retain as much material as possible, though, so it'll probably be a relatively small amount of stuff that's "left out." And what IS left out is going to skew toward things that have proven themselves to be relatively unnecessary or, perhaps, have been covered adequately in other products. This does mean that there'll be some minor bits of information in the current hardcover that are unlikely to make it in to the newer book, so if you're a Golarion completionist, that could be a reason to pick up the first edition of the hardcover.

The MAIN difference between the two editions of the book, though, will be that all of the 3.5 material will be updated. So if you're playing a Golarion campaign with the 3.5 rules, that's a great reason to pick up the hardcover.

Issues of rules content set aside, though, I expect the relationship between the 1st edition of the PCCS and the 2nd edition version to be similar to the relationship between the 1st edition PCCS and the 64 page Gazetteer. All three of these products will work great to introduce you to Golarion and give you a lot of information about the world, but the most COMPLETE and most up-to-date version of this product will be the new printing coming up.


+1 for low-templar, but sense I already have that class a new one would be cool as well.


Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber
James Jacobs wrote:
Ramses135 wrote:
All other posts are like "if I own the old book, will I need / want the new book?" - I would like to get answer to the exact opposite. If I plan to buy the new book for sure, is there any sense in buying the old Campaign Settings right now?

The revised book due out this Fall is going to expand on the current book by 64 pages. It's also going to condense and reorganize information, and in some cases will shift focus from some elements to others. My goal for the revision is to retain as much material as possible, though, so it'll probably be a relatively small amount of stuff that's "left out." And what IS left out is going to skew toward things that have proven themselves to be relatively unnecessary or, perhaps, have been covered adequately in other products. This does mean that there'll be some minor bits of information in the current hardcover that are unlikely to make it in to the newer book, so if you're a Golarion completionist, that could be a reason to pick up the first edition of the hardcover.

The MAIN difference between the two editions of the book, though, will be that all of the 3.5 material will be updated. So if you're playing a Golarion campaign with the 3.5 rules, that's a great reason to pick up the hardcover.

Issues of rules content set aside, though, I expect the relationship between the 1st edition of the PCCS and the 2nd edition version to be similar to the relationship between the 1st edition PCCS and the 64 page Gazetteer. All three of these products will work great to introduce you to Golarion and give you a lot of information about the world, but the most COMPLETE and most up-to-date version of this product will be the new printing coming up.

Ok, thanks for the answer, James. So for all intent and purposes, this will be replacing the first Campaign setting book.

I will say, I was a bit confused as well as it sounded like it was going to zero on a specific part of Golaria (The Inner Sea) than be an all-encompassing world campaign guide. But from what you are saying, for the most part, it is pretty much duplicating the first campaign setting book.

I don't have either of them right now, and don't know if our DM would use this world (although I would like to try it), but just wanted to know as well if I needed to get both books. Thanks.

Edit

James Jacobs wrote:
The MAIN difference between the two editions of the book, though, will be that all of the 3.5 material will be updated. So if you're playing a Golarion campaign with the 3.5 rules, that's a great reason to pick up the hardcover.

James, what exactly do you mean by 3.5 will be updated? Are you (Pazio) referring to changes in the rules for the PFRPG we need to be aware of? I only ask in is it something we should be aware of for our core rulebook, as well?

I guess I am just a bit puzzled as I thought PFRPG was already an update to the D&D 3.5 system.


Hobbun wrote:


James, what exactly do you mean by 3.5 will be updated? Are you (Pazio) referring to changes in the rules for the PFRPG we need to be aware of? I only ask in is it something we should be aware of for our core rulebook, as well?

I guess I am just a bit puzzled as I thought PFRPG was already an update to the D&D 3.5 system.

The original Campaign Setting book was released when there was no PFRPG. Most of the material in the book is just fluff for the world (background setting, countries and relationships between, etc.). However, there is some crunch in the book as well (traits, feats, weapons, PrC, etc.) that were done with 3.5 rules.

PFRPG and 3.5 rules are VERY similar. There were a few changes to classes, weapons, feats, etc. that makes PFRPG slightly different to 3.5. This book is meant to bring forward, and readjust the crunch to PFRPG. Most of this is something that's easy to do on your own, but with the updated book you won't have to make your own house rulings. Also, this release will allow them to possibly use some of the prestige classes in the setting in their organized play environment.

