Pathfinder Companion: Gnomes of Golarion (PFRPG)

4.70/5 (based on 7 ratings)
Pathfinder Companion: Gnomes of Golarion (PFRPG)
Show Description For:
Non-Mint

Print Edition Out of print

Add PDF $7.99 $5.99

Non-Mint Unavailable

Facebook Twitter Email

Know Your Gnomes!

Exiled from the mysterious fey realm of the First World, gnomes are fundamentally alien to Golarion. Endlessly excitable, gnomes amuse and terrify other races with their strange obsessions and unconventional methods. Their childlike wonder—and sometimes innocent cruelty—are two sides of the same coin, and every coin the gnomes have is spent in pursuit of adventure, whether they like it or not. For the gnomes have a dark secret: should they ever stop seeking out new experiences, they fall prey to the Bleaching, a wasting disease that slowly sucks away their hold on the world, leaving them nothing but bones and dust.

    Inside this Pathfinder Companion, you’ll find the following:
  • Details on the gnomes of Golarion—how they live, who they worship, their relations with other races, their strange obsessions, and more.
  • History and folklore of the gnome race.
  • Map and descriptions of the major gnome settlements.
  • New traits designed exclusively for gnome characters.
  • Rules for the Wonderseekers, a new faction dedicated to fending off the Bleaching.
  • Statistics for the Bleaching, as well as for those strange creatures known as bleachlings.
  • Bizarre new gnome weapons, spells, and feats.

By Colin McComb, Steven Schend, Sean K Reynolds, Owen KC Stephens, Mark Moreland, Jeff Quick, and Hal Maclean

Each bimonthly 32-page Pathfinder Companion contains several player-focused articles exploring the volume’s theme as well as short articles with innovative new rules for social, magic, religious, and combat-focused characters, as well as a persona section detailing helpful NPCs and traits to better anchor the player to the campaign.

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-223-4

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Player Companion Subscription.

Product Availability

Print Edition:

Out of print

This product is out of print.

PDF:

Fulfilled immediately.

Non-Mint:

Unavailable

This product is non-mint. Refunds are not available for non-mint products.

Are there errors or omissions in this product information? Got corrections? Let us know at store@paizo.com.

PZO9411


See Also:

1 to 5 of 7 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | next > last >>

Average product rating:

4.70/5 (based on 7 ratings)

Sign in to create or edit a product review.

5/5


Interesting and Original Portrayal of Gnomes

5/5

Gnomes of Golarion is a 32-page entry in the Pathfinder Player Companion line of books. The subject matter, obviously, is gnomes; what this book does quite well is explain how gnomes in the official campaign setting of Golarion are different than standard "D&D" gnomes. Gnomes in Golarion are exiles from another plane of existence, the First World, and their presence on Golarion comes with a price: The Bleaching. The Bleaching is a sort of wasting-disease that affects gnomes if they fall prey to the status quo and stop seeking out new experiences and wonders. Thus, the Bleaching ties in perfectly to a game that's about adventurers, and gives gnome characters a natural reason to travel, encounter dangers, and be curious: they have to do something to stave off the Bleaching! I really like the concept, and although I haven't played a gnome character in Golarion, I certainly have an interest in doing so.

I really like the front cover's artwork, as it's brighter and just a tad more "cartoony" than normal Paizo art which fits gnomes quite well. The inside front cover is a helpful summary of gnome racial traits, favored deities and regions, and naming conventions. All of this can be found scattered in other books, but it's helpful to have it collected in one place. The inside back-cover is a map of major gnome settlements in the Inner Sea Region, descriptions of which we'll find inside the book. Gnomes of Golarion is divided into nine separate sections.

Section 1 is ten pages long and titled simply "Gnomes of Golarion." The first couple of pages give a "fluff" or "flavour" explanation for the mechanical racial traits of gnomes, which perhaps isn't strictly necessary but better for players than "just because." The first real meat in this section is the description of the gnomes as exiles from the First World, the curse of the Bleaching, and how the race eventually discovered a way to stave it off. As I mentioned in the first paragraph, it's really good. The rest of the section delves into other aspects of gnome culture and society: birth and death, clothing, their fondness for pranks and jokes (where some of the unfortunate hatred of gnomes by gamers comes from), and their skill at invention (I quite liked the description of gnomes as being quite skilled inventors whose devices work quite well; it's just that the devices do things that other races find absurd, and gnomes are easily distracted and unlikely to repeat their inventions for broader distribution). The section ends with a couple of paragraph each on two varieties of gnomes shunned by their mainstream kin: spriggans (feral gnomes) and svirfneblin (subterranean gnomes). Readers interested in this last bit will get only a tease, and will need to seek out other Pathfinder books for more information.

