Pathfinder Chronicles: City of Strangers (PFRPG)

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Pathfinder Chronicles: City of Strangers (PFRPG)
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In the outcast city of Kaer Maga, your business is your own, and no ware is too dangerous or taboo to find a buyer. Within the walls of the ancient, ruined fortress, refugees and criminals from every nation disappear into the swirling crowds of gangs and monsters. Here leech-covered bloatmages haggle with religious zealots who sew their own lips shut, while naga crime lords squeeze self-mutilating troll prophets for protection money. And these are just the city’s anarchic residents, not the fearsome beasts barely contained in the mysterious dungeons beneath the streets, held at bay by the elite rangers known as the Duskwardens. Welcome to the City of Strangers, a haven of freedom and independence—assuming you survive.

    Inside this book, you’ll find:
  • Detailed gazetteers for all 11 of the city’s districts, from the fabled Balconies of Bis to the necromantic paradise of Ankar-Te.
  • A history of the city and the bizarre, ruined monument that houses it.
  • Thorough briefings on the most important gangs and factions within the city, such as the golem-crafting Ardoc family and the abolitionist Freemen, as well as how they interact with each other.
  • The bloatmage prestige class, in which spellcasters use their own blood to empower their spells—but at a terrible price.
  • Statistics for the caulborn, a mysterious new race of telepathic, memory-eating monsters.
  • A layer-by-layer guide to the dungeons beneath the city, and the echoes of lost races and magic that still guard them.
  • New magic items, random encounter tables, and more.

City of Strangers is intended for use with the Pathfinder Chronicles campaign setting and the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game, but can easily be used in any fantasy game system or setting.

by James L. Sutter

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-248-7

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Lost Omens Subscription.

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Simply the Best

5/5

Sometimes it's good to be direct: City of Strangers is the best book I've read so far in the Pathfinder Campaign Setting line. Written by James L. Sutter, it's all about Kaer Maga, a city in Varisia inhabited by outcasts from a hundred lands somehow finding a way to live together in the crumbling remains of an ancient walled fortification. A city of outlaws and slavers with an "anything goes" mentality and no central government, there's also a strong current of individuality and freedom that makes the place far more interesting than a generic hive of cut-purses. Kaer Maga itself has a fascinating history and ethos, but what really sets this book apart is the writing: it's frankly fantastic. It's colourful, laugh-out-loud funny in some places, squirm-inducing in others. There are few RPG books that are "page-turners", but this is one of them. Indeed, the book, one of the earlier ones in the line, is almost 90% descriptive flavour with very little rules crunch, which is sometimes a turn-off for me: but here, I didn't miss it. I want a full adventure path centered around Kaer Maga just so I can use this book more.

Weighing in at 64 full-colour pages, the book has one of my favourite pieces of artwork to grace a Pathfinder book: the Iconic rogue Merisiel in battle against a Bloatmage. This art is reproduced as the inside-back cover, while the inside-front cover is a really good map of Kaer Maga that shows several notable locations while making the geography of the walled city quite clear. The interior of the book is divided into seven sections.

The first section (four pages) is the Introduction. It provides a brief history of the city, much of which will get expanded upon in later sections of the book, but the way the city is related to ancient Thassilon and the Runelords made it especially interesting for someone (like me) who is involved in the Rise of the Runelords adventure path. Next, the section has an overview of the various districts of the city. Unlike some Golarion cities, each of these districts has a very distinct "feel" and they don't seem repetitive. Last, there's the expanded settlement stat block for the city.