Also, the original campaign setting was basically for the Inner Sea as well. The other areas of the world are given vague descriptions, but no detail really. These areas are suggestively going to contain civilizations like Native American, Indian, Asian, etc. It sounds like they'll tackle these items piece by piece in the future, but for now they're still expanding on the Inner Sea region (which is huge in of itself).

Just my 2cp.


Pathfinder Battles Case Subscriber
Sniggevert wrote:

The original Campaign Setting book was released when there was no PFRPG. Most of the material in the book is just fluff for the world (background setting, countries and relationships between, etc.). However, there is some crunch in the book as well (traits, feats, weapons, PrC, etc.) that were done with 3.5 rules.

Oh, ok, this answers my question. I did not realize that the original campaign book was released before the PFRPG core rulebook.

Thanks.

Shadow Lodge

Hobbun wrote:

Ok, thanks for the answer, James. So for all intent and purposes, this will be replacing the first Campaign setting book.

I will say, I was a bit confused as well as it sounded like it was going to zero on a specific part of Golaria (The Inner Sea) than be an all-encompassing world campaign guide. But from what you are saying, for the most part, it is pretty much duplicating the first campaign setting book.

Well, the first campaign setting barely stepped out of the Inner Sea area. The title of this updated version just rather heavily implies that other areas will eventually get a similar treatment.

Liberty's Edge

18DELTA wrote:
Kthulhu wrote:
Awww....my only problem with this is that it's coming out right as I'll be headed to Iraq.

Have someone send it to you;)

Thanks for your service!=)

Please allow me to echo that thanks from one vet to another!


Ernest Mueller wrote:
I was just reading this awesome post on customs and folklore of the Flanaess (Greyhawk) and wanted to just put a bug in your ear about considering having a couple distinct little local customs like this for each region in the Inner Sea book. Sometimes in the rush to describe a region and make sure it's got a bunch of good adventure hooks, it's overlooked to put in something characters from there can use. There's a lot of Inner Sea countries where when I read the descriptions from a "I want to draw inspiration for my character" point of view, I feel like I need a little more - there's broad brush stroke "oh I could be an escaped slave since they're into slavery" stuff but a little more man-on-the-street level regional quirks would be boss.

I'd like to second (third?) this as well. Some of the best campaign settings are ones where you can get a sense of the world easily, especially the sense of living in it. One of the problems I have running Council of Thieves was that there is very little about what life is like for the average Joe(vanni) on the street. Ok, shadow creatures are bad, devils are bad, it's bad to be under the thumb of Asmodeus, but how and why are they bad? Ok, the city's corrupt, but what does that mean to the people that live there? Why would the PCs want to change the status quo or why would they want to stay? There's a little of that in the Cheliax book and the Player's guide, but truthfully, it was the names that gave me the flavor to project city/nation. The Italian-Spanish-Eastern European-Russian flavor of the names let me dig into the decadence and the gothic/evil empire feel.

Customs can tell a lot about the attitudes of the people in the region, and give flavor to them as well. It gives a place for DMs to hook things to, and for players to imagine characters. Heck, even discussing the architecture is a big help!

You folks do such a great job of creating a rational, vivid world that grew out of its history, very much like the Greyhawk setting (not kludged together like the fun but unrealistic Realms). But, like Greyhawk, it's a little more alien (because of that wealth of detail), and harder to hook into quickly. I'd love to be able to 'feel' the world.


Makarnak wrote:

There's a little of that in the Cheliax book and the Player's guide, but truthfully, it was the names that gave me the flavor to project city/nation. The Italian-Spanish-Eastern European-Russian flavor of the names let me dig into the decadence and the gothic/evil empire feel.

Yes, but unfortunately not all names in Paizo modules give this "name" feeling. There are many generic fantasy names without cultural association in it. For example in Cheliax I would prefer a Julio, Giaccomo, Paolo or Giovanni to a Palaveen, Janiven or Aberian (the later names are actual names from the 1st book in CoT).

So in the books there is rather a mix of cultural inspired names (which I really like) and purely fantasy names. (which I am not keen about)


Enpeze wrote:
Makarnak wrote:

There's a little of that in the Cheliax book and the Player's guide, but truthfully, it was the names that gave me the flavor to project city/nation. The Italian-Spanish-Eastern European-Russian flavor of the names let me dig into the decadence and the gothic/evil empire feel.