Section 2, "The Wonderseekers" (two pages long), introduces a new organisation whose goal is to seek out gnomes who appear to be falling prey to the the Bleaching and get them active by awakening their sense of wonder. The group thus sponsors new adventuring parties, makes travel and exploration magic available at quite reasonable prices, etc. The Wonderseekers are presented as an option to use as a Faction under the Faction Guide, and contains some information tied to that subsystem. I haven't ever played with Factions, and can't really comment on the idea. The section introduces a new feat, Master of Wonders, which has membership in the Wonderseekers as a prerequisite: it allows gnomes to reroll a result on a rod of wonders and take the second roll. Overall, I like the concept of The Wonderseekers and could see them as a good way to get a gnome PC or (perish the thought!) an all-gnome party started in a campaign. Imagine gnomes whose lives have become dull and routine being pushed (or dragged) out of their humdrum existence by The Wonderseekers into a life of adventure!

Section 3, "Gnome Traits" (two pages long), describes several new background traits in the following categories: Combat (x3), Magic (x3), Social (x4). All are restricted to gnomes. The traits definitely fall on the average- to low- spectrum in terms of mechanical advantage to gnome PCs and they don't really do a lot that's exciting (usually a minor skill boost here or there, with the best perhaps being one that raises a PC's caster level for illusion spells). But, they're all flavoured well and clearly show ways for players to use the traits as role-playing opportunities. No complaints here.

Section 4, "Gnome Settlements" (six pages) covers, with two to three paragraphs each, several notable gnome towns in the Inner Sea. I think this amount of attention is probably just right for a Player Companion, as it gives PCs enough information to pick one of these places as a "hometown" for their character. The entries focus on what's distinct or interesting about each location, which keeps the section from becoming a dry gazetteer. The following settlements are included: Brastlewark, Finderplain, Gogpodda, Irrere, Sovvox, Kalsgard, Omesta, Quantium, Thom, Tiven's Reed, Whistledown, Umok, Wispil, and Yavipho. I imagine it's hard for a writer to come up with interesting descriptions of so many different cities that all fit into the overall picture of gnome culture, so this is a job well done.

Section 5, "Gnome Weapons" (two pages) introduces about a half-dozen new weapons and a couple of shields. The idea here is solid, and one of the weapons is hilarious and fits the "gnome invention" concept perfectly: the Ripsaw Glaive which is basically a chainsaw! There is a problem here in that one of the weapons, the Flickmace, receives an entry on the weapons table but doesn't receive any description; normally, that wouldn't be such a big deal, but it is for the Flickmace because it's a small-size weapon that has reach, which makes it an intriguing option for Medium-sized PCs who want a one-handed reach option. Paizo's policy of not publishing errata or clarifications for the Player's Companion line is unfortunate here. In addition, another weapon, the Switchscythe, has a confusing and probably erroneous description in relation to how it can be disguised as a quarterstaff.

Section 6, "Faith" (two pages) contains short descriptions of commonly-worshipped deities and the reasons why gnomes venerate them. Instead of a new clerical spell, like one might expect, this section contains a mechanical description of the Bleaching as a curse whose onset is middle-age and has a frequency of 1/year. I think it might have been better to keep the Bleaching as a purely discretionary "fluff" concept instead of attempting to quantify it and remove its mystery. But this is Pathfinder, and if it doesn't have numbers a lot of readers won't pay attention to it, so I understand the decision.

Section 7, "Magic" (two pages) starts with an attempt to give a coherent reason why gnomes have the seemingly-unrelated grab bag of innate spell-like abilities they start with. I'm not sure it's successful, but I appreciate the attempt. Next, there are three new feats (all limited to gnomes) Effortless Trickery allows for spellcasters to concentrate on illusions as a swift action, and would be a no-brainer for dedicated specialists. Extra Gnome Magic adds to the number of times per day a gnome can use their innate spell-like abilities; I would consider this a waste of something as powerful as a feat. Threatening Illusion is a cool metamagic feat that allows illusions to threaten squares for the purposes of flanking if an enemy fails a will save; I could imagine a lot of uses for this one. Finally, there's an odd new spell: Illusory Poison, which creates just what the name implies. I'm not sure if it would be worth it, since the target receives a Will save and then Fort saves.