Section two, "The City", makes up the bulk of the first half of the book, weighing in at 24 pages. As you would expect, each district gets a more detailed write-up. There's Ankar-Te where undead servants openly walk the streets. The Bottoms is a district of craftsmen and day laborers firmly committed to democratic decision-making. Cavalcade is the industrial heart of the city, but one of its notable features is the Augur Temple: reclusive troll seers! The city's wealthiest residents live in Highside Stacks, and this district contains one of the most important libraries in Varisia: the Therassic Spire. Hospice is a district catering to visitors, and is full of inns, brothels, theatres, and taverns. There's a brewing antagonism between brothel owners in the district that could have surprisingly large repercussions! Oriat is something of a war-zone between clashing sects of a monastic order, but it also contains the Lyceum, a bardic college. Tarheel Promenade is the district where both divine and arcane spellcasters are likely to want to visit, as it's filled with temples, magic shops, and the like. The description makes it clear that some sort of shrine to every deity, large or small, can be found somewhere in the city. The Warren is where the city's poorest live, while Widdershins is best thought of as a "gated community" bought-up by the upper middle-class. I haven't done justice to the flavour and detail that litter these descriptions of the districts, but it will have to suffice to say that there's a lot for a GM to work with and PCs will never leave thinking Kaer Maga was "just another city." I also appreciate the little sidebars in the section, such as "City Adventure Hooks" and "Seen on a Street Corner."

Section three, "The People", is 18 pages long. The first couple of pages explain how each of the core classes and races fit into Kaer Maga. Photocopying these pages for players in a Kaer Maga-focused campaign wouldn't be a bad idea. Kaer Maga really is a city of outcasts, and, unlike most "civilized" cities, no one's going to bat an eye if an orc, tiefling, or ogre enters the city. Several paragraphs each cover the city's government (accurately described as "anarcho-capitalist") and foreign relations. A section on religion provides a little info on how some of the core deities are perceived. Abadar and Asmodeus are the most prevalent faiths in Kaer Maga, but some others receive their due; on the other hand, the "crusading" faiths of Sarerae and Iomedae don't receive a warm reaction. Last, twelve different factions in the city receive several paragraphs each of description. The groups that really stood out to me were the Augurs (the troll prophets I spoke about above), the Bloatmages (more on them below), the Duskwardens (urban rangers that keep the city safe from the threats that lay below), and the Iridian Fold (a positive representation of same-sex male couples, which is much appreciated in RPGs!). These factions, and their tensions, offer plenty of opportunity for drama and adventure in Kaer Maga.

Section four, "Beneath Kaer Maga" (11 pages) dives into the variety of threats laying under the city, which, in class gaming fashion, get more and more dangerous and mysterious the deeper down you go. What sets this chapter apart from most is how well-crafted the history and story of Kaer Maga is. Kaer Maga predates even ancient Thassilon, but during the age of the Runelords, the city served as a prison for Runelord Karzoug. What lays beneath Kaer Maga is not generic subterranean monster caverns, but things far stranger and truly unique from the prison period and before. I especially liked the map on page 52; it's useful but also looks exactly like something that could have been created in that setting. This section, of course, only gives overviews of what PCs are likely to run into beneath the city, and a GM would still need to develop actual level lay-outs and encounters. It'd be worth it though!

I don't know if I've ever seen a single-page section in a Campaign Setting book, but a random encounters table makes up section five. It's a good one that covers the surface and various subterranean levels and sensibly withholds the higher CR threats for the more dangerous areas.

Section six is a two-page write-up on the Bloatmage prestige class. These power-hungry arcane spellcasters have turned to blood-magic to fuel their abilities, and they can draw upon energies greater than traditional casters but at great cost: their bodies become more and more corpulent, and they can easily overextend themselves and collapse or fly into a homicidal rage! I never hear of players taking the Bloatmage prestige class so perhaps its drawbacks far outweigh its benefits, but I want to run one purely for the flavour.

The book ends with section seven, a two-page write-up on the Caulborn. The Caulborn, a race of hairless, blind humanoids that lurk under Kaer Maga, are a hive-mind whose goal is to collect the thoughts and knowledge of living creatures and transmit them to their hive's brain-sack. They're quite different than anything I've seen before, and I like it.

Reading this book immediately answers the question I have going into every Campaign Setting book: what's special about this place? The book is incredibly entertaining and evocative, and I had more than one "Jeez!" moment (but in a good way), like reading about a brothel with undead prostitutes ("there are some things you just can't do with a live 'un" reports regulars at The White Lady brothel, according to the book). Kaer Maga is definitely not your average fantasy city; its history and current lived reality make it a worthwhile setting for groups willing to take a turn on the darker (but not always evil) side of adventuring life. City of Strangers merits an immediate purchase.


