Pathfinder Chronicles: Classic Horrors Revisited (PFRPG)

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Pathfinder Chronicles: Classic Horrors Revisited (PFRPG)
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Things from Beyond the Grave

Born of myth, legend, and even modern film and literature, monsters such as the mummy, vampire, werewolf, and zombie are the stuff of nightmares—and frequent foes of heroic adventurers! Along with flesh golems, gargoyles, ghosts, ghouls, hags, and the mysterious derro, these ten monsters are staples of horror fiction and the bane of countless would-be heroes.

This 64-page book explores the origin of these creatures (in both the game world and real-world history), as well as their creation, habitat, society, motivations, and role in a campaign. Each creature also includes information on new and deadly creature variants, such as nosferatu vampires, corpse chill mummies, gemstone gargoyles, host corpse zombies, and phantasmagoric ghosts. What’s more, each chapter provides several new and notable examples of each creature, as well as a fully statted and ready-to-run sample monster, whether it’s a flesh golem barbarian, a derro magister, a ghoul necromancer, a hag water-witch, or a lycanthrope-hunting werewolf.

Whether your campaign is a standard fantasy monster hunt, a gothic romance, or an exercise in terror, Classic Horrors Revisited provides both historical insight and fresh new spins on these traditional icons of fear!

by James Jacobs, Rob McCreary, and F. Wesley Schneider

ISBN-13: 978-1-60125-202-9

Note: This product is part of the Pathfinder Lost Omens Subscription.

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Fantastic Writing

5/5

The idea behind Classic Horrors Revisited is to take ten classic "horror" monsters from D&D's past and expand and update them for Pathfinder. This is the sort of book that could be a bit "blah" in lesser hands, but Paizo put their A-list writing talent on the project: James Jacobs, Rob McCreary, and Wes Scheider. The result is a really good book that adds depth and detail to these monsters while sticking fairly closely to the common understanding of how they operate. In other words, this book isn't a crazy-cool re-imagining of the monsters, but a well-written, cohesive elaboration.

Classic Horrors Revisited is a 64-page, full colour book. I would label the interior artwork as "okay". Better than most other companies', but not as good as Paizo has done in other books. The interior front cover lists books and films that can serve as inspiration for using each of the monsters, while the interior back cover is a reprint of the front cover art (which is a bit too-obviously Dracula to interest me).

The ten monsters covered are: Derro, Flesh Golems, Gargoyles, Ghosts, Ghouls, Hags, Mummies, Vampires, "Walking Dead" (zombies and skeletons), and Werewolves. Each monster receives six pages of coverage, and each entry is broken down into a "flavour" page (a half-page illustration and a half-page in-universe bit of prose), a couple of pages of overview and ecology/society, a few paragraphs on their role in a campaign (which I really liked), a paragraph on two or three known monsters of that kind in Golarion, and then a named NPC example with full stat block and picture. Most monster entries also contain at least a little rules-option "crunch," such as variants, new feats, etc. Here's a little more info about each of the entries:

1. Derro: I really love the Pathfinder approach to Derro--they are creepy, malevolent, and almost alien abductors of people on the surface so that they can perform strange experiments and then return them with no or fragmented memory of what happened. This book introduces four new Derro weapons (Aklys, Crystal Chakram, Fauchard, and Injection Spear) and a new poison (Cytillesh Extract). The sample is Evehxa, a derro magister (enclave leader) and 6th-level sorcerer.

2. Flesh Golem: This will sound stupid, but I never really made the connection between flesh golems and Frankenstein's monster before reading this book! The section has a good discussion of different types of flesh golems, and the writing and world lore is superb. Rules are provided for awakened (sentient) flesh golems, as well as for electrified and unholy variants. The sample is the Beast of Lepidstadt, an awakened flesh golem that haunts Ustalav (written up with 6 levels of barbarian).