Section 8, "'Persona" (two pages) introduces two new gnome NPCs. I've talked a lot in the past about how weird it is to see NPCs in a Player Companion, and Paizo long-ago stopped doing it. Still, I have to admit that the two NPCs here are great: one of them intentionally loses a magical coin to interesting-looking people so she can challenge herself to steal it back, while the other is a Don Quixote-like gnome who, if it had been possible at the time, should have been statted out as a cavalier rather than a fighter.

Section 9, "Social" (two pages) concludes the book with nine (!) new feats that offer gnomes various tricks when using the Bluff skill. Most of them probably aren't worth it, as they require a standard or full-round action to Bluff an enemy so that the PC gains, on the next round, a relatively small mechanical advantage to something else. They have great flavour, but are probably more for the "RP above stats" devotees. One feat, Babble-Peddler, has been known to create some problems in game play by allowing gnomes to get away with some stunning thefts quite easily since they'll have maxed-out their Bluff skill and most NPCs haven't done the same with Sense Motive.

Overall, Gnomes of Golarion is a strong addition to the "races" line of Player Companion books. It's far more interesting and original than Dwarves of Golarion, for example, because it gives a clear reason why the race in Golarion is at least somewhat different than it's portrayed in generic fantasy settings. I quite liked the Bleaching concept. Too often, gaming sourcebooks provide a ton of dry historical or cultural exposition that is difficult or impossible to see manifest in actual gameplay. But, the "lived reality" of the Bleaching is an excellent motivator for gnome PCs. GMs also don't need to worry about the Player Companion creating any sort of power-creep; the mechanical advantages it provides are actually quite modest. So for players and GMs interested in gnomes, this book would be a great start.


Gnomes for everyone!

4/5

I ordered this book with very high expectations and very high hopes. And it mostly delivered. Since I started gaming gnomes have been my favorite race by far and I’ve really enjoyed the Pathfinder/Glorian spin to the little buggers. The physical quality of this supplement was nice. It is a nice, solid paperback with a glossy cover, and the artwork and fonts really pop and show personality. The flavor within, and it does contain fluff by the truckload, is all interesting and fun, and well worth the price alone. and the new spell is exciting, balanced, creative, and generally top notch. The sample NPCs are a couple of the best I’ve seen so far and there are a handful of traits which I would gladly allow in my games. Overall I find this book to be an excellent addition to my collection, but there were some minor details which, when added together, led to the loss of a star;

The new exotic weapon section, despite being one of my favorite sections of the book, contained a couple of errors. One of the weapons listed on the chart doesn’t have a description and as a gnomish weapon it can be difficult to discern how it is supposed to appear or function. There is also a weapon which has a fun description listed that isn’t on the weapon chart, so there is no way to guess its price and weight.

Another qualm I have with this companion is that there are several new feats, which while fun, have a couple of problems. One feat, for example, lists a ability that the opponent must save against, although it lists no way to calculate the DC. Through reading the other feats I believe that I’ve inferred the correct way, but having something so large missing is a bit annoying.

But even with the problems listed above I’d strongly suggest buying this supplement if you like to play gnome characters or if you intend to include them as part of a campaign. I’d even suggest purchasing it for some fun, light reading.


Gnomes to every garden... errrm...

5/5

Here the Gnomes finally became a full race with believable identity. I find this book highly inspiring!


Actually makes Gnomes Playable! Miraculous!

4/5

I have always hated gnomes as a throwaway race with out much of a racial identity. Now, they are a cohesive, and vibrant variation, with a ton of potential! Check out my full review: Gnomes of Golarion


1 to 5 of 7 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | next > last >>
51 to 100 of 131 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | next > last >>

Heh, heh. Nice.


Elves vs. Bugbears
Dwarves vs. Giants
Gnomes vs. Kobolds

How perfect, I also love the title font and colour of the cover! Fantastic stuff!

Dark Archive

I really like the cover of this one.

Paizo Employee Director of Brand Strategy

Is that famed Pathfinder Delver Arnistolientar Popswicker running away while Lini cleans up after her draconic visitors?

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The cover, the font, the author list, it's all perfect.