No GM is New to the City of Strangers - with this Book in Hand!

5/5

The City of Strangers campaign setting book is hands down my favorite of the Golarion setting so far! These 64 pages are filled with more info on the city of scum and villainy than I'll be able to put into practice over the course of ten campaigns.

This is the book you need if your PCs are going to set foot anywhere atop that dreaded city on the Storval Plateau. If you are planning to run The Godsmouth Heresy, Seven Swords of Sin, The Asylum Stone or any of the PFS scenarios set in Kaer Maga, you MUST OWN THIS BOOK!

It will help you fill in the details of the various sectors of Kaer Maga and the factions that populate them. Breathe life into your bloat mages, necromancers of Ankar-Te with their undead servants and the troll augurs by reading up on them first in this setting guide.

Kaer Maga is my favorite setting in Golarion and whole campaigns can be cut from the cloth provided in these pages. Buy it today!!!


Favorite guide so far

5/5

I can only agree with the other comments, this supplement is brilliant and inventive. Kaer maga is stuffed with unusual characters, sometimes weird, sometimes plain brilliant, able to move even the most jaded players. Every corner hides some oddity!
I just love it and hope future supplements will hold to that standard.


4/5


The Standard for City Supplements

5/5

I finally made it around to picking this product up in preparation for a campaign that is starting up shortly. This is the bar for all city book supplements to meet. With the city of Kaer Maga brought to life this book was an excellent read with interesting districts, factions, people and geography.

See my full review at The Iron Tavern - Review: City of Strangers.


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I really wish the city was described in more detail.

Really, the city concept itself is far too confusing for this not to have been (heavily) described, and - for me - the map was tremendously disappointing (though certainly a valiant attempt at something that was doomed from the start).

Very cool idea, but the limit of 64 pages (and likely budget) hamstrung this product from the beginning. Unfortunate, but that's the way things go sometimes, I suppose.

[Don't take this as being overly critical, BTW. It's still a good/evocative product.]


Arnwyn wrote:

I really wish the city was described in more detail.

Really, the city concept itself is far too confusing for this not to have been (heavily) described, and - for me - the map was tremendously disappointing (though certainly a valiant attempt at something that was doomed from the start).

Very cool idea, but the limit of 64 pages (and likely budget) hamstrung this product from the beginning. Unfortunate, but that's the way things go sometimes, I suppose.

[Don't take this as being overly critical, BTW. It's still a good/evocative product.]

It is a shame that boxed sets with two to three 64p-booklets and four poster maps are just not an option any more. I would readily give up full color printing for that to return....


Hyla Arborea wrote:
It is a shame that boxed sets with two to three 64p-booklets and four poster maps are just not an option any more. I would readily give up full color printing for that to return....

Indeed. It's a significant reason why the City of Splendors FR box is the best city supplement of all time, and won't ever be beaten.


Its not a knock on either product, but its not just Kaer Maga that could use tons of more pages. I'd still love to see Absalom get its own hardcover . . . ;)


James Sutter wrote:


In my imagination--and again, this is just my take--the ground floor of Kaer Maga *is* mostly open, though there are probably some pillars and the occasional wall segment strewn around there (and likely incorporated into the structures... why build four walls for your house when you could build three?). That said, the ceiling height of the various districts varies considerably (and changes within the individual districts as well). In Bis, the ceilings are incredibly high, and in the southern districts you can actually see sky in places, but I imagine that Ankar-Te and Oriat are a lot lower-ceilinged... probably no higher than 20 feet in many places, with larger structures naturally built in those areas where the ceiling is higher. If I had to pick the district that has the lowest ceilings, I'd guess that it's Tarheel... nothing over there is more than a few stories.

All of which is a long way of saying: If you levitate somewhere on the ground floor, you can probably see quite a ways over the rooftops, but...

OK, cool, thanks... I know a lot of detail had to be left up to the GM to fill in, and it helps knowing what the overall accumulation of those details looks like.

