The Genius Guide to the Templar (PFRPG) PDF

****( ) (based on 4 ratings)

Our Price: $3.99

Add to Cart
Facebook Twitter Email

The templar is a divine warrior—an agent and crusader for his god and (possibly) his church. Most are champions of a religious order, using their faith to gird them against the plots of heretics, infidels, and pagans. Others are devoted to a specific holy duty, perhaps one that has been entrusted to their family for generations. Although clerics are servants of their gods and paladins, in different lands they might be called bannerets, champions, gallants, kirks, or warders.

Although different templars express their powers of faith in different ways, they all share the ability to drive themselves further because of this faith. Some of the powers they gain through their unflinching faith are extensions of their normal talents, while others are mystic powers not unlike the divine gifts of clerics and paladins.

The personality and training of a templar is influenced by the dogma to which he subscribes. Those who ascribe to a religion with requirements for charity, chastity, and truthfulness might seem saintlike, while those who worship a care-free earth mother might appear far less chaste and knightlike. Templars conform closely to their faith’s ideal, making them stereotypical examples of their culture. Some make no effort for such conformity, however, becoming brooders who do their duty grimly, even when in service to gods of love and joy. Often templars of this kind see themselves as buffers who do the unpleasant tasks required by their position so others need not take on such burdens.

Templars do well as primary front-line melee combatants. Although they lack the rage of barbarians or the broad range of combat skills of fighters, templars’ powers of conviction compensate well for these lacks. They can function anywhere a fighter could, and might aid party members in ways a fighter cannot. A templar traveling with a cleric of the same faith might well see himself as the cleric’s guardian, though templars of warrior gods are just as likely to stand aside in combat, to allow the cleric to prove worthiness of their martial deities’ respect.

Templar vs. Paladin

So, what’s the difference between a templar and a paladin? It’s twofold, and the first is easy to explain. Although a paladin is an exemplar of the forces of good and law, a templar is an agent of divine will closer in scope and concept to a cleric. Any god can have templars, and chaotic good, true neutral, and even lawful evil templars are just as common (possibly even more so) as lawful good examples of the class. The grim warlord who conquers cities for the god of war, the battlefield hospitaller who escorts healers for the god of healing, and the insane pyromaniac determined to burn the world for the god of madness and fire are all examples of templars, though none could possibly qualify as paladins.

That naturally leads to asking what the crucial difference between a paladin and a lawful good templar is, which touches on the second major difference between the two classes. Put simply, templars are not held to the same standards as paladins, by either their order or their gods. Paladins must follow a strict code of conduct. This code is not just a requirement of their order, it’s a crucial part of how they gain their power. No matter how reasonable or forgivable a paladin’s violation of this code might be, it results in a loss of divine power until the paladin atones. If a paladin uses poison to destroy a great evil, even if no other option seemed to exist and the evil had to be destroyed, that paladin loses her divine powers until she atones. A paladin is not even required to worship a god (or similar philosophic concept) as a cleric is. It seems reasonable then to say that it’s not a god that gives a paladin her power, it’s the dedication to order and righteousness required of a paladin, and this is why there is no such thing as paladins of other alignments. Only a lawful good character can remain so purely dedicated to a specific set of rules as to gain supernatural power from doing so.

Product Availability

Fulfilled immediately.

Are there errors or omissions in this product information? Got corrections? Let us know at store@paizo.com.

PZOPDFRGGOWC5076E


See Also:

Average product rating:

****( ) (based on 4 ratings)

Sign in to create or edit a product review.

*****

I really like this class.

It's a divine champion, but tied to a god instead of to an alignment. I haven't seen it in play yet, but it looks to be alot of fun.

I don't care for paladins as an iconic very much, and I can see myself replacing paladins with these guys entirely in my future games.


Ok general holy warrior class

***( )( )

This pdf is 12 pages long, 2/3 of a page front cover, 1 page SRD and credits, leaving 10 1/3 pages of content for the Templar, so let’s check out what the class is all about.

After a brief discussion on the nature of Templars and e.g. Paladins, we are introduced to the class. What are Templars, you ask? Well, they are warriors of a given faith, not necessarily a good or even lawful one, but just any kind of faith and are not beholden to as high moral standards as Paladins. Think of them as the clerics of fighters – devout, yes, but they don’t necessarily have to adhere to a strict moral code. All the people who don’t like codices can take deep breath now. ;)

On to the class: The Templar gets a whopping d12, full BAB, a good fort-save, 4+Int skills per level. The defining two class features of a Templar, though, are the order and faithful talents. The order of a templar usually is determined at character creation – one order per domain a deity has access to.