Lantern Lodge

Dark_Mistress wrote:
I really like the cover of this one.

nods nods* I am not evena gnome fan and I agree with you on that


Vic Wertz wrote:
I've updated the product description and cover image to match the finished product.

Thanks, it looks great Vic!


I've been dying for this one. I've always loved gnomes and I like the paizo take on them.

Silver Crusade

yoda8myhead wrote:
Is that famed Pathfinder Delver Arnistolientar Popswicker running away while Lini cleans up after her draconic visitors?

Holy crap, it is!

Good gravy, the font for this book is perfect. The faint glow on the Pathfinder logo too. So 80's Filmation/David The Gnome. :D


Pathfinder Card Game, Companion, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game, Starfinder Society Subscriber; Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Charter Superscriber

Awesome cover!


I deeply crave this book. I've had three separate gnomes over the years, and they rank as my top three favorite PC/NPCs.

I will gladly give you every Bag of Tricks I own for an advance copy of this book. I will still offer at least three DAYS worth of pulls from my gray bag of tricks if advance copies are not permissible, forcing me to buy it on release. That's more weasels than you can shake a 10-ft pole at.


Gnomes > Halflings. Can't wait for this release, though the only thing that bothers me is their hair color. I know it's explained as fey influence, which is great and something I had always hoped for, but I don't think it should necessarily make an entire race look like the cast of a bad anime.

Liberty's Edge

Preview wrote:

Inside this Pathfinder Companion, you’ll find the following:

...
Map and descriptions of the major gnome settlements.

I has a lair!

Sorry, couldn't resist. Can't believe that hadn't been said yet...


Dangleberry Tagnut wrote:
Preview wrote:

Inside this Pathfinder Companion, you’ll find the following:

...
Map and descriptions of the major gnome settlements.

I has a lair!

Sorry, couldn't resist. Can't believe that hadn't been said yet...

(walking by minding my own business...notices 4E gnome)

Me: ..."hmm?" "Oh, you're one of those 4E gnomes, right"

'gnome': "Yep. I've got a lair. Rowrr!"

Me: "Hm. What are you doing in Golarion?"

'gnome': (looks downcast) "I got lost. Hard to find current maps and not many knowledgable travelers. Points-of-light and all that."

Me: "Ahh." (nods head understandingly) "Say, I think there's a gnome settlement over that way."

'gnome': "REALLY? Is it a lair?"

Me: "Nah, it's a settlement. Gnomes are PCs around here, not monsters. That place is a little rough though, so it's kind of like a lair I guess."

'gnome': "Thanks." gnome shuffles off.

I walk away whistling to myself as the screams of the 4e gnome reach my ears and I envision the Golarion goblins that are gleefully hacking him to pieces with their dogslicers...

Me: "Lairs. What a putz."


Can't wait for this - my boyfriend & I both want to play gnome characters eventually =)

Love the cover art - this one's going to be fun to read, I can tell =)

Scarab Sages

Does anyone know if the content is going to be legal in PFSoc by mid-July (let's say, by 16th July, hint, hint)?


Snorter wrote:
Does anyone know if the content is going to be legal in PFSoc by mid-July (let's say, by 16th July, hint, hint)?

Version 2.2 of the Guide to Pathfinder Society Organized Play lists the legal material from this book, so once you get a copy of it, in either print or pdf, you can use the listed elements.

Liberty's Edge

That's awesome; I didn't expect tham to have pre-empted the content of product that hadn't been released yet. I was expecting a revised player's guide nearer Summer.

Well planned, everyone.
Now I just gotta sit back and wait to see what all those pre-approved options do!


It is somewhat appropriate that I have questions about the Bewildering Koan feat on page 30.

It says, "If the creature fails its check," but I'm not sure what check they have to make. Do they have to make a Bluff check, a Knowledge check, a Sense Motive check, or something else?

It then says that the target creature "loses its next action." Does that mean it loses it's next turn, that it loses a readied action, or that it loses a move or standard action during it's turn to contemplation?

Sovereign Court

The description of teh Flickmace seems to be missing. It sounds like it could be an interesting weapon.

Contributor

12 people marked this as a favorite.
Blazej wrote:

It is somewhat appropriate that I have questions about the Bewildering Koan feat on page 30.