On the topic of viewpoints, does this sound correct: If you're somewhere in the core, and you look at the hexagonal line separating the core from the ring, you see an 8-story wall punctuated all over the place with all kinds of openings, balconies, etc., with passages at ground level where the roads go through it -- but nonetheless, a definite wall, except for the Warrens and Bis? (Actually, is Bis open to the core, or still pretty well self-contained?)

thanks!
Karl

Contributor

Kreniigh wrote:


On the topic of viewpoints, does this sound correct: If you're somewhere in the core, and you look at the hexagonal line separating the core from the ring, you see an 8-story wall punctuated all over the place with all kinds of openings, balconies, etc., with passages at ground level where the roads go through it -- but nonetheless, a definite wall, except for the Warrens and Bis? (Actually, is Bis open to the core, or still pretty well self-contained?)

Exactly. There aren't always walls between the various abutting Ring districts, but from either the outside or the Core, the ring districts are almost completely walled off. Think of Kaer Maga as being kinda like the Pentagon, and you'll be reasonably close.

(And Bis isn't actually open to the Core--the Warren is the only place where the big stone ring-wall has been shattered enough that they had to fill it in with other structures.)


James Sutter wrote:

Exactly. There aren't always walls between the various abutting Ring districts, but from either the outside or the Core, the ring districts are almost completely walled off. Think of Kaer Maga as being kinda like the Pentagon, and you'll be reasonably close.

(And Bis isn't actually open to the Core--the Warren is the only place where the big stone ring-wall has been shattered enough that they had to fill it in with other structures.)

OK, cool... I just have one more question, I promise.

It's about the roof. You mentioned in an earlier post there you saw it as mostly a featureless expanse, but that some hardy people might build structures up there.

Yet Highside has 16-story towers that look down on the city, and both the art and the cross-section map show multiple towers rising high above the top of the ring across the southern end of the city. I can't see how that's possible unless large sections of the roof are missing there.

So if parts of Highside -- maybe just the topmost levels -- are open to the sky... Well, I considered the idea that most of the roof of the ring is open, but Bis is obviously meant to be an enclosed cavern, and a mostly open roof would make the top levels of most districts as valuable as the heights of Highside.

What I'm picturing now is that Highside has the same internal walls and levels as the rest of the ring, but lacking structural support on three sides, it's degraded faster. The higher up you go, the more open space there is for multi-level towers, all the way up to the roof, which is mostly gone. (Parts of the original roof still remain as levels in the towers and connecting bridges between towers.) The other districts still have mostly intact roofs, with open space to be determined by the GM when needed.

I guess that's less of a question than my own theory... Does it conflict with anything you might have intended?

Thanks much!
Karl

Contributor

In my mind, the Stacks are only sort of a part of the Ring--you can see how the otherwise symmetrical walls bulge in toward the middle there. My thought is that the Ring districts are all the same height in that outer hexagon of stone, and then where Highside Stacks protrude into the Core the walls rise up into this crazy collection of high towers. Most of the Ring is totally enclosed, but from the towers you can look out on all the open-air districts of the Core, as well as down into those parts of Cavalcade where the ceiling is broken.

Sorry that was unclear! The towers of Highside definitely stretch way above everything else in the city... you can see that somewhat in the map on page 52, though of course that's an artist's interpretation and not to scale (the actual towers being a narrower patch, and MUCH taller).

Dark Archive

Hi, James!

One more question: Are you working on a Kaer Maga adventure, a second sourcebook, and a dungeons of Kaer Maga super-sourcebook yet? If your answer is no, why not?

Dark Archive

Hmmmmm. Wonder why James isn't answering....

Dark Archive

kikai13 wrote:
Hmmmmm. Wonder why James isn't answering....

Because he's lazier than even Cosmo.

Dark Archive

Arnwyn wrote:
Hyla Arborea wrote:
It is a shame that boxed sets with two to three 64p-booklets and four poster maps are just not an option any more. I would readily give up full color printing for that to return....
Indeed. It's a significant reason why the City of Splendors FR box is the best city supplement of all time, and won't ever be beaten.

Ahem. one word for you:

Ptolus.


carmachu wrote:


Ahem. one word for you:

Ptolus.

+1


Spawn of Rovagug wrote:
carmachu wrote:


Ahem. one word for you:

Ptolus.