3. Gargoyle: I've never found anything particularly interesting about gargoyles in the past, but this book has changed my mind. It's made them scary! Their love of sadism and perverse games gives them an interesting role as capable of inflicting both physical and mental pain. Six variant gargoyles are discussed (arctic, forest, gemstone, obsidian, sandstone, and waterspout), making them useful in far more than just urban environments. The sample is "Ajekrith, the Nightwing Snatcher", a gargoyle with 4 levels of rogue who preys on lone wanderers in Magnimar's Underbridge District.

4. Ghost: There's an insightful discussion here about the differences between ghosts and other undead: not only are they usually bound to a fixed location, but they exist for a particular purpose. I've panned the artwork in this book, but the picture on page 22 of a ghost carrying its own head is fantastic. This entry provides new abilities for ghosts depending on why they're materializing; it's a great way to better tie a ghost's powers to its story, and I highly recommend using it. The sample ghost is Maven Mosslight, a ghost with 9 levels of sorcerer who seeks her lost love in the Boarwood in Galt.

5. Ghouls: I've been running an adventure path that happens to features ghouls quite prominently in one chapter, so I've had a lot of time to think about them. This entry offers some surprisingly deep insights into them. And, I managed to incorporate the symptoms of ghoul fever into the game when a PC got infected. So . . . bonus! This entry includes rules for making ghouls of larger and smaller races, as well as specific mention of what happens if other creatures (like lycanthropes or fire giants) get transformed. Three new feats are added for ghouls, but they have *really* high prerequisites and only exceptional ghouls would be able to qualify. Still, I like them in the abstract: one gives a ghoul bonuses for eating brains, one allows ghouls to pass as humans (and ghasts to suppress their stench), and one gives a ghoul a burrow speed. The sample ghoul is Ehrimun, a 14th level necromancer exiled from the ghoul city of Nemret Noktoria.

6. Hags: I've never really used these in a game, but the entry does provide a useful discussion of the relationship between the three most common types of hags (Annis, green, and sea hags) as well as night hags. There's some discussion of the powers that hag covens (as opposed to individual hags) could possess. The sample is Ulla Jarnrygg, a formidable hag with 9 levels of sorcerer and ice giant ancestry.

7. Mummies: There's an excellent discussion here of the role of mummies in a campaign: as (un)living transmitters and reminders of the game world's history. Mummies are often focussed on recreating the society and time period from when they died, and this allows GMs to incorporate otherwise dry historical information as an important part of a story arc. The entry gives four different ways to re-flavour mummy rot, and the sample mummy is very cool: Shielseis, Queen of Asps in Osirion. The artwork for her is great.

8. Vampires: I'm one of those annoying people who think vampires have been overused in pop culture, and frankly there wasn't anything in this entry that I found new or exciting. The entry offers five new variant vampire abilities, including everything from changing into a swarm to being able to survive longer in daylight. The sample vampire is Audbrey Aldamori, a pretend "aristocratic fop" who travels the Inner Sea feasting on those of noble blood.

9. Walking Dead: We're talking zombies and skeletons here, and Pathfinder sticks with the traditional concept of them being mindless, low-level threats. The artwork in this entry is pretty bad. There's 13 variants, however, which really spice things up. Throw some "Exploding Skeletons" or "Gasburst Zombies" at your players and watch them recoil in surprise! The sample is a "Gillamoor Plague Zombie", which (unlike all the other samples in the book) is not a named NPC.

10. Werewolves: This entry has a good, clear summary of what it means to be a werewolf in Pathfinder (different forms, means of transmission, etc.). I was intrigued by a passing mention of good werewolves inspired by the dead god Curchanus. The sample NPC is Ruxandra Katranjiev, a werewolf with levels in ranger who is also a cleric of the goddess Jezelda and wants to purge the Varisian town of Wolf's Ear of all non-werewolf lycanthropes.

Classic Horrors Revisited is an older book (2009), and some of the monsters here have also been revisited in more recent Pathfinder products (such as ghouls and vampires in the Monster Codex and derro in the Inner Sea Monster Codex). That being said, there's great value for the money here if a GM is hoping to gain better understanding of these monsters and to add more depth to running them in a storyline. Bestiaries can give a basic stat block, but usually don't have room for much description, making books like this one quite useful. As I said at the beginning, the writing is top-notch even if the artwork is of varying quality. I'd definitely recommend this one for a GM who is interested in any of the monsters covered.