Yes, but unfortunately not all names in Paizo modules give this "name" feeling. There are many generic fantasy names without cultural association in it. For example in Cheliax I would prefer a Julio, Giaccomo, Paolo or Giovanni to a Palaveen, Janiven or Aberian (the later names are actual names from the 1st book in CoT).

So in the books there is rather a mix of cultural inspired names (which I really like) and purely fantasy names. (which I am not keen about)

I mixed those up by giving them the associated pronunciation and hacking them up a bit:

Janiven Key: YAna fenKEY

Palaveen: pala-VE-en

Aberian I left pretty much the same, but I rolled the R, especially in his last name (and I emphasized the X, as in ar-VANX-ee). And so forth. At least they were fairly similar in flavor.

NPCs that I named, I tried to pick Russian or Italian names and then warp them: Pavo, Vigio, etc.

But I agree that not all of them are perfect. Of course, these cultures are really old, and with the blending of cultures, it would be easy for names to become 'bastardized' over the years. Still, it would be nice for the associated projects to tie into that, but it would probably be asking as much to have the PCs choose names that tie in.


Makarnak wrote:

NPCs that I named, I tried to pick Russian or Italian names and then warp them: Pavo, Vigio, etc.

But I agree that not all of them are perfect. Of course, these cultures are really old, and with the blending of cultures, it would be easy for names to become 'bastardized' over the years. Still, it would be nice for the associated projects to tie into that, but it would probably be asking as much to have the PCs choose names that tie in.

Interesting thought. Some could possibly be of Taldorian root with a little bit good will. But in truth I guess most of these "fantasy names" are just fast shots because the authors didnt spend the necessary time to look up for proper cultural names. Whatever, not that important. Its not very time consuming to rename all these Janivens or Palaveens to good old traditional Giovannas and Vigios.


The first campaign setting guide included a page each on each of the 11 base classes of the Pathfinder RPG (as pertains to the setting itself).

Will the new campaign setting guide not only include the information for the 11 base classes, but also information on the 6 new base classes that will be in the Advanced Player's Guide (as they pertain to the setting)??

Thanks for answering.

I really enjoyed the first book, & I'm looking forward to the updated book!

- C.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Psiphyre wrote:

The first campaign setting guide included a page each on each of the 11 base classes of the Pathfinder RPG (as pertains to the setting itself).

Will the new campaign setting guide not only include the information for the 11 base classes, but also information on the 6 new base classes that will be in the Advanced Player's Guide (as they pertain to the setting)??

There'll actually be LESS information about the classes, but we'll have information for all 11 core classes and all 6 base classes. The majority of the information given on pages 41–51 of the current hardcover is either repeated or "replaced" by information in the core rulebook or the Advanced Player's Guide. It's not a very efficient use of space to simply regurgitate the paragraphs about "what is a rogue" or "how a wizard works" in the campaign setting since that information is already presented in the core book or the APG.

What WILL be retained is the information in the "Favored Regions," though—a paragraph or so of information about each class's role on Golarion. We'll be providing that information for all 11 core classes, all 6 base classes, and as many prestige classes as we can... but there's a lot of other stuff we want to put in the book, and compressing the 11 pages of class info down to probably only 2 pages is a necessary compromise.


James Jacobs wrote:

There'll actually be LESS information about the classes, but we'll have information for all 11 core classes and all 6 base classes. The majority of the information given on pages 41–51 of the current hardcover is either repeated or "replaced" by information in the core rulebook or the Advanced Player's Guide. It's not a very efficient use of space to simply regurgitate the paragraphs about "what is a rogue" or "how a wizard works" in the campaign setting since that information is already presented in the core book or the APG.

What WILL be retained is the information in the "Favored Regions", though—a paragraph or so of information about each class's role on Golarion. We'll be providing that information for all 11 core classes, all 6 base classes, and as many prestige classes as we can... but there's a lot of other stuff we want to put in the book, and compressing the 11 pages of class info down to probably only 2 pages is a necessary compromise.

I'm fine with that - what I placed in bold from your reply above is what I was hoping would be in the book (at the very least), although at only two pages for all 17 base classes, does that mean that the variant class features specific to Golarion for each of the classes won't be included?

Thanks for answering. It's great to get replies from those who worked on the products! *(^_^)*

m(_ _)m

- C.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Psiphyre wrote:

I'm fine with that - what I placed in bold from your reply above is what I was hoping would be in the book (at the very least), although at only two pages for all 17 base classes, does that mean that the variant class features specific to Golarion for each of the classes won't be included?