+1

Here's one thing. The documented population for Kaer Maga is around 20K or less I think. Ptolus is around 80-100K. Look at it like some of your suburbs versus' Ptolus's Peoria-like metropolitan area. Kaer Maga has a huge underground group that doesn't do the census.

Mind you, if you have Ptolus but many of your players are gunshy about it and don't want to be a part of that, cannibalize it for your current game. And Kaer Maga has so much in it that you should stay away from the underground until around 5th level.

Anyone have some old dungeon issues lying around for use in this wonderful relic from Thassilonian times?


Pathfinder Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber

Hey there. I'm currently running an adventure which may take my PCs down into the Dark Forest. The Khaei race that James Sutter alludes to in City of Strangers fascinates me, and I was disappointed to find that there doesn't seem to be any stats or anything for them. Now, I know that stats may not be necessary, given their description depicts them as mostly amiable and helpful to strangers, but I was wondering if anyone else has made use of the Khaei yet and how you may have handled them.

Contributor

kikai13 wrote:
Hmmmmm. Wonder why James isn't answering....

Noooo! Someone was posting about Kaer Maga and I missed it! Why didn't anyone tell me?!?

As it turns out, I'm not currently working on any new Kaer Maga stuff, but we had Rob McCreary take a shot at a Kaer Maga adventure with The Godsmouth Heresy, and I was quite impressed with the results (as it sounds like many other folks were!).

Instead, I've been busy writing away on another of my pet projects, writing up a whole sourcebook for one of my favorite parts of the campaign setting. And on that, I can say no more...

Contributor

Joseph Wilson wrote:
Hey there. I'm currently running an adventure which may take my PCs down into the Dark Forest. The Khaei race that James Sutter alludes to in City of Strangers fascinates me, and I was disappointed to find that there doesn't seem to be any stats or anything for them. Now, I know that stats may not be necessary, given their description depicts them as mostly amiable and helpful to strangers, but I was wondering if anyone else has made use of the Khaei yet and how you may have handled them.

Hooray! And I'm also curious to see how people handle the Khaei. One of the best and worst parts about a book of this size is that you have the opportunity to introduce a bunch of new races/monsters/locations, but never enough space to detail them all fully. When in doubt, I try to err on the side of dropping more allusions and ideas rather than less, and letting the readers develop them. (And if people are curious enough about them... well, that's how the City of Strangers book came to be!)


Pathfinder Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber
James Sutter wrote:


Hooray! And I'm also curious to see how people handle the Khaei. One of the best and worst parts about a book of this size is that you have the opportunity to introduce a bunch of new races/monsters/locations, but never enough space to detail them all fully. When in doubt, I try to err on the side of dropping more allusions and ideas rather than less, and letting the readers develop them. (And if people are curious enough about them... well, that's how the City of Strangers book came to be!)

SPOILER:
The Godsmouth Heresy is actually what I'm running (fantastic adventure!). If the PCs end up lingering too long with the menhir in the "kennels," I definitely intend for it to take them down to the Forest for a little side trek. I have a basic idea how how I'm going to handle everything, including the Khaei, but figured I'd see what else people may have done.

I'll try to remember to report back depending on what happens.

Contributor

Joseph Wilson wrote:


I'll try to remember to report back depending on what happens.

Please do! I'll be interested to hear about it.

The same goes for anyone else currently playing in Kaer Maga!


I need to get some money to get this book.....

Shadow Lodge

James, I'm not sure if your still haunting this thread :) , but I was wondering ...

The similarities between the Caulborn and the Sinspawn ... this can't be a coincidence, right? I don't suppose you might want to elaborate?!

Love all the Kaer Maga stuff, as I slowly work through the lore!

Contributor

Gully13 wrote:

James, I'm not sure if your still haunting this thread :) , but I was wondering ...

The similarities between the Caulborn and the Sinspawn ... this can't be a coincidence, right? I don't suppose you might want to elaborate?!

Love all the Kaer Maga stuff, as I slowly work through the lore!