Things that go bump in the night

5/5

These books are brilliant. They give you the flavour that you wish they could fit into the one page creature descriptions which you just know they cannot.

Buy these books, as I have never struck a bad one yet :)


Bring the Horror! Classic Horrors Revisited!

4/5

This is a great suppliment made to spark the fevered imagination of the most Jaded DM back to sadistic life! Check out my full review: Classic Horrors Revisited


Paizo brings the Horrors home

5/5

I love horror, and I love pulp fantasy, so it's no surprise that I love this. It's a great collection of classic monsters, from immortals like vampires and werewolves through their lesser-known cousins like the ghoul and the hag, to newcomers like the derro and the flesh golem.

The monsters are brought to (un)life in classic style, and the NPC critters are very well done and nicely illustrated as well. There are new feats and tips to individualize any monsters of your own creation as well. This book is worth every penny I paid for it.


Even More Horrifying

5/5

A solid product packed with suggestions on how to add a new twist on a number of gothic monsters. Tons of hooks and ideas to help spark a GM's imagination.

Absolutely worth picking up if you're planning on running a horror themed adventure, and are looking for something a little different to terrify your players with.


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Dark Archive

Very cool though it is coming out a month late though. Really should be a Oct release.


*clears throat.*

Ahem...

Squeee!


Yes please.

Liberty's Edge

Is there rules on how to stake a vampire in combat?
*gnnnng*

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
Heathansson wrote:

Is there rules on how to stake a vampire in combat?

*gnnnng*

Yeah ... 'cos we got some ideas for you Wes, if not.

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Charter Superscriber

OMG! I must have this!!!
I am glad my RotRL campaign will last the whole year. When it's over I have so much stuff to choose from... LoF, CoT, Classic Horrors Revisited and much much more. Can't wait to read Paizo's take on thieves guild's as well...
I am so happy to take a ride on the D&D Paizo-Era!!!

Dark Archive

Argh! Hag and werewolf! I need it now! And another exclamation mark!

Liberty's Edge

Mothman wrote:
Heathansson wrote:

Is there rules on how to stake a vampire in combat?

*gnnnng*
Yeah ... 'cos we got some ideas for you Wes, if not.

I'm gonna add in that concealment thing too; I don't foresee another vampire any time soon though...


Oooooo
Me wants
Me wants

Sovereign Court

Oh sweet merciful Desna, Seoni AND hot female Vampires/Succubi/chicks with wings and a tail on the cover? Awesome stuff.

I'm also sure the insides will be good too.

Sovereign Court

I know the cover is likely to be a mock up.. but yeah. Seoni with stake vs Hot Female Vampires on the cover = Lots of sales.


Must get a copy now...

Dark Archive

I'm thinking that my wife will be ****** off at me once again... for investing too much money on Paizo goodness! (last time we had a conversation about it a month ago)

Seriously, Paizo is churning out too many products that I want -- I've ordered so much from Amazon (or bought them at my FLGS), and comparing to how little I invested in WoTC's 3.5 stuff, it seems Paizo folks are reading my mind about what I'd want to see published! :)

Guys, you totally *ROCK*!


First of all, leave the cover as it is, it looks just fine. ;)

Secondly, this is yet another book from you people that can't come out soon enough for me! This looks like it'll be a great year for Paizo, but not so much for my wallet. *weeps*


Sannos meditate…

"I must wait until November"

"I must wait until November"

"I must wait until November"

Sannos scream in pain. I have edited this commits out because of content. Now back to Sannos …

"I must get a copy NOW"

"I must have a plan"

"1. Find out Paizo address in Seattle"

"2. MapQuest Paizo's address"

"3. Drive to Paizo"

Contributor

Mothman wrote:
Yeah ... 'cos we got some ideas for you Wes, if not.

Do tell. ^_~

Liberty's Edge

Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber

I’ll let Heathy tell you, since most of it was his good ideas. We were trying to come up with a mechanic that would allow you to combat-dust a vampire Buffy style without turning a vampire fight into a one round insta-kill affair when the PC with the stake rolled moderately high. Don’t know if we’ve quite nailed it yet…

Liberty's Edge

Whimper... NEED IT...