Each order grants a Templar access to either a bonus skill that becomes a class-skill for the Templar or a bonus feat as well as an order-related special ability that ranges from healing touch to the ability to strengthening certain structures they defend. 34 orders are presented (unless I miscounted) and at higher levels Templars get access to more orders of their deity, learn domain spells associated with their order(s) or get ranger-like foes of certain kinds of unfaithful.

The 10 faithful talents Templars can choose from can be divided in two categories –rather straightforward ones (e.g. proficiency in tower shields and heavy armor) and mantras, of which only one can be active at a given time. Mantras grant minor bonuses or make the Templar immune to e.g. fear while reciting them.

The pdf closes with 3 feats, one to improve domain-usage, access to a domain aligned with your order or the ability to use two mantras at once.

Conclusion:

Editing is top-notch, I didn’t notice any glitch. There’s a formatting error, though, a line that misses a break. Layout adheres to the full-color, 3-column standard. There are no bookmarks here. I bought this book and thought: Hell yeah, holy warriors for everyone! *puts2 bucks into the bad pun jar* Ähem. The mechanic execution of the Templar base-class is a concise and precise as you have come to expect from SGG – however, I nevertheless couldn’t shake a distinct feeling of lack after reading it and thinking long and hard, I’ve come to realize which components of this class actually bug me: The first one would be that the assortment of faithful talents is rather small and their execution lackluster and not too exciting when e.g. compared to shadow assassin, war master, witch hunter etc. The second one would be the orders. While I’m wholly aware that support for all domains would be too much to ask, I would have loved for the concept of subdomains or other domains to at least get some guidelines to design them myself. Furthermore, the domains just feel bland in their presentation and predictable in most of the abilities they grant. When compared to e.g. the domains in Secrets of the Divine Channeler, another domain-centric class, the Templar falls short not due to length, but due to the sheer fact that a bit of fluff here and there, at least some short sentence, can go a long way. Giving Templars of the destruction order the weapon quality “vicious” for their strikes does not constitute an exciting ability in my book. All in all, it’s a well-executed class that somehow, ironically lacks soul – fluff could possibly have made this an excellent book – as written, it’s average and my final verdict will be 3.5 stars, rounded down to 3 for the purpose of this platform.

Endzeitgeist out.


What I was looking for.

****( )

The templar fills a niche for holy warriors that are not necessarily paladins. Personally, I see it replacing paladins in my campaigns.

First off, the templar is a strong, well balanced, warrior class designed to give any church/temple an order of defenders. The various match domains, so it would be pretty straight forward to make a new order for a new domain, should you need to for your campaign. The class features, as a whole, seem to emulate what a faith based fighting class should be. They are resolute in their dedication to their faith. Overall, any problems I have is more along the lines of, I'm not sure I would have done it this way." I still find it very well balanced & worthy of inclusion in just about any campaign.


Nice option in place of a Paladin

****( )

The Templar by Super Genius Games

This product is 12 pages long. It starts with a cover and introduction (1 pages)

Next it gets into the differences between a Templar and Paladin. Which in short is, a Paladin upholds a set of ideal's and virtues, namely that of Law and Good and follow a strict code of conduct. Templars are merely the martial arm of the church, sure they are religious by the do what they must for the church. Meaning a templar can do things a Paladin couldn't for the greater good, there moral code is a lot more gray than the black and white paladin code. Plus they can be of any alignment and worship any god. There is of course mechanical differences as well. (9 ½ pages)

Templar – D12, 4 skills, full BaB, all weapons, light/medium armor, all shields but tower.
Templar Order – Each domain has a order assigned to it, each one grants a class skill and one power.
Faithful Talent – Works like rogue talents but all divine in nature.
Temple Bond – They have 3 choices, gain a new order, able to cast some domain spells, or gain a bonus to some skills and combat against a alignment opposed to her god.
Curse Resistance – bonus to saves against curses.
Resolute – can partially ignore command spells and powers each round.
Master Templar – gains another order and it does not need match a domain of her god, can also grant allies divine powers.

Feats (½ page)
There is 3 new feats. One can be used by clerics as well the other two just enhance aspects of the templar.