The variant class features aren't really necessary anymore, since some of them are now part of the base game and others are going into the Advanced Player's Guide. In fact, SO many variant class rules are going into the APG that it'd be kind of overkill to do more in the revised hardcover.

Dark Archive

James Jacobs wrote:
The variant class features aren't really necessary anymore, since some of them are now part of the base game and others are going into the Advanced Player's Guide. In fact, SO many variant class rules are going into the APG that it'd be kind of overkill to do more in the revised hardcover.

A quick question about the variant class stuff. Is enough of it present that you could play a core class variant from it without the core book, or will you need both books? This might have been asked already. :-/


James Jacobs wrote:
BryonD wrote:

Will there be another poster map in this update?

(maybe with Region instead of "Reigon") :P

To be honest... fixing that hideous typo is priority #1. We came VERY CLOSE to canceling the book's initial release and missing a Gen Con launch to reprint the posters and replace them all in the entire print run... but that would have cost so much AND would have made us miss Gen Con that we had to basically just swallow our pride and release the book with a super embarrassing typo. Not my proudest moment, I can tell you that.

It's not a typo, it's artistic licence to provide flavour for the campaign setting.

Why swallow your pride when you can maintain plausible deniability?


James Jacobs wrote:
The variant class features aren't really necessary anymore, since some of them are now part of the base game and others are going into the Advanced Player's Guide. In fact, SO many variant class rules are going into the APG that it'd be kind of overkill to do more in the revised hardcover.

Understood (& since I was planning to get the Advanced Player's Guide anyway, I'm OK with it).

Thanks for answering.

- C.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

dm4hire wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
The variant class features aren't really necessary anymore, since some of them are now part of the base game and others are going into the Advanced Player's Guide. In fact, SO many variant class rules are going into the APG that it'd be kind of overkill to do more in the revised hardcover.
A quick question about the variant class stuff. Is enough of it present that you could play a core class variant from it without the core book, or will you need both books? This might have been asked already. :-/

You'll pretty much ALWAYS need the core book to make sense of any product we create. That's our base assumption.

But variant class stuff won't be in the World Guide at all. Again... all of that is being handled in the Advanced Player's Guide. In fact, I have that section of the book under my elbow right now... it's 76 pages long, so it should do the trick for any variants you want to use! :-)


James Jacobs wrote:

You'll pretty much ALWAYS need the core book to make sense of any product we create. That's our base assumption.

But variant class stuff won't be in the World Guide at all. Again... all of that is being handled in the Advanced Player's Guide. In fact, I have that section of the book under my elbow right now... it's 76 pages long, so it should do the trick for any variants you want to use! :-)

Please forward my copy to me ASAP for final proofreading.

And don't forget my bottle of Glenlivet as compensation for services rendered. :P


I'm curious as to whether Isgeri's Sisters of the Golden Erinyes will get an expansion compared to the original, and if one of the cooler martial arts, Hamatulatsu, is going to be included/updated? There's just something awesome with a martial art inspired by devils. :D

And let's be honest, there's not really any other martial arts specified/presented, atleast not mechanically, sadly (although, I don't know what the APG will include). Oh and a prestige class in which a monk would find pretty natural would be a nice addition in the future of the line.


James Jacobs wrote:
stuff

76..pages...off class variants..smiles.

Goodbye Complete xxxx series


gp


DM Wellard wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:
stuff

76..pages...off class variants..smiles.

Goodbye Complete xxxx series

+1 to that.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

hi jo wrote:

I'm curious as to whether Isgeri's Sisters of the Golden Erinyes will get an expansion compared to the original, and if one of the cooler martial arts, Hamatulatsu, is going to be included/updated? There's just something awesome with a martial art inspired by devils. :D

And let's be honest, there's not really any other martial arts specified/presented, atleast not mechanically, sadly (although, I don't know what the APG will include). Oh and a prestige class in which a monk would find pretty natural would be a nice addition in the future of the line.

Note that Isger is 2 pages long in the current book. The new book will have 4 pages for Isger. Expansion is guaranteed, and the Sisters of the Golden Erinyes are an interesting part of Isger... so chances are good, there!

As for feats... a lot of the feats in the original are either no longer really necessary/outdated or got picked up for inclusion in the Advanced Player's Guide. The World Guide will still have some new feats in it, but they'll be gathered on pages 284–289 or something like that rather than scattered throughout the book. I'm actually hoping to be able to create a web enhancement type thing (shudder) that'll take folks through, step by step, what changed between the 1st edition and this new edition of the book, which will help people track down where their favorite feat or class option or whatever can now be found.