It says, "If the creature fails its check," but I'm not sure what check they have to make. Do they have to make a Bluff check, a Knowledge check, a Sense Motive check, or something else?
It then says that the target creature "loses its next action." Does that mean it loses it's next turn, that it loses a readied action, or that it loses a move or standard action during it's turn to contemplation?

Bluff is always an opposed check against the target's Sense Motive check.

If the target fails, it loses its next turn.

Scarab Sages

Sean K Reynolds wrote:

Bluff is always an opposed check against the target's Sense Motive check. If the target fails, it loses its next turn.

Actually Sean, that isn't clear-cut. While that's what the first sentence of Bluff says, in actuality the uses are done as a check against a DC based on your opponent. For example, to feint someone, you make a check against DC 10 + foe's base attack bonus + foe's Wisdom modifier, or against a DC of 10 + foe's Sense Motive bonus. So it's not actually check vs check.

Attempting to deceive someone does seem to be opposed checks, but not everything is.

Contributor

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Owen K. C. Stephens wrote:
Sean K Reynolds wrote:

Bluff is always an opposed check against the target's Sense Motive check. If the target fails, it loses its next turn.

Actually Sean, that isn't clear-cut. While that's what the first sentence of Bluff says, in actuality the uses are done as a check against a DC based on your opponent. For example, to feint someone, you make a check against DC 10 + foe's base attack bonus + foe's Wisdom modifier, or against a DC of 10 + foe's Sense Motive bonus. So it's not actually check vs check.

Attempting to deceive someone does seem to be opposed checks, but not everything is.

Well, the feat says "if the creature fails its check," so it's clear that the target is making a check (as opposed to its stats setting a flat DC).

Blazej's question was "what kind of check is the target making?" and the answer to that is "a Sense Motive check."

I'm not arguing that the feat isn't 100% clear (it could say "You make a Bluff check against the target's Sense Motive check"), and that disappoints me (as I developed the text and felt it was clear enough), but the logic of

"the feat says the target makes a check"
combined with
"the Bluff skill says it's either against the target's Sense Motive check or a flat number"
leads to
"therefore it has to be a Sense Motive check"

is straightforward.

Contributor

2 people marked this as a favorite.
Cylerist wrote:
The description of teh Flickmace seems to be missing. It sounds like it could be an interesting weapon.

It got cut for space when the body text ran long, but it remains in the table like an evil, gnome ghost. IIRC it was a mace with a built-in spring, allowing you to use an action to change it from a normal mace to a reach weapon.


Sean K Reynolds wrote:
Blazej wrote:

It is somewhat appropriate that I have questions about the Bewildering Koan feat on page 30.

It says, "If the creature fails its check," but I'm not sure what check they have to make. Do they have to make a Bluff check, a Knowledge check, a Sense Motive check, or something else?
It then says that the target creature "loses its next action." Does that mean it loses it's next turn, that it loses a readied action, or that it loses a move or standard action during it's turn to contemplation?

Bluff is always an opposed check against the target's Sense Motive check.

If the target fails, it loses its next turn.

Alright, thank you. I am a tad concerned that at higher levels that the character might be able to often use it to consistently prevent enemies from acting for 10+ rounds each day. Although, honestly, it still is my favorite feat concept at the moment.

Again, thank you for the quick response to my question.

Sovereign Court

This is probably my favourite Companion so far, I really want to play a gnome now.

It looks like the table entry for the switchscythe was removed instead of the flickmace. And speaking of the switchscythe, it seems to imply that an opponent needs to make a bluff check to notice it is not a staff, either that or a paper maché disguise makes it more difficult to hide its true nature... without a paper maché it apparently takes a DC15 bluff check (either to notice it, or hide it, I'm not entirely sure either way), and with the paper maché it takes a DC20 bluff check. Should those DCs be reversed, or should they actually be perception checks?

Contributor

I realize that flavor text almost never needs any clarification, but I am totally willing to talk about it for gnomes... you know, just in case.

Sovereign Court RPG Superstar 2009 Top 32, 2010 Top 8

I think I must have downloaded Pugwampis of Golarion since the frakking file has failed to copy to DVD three times now to read at work.


This will be an instant purchase.

I love Gnomes...portrayed as the fey/forest/mischieveous race they "should" be.

But if this has any "Tinker" Gnome crap in it, I'll be sad.

I HATE "Tinker" Gnomes...

I "tinkle" on "Tinker" Gnomes.