It ends with a OGL. (1 page)

Closing thoughts. The templar is a interesting class, it is a divine warrior that is more interested in doing what they believe to be their gods wishes than being a shining example of their gods beliefs. So they will do things their gods don't approve of, if they believe it is in the best interest of their god. I am sure some players that like the idea of paladins but hate how strict their code is, will like playing these. I on the other hand think they will make great NPC's. I have already thought of a great villain who works for a good god, but does questionable things, a villain that believes they are doing the right thing.

The art is a mixed bag, some is meh, some is good, some color, some B&W. Editing and layout are top notch. My only real critic is while I like the class, I wish a few things had been done differently. Namely I wish the orders had been expanded and played a much larger part in the templar than they had, plus I would have liked the orders to have been disconnected from the domains. Yes I know that would be treading on the toes of the cavalier then, but not to much if they had all been divine orders. In fact that is kinda what I was hoping for. More of a divine inspired cavalier. The orders they have is ok, but I would have rather the name had been changed to something like divine focus and left in. Anyways all and all it is a good class, just not exactly what I was hoping for. So I am giving this a 4 star, the class is good but I felt could have been better.


1 to 50 of 70 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | next > last >>
Paizo Employee Starfinder Design Lead

Not every divine warrior is a paladin, and they certainly aren't all lawful good! The Genius Guide to the Templar introduces a new base class, the templar, who can serve as temple guardian, holy knight, or divine enforcer of the church. The templar draws power from his god and faith, but templars can worship death and madness as easily as law and good.

Come take a look at who else fights with sword and holy symbol!

Dark Archive

You just won't leave my poor bank account alone will you?

Paizo Employee Starfinder Design Lead

Dark_Mistress wrote:
You just won't leave my poor bank account alone will you?

Absolutely not!

Dark Archive

bought!!


I have to stop checking this bloody website for new products!!!!!

Dark Archive

DungeonmasterCal wrote:
I have to stop checking this bloody website for new products!!!!!

If you did that, how would you spend all your money?


Dark_Mistress wrote:
DungeonmasterCal wrote:
I have to stop checking this bloody website for new products!!!!!
If you did that, how would you spend all your money?

If he has kids like me, that's a done deal. Fortunately I manage to find the money for my obsess-- er hobby too :)

Bought this, have my own "Templar" class, we'll see how they match up...


Pathfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I... I think I want this.

And @ DM... I know your query wasn't for me ... but it got me thinking... if I didn't buy Paizo's Pathfinder game books, and 3pp's books/PDFs that are PF compatible... I don't know what I'd spend my money on. (Comics books... likely... probably more of the DCU would be on my shelves). :)

And probably action figures of DCU characters... cuz they're cool. :)


So, I have to ask, how does this compare to the Holy Vindicator APG Prestige class? I always assumed they were the most Templar-ish class available.


I'm weak. I just bought it. I love it. I can't let my current paladin-player see this. Ever...lol

Paizo Employee Starfinder Design Lead

DungeonmasterCal wrote:
I'm weak. I just bought it. I love it. I can't let my current paladin-player see this. Ever...lol

*Sure* you can. Just make the player buy his own copy, and... actually my plan stops at that point. :)

I'm glad people are enjoying this one.


I will have to get this soon. Was thinking of making a Templar class for my homebrew I am working on & here you go & save me the trouble.

Sczarni

Question, how does this compare to the Justicar Inquisitor variant you guys put out a couple weeks ago? I ask because that seemed like a solid take on a non paladin holy warrior. is this closer to the paladin concept wise and mechanically?

Paizo Employee Starfinder Design Lead

Frerezar wrote:
Question, how does this compare to the Justicar Inquisitor variant you guys put out a couple weeks ago?

That's an entirely fair question. In fact, I was working on my Justicar as a non-spellcasting any-alignment paladin when it morphed into the version in AO: Inquisitors' Judgments. The Templar was a second run at the same idea, using things that no longer fit in the Justicar.

So, the Justicar is a fine divine warrior, but is built almost entirely around judgments. That's cool, but it is very much not everyone's cup of tea. Like the inquisitor, what god a justicar worships has little to no affect on his powers. And the Justicar has no spellcasting options.

The Templar is a custom-built holy warrior, with some powers (temple bonds) tied to domains granted by their deity. And if a templar *wishes* to, he can pick up modest spellcasting ability (more than a rogue using the minor and major magic talents, less than a ranger or paladin, though he could theoretically end up with two 6th level spells/day), though a templar works just fine without ever taking the spellcaster option.