Zaister wrote:

"World Guide: The Inner Sea" sounds like "More volumes forthcoming!"

Cool!

So what we are saying, is I am going to know more about the Inner Sea region than i do about Earth history :P ?


Does this product supersede or duplicate anything in the Chronicles or Companion series?

The Exchange

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber
William Edmunds wrote:
Does this product supersede or duplicate anything in the Chronicles or Companion series?

It will essentially supercede the 3.5 Campaign Setting hardcover from 2008.


William Edmunds wrote:
Does this product supersede or duplicate anything in the Chronicles or Companion series?

Maybe. Some of the history is being tightened up and clarified, I think. How much of that may have featured in chronicles and companions (particularly earlier ones) I'm not sure.

Looks around hopefuly for a Paizo editor...

Paizo Employee Creative Director

William Edmunds wrote:
Does this product supersede or duplicate anything in the Chronicles or Companion series?

Yes. It's effectively a reprint of the 256 page "Pathfinder Chronicles Campaign Setting" hardcover.

But that book was ITSELF a reprint, of the even earlier 64 page "Gazetteer" softcover book. It's a pretty good analogy to think of this new 320-page World Guide to the Inner Sea as being the next evolution in the line. It's going to have 64 more pages, but it's going to have MORE than 64 pages of new content, since many pages of the 256 page version are now out of date due to the fact that it was for an earlier edition of the game.

The 320 page version of the book coming out later this Fall/Winter is intended to be "ground zero" for all things Inner Sea. It's going to be the book WE use as a starting point and go-to point for the baseline information about the world. And since we have a MUCH clearer view of what we want Golarion to be now (thanks 2 or so years of experience with the world and access to a set of rules we control and know won't be going out of print anytime soon), I feel confident in saying it's going to be the definitive Golarion book.

It WILL duplicate a lot of material from the 256 page hardcover, since at one level it's a reprint of that book. It'll also duplicate material from a lot of other books, since we'll be bringing in more info from two additional years-worth of products. But it's also going to have a LOT of new content—at latest guess, about 40,000 brand new words and a LOT of new art.

For example: EVERY one of our 41 or so regions will have four pages of art and maps and text now, rather than only a few having 4 pages and most having 2 pages. And EVERY one of those regions will have a cool half-page opening illustration—some of which will be taken from other products in the case of places like Cheliax or Katapesh that have had a lot of attention over the last few years, and some of them (like the Land of the Linnorm Kings, Numeria, and Molthune) with a bunch of brand new art.


James Jacobs wrote:
The World Guide will still have some new feats in it, but they'll be gathered on pages 284–289 or something like that rather than scattered throughout the book.

Thank you!

I hope you do this in the future for other books too (it's pretty annoying trying to locate "feat X" when it could be anywhere in the book). Maybe except for books where it makes more sense to have the feats in separate areas, such as the 3.5 Lords of Madness book, but even for that book I thought they should have had a dedicated "feats" section.

Hmm.. I'll have to pester my local gaming shop for more Pathfinder products soon; Too many cool hardcovers coming out now to miss out on :)


James Jacobs wrote:


Yes. It's effectively a reprint of the 256 page "Pathfinder Chronicles Campaign Setting" hardcover.

The 320 page version of the book coming out later this Fall/Winter is intended to be "ground zero" for all things Inner Sea. It's going to be the book WE use as a starting point and go-to point for the baseline information about the world.

Okay, put another way: if I purchase "Guide to the River Kingdoms" and "Seekers of Secrets", will those be obsolete once the new 320 page book comes out?


William Edmunds wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:


Yes. It's effectively a reprint of the 256 page "Pathfinder Chronicles Campaign Setting" hardcover.

The 320 page version of the book coming out later this Fall/Winter is intended to be "ground zero" for all things Inner Sea. It's going to be the book WE use as a starting point and go-to point for the baseline information about the world.

Okay, put another way: if I purchase "Guide to the River Kingdoms" and "Seekers of Secrets", will those be obsolete once the new 320 page book comes out?

This book will give you a 4 page overview of the River kingdoms, with maybe some other references. And a page maybe on the pathfinder society.

Both of those books are 64 pages of content.

Short answer: Nope, definately not.