Liberty's Edge

*curses out loud*

want it... now!

Scarab Sages

Pathfinder Adventure, Adventure Path Subscriber

I may be more excited about this product than any other on the schedule (other than the Pathfinder RPG itself, of course)...! Can't wait!

Grand Lodge

YEEEEEEEEEEEEEEESSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS

Please please oh PLEASE do a great job on the mummy and werewolf! They get such the shaft in most games!


And hags too... :S

I know they were covered pretty well in Dragon, but I'm really looking forward to the Golarion versions :)

Sovereign Court

I eagerly await seeing if Paizo can actually do something new with Ghosts, Vampires, and Werewolves. I'm even dialing my expectations down to being satisfied if Paizo can do something that isn't completely played out with regards to Vampires.

The rest should be fun, though! I've liked what's been done with Ghouls so far - a nice mix of Lovecraft and Gygax.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

cappadocius wrote:

I eagerly await seeing if Paizo can actually do something new with Ghosts, Vampires, and Werewolves. I'm even dialing my expectations down to being satisfied if Paizo can do something that isn't completely played out with regards to Vampires.

The rest should be fun, though! I've liked what's been done with Ghouls so far - a nice mix of Lovecraft and Gygax.

I'm not sure what you're looking for... ghosts and vampires and werewolves have a LOT of tradition behind them, and I'm 99% sure we'll be using tradition to focus our work on this book rather than trying to make new things for these creatures. It's the "Classic" line, after all, not the "Brand New" line.

Sovereign Court RPG Superstar 2009 Top 32, 2010 Top 8

James Jacobs wrote:
cappadocius wrote:

I eagerly await seeing if Paizo can actually do something new with Ghosts, Vampires, and Werewolves. I'm even dialing my expectations down to being satisfied if Paizo can do something that isn't completely played out with regards to Vampires.

The rest should be fun, though! I've liked what's been done with Ghouls so far - a nice mix of Lovecraft and Gygax.

I'm not sure what you're looking for... ghosts and vampires and werewolves have a LOT of tradition behind them, and I'm 99% sure we'll be using tradition to focus our work on this book rather than trying to make new things for these creatures. It's the "Classic" line, after all, not the "Brand New" line.

Hmm, vampires...

Specific alergies (white ash stake vs generic wood stake)

Vampire detection (In Russian myth, a virgin boy riding a white horse could not walk over a vampire's grave for example)

Dhampires!

Sovereign Court

James Jacobs wrote:

I'm not sure what you're looking for... ghosts and vampires and werewolves have a LOT of tradition behind them, and I'm 99% sure we'll be using tradition to focus our work on this book

There's traditions like counting every mustard seed scattered on one's door step, and being bloated and ruddy, and then there's traditions like pale, sexy people having homoerotic adventures and seducing (seducing!) teenaged girls.

One of these is played out, and the other is merely old school. I'm all for old school.

As for the last bit - I've been focusing on the "Revisited", rather than the "Classic". Clearly, editorial hasn't. I'll keep it in mind when reading this fella. Which I am totally stoked about, just to be clear.

Sovereign Court

Matthew Morris wrote:


Vampire detection (In Russian myth, a virgin boy riding a white horse could not walk over a vampire's grave for example)

Ha! That's great, and I did not know that. Vampires before Stoker were wicked awesome. :)

Contributor

Mothman wrote:
Yeah ... 'cos we got some ideas for you Wes, if not.

Oh yeah? Do tell...

Paizo Employee Franchise Manager

F. Wesley Schneider wrote:
Mothman wrote:
Yeah ... 'cos we got some ideas for you Wes, if not.
Oh yeah? Do tell...

Uh oh. Wes is repeating himself.


I find myself doing this ALL the time. Students...wife...offspring...
The hope is, eventually it will take.