Put another way, the Justicar is built off the inquisitor, while the Templar is built off the cleric, while explicitly making them something other than a paladin with different kinds of smite and mercy.


If one was inclined to not have paladins in a campaign, would the Templars be reasonable substitutes in that role?

Paizo Employee Starfinder Design Lead

xorial wrote:
If one was inclined to not have paladins in a campaign, would the Templars be reasonable substitutes in that role?

I certainly think so! I designed them to be able to do exactly that. But I am, clearly, biased. :)


Owen K. C. Stephens wrote:
xorial wrote:
If one was inclined to not have paladins in a campaign, would the Templars be reasonable substitutes in that role?
I certainly think so! I designed them to be able to do exactly that. But I am, clearly, biased. :)

Good to know, since that would be what I wanted them to do.


Pathfinder Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
xorial wrote:
I will have to get this soon. Was thinking of making a Templar class for my homebrew I am working on & here you go & save me the trouble.

You have no idea how many times they've done that to me too. I've been thinknig 'gunslinger' real hard at owen for weeks now in hopes that I wont have to put the final spit and polish on my version of that as well. We'll see if it pays off.

Paizo Employee Starfinder Design Lead

Kolokotroni wrote:
xorial wrote:
I will have to get this soon. Was thinking of making a Templar class for my homebrew I am working on & here you go & save me the trouble.
You have no idea how many times they've done that to me too. I've been thinknig 'gunslinger' real hard at owen for weeks now in hopes that I wont have to put the final spit and polish on my version of that as well. We'll see if it pays off.

You know, I suddenly had this idea...


Owen K. C. Stephens wrote:
Kolokotroni wrote:
xorial wrote:
I will have to get this soon. Was thinking of making a Templar class for my homebrew I am working on & here you go & save me the trouble.
You have no idea how many times they've done that to me too. I've been thinknig 'gunslinger' real hard at owen for weeks now in hopes that I wont have to put the final spit and polish on my version of that as well. We'll see if it pays off.
You know, I suddenly had this idea...

Was it about pizza? I really was thinking about some pizza. :P

Oh!I have bought this & will review it soon. So far looking GREAT!!

Silver Crusade

H......this looks very interesting. Heck, it's only a few bucks.

Paizo Employee Starfinder Design Lead

Iron Sentinel wrote:
Heck, it's only a few bucks.

Our business plan strikes again!


Owen K. C. Stephens wrote:
Iron Sentinel wrote:
Heck, it's only a few bucks.
Our business plan strikes again!

You could start a new line called "Evil Genius Games"

Mwahahahaha!

Bought


Realmwalker wrote:
Owen K. C. Stephens wrote:
Iron Sentinel wrote:
Heck, it's only a few bucks.
Our business plan strikes again!

You could start a new line called "Evil Genius Games"

Mwahahahaha!

Bought

Just finished reading this and it is very well done.

Between this and the Justicar i have all kinds of interesting plans about a city controlled by the followers of their local deity. The Adept Godling as well... :)

I'm always impressed with the work you do my game world has evolved greatly.

Paizo Employee Starfinder Design Lead

Realmwalker wrote:
Just finished reading this and it is very well done.

I'm sincerely glad you like it!

Realmwalker wrote:
Between this and the Justicar i have all kinds of interesting plans about a city controlled by the followers of their local deity. The Adept Godling as well... :)

One of the things we do strive for is for all SGG material to work well together, and I'm always thrilled to hear about player's plans to use multiple things of ours at once. I was particularly aware of potential overlap when working on the justicar and templar, and it's nice to see the extra effort to make them stand apart has paid off for someone. :)

Realmwalker wrote:
I'm always impressed with the work you do my game world has evolved greatly.

Thanks for the kind words, and I'm glad we added something to your game!


I am now a contributing reviewer at the well-known site Robot Viking. My intro is here: http://www.robotviking.com/2011/01/03/introducing-robot-vikings-new-grrrl-o f-mystery/

And my first review is for the Templar, here: http://www.robotviking.com/2011/01/03/genius-guide-to-templars-bridges-the- gap-between-paladin-and-cleric/

And I have many more Pathfinder-compatible reviews planned for the year!


Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Congratulations on the reviewing gig DG! I've been reviewing RPG materials for several years now, and I've had a great time doing it - hopefully you'll have the same level of fun.