Dark Archive

William Edmunds wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:


Yes. It's effectively a reprint of the 256 page "Pathfinder Chronicles Campaign Setting" hardcover.

The 320 page version of the book coming out later this Fall/Winter is intended to be "ground zero" for all things Inner Sea. It's going to be the book WE use as a starting point and go-to point for the baseline information about the world.

Okay, put another way: if I purchase "Guide to the River Kingdoms" and "Seekers of Secrets", will those be obsolete once the new 320 page book comes out?

Nope the only thing that it will "replace" is the old campaign setting. Now the new book might borrow a bit from here and there of other books but it will far from replace them.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

William Edmunds wrote:
James Jacobs wrote:


Yes. It's effectively a reprint of the 256 page "Pathfinder Chronicles Campaign Setting" hardcover.

The 320 page version of the book coming out later this Fall/Winter is intended to be "ground zero" for all things Inner Sea. It's going to be the book WE use as a starting point and go-to point for the baseline information about the world.

Okay, put another way: if I purchase "Guide to the River Kingdoms" and "Seekers of Secrets", will those be obsolete once the new 320 page book comes out?

Absolutely not.

The 320 page hardcover will have about 4 pages devoted to the River Kingdoms (plus spot references scattered here and there that probably bring that total up to 5 pages). The "Guide to the River Kingdoms" has 64 pages.

The 320 page hardcover has 2 pages devoted to the Pathfinder Society (plus spot references scattered here and there that probably bring that total up to 4 pages). "Seekers of Secrets" has 64 pages.

The World Guide is big, but the whole reason we publish books like "Seekers of Secrets" or "Guide to the River Kingdoms" is that, no matter HOW big the core book is, it can only scratch the surface of any one specific element of the world.


James Jacobs wrote:
Sketchpad wrote:
Will it still have Prestige Classes like The Harrower? Or will that be in the APG?

At this point I'm thinking it'll have 4 prestige classes: the Harrower, the Red Mantis Assassin, the Hellknight (which is replacing the Pathfinder Chronicler, who moved to the core rules), and one more. Which may or may not be the Low Templar or the Lion Blade or something else.

Basically, I'm hoping to get the four most iconic Golarion prestige classes in there. I know what three are. Anyone want to nominate and support the fourth?

As long as it's got the Hellknight PrC I'll be happy.


gigglestick wrote:
samerandomhero wrote:

[puppy eyes]

May we still have the "fighter college" option? My fighters have so much more self esteem now that they have degrees from Korvosa State.
On a serious note, I really like the fighter education option. But I understand if you feel the need to send fighters back to G.E.D. status.
I LOVE the fighter college option (For those who dont have the 1st Campaign Guide, it basically allows you to drop the extra feat fighters get at first level to get 4 skill points/ level instead of 2/ level and it adds a few more class skills. It's a good tradeoff and allows you to build a fighter who can hold their own better in non-combat roleplaying situations. Great for Fighters without a lot of INT. And it encourages single-class roleplaying fighters...

I'll add in a vote of my own for this idea. I love the Fighter Colleges and what they can do for a fighter. It's a great idea and I hope it stays in the book.


KnightErrantJR wrote:
For what its worth, I do like the Low Templar, and if there isn't a book slated to update it if its scrubbed from the Campaign Setting, I'd be a little bummed. For what its worth.
Andrew Philips wrote:
+1 for Low Templar

And another vote from me for the Low Templar. That PrC just strikes me as very cool, possibly for the whole 'anti-hero or just plain villain?' vibe it has.


Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber
tbug wrote:
Does it advance the timeline?

I think Vic mentioned something about 1 game year for every 2 of ours or the other way around. Cant find the thread right now. I'll keep looking.

Hopefully it wont be like FR where it was stuck on DR1358 for like 10 years.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

Shivok wrote:
tbug wrote:
Does it advance the timeline?

I think Vic mentioned something about 1 game year for every 2 of ours or the other way around. Cant find the thread right now. I'll keep looking.

Hopefully it wont be like FR where it was stuck on DR1358 for like 10 years.

Nope; it's 1 year per real year. To get the current year in Golarion, just add 2700 to our current year.

But we're not planning on advancing the actual events in world anytime soon. We still assume that all our modules and adventures begin on the current day, even though that current day advances ever forward. In other words, we don't want to self-obsolete our products.

The Exchange

James Jacobs wrote:
Shivok wrote:
tbug wrote:
Does it advance the timeline?