Paizo Employee Franchise Manager

F. Wesley Schneider wrote:
Mothman wrote:
Yeah ... 'cos we got some ideas for you Wes, if not.
Oh yeah? Do tell...

Uh oh. Wes is repeating himself.


cappadocius wrote:


Ha! That's great, and I did not know that. Vampires before Stoker were wicked awesome. :)

Correction: vampires before Legosi were awesome. (and wicked).

Stoker's novel was impeccably researched in many ways. Surely, it spawned the romantic vampire trope, but it also spawned the film(s) Nosferatu.

I think there's a good way to reconcile the disparity between sexy vampires and undead monsters... there was a lot of sexuality in the folklore. But the seductive nature was always a veneer concealing a rotting abomination; none of this "twilight" nonsense.

The sexuality that vampires have in the folklore is not the enjoyable kind, which gives me hope because Paizo can tackle such issues. If they're brave enough to face topics such as...

Pathfinder #1

Spoiler:
Nualia's demonic miscarriage

...then they can have dead husbands return to assault their wives, and other spooky but authentic vampire stories.


Uzzy wrote:

Oh sweet merciful Desna, Seoni AND hot female Vampires/Succubi/chicks with wings and a tail on the cover? Awesome stuff.

I opened this thread today at work in a grumpy mood, trying to clear my mind of a staff problem.

After seeing the cover my facial expression must have changed from grave to very dreamy :-)

Seoni and equally scantily-dressed, hot Vampires/Succubi/chick with wings in a face-off. Ready to fight toe-to-toe, or not just toe-to-toe but also......

.....stops writing just before embarrassing himself and again gets a dreamy expression...

Dark Archive

yoda8myhead wrote:
F. Wesley Schneider wrote:
Mothman wrote:
Yeah ... 'cos we got some ideas for you Wes, if not.
Oh yeah? Do tell...
Uh oh. Wes is repeating himself.

Nah, he's just milking us for ideas... or maybe he's fallen victim to a succubus, or something?

(My turn to repeat myself: Wes, I think Castle Odranto in Ustalav is a nice tribute to Walpole's gothic horror classic, and I'm glad you included it in there! :)

Contributor

Asgetrion wrote:
(My turn to repeat myself: Wes, I think Castle Odranto in Ustalav is a nice tribute to Walpole's gothic horror classic, and I'm glad you included it in there! :)

Nice catch! Ustalav is a gold mine/mine field of horror references, from classic literary references to modern horror film. I've got a ton written down, but I'm sure a few have already been lost to my own late night fuges.

As for expecting things both old and new, this "Classic X" book is going to be a bit different. It's one thing to write about the noble otyugh, with a history that goes back a whole 30 years, and quite another to tap into creatures of myth, some of which have oral histories stretching back far more than 300 years. If anything, I'm a traditionalist when it comes to my monsters - which is why you see so many "real world" monsters in Pathfinder's Bestiary. About half the monsters in here are creatures that have never been detailed to my satisfaction (what is gargoyle society like after all? Are ghosts all just wandering plot hooks?). That being said, I can assure that even the best read horror scholar doesn't know every angle of the hag, the mummy, or the vampire, so I'm sure we'll be able to give you something to cackle madly about in here, and maybe be slightly educational at the same time.


Sigh...I wonder how many subscriptions I can get away with...


Matthew Morris wrote:

Hmm, vampires...

Specific alergies (white ash stake vs generic wood stake)

Vampire detection (In Russian myth, a virgin boy riding a white horse could not walk over a vampire's grave for example)

Dhampires!

Russian lore also had iron nail through the forehead instead of the stake through the heart thing. I used that once in a Ravenloft game. Surprise the heck out of my players when the Vampire pulled the stake out.


I want this book already!

I'm a bit worried since I'm not sure if/when I'll ever switch from 3.5e OGL to PFRPG, so I'm hoping the creatures are still extremely mechanically compatible.


Pathfinder Adventure Path Subscriber
toyrobots wrote:
cappadocius wrote:


Ha! That's great, and I did not know that. Vampires before Stoker were wicked awesome. :)

Correction: vampires before Legosi were awesome. (and wicked).