Dark Archive

Dungeon Grrrl wrote:

I am now a contributing reviewer at the well-known site Robot Viking. My intro is here:

And my first review is for the Templar, here:

And I have many more Pathfinder-compatible reviews planned for the year!

Fixed the links for you.

Scarab Sages

A bit OT, sorry...

Any chance that the GG stuff will be made available for use with Hero Labs? I (and my group, about 8 of us) love HL, and we want to run a Godlings game (Using a Norse setting, the Godlings are sons of Asgardians, in the time leading up to Ragnorok).
Anyways, it would be great of the Godling/other Classes that you folks have made we add-ons.

-Uriel

Paizo Employee Starfinder Design Lead

Uriel393 wrote:
A bit OT, sorry...

It's about us. Good enough!

Uriel393 wrote:
Any chance that the GG stuff will be made available for use with Hero Labs? I (and my group, about 8 of us) love HL, and we want to run a Godlings game (Using a Norse setting, the Godlings are sons of Asgardians, in the time leading up to Ragnorok).

First, that game sounds awesome! I hope you do it.

I use HL myself, and I'd love to have all our classes (at least) entered as options. SGG has been looking into this, but so far we haven't found an economic way to make that happen. We're still working on it, and I'll let everyone know if we make any progress.

Scarab Sages

Owen K. C. Stephens wrote:
Uriel393 wrote:
A bit OT, sorry...

It's about us. Good enough!

Uriel393 wrote:
Any chance that the GG stuff will be made available for use with Hero Labs? I (and my group, about 8 of us) love HL, and we want to run a Godlings game (Using a Norse setting, the Godlings are sons of Asgardians, in the time leading up to Ragnorok).

First, that game sounds awesome! I hope you do it.

I use HL myself, and I'd love to have all our classes (at least) entered as options. SGG has been looking into this, but so far we haven't found an economic way to make that happen. We're still working on it, and I'll let everyone know if we make any progress.

Thanks for the reply. I am looking at one each of the 4 Godlings, to try them out. Not sure if I am going to start at Lvl 1, since that wouldn't let them take on the baddies of Norse Legend. Frost Giants at Lvl 1? Er...

One player is rally into Thor, another Loki...I was thinking of having their mother the same, half brothers, mimiking their father's on/off enmity/friendship, as per the myths. I haven't decided on the 3rd and 4th players, but I know a girl who mentioned Freya's daughter sounded fun.

-Uriel


This question stems from a post I started on another subject, but thought it would be more appropriate to ask here.

Aside from game mechanics, how is an Inquisitor (particularly a Justicar) and a Templar that much different from each other? They seem to follow very similar ideals in achieving their (or their church's) goals.


If I had waited a couple of days I would have saved $.75. ARRRGGGGGGGHHHHH

Not really worried, lol.

Paizo Employee Starfinder Design Lead

DungeonmasterCal wrote:
Aside from game mechanics, how is an Inquisitor (particularly a Justicar) and a Templar that much different from each other? They seem to follow very similar ideals in achieving their (or their church's) goals.

The justicar is the fighting version of the inquisitor, and thus serve much the same role. Indeed, if the justicar hasn't specifically said otherwise, you use the rules for the inquisitor. A justicar is the remorseless hunter of a god, an agent who seeks out and deals with the god's foes whether the church (or some extent his god) likes it or not. Many do work with their church, though they may be seen as largely above the church's (or at least common priest's) rules. The power of the justicar comes from a powerful sense of religious duty, aligned with the general philosophy of his god, combined with the direct granting of power from a god. This power is the justicar's to do with as he pleases, so long as he remains dutiful to his deity, even if his own deity might disapprove of his methods.

Why is that my interpretation? Look at how an inquisitor (and thus a justicar) loses her class powers. It comes from either A: taking on a prohibited alignment (changing to be so different from the power-granting deity that the powers are no longer accessible to the inquisitor) or slipping into corruption. Corruption being the opposite of duty, it is this, and not taking some act forbidden by her deity, that strips an inquisitor of her sacred trust.

Compare this to what causes a cleric (and templar) to lose power, a gross violation of the code of conduct required by her god. Note that gods don't appear to care what alignment a cleric is after 1st level, as long as the cleric obeys the rules of the god. On the other hand, an inquisitor doesn't lose power for gross violations of a god's code of conduct, but does lose for changing alignment.

So inquisitors/justicars must be of the right moral character to be trusted by their gods, and driven to avoid corruption (which equals a dereliction of duty), but are not held to a specific standard of behavior. Clerics/templars may drift from the proper moral character, as long as they never violate the conduct required of their position.