Hm... keen observation. :)

Silver Crusade

HA! It's almost been a year since this was last commented on but i must, for my sanity.
Bloatmage? BLOATMAGE!!! HEMOTHEURGES! No, NO! This is Pathfinder Societies OFFICIAL take on Blood Casters!?!
So i came from 3.5 to PFS for this... Do you hate me? Did we meet on the street one time and i was having a bad day and you got the brunt end of it?
Sadly this ALONE makes me reconsider joining Pathfinder. but what other choice do i have? I lost all my friends when i moved, you have a good community a great system. But because i wasnt involved in this 3-4 years ago i get punished with BARON HARKONNEN!!!
I'm going to help make a better alternative than this... thing. Expect to hear more from me James L. Sutter.

Dark Archive

There's also the Cruoromancer from the Advanced Race Guide.

Silver Crusade

Jadeite wrote:
There's also the Cruoromancer from the Advanced Race Guide.

Thanks for letting me know about this. I doubt this will be available until Dhampir is fully released. also my love for blood out weighs my hate of wizards. Due to the fact Dhamphir's arn't legal yet. I couldn't find this through my usual resources.

Still not going to stop me from making my own class/PrC. and putting it in the appropriate forum.


If any are interested my blog is currently following my group's Kaer Maga game. We love this city thus far.

http://oldmenrollingdice.blogspot.ca/


Bloatmages are one of my absolute favorite things about Kaer Maga, and I find the prestige class to be a glorious write-up of them, with a bit of sacrifice for power - highly appropriate.

Actually, I just popped in here to ask that the cover art of the Bloatmage be added to the Avatar pictures - my Bloatmage needs a better picture!


Adventure Path Charter Subscriber

So... how does one go about finding 300-foot Caulborn?


Is there an errata PDF for this? I'm on page 3 and have come across a sentence that doesn't make any sense: "Without warning the current runelord, an archmage named Karzoug, they retreated deep into the tunnels beneath the city, placing thousands of feet of stone between themselves and the ruin to come."

I thought we were talking about one archmage, Karzoug, so who is "they"/"them"?

Liberty's Edge

The sentence makes perfect sense. To help with comprehension read it without the section separated out by commas.

Without warning the current runelord, they retreated deep into the tunnels beneath the city, placing thousands of feet of stone between themselves and the ruin to come.

The "they" in question is, explicitly, not the runelord. I don't remember who "they" are. I would assume "they" are whoever the previous sentences are talking about.


Ohhhhh Thanks Graywulfe, now I get it! The way I was reading it, it was Karzoug the runelord who retreated deep into the tunnels without any warning. But in fact it is the caulborn who did so, without warning Karzoug. Got it!


The Kaer Maga city map is, indeed, incredible! Is there a high-res, unlabeled version of it anywhere that could be used as a map with players?


Necro, because I just reread this. On one hand, it still holds up really well and you can absolutely still go there and have all kinds of fun. On the other hand, it does feel a little dated in the sense that it's very much a first-decade-of-the-21st-century kind of a product. It's coming from the same place as Ptolus, yes? And I feel like Paizo doesn't really do this kind of setting any more: dark and adult, but with the darkness being more whimsical/weird/wacky as opposed to grimdark, and the whole thing very much one man's crazy vision. There's been plenty of great stuff from Paizo in the last five years, but... nothing that quite scratches exactly this itch.

James Sutter left behind a bunch of little mysteries that will probably never be solved. I doubt we will ever get an in-canon explanation for what the Child Goddess really is, Uncle Guden's true identity, how the Flickering Tower works, what the Pillars of Dream were originally, or what's even the deal with the Iridian Fold. Which is fine. But I do wonder how Paizo will deal with this oddly shaped puzzle piece going forward. Is there anyone but James Sutter who can really do Kaer Maga justice? Will anyone even try?

Doug M.


Starfinder Charter Superscriber

I do think the early years of adventure and setting material was the best: sometimes a glorious mix of dark, original, and sometimes shocking ideas. I don't think we'll ever see anything like City of Strangers or the Graul farm again. As companies grow more popular, they also tend to adopt a more accessible "family friendly" approach when it comes to content.

Officially at least, Sutter is available as a freelancer though. So maybe we'll see some more of his work in Pathfinder or Starfinder.

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