Stoker's novel was impeccably researched in many ways. Surely, it spawned the romantic vampire trope, but it also spawned the film(s) Nosferatu.

I think there's a good way to reconcile the disparity between sexy vampires and undead monsters... there was a lot of sexuality in the folklore. But the seductive nature was always a veneer concealing a rotting abomination; none of this "twilight" nonsense.

The sexuality that vampires have in the folklore is not the enjoyable kind, which gives me hope because Paizo can tackle such issues. If they're brave enough to face topics such as...

Pathfinder #1 ** spoiler omitted **

...then they can have dead husbands return to assault their wives, and other spooky but authentic vampire stories.

The thing is, Stoker researched a lot of Eastern vampire lore, but also integrated Irish Folklore too- The LenanShee (lit. Fairie Lover) would seduce young and talented men, slowly draining them of life force while they created their greatest works- a bit like a horrific muse. Like most fairies, it had the power to change appearance, both into beast and invisible. Or the Hungry Grass, a fairie curse where a home is surrounded by cursed fairie sod that causes that victims to starve and waste away, no matter how much they try and eat (protection granted, not surprisingly, by a hard boiled egg brought into the house from outside, well salted). Stoker also was born in the worst year of the Irish Famine (Black '47), so grew up in a country where the walking dead were still very much fresh in the memories of the nation.

Shadow Lodge

Pathfinder Adventure Path, Lost Omens, Rulebook, Starfinder Adventure Path, Starfinder Roleplaying Game Subscriber
toyrobots wrote:
none of this "twilight" nonsense.

Take not a fan of "sparkly" vampires, hehehehe

I mean all the kids are into it, that means it's good

Dark Archive

Adventure Path Charter Subscriber; Pathfinder Adventure, Companion, Lost Omens, Rulebook Subscriber
Wolf Munroe wrote:

I want this book already!

I'm a bit worried since I'm not sure if/when I'll ever switch from 3.5e OGL to PFRPG, so I'm hoping the creatures are still extremely mechanically compatible.

For monsters, what's to change? CMB is roughly equivalent to Grapple; Perception, Stealth, Acrobatics are the big three skill changes, and apparently the BAB - HD relationship is changing as for classes (according to Jason's first guest blog on dungeonaday.com) so just adjust by +/- 1 hp per HD for affected types...

Maybe a feat here or there, but otherwise, I really doubt there'll be significant changes, and even with what is affected, it's so minor in scope that is it even really necessary to rework a Pathfinder statblock to 3.5?

Scarab Sages

If it's going to have zombies, that's all I need to know.

Scarab Sages RPG Superstar 2009 Top 32

Aberzombie wrote:
If it's going to have zombies, that's all I need to know.

It'll even have a sidebar: How to use the Aberzombie in Golarion.


"This stylish, androgynous yet over-sexed young zombie..."

Sovereign Court

Questions!

1) Will the Derro chapter have at least a sidebar mentioning the Tero and the possibility of integrating them into one's game?

2) Will the Mummy chapter talk about how to use them in a world that doesn't have the very specific bodily resurrection concepts that led to "bandage" mummies in Egypt?

3) Will Kapoacinth have to share with the Gargoyles, or can I reasonably wait patiently for the possibility of an Aquatic Monsters revisited book?

4) Are we really cramming all three (four, if we count Night Hags) Hags into one chapter? Poor old biddies.


firbolg wrote:
The thing is, Stoker researched a lot of Eastern vampire lore, but also integrated Irish Folklore too- The LenanShee (lit. Fairie Lover) would seduce young and talented men, slowly draining them of life force while they created their greatest works- a bit like a horrific muse. Like most fairies, it had the power to change appearance, both into beast and invisible.
Quote:

I'd say that the closest comparison to "sexy Dracula" in Faerie folklore would be the ganconer -- a handsome young man who seduces young women and then slowly consumes their lives and souls until they literally die for their love of him.

firbolg wrote:
Or the Hungry Grass, a fairie curse where a home is surrounded by cursed fairie sod that causes that victims to starve and waste away, no matter how much they try and eat (protection granted, not surprisingly, by a hard boiled egg brought into the house from outside, well salted). Stoker also was born in the worst year of the Irish Famine (Black '47), so grew up in a country where the walking dead were still very much fresh in the memories of the nation.