I think Vic mentioned something about 1 game year for every 2 of ours or the other way around. Cant find the thread right now. I'll keep looking.

Hopefully it wont be like FR where it was stuck on DR1358 for like 10 years.

Nope; it's 1 year per real year. To get the current year in Golarion, just add 2700 to our current year.

But we're not planning on advancing the actual events in world anytime soon. We still assume that all our modules and adventures begin on the current day, even though that current day advances ever forward. In other words, we don't want to self-obsolete our products.

At some point doesn't that become unrealistic? e.g. The "current year" in the PFCCS is 4708. If nothing happens between '08 and '10 in the timeline, it would be a very uneventful world, wouldn't it?


Zeugma wrote:
At some point doesn't that become unrealistic? e.g. The "current year" in the PFCCS is 4708. If nothing happens between '08 and '10 in the timeline, it would be a very uneventful world, wouldn't it?

I see it as like James Bond movies (at least pre-reboot).

James Bond defeated Dr. No and Blofeld and Goldfinger and later on he saved the day in Golden Eye and Die Another Day. If you are watching Dr. No, then the details of Die Another Day are out of focus. It happened pretty much the same, only how it *would* have happened in the late 1960s. If you are watching Die Another Day, then Dr. No really happened in the mid 1990s and the "true" details are little different to match.

Kinda James Bond meets general relativity with some cool thrown in and that makes Golarion.

The Exchange

BryonD wrote:
Zeugma wrote:
At some point doesn't that become unrealistic? e.g. The "current year" in the PFCCS is 4708. If nothing happens between '08 and '10 in the timeline, it would be a very uneventful world, wouldn't it?

I see it as like James Bond movies (at least pre-reboot).

James Bond defeated Dr. No and Blofeld and Goldfinger and later on he saved the day in Golden Eye and Die Another Day. If you are watching Dr. No, then the details of Die Another Day are out of focus. It happened pretty much the same, only how it *would* have happened in the late 1960s. If you are watching Die Another Day, then Dr. No really happened in the mid 1990s and the "true" details are little different to match.

Kinda James Bond meets general relativity with some cool thrown in and that makes Golarion.

But isn't that just pushing the timeline's events forward, like some kind of kinetic energy transfer? (or a car wreck where the rear car sustains little damage but the car in front is compressed like an accordion?)

I don't see how the events can be "moved ahead" like in Die Another Day - maybe for the modules and adventure paths, but not the major events of Golarion (uninfluenced by the PCs actions). Somehow, in later campaign setting books, the Paizo team is going to have to "add in" stuff to happen between '08 and year X, or else places like Casmaron and Tian Xia aren't going to have a "current events" section of the timeline at all. And even if interesting things are happening in Casmaron in the Year X, that period in the Inner Sea has been uneventful.

Shadow Lodge

To use another analogy, think of it as being like Marvel's flexible timeline. When Flash Thompson first left New York to join the Army, he then went on to fight in the Vietnam War. But current continuity holds that it was the Gulf War, because they don't want all their popular characters to be based out of a retirement home.

The Exchange

That's just pushing one character's timeline forward. Moving up Golarion's events would be like Flash staying the same but having the Vietnam War in the 1990s.


Zeugma wrote:
That's just pushing one character's timeline forward. Moving up Golarion's events would be like Flash staying the same but having the Vietnam War in the 1990s.

Right now we are talking a couple years. Nothing remotely on the order of moving the Vietnam War into the 1990s is on the table.

If they are still developing Golarion stuff 15 years from now, then they will probably need to bite the bullet and declare that the "old stuff" is truly in the past.

That would be an awesome problem to have.

I don't see an issue.

The Exchange

But we're talking about entire continents here, not one country. Nothing interesting happening in one country for 3 years isn't a big deal. Nothing interesting happening on a quarter of the planet for 3 years is.

I'm okay with it, it's not really an "issue". But it isn't realistic, so if I were running a game where my players cared about verisimilitude, I'd have something happen. Not neccessarily where they're adventuring, but at least SOMETHING would happen. Maybe a truce in the Molthune war, maybe an expansion of the Worldwound, etc.

Dark Archive

I suppose that part of the "time continuity" problem lies in transfer from 3.5 to Pathfinder. Current events in published material happen at the same time, but at different locations on Golarion. So, new campaign setting book just collects and updates that information. I suppose that the timeline will be advanced in five year or so with another hard cover, but by then there will be new info on places like Cheliax, Varisia etc.

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