Goldberry wrote:
Can't wait for this release, though the only thing that bothers me is their hair color. I know it's explained as fey influence, which is great and something I had always hoped for, but I don't think it should necessarily make an entire race look like the cast of a bad anime.

I agree. The poor Pathfinder Druid iconic is Gnome...poor, poor thing. Her art doesn't fit with the other iconics.

Silver Crusade

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Having an outlook as poor man's anime second rate cast is what makes Gnomes of Golarion actually stand out from the "a little less fat than a halfling and a little shorter than a dwarf" crowd of generic D&D gnomes of yesteryear.

More weird hairdos, please. :)

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

The Blog says it is out now. When does this ship for subscribers?

Sovereign Court

Shar Tahl wrote:
The Blog says it is out now. When does this ship for subscribers?

Most likely some time this week, mine is due to ship Thursday, but I think it varies depending on where you live and what bundling options you have chosen.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

My May shipments only have this item listed. I usually get an email that it is shipping soon, so I was wondering.


Paizo Charter Superscriber; Pathfinder Companion, Pathfinder Accessories Subscriber; Starfinder Charter Superscriber

Oh my god, this book looks like an LSD trip on the inside (or so I imagine).

Grand Lodge

Zaister wrote:
Oh my god, this book looks like an LSD trip on the inside (or so I imagine).

Yeah, it's pretty groovy, dude.

Okay, I'm not quite old enough to be in that generation, but I'm glad I got the .pdf and the print copy both, so that I don't run out of, um, pink.

Contributor

I'd like everyone to know (as you didn't already) that Paizo's developers and editors rock. I was happy with my turnover, but they made it awesome.

So officially: Thanks, Paizo.


Grrr..logged on and this showed as being in my downloads..great I thought..went to my downloads and it wasn't there..went back to the product page to find it no longer showing in my downloads..Grrrrrrrr


DM Wellard wrote:
Grrr..logged on and this showed as being in my downloads..great I thought..went to my downloads and it wasn't there..went back to the product page to find it no longer showing in my downloads..Grrrrrrrr

Gnome pranks at work!


pah..Gnomes indeed..any off the lawyers out there want to help me sue Paizo for mental cruelty..I won't want much just say..ohh 10% of the company..j/k

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

What are the statistics for the switchscythe? It seems to be missing from the table


Nor is there a description of the flickmace.


On the map inside the back cover I would guess that the northernmost Omesta should be labeled Thom.

CJ

Sovereign Court

DM Wellard wrote:
Nor is there a description of the flickmace.

ALREADY ANSWERED IN THIS THREAD.

Sovereign Court RPG Superstar 2009 Top 32, 2010 Top 8

I've found the read on the gnomes, interesting.

They have the (negative) potential to become Golarion's Kender, but at the same time, the creativity aspect is enticing.

That said, it's made me switch my cleric of Sheylin idea from halfling to gnome.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

Are the items listed under "New Gnome Weapons" considered martial for gnomes? The flavor text seems to imply so. They do not have "Gnome" in the name so it seems in question.


taig wrote:
I'm late to this party, but, YAY! GNOMES!!!

I love the 1e/2e halfling descriptions.

Sovereign Court

Gnomes of Golarion wrote:
Flask Thrower: This weapon resembles a halfling sling staff, except that the cradle at the end is designed to hold and hurl flasks as well as stones or bullets. It significantly extends the range of thrown substances that deal splash damage, such as acid, alchemist’s fire, or holy water, as well as that of tools such as tanglefoot bags, thunderstones, or caltrops.

The Flask Thrower resembles a halfling sling staff, but does it have all of the functions of a sling staff, such as damage, crit multiplier, etc?

Is the range increment 20' for all of the weird equipment above, but for stones/bullets it has a 80' increment like with the sling staff?

Can it be used as a club like the sling staff?

Is it considered a "Gnome" weapon?

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Starfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

That's what I am wondering! The table says "Gnome Weapons" but PRD says ...

PRD wrote:
Weapon Familiarity: Gnomes treat any weapon with the word “gnome” in its name as a martial weapon.

None of them have "gnome" in the name but they are called "gnome weapons"

51 to 100 of 131 << first < prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | next > last >>
Community / Forums / Paizo / Product Discussion / Pathfinder Companion: Gnomes of Golarion (PFRPG) All Messageboards

Want to post a reply? Sign in.