The Hungry Grass sounds like a good twist to pull on PCs used to obvious monsters -- "I don't get it! Why are we starving to death? There's nothing here but some grass!"

And I've read some Irish folktales of the walking dead that weren't scary, including one suposed eyewitness acount from the 1910's or so as told by a very old man (who'd been a very young boy then) who remembered his dead and buried grandfather attending a party with the family. He even sat in the revenant's lap!

I liked one response to a question from the interviewer: "Weren't you scared?'

"Of me own grandpappy?"

*Note* I'm not saying I believe that story actually happened, I'm just reporting it. But imagine PCs cutting down a 'vile undead', only to face a lynch mob for killing a local respected ancestor...


cappadocius wrote:

Questions!

1) Will the Derro chapter have at least a sidebar mentioning the Tero and the possibility of integrating them into one's game?

A Shaver fan, are we?

Liberty's Edge

cappadocius wrote:

There's traditions like counting every mustard seed scattered on one's door step, and being bloated and ruddy, and then there's traditions like pale, sexy people having homoerotic adventures and seducing (seducing!) teenaged girls.

One of these is played out, and the other is merely old school. I'm all for old school.

As for the last bit - I've been focusing on the "Revisited", rather than the "Classic". Clearly, editorial hasn't. I'll keep it in mind when reading this fella. Which I am totally stoked about, just to be clear.

hey Carmilla is old school and... ah yes lesbian vampire I forgot that... but is even older than Dracula :P

but yes the homo erotic thing if i remember is modern fashion...

and yes I would liek to see something about Dhrampirs... they were the best hunters... they could take out their shirts and peer thrught them to find the Invisible Vampire

Dark Archive

Speaking as an Eastern European - and from a nation that gave the name to vampires, Stoker did a terrible job with Dracula, and Hollywood even more so. For instance, original vampires did not have the pronounced fangs. Furthermore, not all wooden stakes are deadly to the vamps. Only blackthorn is. Etc.

Paizo Employee Creative Director

cappadocius wrote:
1) Will the Derro chapter have at least a sidebar mentioning the Tero and the possibility of integrating them into one's game?

I'm writing this chapter, and it'll have a sidebar about where Derro come from that's likely to mention the Tero, but since the D&D/Pathfinder version of Derro is quite different from the Shaver version, the Tero don't really have a place in the game. Still... there'll be something about the Tero in that "Where do derros come from?" sidebar. Of course, you could just check out the similar sidebar in "Into the Darklands" to see Teros mentioned.

Anyway, since Teros are much more human-like, you could probably just use humans for them in a game and change their societies as necessary to make them work. And maybe give them darkvision.

cappadocius wrote:
2) Will the Mummy chapter talk about how to use them in a world that doesn't have the very specific bodily resurrection concepts that led to "bandage" mummies in Egypt?

Wes is writing about mummies, but since mummies can come from bogs or glaciers or other naturally occuring methods, I suspect he will indeed mention them. That said, the ancient religious factors that shroud Egyptian mummies is really what makes them not zombies or wights or something. We'll see...

cappadocius wrote:
3) Will Kapoacinth have to share with the Gargoyles, or can I reasonably wait patiently for the possibility of an Aquatic Monsters revisited book?

Wes is also writing the gargoyle chapter, and he'll probably be focusing on the mythological history of the creature as a creepy castle lurker. Kapoacinth aren't really scary or classic, so I doubt they'll get much room in the book.

cappadocius wrote:
4) Are we really cramming all three (four, if we count Night Hags) Hags into one chapter? Poor old biddies.

Yup. As with the chapter on the walking dead (zombies), we'll be looking at the monster not as a specific creature but as their niche. There are lots of hags, but they all fill the same basic role in horror and in D&D, so we can talk about all of them collectively with ease. Similar to how we talked about trolls in Classic Monsters (there being a LOT of different types of trolls, and all).

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