Paladins aren't even agents of a specific god, though some may choose to serve as such, instead being embodiments of all that is beneficent and orderly. They are held to a higher standard than any other divine agent, and granted extraordinary powers as a result of the narrow path they must tread. (For more on my take on paladins, see the Genius Guide to the Templar, which discuses the differences between paladins and lawful good templars).

To recap:

Inquisitor/Justicar: Duty bound ‘divine black ops,' allowed to act outside the normal constraints of other worshipers to ensure things get done.
Cleric/Templar: Agent of god and church, granted power in return for performing needful duties, and required to act as an example of the god's will. ‘Rank-and-file sacred troops.'
Paladin: Paragon of law and good, whose powers don't even come from a specific deity, but from embodying a perfect conception of organized virtue. ‘Holy special forces.'


Owen K. C. Stephens wrote:

Inquisitor/Justicar: Duty bound ‘divine black ops,' allowed to act outside the normal constraints of other worshipers to ensure things get done.

Cleric/Templar: Agent of god and church, granted power in return for performing needful duties, and required to act as an example of the god's will. ‘Rank-and-file sacred troops.'
Paladin: Paragon of law and good, whose powers don't even come from a specific deity, but from embodying a perfect conception of organized virtue. ‘Holy special forces.'

I just now read your reply. Thank you for breaking these down the way you did. Just another reason I like SGG so much!

Paizo Employee Starfinder Design Lead

DungeonmasterCal wrote:
I just now read your reply. Thank you for breaking these down the way you did. Just another reason I like SGG so much!

You are most welcome. Of course all such breakdowns are subject to campaign-specific changes. I got an email from a gamer recently who runs a game where there is 1, total, paladin alive at any given time in the whole campaign world. And you get to be an anti-paladin by killing a paladin. So templars, good and evil, now reside in the "normal warriors for good and evil" slots of his game, while the lone paladin is hunted by evil templars and inquisitors who wish to become anti-paladins.

Not the way I presented things, but extremely cool, nonetheless.


Owen K. C. Stephens wrote:
Not the way I presented things, but extremely cool, nonetheless.

That IS cool.


No rest from the wicked! It's like Highlander. There can only be one!

*head chop*

Dark Archive

reviewed.

Paizo Employee Starfinder Design Lead

Dark_Mistress wrote:
reviewed.

Many thanks!


Hi,

First thing, thanks for this great job about Templar.

Then, well, one question...

A Templar who choose Healing and Good as Templar Oders earns Heal and Sense motive as a bonus skill. But, it seems that this 2 skills are already Class skills for Templar.

Am i missing something ?

Thanks.

Paizo Employee Starfinder Design Lead

Shuby wrote:

Hi,

First thing, thanks for this great job about Templar.

I'm glad you like it!

Shuby wrote:

Then, well, one question...

A Templar who choose Healing and Good as Templar Oders earns Heal and Sense motive as a bonus skill. But, it seems that this 2 skills are already Class skills for Templar.

Am i missing something ?

Nope! That's my mistake, and it comes from making too many changes towards the end of the development/playtest option.

Change the bonus for Good domain to Skill Focus (Sense Motive), and the bonus for the Healing Order to Self-Sufficient.

While I'm at it, if you pick up an additional order that gives you one or more class skills you already have from another order, chose *one* other skill to become a class skill.

I'll add those notes on the next revision of the PDF.


Ok, thanks


I didn't see it in my copy or in the favored class option pdf. What are the favored options for the templar?

Paizo Employee Starfinder Design Lead

Templar came out after the last favored class PDF. When we do the next favored class PDF, we'll include the templar, and all the other SGG and Paizo classes that have come out since.


Ok, I'll get it when it arrives. Thanks.


Owen K. C. Stephens wrote:


I'll add those notes on the next revision of the PDF.

Has this revision been released ?

Paizo Employee Starfinder Design Lead

Shuby wrote:
Owen K. C. Stephens wrote:


I'll add those notes on the next revision of the PDF.
Has this revision been released ?

No. When it is, everyone who has already bought the PDF will have access to it for free. :)


Reviewed here and sent to GMS magazine. Cheers!

Dark Archive

Nice review End.

1 to 50 of 70 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | next > last >>
Community / Forums / Paizo / Product Discussion / The Genius Guide to the Templar (PFRPG) PDF All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.